History YMMV / FightClub

2nd Mar '17 6:18:14 PM WarriorsGate
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* RetroactiveRecognition: Watching the credits to the video game reveals ''WesternAnimation/GravityFalls'' composer Brad Breeck was the soundtrack's co-producer.
15th Feb '17 4:24:26 PM GaryKing95
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* HolyShitQuotient: The moment you learn that [[spoiler:Jack is actually a separate personality of the narrator's]], you will be prone to yelp, "Oh my god! He's a madman!"

to:

* HolyShitQuotient: The moment you learn that [[spoiler:Jack [[spoiler:Tyler is actually a separate personality of the narrator's]], you will be prone to yelp, "Oh my god! He's a madman!"
10th Feb '17 6:30:29 AM Pren
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** Palahniuk has stated Tyler mocking someone as a "snowflake" in the book is likely the reason the word was adopted by the alt-right as an insult to liberals.
6th Feb '17 11:18:44 AM JamesAustin
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* CultClassic:
** During its original outing in the theatres, the film fell sort of the executives' expectations and received polarized reviews from the critics. Its real breakthrough came with its DVD release, where it gathered a devoted cult following, to the point that people started real life Fight Clubs.

to:

* CultClassic:
**
CultClassic: During its original outing in the theatres, the film fell sort of the executives' expectations and received polarized reviews from the critics. Its real breakthrough came with its DVD release, where it gathered a devoted cult following, to the point that people started real life Fight Clubs.
6th Feb '17 11:15:13 AM JamesAustin
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: More like alternate ''movie'' interpretation. Many critics (specifically [[NeedsMoreGay Rantasmo]]) have made the comparison of the Narrator's life to that of a closeted homosexual who desperately wants to be straight (Chuck Palahniuk himself is Gay). The Narrator feels a certain "emptiness" in his life which he fills by shamelessly pretending to be someone he isn't. However, his catharsis is lost once Marla forces him to acknowledge that he's living a lie, and his anger is the catalyst to the introduction/creation of Tyler Durden, who is everything the narrator wishes he could be: attractive, confident and very obviously straight. All of the sex scenes with Marla are with the Tyler persona, while the Narrator finds her repulsive. The ensuing chaos is symbolic of someone so in denial about who they are that it becomes hurtful to themselves and everyone around them, and Tyler's [[spoiler: "death"]] is the Narrator coming to terms with who he is. Notice how he and Marla [[spoiler: hold hands instead of kissing]] at the end.

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
**
More like alternate ''movie'' interpretation. Many critics (specifically [[NeedsMoreGay Rantasmo]]) have made the comparison of the Narrator's life to that of a closeted homosexual who desperately wants to be straight (Chuck Palahniuk himself is Gay). The Narrator feels a certain "emptiness" in his life which he fills by shamelessly pretending to be someone he isn't. However, his catharsis is lost once Marla forces him to acknowledge that he's living a lie, and his anger is the catalyst to the introduction/creation of Tyler Durden, who is everything the narrator wishes he could be: attractive, confident and very obviously straight. All of the sex scenes with Marla are with the Tyler persona, while the Narrator finds her repulsive. The ensuing chaos is symbolic of someone so in denial about who they are that it becomes hurtful to themselves and everyone around them, and Tyler's [[spoiler: "death"]] is the Narrator coming to terms with who he is. Notice how he and Marla [[spoiler: hold hands instead of kissing]] at the end.



** Alternatively [[spoiler: The personalities finally merged, thus the person at the end is the best assets of both the narrator and Tyler Durden.]]

to:

** Alternatively Alternatively, [[spoiler: The the personalities finally merged, thus the person at the end is the best assets of both the narrator and Tyler Durden.]]



* SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic:
** "Finding the Bomb" is rather epic, almost dancey, very dark, amazing introduction to the movie and it's concepts.
** Music/ThePixies' "Where Is My Mind?" playing over the end credits.



* CrowningMusicOfAwesome:
** "Finding The Bomb" is rather epic, almost dancey, very dark, amazing introduction to the movie and it's concepts.
** Music/ThePixies' "Where Is My Mind?" playing over the end credits.



* CultClassic: During its original outing in the theatres, the film fell sort of the executives' expectations and received polarized reviews from the critics. Its real breakthrough came with its DVD release, where it gathered a devoted cult following, to the point that people started real life Fight Clubs.

to:

* CultClassic: CultClassic:
**
During its original outing in the theatres, the film fell sort of the executives' expectations and received polarized reviews from the critics. Its real breakthrough came with its DVD release, where it gathered a devoted cult following, to the point that people started real life Fight Clubs.



** Alternatively, the story is supposed to mock both ways. It's meant to scorn the normal corporate suburban life and how people need to learn to let go a little more, but also show the dangers of living completely like someone like Tyler. Both the book and the movie show that you can and need to find a balance, and not become a person solely focused on their appearance, money, and job, but not become a self-destructive nihilistic nut like Tyler.\\
Project Mayhem was an exaggerated version of the very real [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cacophony_Society Cacophony Society]], which the author was a member of. The Cacophony Society was formed out of a group known as the Suicide Club ([[ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything though they did not actually commit suicide]]) and is more or less the {{evil twin}} of Creator/ImprovEverywhere, where they play pranks to make people unhappy rather than happy.

to:

** Alternatively, the story is supposed to mock both ways. It's meant to scorn the normal corporate suburban life and how people need to learn to let go a little more, but also show the dangers of living completely like someone like Tyler. Both the book and the movie show that you can and need to find a balance, and not become a person solely focused on their appearance, money, and job, but not become a self-destructive nihilistic nut like Tyler.\\
Project Mayhem was an exaggerated version of the very real [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cacophony_Society Cacophony Society]], which the author was a member of. The Cacophony Society was formed out of a group known as the Suicide Club ([[ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything though they did not actually commit suicide]]) and is more or less the {{evil twin}} of Creator/ImprovEverywhere, where they play pranks to make people unhappy rather than happy.



** Not to mention the whole concept of terrorists blowing up skyscrapers in major US cities.
*** Especially the destruction of a public sculpture which strongly resembles a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sphere real-life sculpture]] that was damaged in the 9/11 attacks.

to:

** Not to mention the whole concept of terrorists blowing up skyscrapers in major US cities.
***
cities. Especially the destruction of a public sculpture which strongly resembles a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sphere real-life sculpture]] that was damaged in the 9/11 attacks.



** The line [[{{Disney/Bolt}} "When the snooty cat and the courageous dog with celebrity voices meet for the first time in reel three"]].
** Marla's line "the condom is the glass slipper of this generation," with Helena Bonham-Carter's role in ''[[Film/{{Cinderella2015}} Cinderella]]''.

to:

** The line [[{{Disney/Bolt}} [[Disney/{{Bolt}} "When the snooty cat and the courageous dog with celebrity voices meet for the first time in reel three"]].
** Marla's line "the condom is the glass slipper of this generation," with Helena Bonham-Carter's role in ''[[Film/{{Cinderella2015}} Cinderella]]''.''Film/{{Cinderella|2015}}''.



* MemeticMutation: "The first rule of Fight Club is, you do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is, you ''do not'' talk about Fight Club." Much referenced and parodied, it's practically on the way to being a StockShoutOut.
** His name is Robert Paulsen.

to:

* MemeticMutation: MemeticMutation:
**
"The first rule of Fight Club is, you do not talk about Fight Club. The second rule of Fight Club is, you ''do not'' talk about Fight Club." Much referenced and parodied, it's practically on the way to being a StockShoutOut.
** His "His name is Robert Paulsen.Paulsen. He has bitch tits."



** Yes, Tyler is cool. He's the walking personification of the Narrator's id. [[RefugeInAudacity No one should actually attempt to live that way]]. Tyler is one in a long string of Chuck Palahniuk characters who are deeply disturbed sociopaths.
*** Going off of this, it's worth mentioning that Tyler is often interpreted as a personification of taking masculinity too far (being the manifestation of a relatively average dude's ideal self; "I look like you want to look, fuck like you want to fuck," etc.) intended to demonstrate how dangerous the kind of man that our culture idolizes actually is. Despite this, Fight Club is often pointed to as the ultimate Dude Film and has even been described as a celebration of masculinity, sometimes by the exact kind of person it was originally meant to skewer.
** It's also worth noting that Tyler ''does'' initially start out kinda reasonable, if very rebellious. His increasing fanaticism is presumably indicative of the Narrator's own decaying mental state.

to:

** Yes, Tyler is cool. He's the walking personification of the Narrator's id. [[RefugeInAudacity No one should actually attempt to live that way]]. Tyler is one in a long string of Chuck Palahniuk characters who are deeply disturbed sociopaths.
***
sociopaths. Going off of this, it's It's also worth mentioning noting that Tyler is often interpreted as a personification of taking masculinity too far (being the manifestation of a relatively average dude's ideal self; "I look like you want to look, fuck like you want to fuck," etc.) intended to demonstrate how dangerous the kind of man that our culture idolizes actually is. Despite this, Fight Club is often pointed to as the ultimate Dude Film and has even been described as a celebration of masculinity, sometimes by the exact kind of person it was originally meant to skewer. \n** It's also worth noting that Tyler ''does'' initially start out kinda reasonable, if very rebellious. His increasing fanaticism is presumably indicative of the Narrator's own decaying mental state.



* ParanoiaFuel: So there's this enormous anarchist group hiding right under our noses whose members like nothing more than committing acts of violence and putting certain, er, bodily fluids in our food at restaurants...

to:

* ParanoiaFuel: ParanoiaFuel:
**
So there's this enormous anarchist group hiding right under our noses whose members like nothing more than committing acts of violence and putting certain, er, bodily fluids in our food at restaurants...



* TheWoobie: Marla, who has contend with her relationship with Tyler, and the narrator by proxy.

to:

* TheWoobie: TheWoobie:
**
Marla, who has contend with her relationship with Tyler, and the narrator by proxy.
14th Dec '16 2:27:35 PM ZombieAladdin
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Added DiffLines:

** Project Mayhem is supposed to be viewed as destructive and very harmful to society as a whole, if not outright evil, with Tyler being the antagonist by the third act. Some people who have a strong anti-establishment bent instead sympathize with Tyler and his Project Mayhem, cheering him on when [[spoiler:he and his followers blow up a number of office buildings]] and interpreting the BittersweetEnding as a full-on happy ending.
17th Nov '16 5:08:15 PM whiteladydragon000
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* RealitySubtext: Palahniuk was wrestling with his sexuality at the time of writing the novel, and came out as gay shortly after its publication.
17th Nov '16 12:09:49 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: More like alternate ''movie'' interpretation. Many critics (specifically [[NeedsMoreGay Rantasmo]]) have made the comparison of the Narrator's life to that of a closeted homosexual who desperately wants to be straight (Chuck Palahniuk himself is Gay). The Narrator feels a certain "emptiness" in his life which he fills by shamelessly pretending to be someone he isn't. However, his catharsis is lost once Marla forces him to acknowledge that he's living a lie, and his anger is the catalyst to the introduction/creation of Tyler Durden, who is everything the narrator wishes he could be: attractive, confident and very obviously straight. All of the sex scenes with Marla are with the Tyler persona, while the Narrator finds her repulsive. The ensuing chaos is symbolic of someone so in denial about who they are that it becomes hurtful to themselves and everyone around them, and Tyler's [[spoiler: "death"]] is the Narrator coming to terms with who he is. Notice how he and Marla [[spoiler: hold hands instead of kissing]] at the end.

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: More like alternate ''movie'' interpretation. Many critics (specifically [[NeedsMoreGay Rantasmo]]) have made the comparison of the Narrator's life to that of a closeted homosexual who desperately wants to be straight (Chuck Palahniuk himself is Gay). The Narrator feels a certain "emptiness" in his life which he fills by shamelessly pretending to be someone he isn't. However, his catharsis is lost once Marla forces him to acknowledge that he's living a lie, and his anger is the catalyst to the introduction/creation of Tyler Durden, who is everything the narrator wishes he could be: attractive, confident and very obviously straight. All of the sex scenes with Marla are with the Tyler persona, while the Narrator finds her repulsive. The ensuing chaos is symbolic of someone so in denial about who they are that it becomes hurtful to themselves and everyone around them, and Tyler's [[spoiler: "death"]] is the Narrator coming to terms with who he is. Notice how he and Marla [[spoiler: hold hands instead of kissing]] at the end.
8th Oct '16 9:34:10 AM arrgh
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*** Going off of this, it's worth mentioning that Tyler is often interpreted as a personification of toxic masculinity (being the manifestation of a relatively average dude's ideal self; "I look like you want to look, fuck like you want to fuck," etc.) intended to demonstrate how dangerous the kind of man that our culture idolizes actually is. Despite this, Fight Club is often pointed to as the ultimate Dude Film and has even been described as a celebration of masculinity, sometimes by the exact kind of person it was originally meant to skewer.

to:

*** Going off of this, it's worth mentioning that Tyler is often interpreted as a personification of toxic taking masculinity too far (being the manifestation of a relatively average dude's ideal self; "I look like you want to look, fuck like you want to fuck," etc.) intended to demonstrate how dangerous the kind of man that our culture idolizes actually is. Despite this, Fight Club is often pointed to as the ultimate Dude Film and has even been described as a celebration of masculinity, sometimes by the exact kind of person it was originally meant to skewer.
14th Sep '16 12:41:42 AM KingClark
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* SpritualSuccessor: To Film/Freeway.



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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.FightClub