History YMMV / SpiderMan

25th Feb '17 1:01:31 AM GrammarNavi
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** Gwen Stacy's death. At the time, it was one of the most surprising developments in comics as a hero's love interest was considered totally safe. After this storyline, writers became less shy about killing off supporting cast members and love interests, making it a little hard for newcomers to see why this was such an earth-shattering event for the Marvel Universe. Not to mention it eventually led to the common phenomenon of fridging female characters, which comes off as lazy and misogynistic in the long run. Doing it once to one character is one thing, but it's a problem when so many female characters later on are casually offed so nonchalantly (Big Barda, Alex DeWitt, Sue Dibny...).

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** Gwen Stacy's death. At the time, it was one of the most surprising developments in comics as a hero's love interest was considered totally safe. After this storyline, writers became less shy about killing off supporting cast members and love interests, making it a little hard for newcomers to see why this was such an earth-shattering event for the Marvel Universe. Not to mention it eventually led to the common phenomenon of fridging female characters, which comes off as lazy and misogynistic in the long run. Doing it once to one character is one thing, but it's a problem when so many female characters later on are casually offed so nonchalantly (Big Barda, Alex DeWitt, [=DeWitt=], Sue Dibny...).
22nd Feb '17 11:12:28 AM Kittencakes
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* EvilIsSexy: Harry, Octopus, Venom (even in-universe, apparently).

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* EvilIsSexy: Harry, Octopus, Venom (even in-universe, apparently). And Norman, for some. The sharp businessman plus bad boy attitude certainly works for some people.



** Gwen Stacy's death. At the time, it was one of the most surprising developments in comics as a hero's love interest was considered totally safe. After this storyline, writers became less shy about killing off supporting cast members and love interests, making it a little hard for newcomers to see why this was such an earth-shattering event for the Marvel Universe.

to:

** Gwen Stacy's death. At the time, it was one of the most surprising developments in comics as a hero's love interest was considered totally safe. After this storyline, writers became less shy about killing off supporting cast members and love interests, making it a little hard for newcomers to see why this was such an earth-shattering event for the Marvel Universe. Not to mention it eventually led to the common phenomenon of fridging female characters, which comes off as lazy and misogynistic in the long run. Doing it once to one character is one thing, but it's a problem when so many female characters later on are casually offed so nonchalantly (Big Barda, Alex DeWitt, Sue Dibny...).


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*** It's rather ironic to see many people often fighting about Mary Jane or Gwen, complaining about who is the "stronger" female character, considering when Gwen was alive they were good friends in the comics. It's not helped by the media (outside of the comics and Spectacular Spider-man), which has never presented the two girls on friendly grounds (Or the two being in a gang with Harry and Peter, that's the tragedy of Gwen's death that's overlooked by everyone: it destroyed what was a close friendship between four people, considering Harry later on after it became the Goblin). They're either catty and competitive for Peter's love, or they don't exist at the same time they appear in the story (Amazing Spider-man's Gwen dies before we ever meet their version of MJ).
20th Feb '17 12:54:57 PM ErikModi
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Added DiffLines:

** Joe Quesada stated that he didn't have Peter and MJ just get divorced because he didn't want kids reading Spider-Man to think divorce was okay. [[SarcasmMode No, kids, making deals with the devil is ''much'' more wholesome.]]
20th Feb '17 11:23:36 AM ErikModi
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** Venom. Also, in the animated adaption he once attacked Spider-Man from behind, wrapping his arms around him and yelling "Surprise!"

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** Venom. Also, in the animated adaption he once attacked Spider-Man from behind, wrapping his arms around him and yelling "Surprise!""Surprise!" Deosn't help that the symbiote's main power is forming [[NaughtyTentacles tentacles]] on command.
19th Feb '17 6:19:39 PM ErikModi
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Added DiffLines:

** Similarly, she switches from being lovers with Otto-in-Peter's-body to just friends with Peter (while still sharing an apartment with him!) remarkably quickly. It never seems to bother her that Peter doesn't feel the same way about her, or that he almost immediately begins pursuing other romantic interests (her only objection to Peter and Cindy hooking up seems to be that their constant supercharged sex-drive is annoying).
17th Feb '17 12:09:54 PM rafi
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* TheWoobie: Considering what her abusive ex-boyfriend (not Biff Rifkin) did to her, and how Peter frequently blew her off and took their friendship for granted, Debra Whitman is a classic example.

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* TheWoobie: TheWoobie:
**
Considering what her abusive ex-boyfriend (not Biff Rifkin) did to her, and how Peter frequently blew her off and took their friendship for granted, Debra Whitman is a classic example.
15th Jan '17 2:40:20 PM DustSnitch
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** Since his return Norman Osborn hasn't been overly popular thanks to ''Dark Reign'' and him being linked to a bunch of DorkAge retcons. However the character was redeemed by ''ComicBook/SuperiorSpiderMan'', in which he was [[CharacterRerailment rerailed]] into a {{Badass}} MagnificentBastard supervillain who succeeds on his own merits rather than relying on the IdiotBall. It helped that he was going against Spider-Ock who is, at best, incredibly divisive.

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** Since his return Norman Osborn hasn't been overly popular thanks to ''Dark Reign'' and him being linked to a bunch of DorkAge retcons. However the character was redeemed by ''ComicBook/SuperiorSpiderMan'', in which he was [[CharacterRerailment rerailed]] into a {{Badass}} badass MagnificentBastard supervillain who succeeds on his own merits rather than relying on the IdiotBall. It helped that he was going against Spider-Ock who is, at best, incredibly divisive.
8th Jan '17 11:14:16 PM Lloigor
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** The current Jack O' Lantern, a creepy sociopath in patchwork clothing and a flaming pumpkin mask who goes into battle flaying scythes around.

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** The current Jack O' Lantern, O'Lantern, a creepy sociopath in patchwork clothing and a flaming pumpkin mask who goes into battle flaying scythes around.
8th Jan '17 9:15:02 PM Lloigor
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** Green Goblin killing Gwen Stacy is one of most famous example.

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** Green Goblin killing Gwen Stacy is one of most famous example.examples.



** When the Fantastic Four launched in November 1961, Marvel immediately set itself apart from the Distinguished Competition by giving its heroes an unprecedented (for comics) degree of realism. Before Spider-Man, teenagers had been relegated to the sidekick position for older, experienced, idealized adult heroes, but Ditko and Lee revolutionized the whole concept of a superhero by making Peter Parker just a sarcastic kid who dealt with mundane teen problems like money woes and dating girls when he wasn't fighting crime on his own. That groundbreaking approach included introducing subplots chronicling the hero's daily life, such as the up's and down's of Peter's multi-issue romance with Betty Brant, to a comic book at a time when most single issues of a title were split between multiple anthology stories. Over fifty years later, this approach is pretty much the norm for comic books.

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** When the Fantastic Four launched in November 1961, Marvel immediately set itself apart from the Distinguished Competition by giving its heroes an unprecedented (for comics) degree of realism. Before Spider-Man, teenagers had been relegated to the sidekick position for older, experienced, idealized adult heroes, but Ditko and Lee revolutionized the whole concept of a superhero by making Peter Parker just a sarcastic kid who dealt with mundane teen problems like money woes and dating girls when he wasn't fighting crime on his own. That groundbreaking approach included introducing subplots chronicling the hero's daily life, such as the up's ups and down's downs of Peter's multi-issue romance with Betty Brant, to a comic book at a time when most single issues of a title were split between multiple anthology stories. Over fifty years later, this approach is pretty much the norm for comic books.
8th Jan '17 8:58:37 PM Lloigor
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* DarknessInducedAudienceApathy: Between all the grief Peter goes through in both his personal life and superheroeing (most of the former being caused by the latter) and the cyclical nature of the stories (something good happens to Peter, Spider-Man related incident(s) ruin it, he loses it and he has to start over from the very bottom) it can get frustrating for readers who eventually tire of the predictability of it all and give up on it entirely.

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* DarknessInducedAudienceApathy: Between all the grief Peter goes through in both his personal life and superheroeing superheroing (most of the former being caused by the latter) and the cyclical nature of the stories (something good happens to Peter, Spider-Man related Spider-Man-related incident(s) ruin it, he loses it and he has to start over from the very bottom) it can get frustrating for readers who eventually tire of the predictability of it all and give up on it entirely.
This list shows the last 10 events of 357. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.SpiderMan