History YMMV / LooneyTunes

19th Jul '16 4:21:22 AM Prinzenick
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* GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: Tweety is pretty popular in Japan. He even has a few volumes of DVDs titled "I Love Tweety" sold there. Japan's fondness for small, adorable creatures probably helped him out a lot.
** Back in the Fifties, Tweety (and arch-nemesis Sylvester) had an immense fandom in France with comic books, toys, and various other merchandise.
** Marvin the Martian also seems to be moderately popular in Japan; there's a good amount of Japanese fanart of him, and many Japanese fans, when making posts regarding him, will often mention how they think he's cute.
2nd Jul '16 10:42:28 AM N8han11
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** Want to know what's even more tossed under the bus? The 2000s era flash parody online cartoons. Several of which weren't even included on the two DVD releases, But enough people try to ignore them people don't know there's a Franchise/TheMatrix parody with Bugs and Elmer we should be complaining about not having on DVD.
29th Jun '16 11:34:48 AM speedyboris
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** It started even before that: Due to the fact that Looney Tunes was a LongRunner, many advances in technology took place during the original theatrical run. By the late '50s, characters were shown watching TV [[labelnote:Note]](some examples include "Dog Gone People", "A Mutt in a Rut", "People are Bunny", "Person to Bunny", "Fish and Flips", and "The Million Hare", among others)[[/labelnote]], which is ironic for two reasons: A) The cartoons were originally shown in theaters, and B) Theatrical studios, including WB, were ''petrified'' of TV when it became mainstream in the early '50s, due to the concern that the ease of staying home for entertainment would heavily cut in their profits.

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** It started even before that: Due to the fact that Looney Tunes was a LongRunner, many advances in technology took place during the original theatrical run. By the late '50s, characters were shown watching TV [[labelnote:Note]](some examples include "Dog Gone People", "A Mutt in a Rut", "People are Bunny", "Person to Bunny", "Fish and Flips", and "The Million Hare", among others)[[/labelnote]], which is ironic for two reasons: A) The These cartoons were originally shown in theaters, and B) Theatrical studios, including WB, were ''petrified'' of TV when it became mainstream in the early '50s, due to the concern that the ease of staying home for entertainment would heavily cut in their profits.
29th Jun '16 11:33:03 AM speedyboris
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Added DiffLines:

** It started even before that: Due to the fact that Looney Tunes was a LongRunner, many advances in technology took place during the original theatrical run. By the late '50s, characters were shown watching TV [[labelnote:Note]](some examples include "Dog Gone People", "A Mutt in a Rut", "People are Bunny", "Person to Bunny", "Fish and Flips", and "The Million Hare", among others)[[/labelnote]], which is ironic for two reasons: A) The cartoons were originally shown in theaters, and B) Theatrical studios, including WB, were ''petrified'' of TV when it became mainstream in the early '50s, due to the concern that the ease of staying home for entertainment would heavily cut in their profits.
28th Jun '16 6:01:49 PM Adept
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* ToughActToFollow: With only a handful of exceptions, not a single revival has been able to live up to the spirit of the original shorts, the biggest reason being that the creators simply left very big shoes to fill, not to mention worked in a specific environment conducive to that creative process (you could say ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' was StevenSpielberg buying that environment).

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* ToughActToFollow: With only a handful of exceptions, not a single revival has been able to live up to the spirit of the original shorts, the biggest reason being that the creators simply left very big shoes to fill, not to mention worked in a specific environment conducive to that creative process (you could say ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' was StevenSpielberg Creator/StevenSpielberg buying that environment).
28th May '16 10:31:04 PM nombretomado
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** ''VideoGame/BugsBunnyLostInTime'' and ''VideoGame/BugsBunnyAndTazTimeBusters'' for the PS1 and PC is a great ''Rayman 2''-esque 3D Platformer which is very fun and captures the style of the show perfectly, and was also very well received.

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** ''VideoGame/BugsBunnyLostInTime'' and ''VideoGame/BugsBunnyAndTazTimeBusters'' for the PS1 [=PS1=] and PC is a great ''Rayman 2''-esque 3D Platformer which is very fun and captures the style of the show perfectly, and was also very well received.
23rd May '16 2:03:43 PM speedyboris
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** Pete Puma is copied from Frank Fontaine's John LC Silvoney/Crazy Gugenheim character, which was well known at the time his cartoon came out. Pete Puma is still a well liked and memorable one shot character- only fans of Jack Benny and Jackie Gleason remember Frank Fontaine these days.
23rd May '16 12:15:11 PM Streetstyle97
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** The latest addition is any insinuation that the Looney Tunes aren't WB's top animation section of the library any more. 2015 was not a good year for evidence otherwise.



* ToughActToFollow: With only a handful of exceptions, not a single revival has been able to live up to the spirit of the original shorts, the biggest reason being that the creators simply left very big shoes to fill, not to mention worked in a specific environment conducive to that creative process (you could say ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' was StevenSpielberg buying that environment). [[ExecutiveMeddling Every attempt WB has made]] to revive the characters that isn't [[DoingItForTheArt out of a love for them]] has only continued to [[DeaderThanDisco burry the franchise deeper and deeper]].

to:

* ToughActToFollow: With only a handful of exceptions, not a single revival has been able to live up to the spirit of the original shorts, the biggest reason being that the creators simply left very big shoes to fill, not to mention worked in a specific environment conducive to that creative process (you could say ''WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}}'' was StevenSpielberg buying that environment). [[ExecutiveMeddling Every attempt WB has made]] to revive the characters that isn't [[DoingItForTheArt out of a love for them]] has only continued to [[DeaderThanDisco burry the franchise deeper and deeper]].
18th May '16 5:39:24 AM WiddershinsDaughter
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* GrowingTheBeard: Initially, the Looney Tunes started as shameless ripoffs of Disney's success and Merrie Melodies was just made to sell Warner Studio's sheet music (it's the 1930s version of the music video). That all changed after [[Creator/HarmanAndIsing Hugh Harman and Rudolph Ising]] parted ways with Leon Schlesinger, forcing him to assemble a new staff--many of them important in shaping the studio's future. While the shorts still remained Disney like in nature, Tex Avery and Bob began going against the status quo of animation, starting with Tex's landmark short "Gold Diggers of '49" where he started taking advantage of cartoons being able to do anything and use them as vehicles for gags. It's generally agreed that things vastly improved as a whole when Tex Avery and Bob Clampett began to direct, as they were both a big part of shaping the Looney Tunes sense of humor we know today. However, it's the '40s that are often seen as the high point in the studio's history (ironically, Avery had left WB in 1941, but his influence had already been established).

to:

* GrowingTheBeard: Initially, the Looney Tunes started as shameless ripoffs of Disney's success and Merrie Melodies was just made to sell Warner Studio's sheet music (it's the 1930s version of the music video). That all changed after [[Creator/HarmanAndIsing Hugh Harman and Rudolph Ising]] parted ways with Leon Schlesinger, forcing him to assemble a new staff--many of them important in shaping the studio's future. While the shorts still remained Disney like in nature, Tex Avery and Bob began going against the status quo of animation, starting with Tex's landmark short "Gold Diggers of '49" where he started taking advantage of cartoons being able to do anything and use them as vehicles for gags. It's generally agreed that things vastly improved as a whole when Tex Avery and Bob Clampett began to direct, as they were both a big part of shaping the Looney Tunes sense of humor we know today. However, it's the '40s '40s, combining the Avery-Clampett anything-goes mentality with Creator/ChuckJones' educated sensibilities that are often seen as the high point in the studio's history (ironically, Avery had left WB in 1941, but his influence had already been established).
19th Apr '16 7:08:55 AM aye_amber
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* UnintentionallySympathetic: Several of the reoccurring antagonists. Jerks or not, it was hard not to eventually feel for them after their millionth painful fail. Especially when it came to characters who were just hunting for prey out of instinct, like Wile E. and Sylvester. FrizFreleng outright admitted to this difficulty in making shorts with ElmerFudd, claiming Bugs was more liable to look like a bully against him.

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* UnintentionallySympathetic: Several of the reoccurring antagonists. Jerks or not, it was hard not to eventually feel for them after their millionth painful fail. Especially when it came to characters who were just hunting for prey out of instinct, like Wile E. and Sylvester. FrizFreleng Friz Freleng outright admitted to this difficulty in making shorts with ElmerFudd, WesternAnimation/ElmerFudd, claiming Bugs was more liable to look like a bully against him.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.LooneyTunes