History YMMV / SunsetBoulevard

11th Dec '15 10:54:31 AM jedidarrick
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TearJerker:
** Norma returns to the Paramount lot and is greeted by all her old friends and admirers, and she thinks this is the beginning of her return. It's not - [=DeMille=] is just being nice to her, and the real reason that Paramount kept calling her was because they wanted to rent her car.
*** The musical captures this scene in a song called "As if We Never Said Goodbye". Norma sings it by herself, and the sheer ''longing'' she expresses for the atmosphere of an active shoot, tone alternating between confidence and fear, is absolutely heartbreaking when performed by a talented actress. It's even more affective if you've personally worked in film or theatre and know exactly the kind of atmosphere she means.
** Norma's final scene, as she thinks she's filming her ''Salome'', everyone else just standing there in horror and pity. And then Norma bursts into tears... only because she's so ''happy'' that she's finally making her movies.
6th Dec '15 3:00:50 AM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Buster Keaton's appearance as one of the forgotten actors now that he's better-remembered than anyone else in the cast.

to:

** Buster Keaton's appearance as one of the forgotten actors actors, now that he's arguably better-remembered than anyone else in the cast.
8th Sep '15 2:45:28 PM Timurlame
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Max's motivations are a bit more overtly ambiguous in the musical. In the film, when confronted by Joe, he says "I cannot let her be destroyed". In the play, he says "I will not allow her to surrender". This hints that he's not merely feeding Norma flattering lies to keep her from breaking down, but maintaining his own vicarious fantasy through her.

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Max's motivations are a bit more overtly ambiguous in the musical. In the film, when confronted by Joe, Joe about lying to Norma, he says "I cannot let her be destroyed". In the play, he says "I will not allow her to surrender". This hints that he's not merely feeding Norma flattering lies to keep her from breaking down, but maintaining his own vicarious fantasy through her.
8th Sep '15 2:40:50 PM Timurlame
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Max's motivations are a bit more overtly ambiguous in the musical. In the film, when confronted by Joe, he says "I cannot let her be destroyed". In the play, he says "I will not allow her to surrender". This hints that he's not merely feeding Norma flattering lies to keep her from breaking down, but maintaining his own vicarious fantasy through her.
7th Sep '15 4:28:25 PM Timurlame
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TearJerker: Norma returns to the Paramount lot and is greeted by all her old friends and admirers, and she thinks this is the beginning of her return. It's not - [=DeMille=] is just being nice to her, and the real reason that Paramount kept calling her was because they wanted to rent her car.

to:

* TearJerker: Norma TearJerker:
**Norma
returns to the Paramount lot and is greeted by all her old friends and admirers, and she thinks this is the beginning of her return. It's not - [=DeMille=] is just being nice to her, and the real reason that Paramount kept calling her was because they wanted to rent her car.car.
*** The musical captures this scene in a song called "As if We Never Said Goodbye". Norma sings it by herself, and the sheer ''longing'' she expresses for the atmosphere of an active shoot, tone alternating between confidence and fear, is absolutely heartbreaking when performed by a talented actress. It's even more affective if you've personally worked in film or theatre and know exactly the kind of atmosphere she means.
14th Jun '15 8:29:19 PM WillBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Norma Desmond's idea for her comeback vehicle - a Biblical epic about Salome - is regarded as laughably ridiculous by [=DeMille=] and the other Hollywood types. However, not only was an actual mind boggingly awful ''Salome'' film (starring Rita Hayworth) produced in 1953, but numerous filmmakers throughout the rest of the '50s (including [=DeMille=] himself) would turn to Biblical epics as a way of competing with the television audience, and some of these efforts turned out to be every bit as schlocky as Norma's.

to:

** Norma Desmond's idea for her comeback vehicle - a Biblical epic about Salome - is regarded as laughably ridiculous by [=DeMille=] and the other Hollywood types. However, not only was an actual mind boggingly mind-bogglingly awful ''Salome'' film (starring Rita Hayworth) produced in 1953, but numerous filmmakers throughout the rest of the '50s (including [=DeMille=] himself) would turn to Biblical epics as a way of competing with the television audience, and some of these efforts turned out to be every bit as schlocky as Norma's.
28th Mar '15 3:35:09 PM wittylibrarian
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Norma's final scene, as she thinks she's filming her ''Salome'', everyone else just standing there in horror and pity. And then Norma bursts into tears... only because she's so ''happy'' that she's finally making her movies.
18th Jan '15 8:26:18 PM damus2300
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MemeticMutation: "I ''am'' big. Its the pictures that got small" and "And now Mr. De Mille, I'm ready for my closeup".

to:

* MemeticMutation: "I ''am'' big. Its the pictures that got small" and "And now "Alright Mr. De Mille, I'm ready for my closeup".
18th Jan '15 7:36:15 AM damus2300
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* MemeticMutation: "I ''am'' big. Its the pictures that got small" and "And now Mr. De Mille, I'm ready for my closeup".
2nd Sep '14 8:59:53 AM dsneybuf
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HilariousInHindsight: Norma Desmond's idea for her comeback vehicle - a Biblical epic about Salome - is regarded as laughably ridiculous by [=DeMille=] and the other Hollywood types. However, not only was an actual mind boggingly awful ''Salome'' film (starring Rita Hayworth) produced in 1953, but numerous filmmakers throughout the rest of the '50s (including [=DeMille=] himself) would turn to Biblical epics as a way of competing with the television audience, and some of these efforts turned out to be every bit as schlocky as Norma's.

to:

* HilariousInHindsight: HilariousInHindsight:
**
Norma Desmond's idea for her comeback vehicle - a Biblical epic about Salome - is regarded as laughably ridiculous by [=DeMille=] and the other Hollywood types. However, not only was an actual mind boggingly awful ''Salome'' film (starring Rita Hayworth) produced in 1953, but numerous filmmakers throughout the rest of the '50s (including [=DeMille=] himself) would turn to Biblical epics as a way of competing with the television audience, and some of these efforts turned out to be every bit as schlocky as Norma's.
This list shows the last 10 events of 26. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.SunsetBoulevard