History YMMV / Maus

27th Mar '17 8:59:32 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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** Is Mala an unreasonable harpy only out to get Vladek's money or a sympathetic character trying to cope with the miserly and demanding Vladek? Vladek certainly subscribes to the former, but Art (and most readers) drift toward the latter.

to:

** Is Mala an unreasonable harpy [[GoldDigger only out to get Vladek's money money]] or a sympathetic character trying to cope with the miserly and demanding Vladek? Vladek certainly subscribes to the former, but Art (and most readers) drift toward the latter.
3rd Dec '16 3:32:05 AM MarkyVigoroth
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* UnfortunateImplications: Several critics [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maus#Academic_work_and_criticism argued]] that by portraying Jews and Germans as different species of animals, Spiegelman was accidentally reinforcing the Nazi beliefs about the Jews belonging to a different race.

to:

* UnfortunateImplications: UnfortunateImplications:
**
Several critics [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maus#Academic_work_and_criticism argued]] that by portraying Jews and Germans as different species of animals, Spiegelman was accidentally reinforcing the Nazi beliefs about the Jews belonging to a different race.race.
** Frogs represent the French in this comic book. [[https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=frog 'Frog']] is also a racial slur against those of French descent.
22nd Nov '16 2:36:02 PM Nopperabo
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Added DiffLines:

** Is Lucia a vindictive woman, or is she understandably hurt after Vladek strung her along? Did she try to sabotage Vladek and Anja's relationship out of jealousy, or was she trying to warn Anja about how duplicitous Vladek really was? Does Vladek paint an accurate picture of her, or does he have an ulterior motive for depicting her as vindictive?
22nd Nov '15 8:25:45 PM ThePest179
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* TearJerker:
** The ending to the second book (and thus the whole story), one of the most powerful moments of the story, when Vladek slowly goes to sleep and tells Art goodbye... but addresses him as "Richieu", which gives more fuel to Art's previously mentioned feelings that his parents had always loved their dead child more than him. The next and final panel shows Vladek's and Anja's tombstone.
** There's also the reunion of Vladek and Anja, which is half [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments sweet beyond words]] and half heart-wrenching when you realize [[ForegoneConclusion what happens to Anja later]]. In spite of that, Vladek's unreliable narration, "We lived happily, happily, happily ever after."
** How exactly Richieu died. Vladek and Anja sent him to live with another women in hopes that he'd be safe, [[DrivenToSuicide only for her to poison herself and the children]] [[BetterToDieThanBeKilled at the threat of being sent to Auschwitz]].
** There is a moment near the end where Anja sees the picture of her living husband. Only it was no mouse, it was an ACTUAL photograph of Vladek Spiegelman, a man, a human. It is a simplistic, yet powerful reminder of what the Nazis failed to see, and a reminder that [[TruthInTelevision this entire story actually happened]].
** Near the end, there is a story told to Vladek about a Jew who survived all of the Nazi atrocities and attempted to return to his home, only to find that Poles had taken it for their own and are very unhappy to see the rightful owner return. With no idea what else to do, the Jew sleeps in a room behind the place. The Poles find him there and [[ShootTheShaggyDog beat him to death just for the fun of it]].
** The last time we (and Vladek) see Anja's father, he is crying as he is being deported to Auschwitz. This is even after Vladek tried to bribe his Jewish police relative, who took the jewels, but sent the old man to his doom. What's even sadder is Vladek remarking that with all his wealth, his father-in-law couldn't even save himself, let alone most of his family
22nd Nov '15 8:20:38 PM ThePest179
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* NightmareFuel: It's about the Holocaust. What do you ''expect''?
** At Auschwitz, when the bodies were pulled out of the gas chambers, they were pushed into ditches and set on fire. Not all of them were dead. The fires were kept burning longer by recycling the burnt fat of the victims...
** The four hanged women. There's a scene in the present that's drawn as if they're hanging there, a sort of flashback.
** The comic Art makes about his mother's suicide is this mixed with TearJerker.
** The cargo trains, packed into in cargo containers without food, water or facilities for days on end.
** The countless times Vladek tells of someone who he knew, was friends with, had a plan, etc and after they parted ways they were never seen again.
21st Aug '15 11:39:25 PM CaptainCrawdad
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*** Likewise, Spiegelman himself noted that his own students at art school tend to root for Vladek as a MagnificentBastard and regarded his Stand-In as a whiny ingrate who doesn't understand how terrible his father's sufferings were.

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*** ** Likewise, Spiegelman himself noted that his own students at art school tend to root for Vladek as a MagnificentBastard and regarded his Stand-In as a whiny ingrate who doesn't understand how terrible his father's sufferings were.
5th Aug '15 11:46:55 AM kazokuhouou
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** Despite this, the book is often used in higher forms of middle and high school as a textbook to discuss the Holocaust, both in America and in different countries, especially Europe and Germany who are keen to remind students of their OldShame.

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** Despite this, the book is often used in higher forms of middle and high school school, as well as colleges, as a textbook to discuss the Holocaust, both in America and in different countries, especially Europe and Germany who are keen to remind students of their OldShame.
3rd May '15 3:25:12 PM Minni128
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25th Sep '14 11:29:46 AM Angeldeb82
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* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: The family in Hanover that Vladek and Shimek meet after the war. They are given a warm welcome by the German Gentile wife, her Jewish husband whom she hid during the war, and their two children - cat-striped mice. Seeing this obviously loving German-Jewish family unit for a few brief panels is a welcome reprieve after two volumes of cruelty, and serves as a little bit of proof that the Nazi ideology, ultimately, didn't win.

to:

* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: SugarWiki/{{Heartwarming Moment|s}}: The family in Hanover that Vladek and Shimek meet after the war. They are given a warm welcome by the German Gentile wife, her Jewish husband whom she hid during the war, and their two children - cat-striped mice. Seeing this obviously loving German-Jewish family unit for a few brief panels is a welcome reprieve after two volumes of cruelty, and serves as a little bit of proof that the Nazi ideology, ultimately, didn't win.



** There's also the reunion of Vladek and Anja, which is half [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments sweet beyond words]] and half heart-wrenching when you realize [[ForegoneConclusion what happens to Anja later.]] In spite of that, Vladek's unreliable narration, "We lived happily, happily, happily ever after."

to:

** There's also the reunion of Vladek and Anja, which is half [[SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments sweet beyond words]] and half heart-wrenching when you realize [[ForegoneConclusion what happens to Anja later.]] later]]. In spite of that, Vladek's unreliable narration, "We lived happily, happily, happily ever after."



** There is a moment near the end where Anja sees the picture of her living husband. Only it was no mouse, it was an ACTUAL photograph of Vladek Spiegelman, a man, a human. It is a simplistic, yet powerful reminder of what the Nazis failed to see, and a reminder that [[TruthInTelevision this entire story actually happened.]]

to:

** There is a moment near the end where Anja sees the picture of her living husband. Only it was no mouse, it was an ACTUAL photograph of Vladek Spiegelman, a man, a human. It is a simplistic, yet powerful reminder of what the Nazis failed to see, and a reminder that [[TruthInTelevision this entire story actually happened.]]happened]].
7th Jul '14 3:52:54 PM Aquila89
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Added DiffLines:

* UnfortunateImplications: Several critics [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maus#Academic_work_and_criticism argued]] that by portraying Jews and Germans as different species of animals, Spiegelman was accidentally reinforcing the Nazi beliefs about the Jews belonging to a different race.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.Maus