History YMMV / HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys

4th Apr '16 7:25:50 PM Typos
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* UnintentionallySympathetic: Hera. While she is responsible for a great deal of tragedy in the series, the sheer horribleness of Zeus's infidelities are very much overlooked and outright disregarded by almost every character. As Hercules is the MainCharacter and also the [[GoodAdulteryBadAdultery product of one of Zeus's affairs]], we're meant to sympathize with him, with Hera canonically as the DesignatedVillain. One forgets that she's not only a WomanScorned repeatedly by her [[YourCheatingHeart unremorseful husband]], but also she's ''the Goddess of Marriage''. That means marital fidelity matters to Hera more than '''anyone'''. One might be able to understand just why she became so malicious, looking at her from that perspective.
20th Jan '16 1:08:11 PM rafi
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* EnsembleDarkhorse: Iolaus for reasons stated in AscendedExtra on the main page. Autolycus and Salmoneus also became fan-favorites.

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* EnsembleDarkhorse: EnsembleDarkhorse:
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Iolaus for reasons stated in AscendedExtra on the main page. Autolycus and Salmoneus also became fan-favorites.



* HoYay: Herc and Iolaus aren't quite as explicit as Xena and Gabrielle (not that this is saying much), but have you ''read'' some of the FanFiction?
** Hell, have you read ''[[OlderThanTheyThink the original myth]]''?

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* HoYay: Herc and Iolaus aren't quite as explicit as Xena and Gabrielle (not that this is saying much), but have you ''read'' some of the FanFiction?
** Hell, have you read ''[[OlderThanTheyThink
FanFiction or [[OlderThanTheyThink the original myth]]''?



* TearJerker: In the season 3 episode ''The Lady and the Dragon'', the villain of the week (Adamis) uses a dragon named Braxis to do his bidding. However, as we later find out, [[spoiler: Braxis is only a child who's still mourning his mother's death. Even worse, Adamis lied to him and said Hercules had killer her when Adamis was actually responsible. Adamis even plans to kill Braxis because he's getting too big to control, even though Adamis has actually grown fond of him.]]




20th Jan '16 1:05:43 PM rafi
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* BizarroEpisode
** The 4th season episode "... And Fancy Free", in which Hercules enters a dance competition. Nothing rests on this competition other than his partner's self esteem, and a nice trophy. The town magistrate finds this competition important enough that he spends most of the episode sending assassins after Hercules and his partner to stop them from winning. No other motivation is given, he just wants his daughter to win. It guest stars Michael Hurst in drag as the dance instructor.
** "Stranger in a Strange World", which is referred to as a "Bizarro World episode" by the writer in the interviews feature on the DVD. This episode features an alternate universe with Hercules an evil tyrant marrying Aphrodite, the Xena cast in different roles, and a battle using a wedding cake. And Iolaus as a jester.
** There is a later episode featuring the same characters in struggle over fashion...which is about as pointless as "...And Fancy Free". Also no explanation is given as to why the town magistrate has apparently given up his duties to go into the world of ancient Greek fashion.
** The episode set in the present day which is all about Kevin Sorbo having gone missing, and features the memorable and hysterical restroom whistling scene.
** There was another one where the cast goes on a teamwork-building retreat hosted by Sunny Day (played by Renee O'Connor; normal role Gabrielle). It leads to a Scooby Doo ending where Sunny is revealed to be B.S. Hollinsfoffer (played by Robert Trebor, normal role Salmoneus), who is 1. a lot taller than Sunny, 2. at least a hundred pounds heavier, and 3. male, and concludes with Ares revealing himself to the cast. On top of that, most of them aren't even all that surprised to learn that Greek god of war is real; one of them even claims "I find the thought rather comforting myself."
23rd Aug '15 9:20:01 AM Talisguy
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** Xena, who got popular enough to her own spinoff series that actually surpassed this on in popularity.

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** Xena, who got popular enough to her own spinoff series that actually surpassed this on one in popularity.
20th Jan '15 9:51:15 AM FalconPain
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* MoralDissonance:
30th Dec '14 4:33:12 AM StFan
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** In "Two Men And A Baby," Discord places Iolaus and Nemesis in a trap to fall their deaths. It starts out as a SadisticChoice for Hercules, but he manages to pull off [[TakingAThirdOption a third option]] to save both his heroic sidekick and LoveInterest. Sounds like [[Film/SpiderMan another production]] that Creator/SamRaimi would be involved with.

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** In "Two Men And A Baby," Discord places Iolaus and Nemesis in a trap to fall their deaths. It starts out as a SadisticChoice for Hercules, but he manages to pull off [[TakingAThirdOption a third option]] to save both his heroic sidekick and LoveInterest. Sounds like [[Film/SpiderMan [[Film/SpiderMan1 another production]] that Creator/SamRaimi would be involved with.
24th Nov '14 2:17:09 PM MagBas
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** Herc goes to ridiculous lengths to SaveTheVillain, in many episodes. However, for people like Xena and Dirce, he lets them go, despite their manifold crimes, as long as they promise to stop, while for many people who have done much lesser crimes, he forces them to "face justice" even though they have accepted the error of their ways and want to atone. Basically it works like this: killed manifold people in cold blood, conquered entire countries, oppressed people's way of life and sold people into slavery = freedom; performed many robberies, became part of a gang with a bad reputation, killed a couple of people in cold blood = death by hanging (according to justice). And the times that Hercules thinks that the court is unfair, he will free people or stop the court from performing punishments (despite the fact that ''the point'' of justice by court is that a magistrate or group of people decide according to their interpretation of the law and the crime). So it boils down to: Hercules decides someone's fate (including delivering them to a court knowing they will be killed), and then allows the court to kill the people that deserve it rather than by his own hand, because he doesn't believe in killing. [[UnfortunateImplications Does anyone else see a problem here?]]

to:

** Herc goes to ridiculous lengths to SaveTheVillain, in many episodes. However, for people like Xena and Dirce, he lets them go, despite their manifold crimes, as long as they promise to stop, while for many people who have done much lesser crimes, he forces them to "face justice" even though they have accepted the error of their ways and want to atone. Basically it works like this: killed manifold people in cold blood, conquered entire countries, oppressed people's way of life and sold people into slavery = freedom; performed many robberies, became part of a gang with a bad reputation, killed a couple of people in cold blood = death by hanging (according to justice). And the times that Hercules thinks that the court is unfair, he will free people or stop the court from performing punishments (despite the fact that ''the point'' of justice by court is that a magistrate or group of people decide according to their interpretation of the law and the crime). So it boils down to: Hercules decides someone's fate (including delivering them to a court knowing they will be killed), and then allows the court to kill the people that deserve it rather than by his own hand, because he doesn't believe in killing. [[UnfortunateImplications Does anyone else see a problem here?]]
27th Sep '14 4:45:30 PM YaboyGabumon
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* MoralDissonance: may count as an OutOfCharacterMoment. When Hercules falls in love with Serena, everything seems well and good... until you find out that he can visit his dead wife and kids any time he likes and when he decides to marry Serena after knowing her for barely one episode, he goes to see his wife to explain that he's fallen in love with someone else, for all intents and purposes ''leaving'' her and the kids and having not a single qualm of conscience over the fact that he is breaking the heart of his dead wife who is stuck in the afterlife ''because'' of him (we know that people can move into Eternity or get reincarnated from certain aspects of their afterlives from both this series and ''Xena'' with the implication that something is required to keep people from moving along, and this does include people who have gone to the Elesian Fields, as we find out).[[note]]If it was even ''difficult'' to visit his family, this might be different but all he has to shout is "Hades" and he gets a free trip across without having to even travel ''through'' the Underworld, with his family not being surprised at all to see him with added evidence that he ''does'' see them often, and his wife being so utterly devastated by his confession that it brings to light the fact that their relationship has really been relegated to a long-distance one (Hades giving Herc a free pass to the Underworld due to his help with Persephone), and that Hercules has basically committed adultery.[[/note]] That Hercules milks the fact that his family died in future episodes for sympathy makes things seem rather hypocritical. So much for loving Deinaira "beyond measure."
** Visits to the Underworld by the living are frowned upon because they interfere with the deads' peace in the afterlife. Every time Hercules visits, he asks Hades to wipe his family's memory so that they won't be grieved when he inevitably leaves. His family cannot come back to life and they cannot remember him. Therefore, Hercules decided to stop stringing the dead along and move on with his own life.



* YourCheatingHeart: Hercules with Serena (when you find out that he regularly gets a free pas to the other side (courtesy of Hades) to visit Deinara and the kids, and that his relationship with them was, at the time he fell in love with Serena, more of a long-distance one that actually accepting that his family is dead and moving on. Hence, when he tells Deinara that he's fallen in love with someone else and that he's getting married - after knowing her for ''one'' measly episode - she is completely and utterly devastated and has no idea how she is going to break it to the kids that their father is essentially "leaving them." The entire thing really makes Hercules morality and behaviour look incredibly self-centered and hypocritical, never more so than that he ''still tells other people that his family is dead and he understands what they are going through when they have lost a loved one, milking it for sympathy.''
** He's able to visit, but not actually be part of the afterlife without dying, and his presence literally spoils his family's paradise, to the extent that Hades has to mind-wipe them to make them happy again after each visit. There's a reason he only visits the underworld infrequently, nephew of the boss or not. This also explains why he still finds his family's death a source of frustration and pain.

to:

* YourCheatingHeart: Hercules with Serena (when you find out that he regularly gets a free pas to the other side (courtesy of Hades) to visit Deinara and the kids, and that his relationship with them was, at the time he fell in love with Serena, more of a long-distance one that actually accepting that his family is dead and moving on. Hence, when he tells Deinara that he's fallen in love with someone else and that he's getting married - after knowing her for ''one'' measly episode - she is completely and utterly devastated and has no idea how she is going to break it to the kids that their father is essentially "leaving them." The entire thing really makes Hercules morality and behaviour look incredibly self-centered and hypocritical, never more so than that he ''still tells other people that his family is dead and he understands what they are going through when they have lost a loved one, milking it for sympathy.''
** He's able to visit, but not actually be part of the afterlife without dying, and his presence literally spoils his family's paradise, to the extent that Hades has to mind-wipe them to make them happy again after each visit. There's a reason he only visits the underworld infrequently, nephew of the boss or not. This also explains why he still finds his family's death a source of frustration and pain.

19th Sep '14 10:01:30 PM Macgyver644200
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* TearJerker: In the season 3 episode ''The Lady and the Dragon'', the villain of the week uses a dragon to do his bidding. However, as we later find out, [[spoiler: the dragon's only the equivalent of a child. He's an orphan who was raised to think his mother was murdered by Hercules. Even worse, the villain actually plans to kill the dragon because he's getting too big to control, even though the man's actually grown fond of him.]]

to:

* TearJerker: In the season 3 episode ''The Lady and the Dragon'', the villain of the week (Adamis) uses a dragon named Braxis to do his bidding. However, as we later find out, [[spoiler: the dragon's Braxis is only the equivalent of a child. He's an orphan who was raised to think child who's still mourning his mother was murdered by Hercules. mother's death. Even worse, the villain Adamis lied to him and said Hercules had killer her when Adamis was actually responsible. Adamis even plans to kill the dragon Braxis because he's getting too big to control, even though the man's Adamis has actually grown fond of him.]]
19th Sep '14 9:55:25 PM Macgyver644200
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* MoralDissonance: may count as an OutOfCharacterMoment. When Hercules falls in love with Serena, everything seems well and good... until you find out that he can visit his dead wife and kids any time he likes and when he decides to marry Serena after knowing her for barely one episode, he goes to see his wife to explain that he's fallen in love with someone else, for all intents and purposes ''leaving'' her and the kids and having not a single qualm of conscience over the fact that he is breaking the heart of his dead wife who is stuck in the afterlife ''because'' of him (we know that people can move into Eternity or get reincarnated from certain aspects of their afterlives from both this series and ''Xena'' with the implication that something is required to keep people from moving along, and this does include people who have gone to the Elesian Fields, as we find out).[[note]]If it was even ''difficult'' to visit his family, this might be different but all he has to shout is "Hades" and he gets a free trip across without having to even travel ''through'' the Underworld, with his family not being surprised at all to see him with added evidence that he ''does'' see them often, and his wife being so utterly devastated by his confession that it brings to light the fact that their relationship has really been relegated to a long-distance one (Hades giving Herc a free pass to the Underworld due to his help with Persephone), and that Hercules has basically committed adultery.[[/note]] That Hercules milks the fact that his family died in future episodes for sympathy makes things seem rather hypocritical. So much for loving Deinaira "beyond measure."

to:

* MoralDissonance: may count as an OutOfCharacterMoment. When Hercules falls in love with Serena, everything seems well and good... until you find out that he can visit his dead wife and kids any time he likes and when he decides to marry Serena after knowing her for barely one episode, he goes to see his wife to explain that he's fallen in love with someone else, for all intents and purposes ''leaving'' her and the kids and having not a single qualm of conscience over the fact that he is breaking the heart of his dead wife who is stuck in the afterlife ''because'' of him (we know that people can move into Eternity or get reincarnated from certain aspects of their afterlives from both this series and ''Xena'' with the implication that something is required to keep people from moving along, and this does include people who have gone to the Elesian Fields, as we find out).[[note]]If it was even ''difficult'' to visit his family, this might be different but all he has to shout is "Hades" and he gets a free trip across without having to even travel ''through'' the Underworld, with his family not being surprised at all to see him with added evidence that he ''does'' see them often, and his wife being so utterly devastated by his confession that it brings to light the fact that their relationship has really been relegated to a long-distance one (Hades giving Herc a free pass to the Underworld due to his help with Persephone), and that Hercules has basically committed adultery.[[/note]] That Hercules milks the fact that his family died in future episodes for sympathy makes things seem rather hypocritical. So much for loving Deinaira "beyond measure." "
** Visits to the Underworld by the living are frowned upon because they interfere with the deads' peace in the afterlife. Every time Hercules visits, he asks Hades to wipe his family's memory so that they won't be grieved when he inevitably leaves. His family cannot come back to life and they cannot remember him. Therefore, Hercules decided to stop stringing the dead along and move on with his own life.


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* TearJerker: In the season 3 episode ''The Lady and the Dragon'', the villain of the week uses a dragon to do his bidding. However, as we later find out, [[spoiler: the dragon's only the equivalent of a child. He's an orphan who was raised to think his mother was murdered by Hercules. Even worse, the villain actually plans to kill the dragon because he's getting too big to control, even though the man's actually grown fond of him.]]
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