History YMMV / SherlockHolmes

7th Feb '16 6:10:50 AM Freshmeat
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* MagnumOpus: Of the "Holmes" stories, either the short story collection ''The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes'' or the novel ''Literature/TheHoundOfTheBaskervilles'' tend to be praised as the finest examples.
26th Nov '15 3:16:45 PM LondonKdS
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** In the run-up to the film's release, Downey trolled the media by making remarks in an interview implying that the film would have heavy homoeroticism between Holmes and Watson, making it sound as if they might even end up shagging on screen. This provoked at least one conservative pundit to publicly show his total ignorance of the existence of {{Yaoi Fangirl}}s.
19th Nov '15 2:45:35 AM thecouchwitch
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** Even outside of shipping circles, some interpret Holmes disinterest in women coupled with his intense relationship with Watson as him being a closeted homosexual. See Hoyay for the evidence supporting this.
18th Nov '15 9:42:22 PM RAMChYLD
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* TorchTheFranchiseAndRun: The reason for the downer ending in ''The Final Problem''. Doyle had simply got tired of writing Sherlock Holmes stories and wanted to move on to do historical novels. He managed to ignore the backlash for a decade before going back to writing Sherlock Holmes book when it became clear that his historical novels just aren't selling, but not before producing the classic that is ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' two years before returning to writing ''Sherlock Holmes'' stories full time.
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* TorchTheFranchiseAndRun: The reason for the downer ending in ''The Final Problem''. Doyle had simply got tired of writing Sherlock Holmes stories and wanted to move on to do historical novels. He managed to ignore the backlash for a decade before going back to writing Sherlock Holmes book stories when it became clear that his historical novels just aren't selling, but not before producing the classic that is ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' two years before returning to writing ''Sherlock Holmes'' stories full time.
18th Nov '15 9:41:24 PM RAMChYLD
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* TorchTheFranchiseAndRun: The reason for the downer ending in ''The Final Problem''. Doyle had simply got tired of writing Sherlock Holmes stories and wanted to move on to do historical novels. He managed to ignore the backlash for a decade before going back to writing Sherlock Holmes book when it became clear that his historical novels just aren't selling, but not before producing the classic that is ''The Hound of the Baskervilles'' two years before returning to writing ''Sherlock Holmes'' stories full time.
5th Nov '15 9:04:12 PM erforce
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!!''Film/SherlockHolmes'' (the films starring Robert Downey Jr and Jude Law)
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!!''Film/SherlockHolmes'' (the films 2009 film starring Robert Downey Jr and Jude Law)
5th Nov '15 9:02:34 PM erforce
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!!SherlockHolmes (the original stories) * AcceptableReligiousTargets: Mormons are given a bad rap in "A Study in Scarlet". The story even indicates that Young has a group of secret killers who murder other Mormons for any act they deem religiously wrong or just speaking out against their faith in any way. In Doyle's defense, though, only Brigham Young's original polygamist followers get this treatment, not every Average Joe on the street who follows the religion. He also apologized for that portrayal. * AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
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!!SherlockHolmes !!''Literature/SherlockHolmes'' (the original stories) * AcceptableReligiousTargets: Mormons are given a bad rap in "A Study in Scarlet". The story even indicates that Young has a group of secret killers who murder other Mormons for any act they deem religiously wrong or just speaking out against their faith in any way. In Doyle's defense, though, only Brigham Young's original polygamist followers get this treatment, not every Average Joe on the street who follows the religion. He also apologized for that portrayal. portrayal. * AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:

* AcceptableEthnicTargets ** The ginger midget is a {{twofer|TokenMinority}}. ** Gypsies in the sequel.
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* AcceptableEthnicTargets ** AcceptableEthnicTargets: The ginger midget is a {{twofer|TokenMinority}}. ** Gypsies in the sequel.[[TokenMinority twofer]].

** ''Rocky Road to Dublin'' played by ''The Dubliners,'' played over Holmes' pit fighting scene, and again over the ending credits. ** ''Game of Shadows'' pinches Ennio Morricone's theme from ''Two Mules for Sister Sara''.
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** ''Rocky "Rocky Road to Dublin'' Dublin" played by ''The Dubliners,'' played over Holmes' pit fighting scene, and again over the ending credits. ** ''Game of Shadows'' pinches Ennio Morricone's theme from ''Two Mules for Sister Sara''.credits.

* CompleteMonster: Professor Moriarty, a criminal mastermind completely devoid of empathy, created an elaborate scheme of an even grander scale than Blackwood's and has a personal grudge against Holmes himself. He has no qualms about threatening two completely innocent people, Watson and his new wife Mary, over Holmes' interference in their plans, and destroyed a train in an attempt to kill them. He poisoned and murdered Irene Adler when she tried to quit being his personal gopher, massacred a large number of Simza's gypsy tribe as they attempted to escape an ill-fated raid on his compound, drove a prideful French revolutionary to suicide, and tortured Holmes (with the full intent to kill him) with a meathook while humming Schubert. Though his plans to jump-start WW 1 are never fully enacted (due to a botched assassination attempt and his own death at the hands of Holmes), his sadism and sociopathic behavior is more than enough to make him the most monstrous criminal Holmes has ever encountered.

* EarWorm: The main theme, which pops up over the course of the film in different styles (from HansZimmer, ''of course'').
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* EarWorm: The main theme, which pops up over the course of the film in different styles (from HansZimmer, Creator/HansZimmer, ''of course'').

** When Gladstone collapses in the second film (just before Holmes gives Watson his [[ChekhovsGun wedding present]]), Holmes mentions to Watson that he's been experimenting with ''Ricinus communis''-- the castor oil plant from which the poison ricin is derived. ** Holmes credits Adler on "Scandal ruins engagement between Habsburg Prince and Romanov Princess," a subtle reference to the original story, a ''Scandal in Bohemia'', where Irene Adler plays a major role. Bohemia, of course, was part of Austria-Hungary, ruled by the House of Habsburg.
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** When Gladstone collapses in the second film (just before Holmes gives Watson his [[ChekhovsGun wedding present]]), Holmes mentions to Watson that he's been experimenting with ''Ricinus communis''-- the castor oil plant from which the poison ricin is derived. ** Holmes credits Adler on "Scandal ruins engagement between Habsburg Prince and Romanov Princess," a subtle reference to the original story, a ''Scandal in Bohemia'', where Irene Adler plays a major role. Bohemia, of course, was part of Austria-Hungary, ruled by the House of Habsburg.

* HoYay: Already a major part of fanon regarding Holmes and Watson, but the movies intentionally play it up as much as they can. The sequel builds this up to almost blatant levels: Holmes acts almost as if he's giving Watson away to marriage, and during a short scuffle on the train Watson tears Holmes' top off while straddling him. And then Holmes asks Watson to lie down on the floor with him... ** After their both on the floor, Holmes start smoking, which [[GeniusBonus old school cinemaphiles should recognize]] as code for characters having just had sex. ** Which then comes to a fantastic head with the dancing scene. * ItWasHisSled: In ''A Game of Shadows'', anyone who's read the books knew what to expect when Mycroft dropped the name of Reichenbach, Switzerland. * LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt: In ''A Game of Shadows'', when Holmes briefly appears to die on the train. Obviously the plot can't go on without him, and any Holmes fan knows that even if the writers ''did'' kill off Holmes, he would have to die alongside Moriarty. (Which makes the ''second'' death scene a lot more convincing.) * MagnificentBastard:
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* HoYay: Already a major part of fanon regarding Holmes and Watson, but the movies intentionally play it up as much as they can. The sequel builds this up to almost blatant levels: Holmes acts almost as if he's giving Watson away to marriage, and during a short scuffle on the train Watson tears Holmes' top off while straddling him. And then Holmes asks Watson to lie down on the floor with him... ** After their both on the floor, Holmes start smoking, which [[GeniusBonus old school cinemaphiles should recognize]] as code Check HoYay.SherlockHolmes for characters having just had sex. ** Which then comes to a fantastic head with the dancing scene. extensive details. * ItWasHisSled: In ''A Game of Shadows'', anyone who's read the books knew what to expect when Mycroft dropped the name of Reichenbach, Switzerland. * LikeYouWouldReallyDoIt: In ''A Game of Shadows'', when Holmes briefly appears to die on the train. Obviously the plot can't go on without him, and any Holmes fan knows that even if the writers ''did'' kill off Holmes, he would have to die alongside Moriarty. (Which makes the ''second'' death scene a lot more convincing.) * MagnificentBastard: MagnificentBastard:

* MisBlamed: Many aspects of the film (i.e. Holmes and especially Watson - stereotyped as a bumbling sidekick - as action heroes, Holmes as a bohemian) which were criticized as being unfaithful to the original stories actually are (relatively) faithful to them - it's PopCulturalOsmosis of [[LostInImitation less faithful adaptations]] that makes these aspects seem especially out-of-place. (Still, one mustn't discount the undeniable CharacterExaggeration in this interpretation.)
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* MisBlamed: MisBlamed: ** Many aspects of the film (i.e. Holmes and especially Watson - stereotyped as a bumbling sidekick - as action heroes, Holmes as a bohemian) which were criticized as being unfaithful to the original stories actually are (relatively) faithful to them - it's PopCulturalOsmosis of [[LostInImitation less faithful adaptations]] that makes these aspects seem especially out-of-place. (Still, one mustn't discount the undeniable CharacterExaggeration in this interpretation.)

* MoralEventHorizon: At first, Professor Moriarty comes across as an AffablyEvil WorthyOpponent to Holmes, but any possible claim to playing fair is utterly destroyed when he announces his intent to make Watson collateral damage for no other reason than to hurt Holmes, and in the same breath reveals that he has already [[spoiler: poisoned Irene Adler because she outlived her usefulness]]. And that's just the beginning; he speeds joyfully deeper throughout the course of the movie. Disturbingly brutal torture is involved.

* ParanoiaFuel: Holmes' urban camouflage. He could be hiding in your room, watching what you're doing, ''right now''. The end? * SecretlyWealthy: Mycroft, in the canon (''The Bruce-Partington Plans''), is said to be a relatively low-ranking official, drawing a salary of 450 pounds per year[[note]]Which was a respectable amount of money back then, a [[BritsWithBattleships Royal Navy]] Captain made about 375 pounds per year in 1893 and an Admiral maybe double that[[/note]] and too lazy to seek high public positions. In the film, he owns a majestic country house. One so secretly placed it's the ideal hiding place for Mary. * [[HesJustHiding She's Just Hiding]]: It's fairly common to see fans purposing ways [[spoiler:Irene Adler's death]] didn't actually happen. Check the WMG page for a few of them.

* TearJerker: [[spoiler:Irene's death]] stands out as the most prominent.

* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot: [[spoiler:The radio transmitter is no way carried on into the sequel. However, with the second sequel in production, it could be a [[CrazyPrepared contingency plan]] for Moriarty.]] ** Also, [[spoiler:the death of Irene Adler]] feels like a waste when you consider they obviously thought the two heroes one villainess formula worked from last film, but felt they should have her carry the IdiotBall enough to keep an appointment with [[spoiler:Moriarty]] after she failed him. Plus, it really ticks off Literature/NeroWolfe fans...
19th Oct '15 10:40:43 AM Psi001
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*** Tying into this, some may question whether the bumbling renditions of Watson such as that of Nigel Bruce are the most incompetent or the most sane. While more cerebral renditions of Watson are quicker to lose patience or judge Holmes and his eccentric methods, the more buffoonish ones are more passive, smart enough to know Holmes will figure everything out and usually playing OnlySaneMan as skeptical crowds question or try to intervene.
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*** Tying into this, some may question whether the bumbling renditions of Watson such as that of Nigel Bruce are the most incompetent or the most sane. While more cerebral renditions of Watson are quicker to lose patience or judge Holmes and his eccentric methods, the more buffoonish ones are more passive, smart enough to know Holmes will figure everything out and usually playing OnlySaneMan as while the more skeptical crowds cast question or try to intervene.
19th Oct '15 10:39:29 AM Psi001
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*** Tying into this, some may question whether the bumbling renditions of Watson such as that of Nigel Bruce are the most incompetent or the most sane. While more cerebral renditions of Watson are quicker to lose patience or judge Holmes and his eccentric methods, the more buffoonish ones are more passive, smart enough to know Holmes will figure everything out and usually playing OnlySaneMan as skeptical crowds question or try to intervene.
30th Sep '15 11:23:26 AM LongLiveHumour
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* DorkAge: Briefly, when the production team decided to retool the series from hour long episodes to feature-length ones: "The Master Blackmailer", The Last Vampyre" and "The Eligible Bachelor" the latter two bare absolutely no resemblance to anything Conan Doyle ever wrote.
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* DorkAge: Briefly, when the production team decided to retool the series from hour long episodes to feature-length ones: "The Master Blackmailer", The "The Last Vampyre" and "The Eligible Bachelor" Bachelor", the latter two bare bearing absolutely no resemblance to anything Conan Doyle ever wrote.

* SeasonalRot: Beginning with "The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes" the series began to decline. For the first few seasons, the production team had cherry picked the best and most well known stories to adapt, now they were left with average to mediocre ones, and some of the episodes began to derail from their source material. Special mention goes to "The Last Vampyre" and "The Eligible Bachelor" which were the final feature length episodes which bare '''no''' resemblance to the ''short'' stories they were suppose to be based on.
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* SeasonalRot: Beginning with "The Case-Book of Sherlock Holmes" the series began to decline. For the first few seasons, the production team had cherry picked the best and most well known stories to adapt, now they were left with average to mediocre ones, and some of the episodes began to derail from their source material. Special mention goes to "The Last Vampyre" and "The Eligible Bachelor" which were the final feature length episodes which bare bear '''no''' resemblance to the ''short'' stories they were suppose to be based on.
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