History YMMV / MommieDearest

16th Apr '17 12:42:26 AM CumbersomeTercel
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*** Several of Joan Crawford's friends, such as Myrna Loy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Creator/RexReed, James [=McArthur=], Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Creator/LanaTurner's daughter Cheryl Crane (who attended the same school as Christina at some point) have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.

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*** Several of Joan Crawford's Creator/JoanCrawford's friends, such as Myrna Loy, Creator/MyrnaLoy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Creator/RexReed, James [=McArthur=], Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Creator/LanaTurner's daughter Cheryl Crane (who attended the same school as Christina at some point) have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.
14th Apr '17 4:38:26 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* TookTheBadFilmSeriously: Faye

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* TookTheBadFilmSeriously: Faye
14th Apr '17 4:38:08 PM CumbersomeTercel
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*** Several of Joan Crawford's friends, such as Myrna Loy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Rex Reed, James [=McArthur=], Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Lana Turner's daughter Cheryl Crane (who attended the same school as Christina at some point) have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.

to:

*** Several of Joan Crawford's friends, such as Myrna Loy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Rex Reed, Creator/RexReed, James [=McArthur=], Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Lana Turner's Creator/LanaTurner's daughter Cheryl Crane (who attended the same school as Christina at some point) have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.



* NightmareFuel: While Dunaway's hammy performance earns some unintentional laughs, it can be pretty terrifying when it needs to (AFI even included Dunaway as Crawford on a list of the best movie villains).

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* NightmareFuel: While Dunaway's Creator/FayeDunaway's hammy performance earns some unintentional laughs, it can be pretty terrifying when it needs to (AFI even included Dunaway as Crawford on a list of the best movie villains).



* TookTheBadFilmSeriously: Faye Dunaway genuinely believed she would win an Oscar for her portrayal of Crawford. She later said that she was horrified and ashamed of the end result, often saying that the director just didn't care to tone down her performance.
** Creator/JohnWaters did this with his DVD commentary. He opens his DVD commentary effectively telling listeners that he's going to approach the film as the serious bio-film that it was supposed to be. He also condemns the attempt to turn it into a cult classic by the studio by way of retooled marketing, pointing out how forced it was trying to do it without letting it naturally occur.

to:

* TookTheBadFilmSeriously: Faye Dunaway Faye
** Creator/FayeDunaway
genuinely believed she would win an Oscar for her portrayal of Crawford. She later said that she was horrified and ashamed of the end result, often saying that the director just didn't care to tone down her performance.
** Creator/JohnWaters did this with his DVD commentary. DVDCommentary. He opens his DVD commentary effectively telling listeners that he's going to approach the film as the serious bio-film that it was supposed to be. He also condemns the attempt to turn it into a cult classic by the studio by way of retooled marketing, pointing out how forced it was trying to do it without letting it naturally occur.
1st Nov '16 2:14:30 AM PrincessGwen
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* VindicatedByHistory: Has been getting this reputation in some circles lately, with audiences feeling that it's not ''as'' bad as everyone says it is. In his review, WebVideo/TheCinemaSnob not only gave it an glowing, non-ironic review, going as far as to praise the infamous "No wire hangers!" scene for such a raw performance, but furiously blamed its bad reputation on negative word-of-mouth more than the quality of the movie itself.

to:

* VindicatedByHistory: Has been getting this reputation in some circles lately, with audiences feeling that it's not ''as'' bad as everyone says it is. In his review, WebVideo/TheCinemaSnob not only gave it an a glowing, non-ironic review, going as far as to praise the infamous "No wire hangers!" scene for such a raw performance, but furiously blamed its bad reputation on negative word-of-mouth more than the quality of the movie itself.
17th Jul '16 12:12:54 PM Mikeyfan93
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** John Waters did this with his DVD commentary. He opens his DVD commentary effectively telling listeners that he's going to approach the film as the serious bio-film that it was supposed to be. He also condemns the attempt to turn it into a cult classic by the studio by way of retooled marketing, pointing out how forced it was trying to do it without letting it naturally occur.
** WebVideo/TheCinemaSnob also gave a positive review of the movie, going so far as to [[Creator/BradJones break character]] to praise Dunaway's performance and slam the Razzies. And he raises some really good points about pop culture's perception of scenes of movies without the overall context (namely, the fact that the infamous "wire hangers" scene is followed by Joan beating up Christina with said wire hanger).

to:

** John Waters Creator/JohnWaters did this with his DVD commentary. He opens his DVD commentary effectively telling listeners that he's going to approach the film as the serious bio-film that it was supposed to be. He also condemns the attempt to turn it into a cult classic by the studio by way of retooled marketing, pointing out how forced it was trying to do it without letting it naturally occur.
** WebVideo/TheCinemaSnob also gave a positive review of the movie, going so far as to [[Creator/BradJones break character]] to praise Dunaway's performance and slam the Razzies. And he Razzies for "awarding" the film Worst Picture of that year. He also raises some really good points about pop culture's perception of scenes of movies without the overall context (namely, the fact that the infamous "wire hangers" scene is followed by Joan beating up Christina with said wire hanger).
22nd May '16 9:11:50 AM toongrrl1990
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*** Several of Joan Crawford's friends, such as Myrna Loy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Rex Reed, James [=McArthur=], Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Lana Turners daughter Cheryl Crane have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.

to:

*** Several of Joan Crawford's friends, such as Myrna Loy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Rex Reed, James [=McArthur=], Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Lana Turners Turner's daughter Cheryl Crane (who attended the same school as Christina at some point) have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.
22nd May '16 9:11:07 AM toongrrl1990
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*** Several of Joan Crawford's friends, such as MyrnaLoy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Rex Reed, James McArthur, Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Lana Turners daughter Cheryl Crane have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.

to:

*** Several of Joan Crawford's friends, such as MyrnaLoy, Myrna Loy, and biographers, such as Donald Spoto, David Bret and Charlotte Chandler, have argued that Joan's strictness toward her children was grossly overblown by Christina, who had real discipline issues throughout her childhood and adolescence and a poor relationship with her mother thereafter (as did her brother Christopher; the twins had a much better relationship with Joan), and who wrote the book as a TakeThat out of resentment, justified or not. (The sources who argue in favor of this interpretation often acknowledge that Joan had personality issues that made her not particularly well-suited to be a mother, despite her intense desire for children.) They also point out that although Joan was, by all accounts, a stern disciplinarian with her children, this was [[FairForItsDay in keeping with the standards of the era]], which placed a premium on discipline, filial respect and similar values. Other friends of Joan Crawford and Christina including Helen Hayes, June Allyson, Rex Reed, James McArthur, [=McArthur=], Betty Hutton, Eve Arden and Lana Turners daughter Cheryl Crane have come forward to say they did witness some abuse. As usual in these matters, the truth likely lies somewhere in between the two poles, and even her sympathizers agree that Joan did occasionally take very harsh actions in dealing with her children's misbehavior; for instance, Bret confirms that Joan did once cut Christina's curls off when she caught the girl impersonating her in front of her dressing-room mirror.
13th Apr '16 11:10:20 PM Random888
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Added DiffLines:

* AudienceAlienatingPremise: In the opinion of Creator/RogerEbert: "In scene after scene, we are invited to watch as Joan Crawford screams at Christina, chops her hair with scissors, beats her with a wire coat hanger and, on an especially bad day, tackles her across an end table, hurls her to the carpet, bangs her head against the floor, and tries to choke her to death. Who wants to watch this?"
30th Dec '15 1:13:56 PM StFan
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* VindicatedByHistory: Has been getting this reputation in some circles lately, with audiences feeling that it's not ''as'' bad as everyone says it is. In his review, WebOriginal/TheCinemaSnob not only gave it an glowing, non-ironic review, going as far as to praise the infamous "No wire hangers!" scene for such a raw performance, but furiously blamed it's bad reputation on negative word-of-mouth more than the quality of the movie itself.

to:

* VindicatedByHistory: Has been getting this reputation in some circles lately, with audiences feeling that it's not ''as'' bad as everyone says it is. In his review, WebOriginal/TheCinemaSnob WebVideo/TheCinemaSnob not only gave it an glowing, non-ironic review, going as far as to praise the infamous "No wire hangers!" scene for such a raw performance, but furiously blamed it's its bad reputation on negative word-of-mouth more than the quality of the movie itself.
27th Aug '15 3:28:43 AM NWolfman
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Added DiffLines:

* VindicatedByHistory: Has been getting this reputation in some circles lately, with audiences feeling that it's not ''as'' bad as everyone says it is. In his review, WebOriginal/TheCinemaSnob not only gave it an glowing, non-ironic review, going as far as to praise the infamous "No wire hangers!" scene for such a raw performance, but furiously blamed it's bad reputation on negative word-of-mouth more than the quality of the movie itself.
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