History YMMV / TheTaleOfGenji

4th Aug '16 8:06:30 PM RisefromYourGrave
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* MartyStu: Genji is ridiculously beautiful, popular and talented in many forms of art and aesthetics (though pretty clueless about a lot of other things). The narrator even lampshades this as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd. He is also the center of the story and almost always the center of attention. Despite these Mary Sueish traits, Genji Monogatari is nevertheless considered a hallmark in the history of the psychologically realistic novel or even the first psychologically realistic novel. Together with Stendahl's The Red and The Black (which also features a ridiculously attractive and talented protagonist and is also considered a hallmark of the psychologically realistic novel) it demonstrates that you can have a Marty Stu protagonist, at least in some interpretations of the term Marty Stu, and still create great litterature. You could possibly argue that Genji is more like a deliberate exaggeration or deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.

to:

* MartyStu: Genji is ridiculously beautiful, popular and talented in many forms of art and aesthetics (though pretty clueless about a lot of other things). The narrator even lampshades this as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd. He is also the center of the story and almost always the center of attention. Despite these Mary Sueish traits, Genji Monogatari is nevertheless considered a hallmark in the history of the psychologically realistic novel or even the first psychologically realistic novel. Together with Stendahl's The Red and The Black (which also features a ridiculously attractive and talented protagonist and is also considered a hallmark of the psychologically realistic novel) it demonstrates that you can have a Marty Stu protagonist, at least in some interpretations of the term Marty Stu, and still create great litterature.literature. You could possibly argue that Genji is more like a deliberate exaggeration or deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.
3rd Jun '15 4:40:44 AM Sensemaker
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* MartyStu: Genji is ridiculously beautiful, popular and talented in many forms of art and aesthetics (though pretty clueless about a lot of other things). The narrator even lampshades this as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd. He is also the center of the story and almost always the center of attention. Despite these Mary Sueish traits, Genji Monogatari is nevertheless considered a hallmark in the history of the psychologically realistic novel or even the first psychologically realistic novel. Together with Stendahl's The Red and The Black (which also features a ridiculously attractive and talented protagonist and is also considered a hallmark of the psychologically realistic novel) it demonstrates that you can have a Marty Stu protagonist, at least in some interpretations of the term Marty Stu, and still create great litterature.
You could possibly argue that Genji is more like a deliberate exaggeration or deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.

to:

* MartyStu: Genji is ridiculously beautiful, popular and talented in many forms of art and aesthetics (though pretty clueless about a lot of other things). The narrator even lampshades this as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd. He is also the center of the story and almost always the center of attention. Despite these Mary Sueish traits, Genji Monogatari is nevertheless considered a hallmark in the history of the psychologically realistic novel or even the first psychologically realistic novel. Together with Stendahl's The Red and The Black (which also features a ridiculously attractive and talented protagonist and is also considered a hallmark of the psychologically realistic novel) it demonstrates that you can have a Marty Stu protagonist, at least in some interpretations of the term Marty Stu, and still create great litterature.
litterature. You could possibly argue that Genji is more like a deliberate exaggeration or deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.
3rd Jun '15 4:40:19 AM Sensemaker
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* MartyStu: Genji, though he's possibly a deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in the narrative as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd.

to:

* MartyStu: Genji, though he's possibly a deconstruction Genji is ridiculously beautiful, popular and talented in many forms of the type art and aesthetics (though pretty clueless about a lot of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in the narrative
other things). The narrator even lampshades this as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd.absurd. He is also the center of the story and almost always the center of attention. Despite these Mary Sueish traits, Genji Monogatari is nevertheless considered a hallmark in the history of the psychologically realistic novel or even the first psychologically realistic novel. Together with Stendahl's The Red and The Black (which also features a ridiculously attractive and talented protagonist and is also considered a hallmark of the psychologically realistic novel) it demonstrates that you can have a Marty Stu protagonist, at least in some interpretations of the term Marty Stu, and still create great litterature.
You could possibly argue that Genji is more like a deliberate exaggeration or deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.
12th Mar '14 1:00:57 PM Ciara13
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* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of the life of a Heian nobleman. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a ''lot'' of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous even back then; like seducing and siring a son on his father's wife, or making plans for Murasaki when she's much too young even by medieval standards.

to:

* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of the life of a Heian nobleman. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a ''lot'' of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous even back then; like then. Like seducing and siring a son on his father's wife, wife...or making plans for Murasaki when she's much ''much'' too young even by medieval standards.
23rd Feb '14 5:03:15 PM Ciara13
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* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of a noble's life. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a lot of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous, even back then. Like seducing and siring a son on his father's wife.

to:

* {{Squick}}: Reading the interactions between little Murasaki and Genji, when you know that he's flat out grooming her to be his perfect woman, can often be hard to stomach.
* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of the life of a noble's life. Heian nobleman. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a lot ''lot'' of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous, outrageous even back then. Like then; like seducing and siring a son on his father's wife.wife, or making plans for Murasaki when she's much too young even by medieval standards.
15th Aug '12 8:45:37 AM roxana
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18th May '12 11:12:04 AM roxana
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* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of a noble's life. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a lot of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous, even back then.

to:

* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of a noble's life. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a lot of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous, even back then. Like seducing and siring a son on his father's wife.
16th Mar '12 4:26:15 AM LordGro
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Added DiffLines:

* MartyStu: Genji, though he's possibly a deconstruction of the type of person the author would have known from her life at the palace.
** [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in the narrative as early as chapter 1; the narrator, when describing his various talents, notes that if she fully described all of them, she'd only make him sound absurd.
* ValuesDissonance: Aspects of the story (Genji having multiple affairs, sneaking around, etc.) may seem odd to modern readers, but back then were expected parts of a noble's life. Well, in moderation; Genji pulls a lot of heinous stuff that was considered outrageous, even back then.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.TheTaleOfGenji