History YMMV / Jeopardy

11th Sep '17 10:37:36 PM Occidensill
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* GameBreaker: Until 2003, ''Jeopardy!'' champions could win up to five games before being retired. Starting in the 2003-04 season, the producers instituted a "sky's the limit" rule, where champions could go on and on winning until being defeated. Towards the season's end, Ken Jennings came along and went on a 74-game winning streak [[GoneHorriblyRight that lasted into the next season]]. And it's debatable whether Jennings' last game was a genuine loss, or him throwing in the towel, thinking "I've got enough, I can go home now." Considering how many shows are filmed in a day, it's completely understandable if it's the latter.

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* GameBreaker: Until 2003, ''Jeopardy!'' champions could win up to five games before being retired. Starting in the 2003-04 season, the producers instituted a "sky's the limit" rule, where champions could go on and on winning until being defeated. Towards the season's end, Ken Jennings came along and went on a 74-game winning streak [[GoneHorriblyRight that lasted into the next season]]. And it's debatable whether Jennings' last game was a genuine loss, or him throwing in the towel, thinking "I've got enough, I can go home now." Considering how many shows are filmed in a day, it's completely understandable if it's the latter.
6th Sep '17 8:15:23 PM jayharrison
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** The simple one-note chime when the Final Jeopardy! category is revealed.

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** The simple one-note chime when the Final Jeopardy! category is and clue are revealed.
6th Sep '17 8:13:30 PM jayharrison
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** ''Jeopardy!'' started falling into this near the start of 1997-98 season. It was at this point when the producers began videotaping celebrities, public figures (scientists, politicians, etc.), and writers to deliver individual clues and, in less frequent cases, even full categories. Not only do their clues tend to break the show's pacing, often taking up to 20 seconds to deliver, their utilization has become much more common in recent years--even going so far as to feature soap opera actors awkwardly delivering clues ''in character''.
** However, it's arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went full steam ahead into Dork Age territory with [[CreatorsPet the Clue Crew]], a regular "feature" born in 2001. It's bad enough that the clues presented by these [[YoungerAndHipper young assistants]] tend to eat up as much time as their celebrity counterparts. It gets even worse upon realizing that, if any member of the Clue Crew introduces a category, there's hardly any effort to speed the game along until ''after'' the crew's entire column has been cleared out.

to:

** ''Jeopardy!'' started falling into this near the start of 1997-98 season. It was at this point when the producers began videotaping celebrities, public figures (scientists, politicians, etc.), journalists, and prolific writers to deliver individual clues and, in less frequent cases, even full categories. Not only do their clues tend to break the show's pacing, often taking up to 20 seconds to deliver, their utilization has become much more common in recent years--even going so far as to feature soap opera actors awkwardly delivering clues ''in character''.
** However, it's more strongly arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went full steam ahead into Dork Age territory with [[CreatorsPet the Clue Crew]], a regular "feature" born in 2001. It's bad enough that the clues presented by these [[YoungerAndHipper young assistants]] tend to eat up as much time as their celebrity counterparts. It gets even worse upon realizing that, if any member of the Clue Crew introduces a category, there's hardly any effort to speed the game along up until ''after'' the crew's entire column has been cleared out.


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** The Skyler Homback Kids' Week CurbStompBattle on July 31, 2013. Thomas Hurley, a 12-year-old contestant, was in a distant second place behind Skyler[[note]]$9,600 versus $36,600, respectively[[/note]] upon entering a Final Jeopardy! on UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar. Unfortunately, Thomas added an extra letter to the phrase "Emancipation[[note]]the misspell: "Emancip'''t'''ation"[[/note]] Proclamation", and wound up getting penalized for it. Many who saw the show believed that, even though Thomas would have finished second even if ruled as correct, should have been given some slack for the misspell.
5th Sep '17 2:07:03 AM jayharrison
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** On June 22, 1999, with a very close game for Final Jeopardy, Alex tells the players "Someone asked me the other day if we've ever had a three-way tie...", to which he said no. On March 16, 2007, the first-ever nonzero three-way tie happened in Final Jeopardy.

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** On June 22, 1999, with a very close game for Final Jeopardy, Jeopardy!, Alex tells the players "Someone asked me the other day if we've ever had a three-way tie...", to which he said no. On March 16, 2007, the first-ever first-ever[[note]]and, since the co-champion rule has been eliminated as of 2017, likely the ''only'' ever[[/note]] nonzero three-way tie happened in Final Jeopardy.



** On July 31, 2013, a player on Kids' Week absolutely owned the game to the tune of $66,600. What do people best remember about this episode? One of his opponents was penalized for misspelling [[spoiler: Emancipation Proclamation]] for his Final Jeopardy! response. In the days that followed, angry posts flooded the show's Facebook page, claiming that since children were playing the game, the judges should have been more lenient. Journalists and news websites also chimed in on the issue with the contestant claiming he was robbed because of his spelling error. Never mind that he would've gotten only second place regardless and the controversy over the misspelling completely overshadowed the winner's huge haul. This mess had an impact on the final fate of the Kids' Week games; the next one in December 2014 that got caught up in the Sony hack and exposed a StageMom incident, which upset Trebek, led to the Kids' Week games going the way of the Seniors Tournament, as none have been held since, [[OldShame and the series has all but distanced itself from them]].
** The October 12, 2009 game was the third game for 5-time champion Terry Linwood. However, one of his opponents was Jeff Kirby, who'd previously played on Jeopardy in 1999, even though Trebek-era contestants are not allowed to appear again. The producers hadn't realized this until someone on the show's message board pointed out that ''he was wearing the same tie'' he had worn in his 1999 appearance. Because of him, [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes this game's been barred from reruns]] ([[LaserGuidedKarma As for Kirby, he finished in last place after failing Final Jeopardy!, just like his 1999 appearance, and was denied the $1,000 third place prize because of his ineligibility]]).

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** On July 31, 2013, a player on Kids' Week absolutely owned the game to the tune of $66,600. What do people best remember about this episode? One of his opponents was penalized for misspelling [[spoiler: Emancipation Proclamation]] for his Final Jeopardy! response. In the days that followed, angry posts flooded the show's Facebook page, claiming that since children were playing the game, the judges should have been more lenient. Journalists and news websites also chimed in on the issue with the contestant claiming he was robbed because of his spelling error. Never mind that he would've gotten only second place regardless and the controversy over the misspelling completely overshadowed the winner's huge haul. This mess had an impact on the final fate of the Kids' Week games; the next one in December 2014 December, 2014, that got caught up in the Sony hack and exposed a StageMom incident, which upset Trebek, led to the Kids' Week games going the way of the Seniors Tournament, as none have been held since, [[OldShame and the series has all but distanced itself from them]].
** The October 12, 2009 2009, game was the third game for 5-time champion Terry Linwood. However, one of his opponents was Jeff Kirby, who'd previously played on Jeopardy in 1999, even though Trebek-era contestants are not allowed to appear again. The producers hadn't realized this until someone on the show's message board pointed out that ''he was wearing the same tie'' he had worn in his 1999 appearance. Because of him, [[KeepCirculatingTheTapes this game's been barred from reruns]] ([[LaserGuidedKarma As for Kirby, he finished in last place after failing Final Jeopardy!, just like his 1999 appearance, and was denied the $1,000 third place prize because of his ineligibility]]).



** The "Clue Crew", first introduced in 2001. Many dislike the fact that their video clues tend to be overlong and distracting, causing them to become so long-winded that the contestants and viewers both lose track of the clue, or simply because they chew up so much airtime, leaving more potential for clues going unrevealed at the end of the round.

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** The "Clue Crew", Clue Crew, first introduced in 2001. Many dislike the fact that their video clues tend to be overlong and distracting, causing them to become so long-winded that the contestants and viewers both lose track of the clue, or simply because they chew up so much airtime, leaving more potential for clues going unrevealed at the end of the round.



*** ''Jeopardy!'''s four Power Players Weeks are maligned by some fans even more than regular Celebrity Jeopardy! games, due to what some perceive as generally weaker competition and a relative lack of "star power" (as contestants are usually journalists, pundits, news anchors, and politicians.) There are also fans who dislike Power Players games due to the inclusion of left-leaning and/or right-leaning political figures, on what is otherwise a bipartisan/nonpartisan series.

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*** ''Jeopardy!'''s ''Jeopardy!''[='=]s four Power Players Weeks are maligned by some fans even more than regular Celebrity Jeopardy! games, due to what some perceive as generally weaker competition and a relative lack of "star power" (as contestants are usually journalists, pundits, news anchors, and politicians.) politicians). There are also fans who dislike Power Players games due to the inclusion of left-leaning and/or right-leaning political figures, on what is otherwise a bipartisan/nonpartisan series.
5th Sep '17 1:53:21 AM jayharrison
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** 2015 13 day champion Matt Jackson proved to be a base breaker for many of the same reasons as Arthur Chu (ultra-serious demeanor, Forrest bouncing, cutting off Alex), and also attracted negative attention for what some perceived as a creepy smile during introductions (even being parodied on ''Series/TheSoup''). Conversely, many fans were impressed with his intelligence and strategy (especially given that he was only ''23 years old'' during his appearances), and noted that during interviews and when the game wasn't in progress, he was very kind and respectful. Notably, on one of his episodes, he informed the judges that they had accidentally ruled an incorrect response from him as correct, and so his score was deducted accordingly.
** 2016 9 day champion Buzzy Cohen turned into this during his last 5 games. Some fans found him smug and cocky for running his hands through his hair and gesturing during introductions, and for distracting the game when referencing the SNL ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' sketches in ''Final'' during his runaway wins (i.e. "What is See you tomorrow, Trebek!"), but others liked that he showed his personality and injected levity into the show.

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** 2015 13 day 2015: 13-day champion Matt Jackson proved to be a base breaker for many of the same reasons as Arthur Chu (ultra-serious demeanor, Forrest bouncing, cutting off Alex), and also attracted negative attention for what some perceived as a creepy smile during introductions (even being parodied on ''Series/TheSoup''). Conversely, many fans were impressed with his intelligence and strategy (especially given that he was only ''23 years old'' during his appearances), and noted that during interviews and when the game wasn't in progress, he was very kind and respectful. Notably, on one of his episodes, he informed the judges that they had accidentally ruled an incorrect response from him as correct, and so his score was deducted accordingly.
** 2016 9 day 2016: 9-day champion Buzzy Cohen turned into this during his last 5 five games. Some fans found him smug and cocky for running his hands through his hair and gesturing during introductions, and for distracting the game when referencing the SNL ''Celebrity Jeopardy!'' sketches in ''Final'' during his runaway wins (i.e. "What is See you tomorrow, Trebek!"), but others liked that he showed his personality and injected levity into the show.



** June 11, 2012. Final Jeopardy! asked "[[Literature/TheBible Acts 1:13]] says this event occurred in 'an upper room'." They were looking for "The Last Supper", and initially ruled the champion's response of "Pentecost" wrong, but Alex later acknowledged the latter as right in a dubbed-in clip and mentioned that, starting with the next game, his score would be adjusted accordingly. The truth is, there ''is'' no right answer Acts 1:13 makes no mention of any "act" besides the disciples meeting there, and Pentecost doesn't show up until Acts 2. Furthermore, the exact location of the Last Supper is unknown; it is believed to have happened in an upper room simply because that was tradition. Fortunately, this did not affect the outcome, since only two players were present at Final Jeopardy! and the champion, who answered "Pentecost", had a "lock" game.
** April 3rd, 2015. One clue asked for the Catholic sacrament that allows a person to take Communion. They were looking for the response "What is Confirmation?". Actually Confirmation has nothing to do with Communion, and often takes place ''after'' a person starts taking Communion. Communion is a sacrament in and of itself, and the initiation of it is just called "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin First Communion]]". At the end of the show, Alex took a moment to acknowledge the mistake and promise they would be more careful in the future.

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** June 11, 2012. 2012: Final Jeopardy! asked "[[Literature/TheBible Acts 1:13]] says this event occurred in 'an upper room'." They were looking for "The Last Supper", and initially ruled the champion's response of "Pentecost" wrong, but Alex later acknowledged the latter as right in a dubbed-in clip and mentioned that, starting with the next game, his score would be adjusted accordingly. The truth is, there ''is'' no right answer Acts 1:13 makes no mention of any "act" besides the disciples meeting there, and Pentecost doesn't show up until Acts 2. Furthermore, the exact location of the Last Supper is unknown; it is believed to have happened in an upper room simply because that was tradition. Fortunately, this did not affect the outcome, since only two players were present at Final Jeopardy! and the champion, who answered "Pentecost", had a "lock" game.
** April 3rd, 2015. 2015: One clue asked for the Catholic sacrament that allows a person to take Communion. They were looking for the response "What is Confirmation?". Confirmation?" Actually Confirmation has nothing to do with Communion, and often takes place ''after'' a person starts taking Communion. Communion is a sacrament in and of itself, and the initiation of it is just called "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin First Communion]]". At the end of the show, Alex took a moment to acknowledge the mistake and promise they would be more careful in the future.



** However, it's arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went full steam ahead--and then some--into Dork Age territory with [[CreatorsPet the Clue Crew]], a regular "feature" born in 2001. It's bad enough that the clues presented by these [[YoungerAndHipper young assistants]] tend to eat up as much time as their celebrity counterparts. It gets even worse upon realizing that, if any member of the Clue Crew introduces a category, there's hardly any effort to speed the game along until ''after'' the crew's column has been cleared out.

to:

** However, it's arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went full steam ahead--and then some--into ahead into Dork Age territory with [[CreatorsPet the Clue Crew]], a regular "feature" born in 2001. It's bad enough that the clues presented by these [[YoungerAndHipper young assistants]] tend to eat up as much time as their celebrity counterparts. It gets even worse upon realizing that, if any member of the Clue Crew introduces a category, there's hardly any effort to speed the game along until ''after'' the crew's entire column has been cleared out.



** The first episode of Trebek's ''Jeopardy!'' on September 10, 1984 had these two back-to-back questions "Two ''[[Series/SaturdayNightLive Saturday Night]]'' alumni who tried ''Film/TradingPlaces''", the answer being "Who are Creator/DanAykroyd and Creator/EddieMurphy?", and "He may ''Film/NeverSayNeverAgain'' when asked to be [[Film/JamesBond Bond]]", with the answer obviously being "Who is Creator/SeanConnery?". That's right Sean Connery and ''SNL'' have been part of Trebek's ''Jeopardy!'' since the beginning.

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** The first episode of Trebek's ''Jeopardy!'' on September 10, 1984 1984, had these two back-to-back questions "Two ''[[Series/SaturdayNightLive Saturday Night]]'' alumni who tried ''Film/TradingPlaces''", the answer being "Who are Creator/DanAykroyd and Creator/EddieMurphy?", and "He may ''Film/NeverSayNeverAgain'' when asked to be [[Film/JamesBond Bond]]", with the answer obviously being "Who is Creator/SeanConnery?". Creator/SeanConnery?" That's right Sean Connery and ''SNL'' have been part of Trebek's ''Jeopardy!'' since the beginning.



** The July 23, 2009 Final Jeopardy! was notorious for its obscure response of Liederkranz cheese, which has gained MemeticMutation in the fandom as a benchmark for clue obscurity (partially because a prominent member of the fandom happened to have a CurbStompBattle going on that day). It turns out that [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=5151 at least one prior episode]] had a nearly-verbatim clue about the cheese, which also stumped all three players even then.
** In the July 29, 2015 show, A question in the category of "Teams That Haven't Won a [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} World Series]]", mentioned Troy Tulowitzki, a player for the Colorado Rockies, trying to lead his team to a championship. While true at the time of taping[[note]]nothing was displayed mentioning when the episode was taped[[/note]], by the time the episode aired on TV, Tulowitzki had been traded to the Toronto Blue Jays [[note]](a team that, for the record, has won the World Series twice--1992 and 1993)[[/note]].

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** The July 23, 2009 2009, Final Jeopardy! was notorious for its obscure response of Liederkranz cheese, which has gained MemeticMutation in the fandom as a benchmark for clue obscurity (partially because a prominent member of the fandom happened to have a CurbStompBattle going on that day). It turns out that [[http://www.j-archive.com/showgame.php?game_id=5151 at least one prior episode]] had a nearly-verbatim clue about the cheese, which also stumped all three players even then.
** In the July 29, 2015 2015, show, A question in the category of "Teams That Haven't Won a [[UsefulNotes/{{Baseball}} World Series]]", mentioned Troy Tulowitzki, a player for the Colorado Rockies, trying to lead his team to a championship. While true at the time of taping[[note]]nothing was displayed mentioning when the episode was taped[[/note]], by the time the episode aired on TV, Tulowitzki had been traded to the Toronto Blue Jays [[note]](a team that, for the record, has won the World Series twice--1992 and 1993)[[/note]].



** On October 14, 2013, the defending champion was penalized for misspelling [[spoiler: Kazakhstan]] for his Final Jeopardy! response (he misspelled it as [[spoiler:Kazkhistan]]). There were many angry posts that flooded the Facebook page, from people who thought that the judges should have been more lenient, given that Alex said, "we don't normally penalize for a misspelled word" but that in Final Jeopardy! the misspelling changed the phonetic pronunciation.

to:

** On October 14, 2013, the defending champion was penalized for misspelling [[spoiler: Kazakhstan]] for his Final Jeopardy! response (he misspelled it as [[spoiler:Kazkhistan]]). There were many angry posts that flooded the Facebook page, from people who thought that the judges should have been more lenient, given that Alex said, "we don't normally penalize for a misspelled word" but that in Final Jeopardy! Jeopardy!, the misspelling changed the phonetic pronunciation.



* JustHereForGodzilla: This can occur when a superchampion goes on a lengthy run, as many casual viewers who don't regularly (or ever) watch ''Jeopardy!'' tune in to see the dominant champion everyone's talking about. Best exemplified by Ken Jennings' 74 day run in 2004 (to the point where ''Jeopardy!'' started overtaking ''Wheel of Fortune'' in the Nielsen ratings), while any 10+ day champion has had this happen to an extent. As well, it came out late in Matt Jackson's 13 day run in 2015 that advertisers were inquiring about how long he'd win for, so they could buy commercial time during his more-watched games (producers obviously declined, not wanting to leak episode results.)

to:

* JustHereForGodzilla: This can occur when a superchampion goes on a lengthy run, as many casual viewers who don't regularly (or ever) watch ''Jeopardy!'' tune in to see the dominant champion everyone's talking about. Best exemplified by Ken Jennings' 74 day 74-day run in 2004 (to the point where ''Jeopardy!'' started overtaking ''Wheel of Fortune'' in the Nielsen ratings), while any 10+ day champion has had this happen to an extent. As well, it came out late in Matt Jackson's 13 day run in 2015 that advertisers were inquiring about how long he'd win for, so they could buy commercial time during his more-watched games (producers obviously declined, not wanting to leak episode results.)



** The "answering with a question" format had so wormed its way into the brain of American audiences, as far back as the Fleming era, that practically any other game show that asks trivia will see multiple contestants answer with a question; that show's host may then remind them "this isn't ''Jeopardy!''" with varying degrees of humor or irritation (most notably ''Series/WinBenSteinsMoney'', where offending contestants were forced to wear a dunce cap). This happens even in high school academic quiz bowls, especially since, like ''Jeopardy!'', contestants have to buzz in.
** Just about any news article about ''Jeopardy!'' is bound to include "What is _____?" and/or "I'll take ______ for $[X]00." They also appears frequently in situations that have nothing to do with Jeopardy, especially the latter.

to:

** The "answering with a question" format had so wormed its way into the brain of American audiences, as far back as the Fleming era, that practically any other game show that asks trivia will see multiple contestants answer with a question; that show's host may then remind them "this isn't ''Jeopardy!''" with varying degrees of humor or irritation (most notably ''Series/WinBenSteinsMoney'', where offending contestants were forced to wear a dunce cap).DunceCap). This happens even in high school academic quiz bowls, especially since, like ''Jeopardy!'', contestants have to buzz in.
** Just about any news article about ''Jeopardy!'' is bound to include "What is _____?" and/or "I'll take ______ for $[X]00." They also appears frequently in situations that have nothing to do with Jeopardy, ''Jeopardy!'', especially the latter.



* StopHavingFunGuys: Some fans have this attitude towards contestants who write down cutesy things during Final Jeopardy!. This most often occurs with the leader in a lock situation although many contestants can't resist the opportunity to give shout-outs to their families or their hometown.

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* StopHavingFunGuys: Some fans have this attitude towards contestants who write down cutesy things during Final Jeopardy!. Jeopardy! This most often occurs with the leader in a lock situation although many contestants can't resist the opportunity to give shout-outs to their families or their hometown.
5th Sep '17 1:33:19 AM jayharrison
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** ''Jeopardy!'' started falling into this near the start of 1997-98 season. It was at this point when the producers began using videotaped celebrities and public figures (scientists, politicians, etc.) for clues and, in rare cases, even full categories. This practice has become much more frequent in recent years--even going so far as to feature soap opera actors ''in character'' awkwardly delivering clues.
** However, it's arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went completely into Dork Age territory when the [[CreatorsPet Clue Crew]] was introduced in 2001.

to:

** ''Jeopardy!'' started falling into this near the start of 1997-98 season. It was at this point when the producers began using videotaped celebrities and videotaping celebrities, public figures (scientists, politicians, etc.) for ), and writers to deliver individual clues and, in rare less frequent cases, even full categories. This practice categories. Not only do their clues tend to break the show's pacing, often taking up to 20 seconds to deliver, their utilization has become much more frequent common in recent years--even going so far as to feature soap opera actors ''in character'' awkwardly delivering clues.
clues ''in character''.
** However, it's arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went completely into full steam ahead--and then some--into Dork Age territory when the with [[CreatorsPet the Clue Crew]] was introduced Crew]], a regular "feature" born in 2001. 2001. It's bad enough that the clues presented by these [[YoungerAndHipper young assistants]] tend to eat up as much time as their celebrity counterparts. It gets even worse upon realizing that, if any member of the Clue Crew introduces a category, there's hardly any effort to speed the game along until ''after'' the crew's column has been cleared out.
5th Sep '17 1:13:20 AM jayharrison
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Added DiffLines:

** The Clue Crew.


Added DiffLines:

* CreatorsPet: The Clue Crew.


Added DiffLines:

* DorkAge:
** ''Jeopardy!'' started falling into this near the start of 1997-98 season. It was at this point when the producers began using videotaped celebrities and public figures (scientists, politicians, etc.) for clues and, in rare cases, even full categories. This practice has become much more frequent in recent years--even going so far as to feature soap opera actors ''in character'' awkwardly delivering clues.
** However, it's arguable that ''Jeopardy!'' went completely into Dork Age territory when the [[CreatorsPet Clue Crew]] was introduced in 2001.
1st Aug '17 3:07:23 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Colby Burnett, winner of the November 2012 Teachers Tournament and 2013 Tournament of Champions. On one hand, he was quite good at the game and quite GenreSavvy with his wagering in early games. On the other hand, he got increasingly cocky with each win. By the finals of the [=ToC=], he was about on par with Darrell Hammond as Sean Connery on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive''[='s=] Celebrity Jeopardy! skits.

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** Colby Burnett, winner of the November 2012 Teachers Tournament and 2013 Tournament of Champions. On one hand, he was quite good at the game and quite GenreSavvy savvy with his wagering in early games. On the other hand, he got increasingly cocky with each win. By the finals of the [=ToC=], he was about on par with Darrell Hammond as Sean Connery on ''Series/SaturdayNightLive''[='s=] Celebrity Jeopardy! skits.



** Since the 1997-98 season, any clue or ''whole categories'' of clues read by a celebrity--or worse, given by casts of TV shows where the clues are given in-character. Almost all of them tend to involve very long clues read '''very''' slowly which gets worse when a Daily Double is hidden there. Many contestants [[GenreSavvy have caught onto these]] which is why they almost always get picked last. These are similarly hated for dragging down the game and creating a greater risk of leaving clues on the board.

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** Since the 1997-98 season, any clue or ''whole categories'' of clues read by a celebrity--or worse, given by casts of TV shows where the clues are given in-character. Almost all of them tend to involve very long clues read '''very''' slowly which gets worse when a Daily Double is hidden there. Many contestants [[GenreSavvy have caught onto these]] these which is why they almost always get picked last. These are similarly hated for dragging down the game and creating a greater risk of leaving clues on the board.
29th Jul '17 3:52:07 PM KoopaKid17
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** Opera, ballet, or spelling categories, which are almost always saved for last. The dislike for opera as a category got Lampshaded several times with an opera themed category that was called "The Dreaded Opera Category", "Oh No, It's Opera" or "Uh Oh, Opera".

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** Opera, ballet, or spelling categories, which are almost always saved for last. The dislike for opera as a category got Lampshaded gets {{Lampshaded|Trope}} several times with an opera themed category that was categories called "The Dreaded Opera Category", "Oh No, It's Opera" or "Uh Oh, Opera".
28th Jul '17 9:22:10 PM KoopaKid17
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Added DiffLines:

** In recent seasons, categories about Broadway musicals have been given this treatment. The most egregious example was on the January 2, 2013 episode where the category "Broadway Lyrics" not only had each clue go without a correct response, no one even rang in to guess!
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