History YMMV / MansfieldPark

9th Jan '17 5:44:13 PM FireflyDaae
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Jane is scathing of her own creation, the woefully inadequate Lady Bertram. However, modern readers might wonder at some underlying heart or autoimmune dysfunction undiagnosable at Austin's time of writing, particularly if she was based on a living template. Add a terrible education, the low social expectations of "proper ladies with money", no worthwhile support systems ''and'' Mrs Norris sticking her oar in for her own selfish reasons... How much of that flighty, inconsistent demeanour ''is'' actually personal, wilful laziness rather than symptomatic of ignored physiological, psychosocial and cognitive issues combining into something horrible for all concerned? Is Lady Bertram just a violent disposition away from MadwomanInTheAttic, rather than her primarily self-imposed isolation from other family members due to an inability to cope?

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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Jane is scathing of her own creation, the woefully inadequate Lady Bertram. However, modern readers might wonder at some underlying heart or autoimmune dysfunction undiagnosable at Austin's Austen's time of writing, particularly if she was based on a living template. Add a terrible education, the low social expectations of "proper ladies with money", no worthwhile support systems ''and'' Mrs Norris sticking her oar in for her own selfish reasons... How much of that flighty, inconsistent demeanour ''is'' actually personal, wilful laziness rather than symptomatic of ignored physiological, psychosocial and cognitive issues combining into something horrible for all concerned? Is Lady Bertram just a violent disposition away from MadwomanInTheAttic, rather than her primarily self-imposed isolation from other family members due to an inability to cope?
6th Jan '17 8:56:07 AM SeptimusHeap
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* FreudWasRight: It pains Fanny to see Mary Crawford riding the horse Edmund once established as solely for Fanny's use...
** The necklace scene. Fanny has two possible chains for her cross--one from Henry and one from Edmund. [[spoiler:Henry's]] doesn't fit in the designated hole. [[spoiler:Edmund's]] fits just fine.
13th Aug '16 7:58:40 PM LadyNorbert
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** The first of the early warning signs that Mary Crawford is a BitchInSheepsClothing seem less blatant when looked at through modern eyes: [[ThickerThanWater She makes an]] [[MyCountryRightOrWrong open criticism of her uncle]] (a philanderer who moved his mistress into the home after his wife's death) a highly disrespectful action in that time.

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** The first of the early warning signs that Mary Crawford is a BitchInSheepsClothing seem less blatant when looked at through modern eyes: [[ThickerThanWater She makes an]] [[MyCountryRightOrWrong open criticism of her uncle]] (a philanderer who moved his mistress into the home after his wife's death) death). Such criticism of her guardian was considered a highly disrespectful action in that time.
5th Aug '16 9:21:27 PM MagBas
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** KissingCousins and the infamous UnfortunateImplications.
31st Jul '16 3:35:11 PM Euodiachloris
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Jane is scathing of her own creation, the woefully inadequate Lady Bertram. However, modern readers might wonder at some underlying heart or autoimmune dysfunction undiagnosable at Austin's time of writing, particularly if she was based on a living template. Add a terrible education, the low social expectations of "proper ladies with money", no worthwhile support systems ''and'' Mrs Norris sticking her oar in for her own selfish reasons... How much of that flighty, inconsistent demeanour ''is'' actually personal, wilful laziness rather than symptomatic of ignored physiological, psychosocial and cognitive issues combining into something horrible for all concerned?

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Jane is scathing of her own creation, the woefully inadequate Lady Bertram. However, modern readers might wonder at some underlying heart or autoimmune dysfunction undiagnosable at Austin's time of writing, particularly if she was based on a living template. Add a terrible education, the low social expectations of "proper ladies with money", no worthwhile support systems ''and'' Mrs Norris sticking her oar in for her own selfish reasons... How much of that flighty, inconsistent demeanour ''is'' actually personal, wilful laziness rather than symptomatic of ignored physiological, psychosocial and cognitive issues combining into something horrible for all concerned?concerned? Is Lady Bertram just a violent disposition away from MadwomanInTheAttic, rather than her primarily self-imposed isolation from other family members due to an inability to cope?
31st Jul '16 3:25:43 PM Euodiachloris
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Jane is scathing of her own creation, the woefully inadequate Lady Bertram. However, modern readers might wonder at some underlying heart or autoimmune dysfunction undiagnosable at Austin's time of writing, particularly if she was based on a living template. Add a terrible education, no worthwhile support systems and Mrs Norris sticking her oar in for her own selfish reasons... How much of that flighty, inconsistent demeanour ''is'' actually wilful laziness rather than symptomatic of physiological and psychosocial issues combining into something horrible for all concerned?

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Jane is scathing of her own creation, the woefully inadequate Lady Bertram. However, modern readers might wonder at some underlying heart or autoimmune dysfunction undiagnosable at Austin's time of writing, particularly if she was based on a living template. Add a terrible education, the low social expectations of "proper ladies with money", no worthwhile support systems and ''and'' Mrs Norris sticking her oar in for her own selfish reasons... How much of that flighty, inconsistent demeanour ''is'' actually personal, wilful laziness rather than symptomatic of physiological and ignored physiological, psychosocial and cognitive issues combining into something horrible for all concerned?
31st Jul '16 3:15:07 PM Euodiachloris
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Added DiffLines:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Jane is scathing of her own creation, the woefully inadequate Lady Bertram. However, modern readers might wonder at some underlying heart or autoimmune dysfunction undiagnosable at Austin's time of writing, particularly if she was based on a living template. Add a terrible education, no worthwhile support systems and Mrs Norris sticking her oar in for her own selfish reasons... How much of that flighty, inconsistent demeanour ''is'' actually wilful laziness rather than symptomatic of physiological and psychosocial issues combining into something horrible for all concerned?
12th Feb '16 11:02:25 AM GothicProphet
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** Also, Edmund is opposed to the play on many grounds - but one of them is the 'indecency' of his sisters being on stage in front of an audience, even a small family audience, something we would not bat an eye at today. Granted, the participants then pick a romantic play and use the rehearsals as an excuse to flirt all over the place, so his objection still ends up justified by modern standards, but his incredibly deep objections when Tom begins the scheme are still puzzling to modern readers.

to:

** Also, Edmund is opposed to the play on many grounds - but one of them is the 'indecency' of his sisters being on stage in front of an audience, even a small family audience, something we would not bat an eye at today. Granted, the participants then pick a romantic play and use the rehearsals as an excuse to flirt all over the place, so his objection still ends up justified by modern standards, but his incredibly deep objections when Tom begins the scheme are still puzzling to modern readers.readers.
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9th Feb '15 5:40:55 AM Julia1984
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* TakeThat: Mary Crawford's plan to fix the mess at the end is to make Henry Crawford marry Maria after her divorce and to help the couple build some kind of life together -- the standard, expected, and accepted solution of the day -- despite the fact that Henry knowingly and willingly ruined her [[DoubleStandard (they all know their society punishes the woman more than the man in these cases)]] and that all sorts of careful manipulation will be necessary to convince him to go through with it. Edmund Bertram is disgusted by the suggestion that his sister marrying such a rake -- "the chance of a marriage which, thinking as I now thought of her brother, should rather be prevented than sought" -- could be seen as a happy ending.



** Also, Edmund is opposed to the play on many grounds - but one of them is the 'indecency' of his sisters being on stage in front of an audience, even a small family audience, something we would not bat an eye at today. Granted, the participants then pick a romantic play and use the rehearsals as an excuse to flirt all over the place, so his objection still ends up justified by modern standards, but his incredibly deep objections when Tom begins the scheme are still puzzling to modern readers.
** Mary Crawford is a bad person because she wants Henry Crawford to be made to marry Maria, after her divorce - and to help the couple build some kind of life together. Edmund Bertram is a good person because ''he'' wants to chew scenery agonizing over the sin and shame of it all and then banish his sister to outer darkness. Hmmm.

to:

** Also, Edmund is opposed to the play on many grounds - but one of them is the 'indecency' of his sisters being on stage in front of an audience, even a small family audience, something we would not bat an eye at today. Granted, the participants then pick a romantic play and use the rehearsals as an excuse to flirt all over the place, so his objection still ends up justified by modern standards, but his incredibly deep objections when Tom begins the scheme are still puzzling to modern readers.
** Mary Crawford is a bad person because she wants Henry Crawford to be made to marry Maria, after her divorce - and to help the couple build some kind of life together. Edmund Bertram is a good person because ''he'' wants to chew scenery agonizing over the sin and shame of it all and then banish his sister to outer darkness. Hmmm.
readers.
15th Sep '14 2:37:16 PM roxana
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** Also, Edmund is opposed to the play on many grounds - but one of them is the 'indecency' of his sisters being on stage in front of an audience, even a small family audience, something we would not bat an eye at today. Granted, the participants then pick a romantic play and use the rehearsals as an excuse to flirt all over the place, so his objection still ends up justified by modern standards, but his incredibly deep objections when Tom begins the scheme are still puzzling to modern readers.

to:

** Also, Edmund is opposed to the play on many grounds - but one of them is the 'indecency' of his sisters being on stage in front of an audience, even a small family audience, something we would not bat an eye at today. Granted, the participants then pick a romantic play and use the rehearsals as an excuse to flirt all over the place, so his objection still ends up justified by modern standards, but his incredibly deep objections when Tom begins the scheme are still puzzling to modern readers.readers.
** Mary Crawford is a bad person because she wants Henry Crawford to be made to marry Maria, after her divorce - and to help the couple build some kind of life together. Edmund Bertram is a good person because ''he'' wants to chew scenery agonizing over the sin and shame of it all and then banish his sister to outer darkness. Hmmm.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.MansfieldPark