History YMMV / DonQuixote

23rd Dec '15 12:49:34 PM maxwellsilver
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* FridgeBrilliance: In the first part, Don Quixote uses AntiquatedLinguistics/[[{{YeOldeButcheredEnglish}} El Viejo Español Masacrado]], but in the Second Part, he almost doesn't use it. This is because in the first Part he is a DiscoDan in a world when ChivalricRomance is DeaderThanDisco, so he uses this trope to [[{{IRejectYourReality}} reject everyone’s reality and substitute his own]]. In the Second Part, [[MemeticMutation everyone has read the first Part]], knew about ChivalricRomance and stage {{MassiveMultiplayerScam}}s to convince Don Quixote he really is an KnightErrant… so this trope is unnecessary for him.

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* FridgeBrilliance: In the first part, Don Quixote uses AntiquatedLinguistics/[[{{YeOldeButcheredEnglish}} El Viejo Español Masacrado]], but in the Second Part, he almost doesn't use it. This is because in the first Part he is a DiscoDan in a world when ChivalricRomance is DeaderThanDisco, so he uses this trope to [[{{IRejectYourReality}} reject everyone’s reality and substitute his own]]. In the Second Part, [[MemeticMutation everyone has read the first Part]], Part, knew about ChivalricRomance and stage {{MassiveMultiplayerScam}}s {{Massive Multiplayer Scam}}s to convince Don Quixote he really is an KnightErrant… so this trope is unnecessary for him.



-->''"He used to say the [[{{FolkHero}} Cid Ruy Diaz was a very good knight]], but that he was not to be compared with the [[{{EscapistCharacter}} Knight of the Burning Sword]] [[{{RuleOfCool}} who with one back-stroke cut in half two fierce and monstrous giants]]. "''
** At Part I, Chapter XLVIII, [[EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep the]] [[MeaningfulName canon]] adduces that this trope is the reason he has [[{{Fanfic}} wrote a hundred pages of a chivalry book]], [[DeadFic but he will not finish it]].
-->''"… because I perceived that the [[{{LowestCommonDenominator}} fools are more numerous than the wise; and, though it is better to be praised by the wise few than applauded by the foolish many, I have no mind to submit myself to the stupid judgment of the silly public, to whom the reading of such books falls for the most part]]."''
* MagnificentBastard: Gines de Pasamonte is an ungrateful galley slave whom Don Quixote frees. Gines is [[{{LargeHam}} a vain, shameless, cynical]] [[{{ArsonMurderAndJaywalking}} bandit, thief, swindler and picaresque writer]]. Then, in the second part, we discover that Gines is a [[spoiler: MasterOfDisguise]].

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-->''"He used to say the [[{{FolkHero}} Cid Ruy Diaz was a very good knight]], knight, but that he was not to be compared with the [[{{EscapistCharacter}} Knight of the Burning Sword]] [[{{RuleOfCool}} Sword who with one back-stroke cut in half two fierce and monstrous giants]].giants. "''
** At Part I, Chapter XLVIII, [[EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep the]] [[MeaningfulName canon]] the canon adduces that this trope is the reason he has [[{{Fanfic}} wrote a hundred pages of a chivalry book]], [[DeadFic but he will not finish it]].
it.
-->''"… because I perceived that the [[{{LowestCommonDenominator}} fools are more numerous than the wise; and, though it is better to be praised by the wise few than applauded by the foolish many, I have no mind to submit myself to the stupid judgment of the silly public, to whom the reading of such books falls for the most part]].part."''
* MagnificentBastard: Gines de Pasamonte is an ungrateful galley slave whom Don Quixote frees. Gines is [[{{LargeHam}} a vain, shameless, cynical]] [[{{ArsonMurderAndJaywalking}} cynical bandit, thief, swindler [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and picaresque writer]]. Then, in the second part, we discover that Gines is a [[spoiler: MasterOfDisguise]].



** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Could be translated as [[{{BadassBoast}} "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?"]]

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** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Could be translated as [[{{BadassBoast}} "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?"]] lions?"



** Lampshaded InUniverse: Alonso Quixano, some time before he had definitely gone nuts and decided [[{{AscendedFanboy}} to be Don Quixote]], but after he devolved from a [[{{Fanboy}} guy interested in chivalry books]] to a [[{{Fandumb}} guy obsessed by them]], displayed this UnexpectedReactionsToThisIndex:
*** Part I, chapter I: Who is Alonso Quixano’s favorite knight? Well, Reinaldos of Montalban. And why? ''[[ComicallyMissingThePoint "because he robbed everyone he meet!"]]''

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** Lampshaded InUniverse: Alonso Quixano, some time before he had definitely gone nuts and decided [[{{AscendedFanboy}} to be Don Quixote]], Quixote, but after he devolved from a [[{{Fanboy}} guy interested in chivalry books]] books to a [[{{Fandumb}} guy obsessed by them]], them, displayed this UnexpectedReactionsToThisIndex:
*** Part I, chapter I: Who is Alonso Quixano’s favorite knight? Well, Reinaldos of Montalban. And why? ''[[ComicallyMissingThePoint "because ''"because he robbed everyone he meet!"]]''meet!"''



* MisBlamed: Even many fans of TheyMightBeGiants assume that the band took their name directly from this novel. It actually comes from the 1971 movie ''They Might Be Giants'', whose main character (who [[NapoleonDelusion believes himself to be Sherlock Holmes]], and has been compared to Don Quixote by another character) muses on the value of being open to the ''possibility'' of windmills being giants. Don Quixote himself had no such doubts; he was positively certain that he was charging against giants.
* NeverLiveItDown: Sancho Panza’s reputation as a BigEater. In the first part of the novel, Sancho Panza has several scenes enjoying food and drink to show his easygoing nature. When Avellaneda [[{{Fanfiction}} published his own second part of the novel]], he accused Sancho of being a BigEater. In Cervantes' second part of the novel, Don Quixote’s niece accuses Sancho of this ([[MaliciousSlander she hates him]]) and later, [[OhCrapThereAreFanficsOfUs when they know about Avellaneda’s second part]], Sancho defends himself against this accusation at chapter LXII of the Second Part:
--> "No, senor, that's not true," said Sancho, "for I am more cleanly than greedy, and my master Don Quixote here knows well that we two are used to live for a week on a handful of acorns or nuts. To be sure, if it so happens that they offer me a heifer, I run with a halter; I mean, I eat what I'm given, and make use of opportunities as I find them; [[TakeThat but whoever says that I'm an out-of-the-way eater or not cleanly, let me tell him that he is wrong]]; and I'd put it in a different way if I did not respect the honourable beards that are at the table."
* RomanticPlotTumor: The last chapters of the First Part solve the LoveDodecahedron between Dorotea, Don Fernando, Lucinda, Cardenio, Clara and Don Luis, leaving Don Quixote as a mere spectator in his own book. In the Second Part Cervantes makes a AuthorsSavingThrow when Don Quixote opines:
--> ''"... and I know not what could have led [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis the author to have recourse to]] [[ShowWithinAShow novels]] and [[RomanticPlotTumor irrelevant stories]], [[ItsAllAboutMe when he had so much to write about in mine; no doubt he must have gone by the proverb 'with straw or with hay,' for by merely setting forth my thoughts, my sighs, my tears, my lofty purposes, my enterprises]], [[DoorStopper he might have made a volume as large, or larger than all the works of El Tostado would make up"'']].

to:

* MisBlamed: Even many fans of TheyMightBeGiants assume that the band took their name directly from this novel. It actually comes from the 1971 movie ''They Might Be Giants'', whose main character (who [[NapoleonDelusion believes himself to be Sherlock Holmes]], Holmes, and has been compared to Don Quixote by another character) muses on the value of being open to the ''possibility'' of windmills being giants. Don Quixote himself had no such doubts; he was positively certain that he was charging against giants.
* NeverLiveItDown: Sancho Panza’s reputation as a BigEater. In the first part of the novel, Sancho Panza has several scenes enjoying food and drink to show his easygoing nature. When Avellaneda [[{{Fanfiction}} published his own second part of the novel]], novel, he accused Sancho of being a BigEater. In Cervantes' second part of the novel, Don Quixote’s niece accuses Sancho of this ([[MaliciousSlander she (she hates him]]) him) and later, [[OhCrapThereAreFanficsOfUs when they know about Avellaneda’s second part]], part, Sancho defends himself against this accusation at chapter LXII of the Second Part:
--> "No, senor, that's not true," said Sancho, "for I am more cleanly than greedy, and my master Don Quixote here knows well that we two are used to live for a week on a handful of acorns or nuts. To be sure, if it so happens that they offer me a heifer, I run with a halter; I mean, I eat what I'm given, and make use of opportunities as I find them; [[TakeThat but whoever says that I'm an out-of-the-way eater or not cleanly, let me tell him that he is wrong]]; wrong; and I'd put it in a different way if I did not respect the honourable beards that are at the table."
* RomanticPlotTumor: The last chapters of the First Part solve the LoveDodecahedron between Dorotea, Don Fernando, Lucinda, Cardenio, Clara and Don Luis, leaving Don Quixote as a mere spectator in his own book. In the Second Part Cervantes makes a an AuthorsSavingThrow when Don Quixote opines:
--> ''"... and I know not what could have led [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis the author to have recourse to]] [[ShowWithinAShow novels]] to novels and [[RomanticPlotTumor irrelevant stories]], [[ItsAllAboutMe stories, when he had so much to write about in mine; no doubt he must have gone by the proverb 'with straw or with hay,' for by merely setting forth my thoughts, my sighs, my tears, my lofty purposes, my enterprises]], [[DoorStopper enterprises, he might have made a volume as large, or larger than all the works of El Tostado would make up"'']].up"''.



* ValuesResonance: ''Literature/DonQuixote''’s {{Satire}} will live as long as the justice system is made of human judges capable of corruption that let criminals go for a price. Or as [[SleazyPolitician the people]] who direct TheGovernment only care about ruling the people without making any effort to enhance the live of his subjects. Or while the MoralGuardians are useless. Or while there are people who fanatically defend any kind of entertainment work no matter its faults. Those examples are only a few of the issues the book attacks.

to:

* ValuesResonance: ''Literature/DonQuixote''’s {{Satire}} will live as long as the justice system is made of human judges capable of corruption that let criminals go for a price. Or as [[SleazyPolitician the people]] people who direct TheGovernment only care about ruling the people without making any effort to enhance the live of his subjects. Or while the MoralGuardians are useless. Or while there are people who fanatically defend any kind of entertainment work no matter its faults. Those examples are only a few of the issues the book attacks.



** Another case of WeirdAlEffect in Don Quixote is that both books were a satire and as such, contained a lot of references not only to now disappeared chivalry books, (the second part contains entire parodies to "Tirant lo blanch", one of the better chivalry books and a Cervantes' favorite) but to Spain's popular culture at the XVII century: (respectful) [[{{NoCelebritiesWereHarmed}} caricatures of then famous celebrities]], unrespectful [[{{TakeThat}} caricatures of contemporary writers]], [[{{ShoutOut}} quotes from Cervantes’ favorite poets]], [[{{HurricaneOfAphorisms}} popular proverbs]], then contemporary UrbanLegends, [[{{DoubleEntendre}} phrases that can be taken in at least two different ways]], [[TheAnnotatedEdition all of them completely unknown for the modern reader if not by the notes provided in the reprints]]. [[{{DontExplainTheJoke}} Cervantes' book was incredibly funny when he published it, but it's very difficult to see it like this now]].

to:

** Another case of WeirdAlEffect in Don Quixote is that both books were a satire and as such, contained a lot of references not only to now disappeared chivalry books, (the second part contains entire parodies to "Tirant lo blanch", one of the better chivalry books and a Cervantes' favorite) but to Spain's popular culture at the XVII century: (respectful) [[{{NoCelebritiesWereHarmed}} caricatures of then famous celebrities]], celebrities, unrespectful [[{{TakeThat}} caricatures of contemporary writers]], [[{{ShoutOut}} writers, quotes from Cervantes’ Cervantes' favorite poets]], [[{{HurricaneOfAphorisms}} poets, popular proverbs]], proverbs, then contemporary UrbanLegends, [[{{DoubleEntendre}} phrases that can be taken in at least two different ways]], [[TheAnnotatedEdition ways, all of them completely unknown for the modern reader if not by the notes provided in the reprints]]. [[{{DontExplainTheJoke}} reprints. Cervantes' book was incredibly funny when he published it, but it's very difficult to see it like this now]].now.
17th Sep '15 2:00:54 AM LahmacunKebab
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--> ''"...and I know not what could have led [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis the author to have recourse to]] [[ShowWithinAShow novels]] and [[RomanticPlotTumor irrelevant stories]], [[ItsAllAboutMe when he had so much to write about in mine; no doubt he must have gone by the proverb 'with straw or with hay, &c.,' for by merely setting forth my thoughts, my sighs, my tears, my lofty purposes, my enterprises]], [[DoorStopper he might have made a volume as large, or larger than all the works of El Tostado would make up"'']].

to:

--> ''"... and I know not what could have led [[LiteraryAgentHypothesis the author to have recourse to]] [[ShowWithinAShow novels]] and [[RomanticPlotTumor irrelevant stories]], [[ItsAllAboutMe when he had so much to write about in mine; no doubt he must have gone by the proverb 'with straw or with hay, &c.,' hay,' for by merely setting forth my thoughts, my sighs, my tears, my lofty purposes, my enterprises]], [[DoorStopper he might have made a volume as large, or larger than all the works of El Tostado would make up"'']].
17th Sep '15 1:54:49 AM LahmacunKebab
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*** Indeed several critics in the 20th Century notably writer Harold Bloom has argued that Quixote is in fact sane and rational and is putting on an act at being crazy to show the absurdity of society. This is borne more in the melancholy Part 2, where Quixote discovers that he has become a cliche in his own lifetime and a LivingLegend much like the great heroes of the past he hoped to emulate.

to:

*** Indeed several critics in the 20th Century Century, notably writer Harold Bloom has Bloom, have argued that Quixote is in fact sane and rational and is putting on an act at being crazy to show the absurdity of society. This is borne more in the melancholy Part 2, where Quixote discovers that he has become a cliche in his own lifetime and a LivingLegend much like the great heroes of the past he hoped to emulate.
29th Aug '14 5:07:45 PM erttheking
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* IconicCharacterForgottenTitle

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* IconicCharacterForgottenTitleIconicCharacterForgottenTitle: [[{{Irony}} And they're the exact same.]]
18th Jul '14 2:14:13 AM RatherRandomRachel
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* ValuesResonance: ''Literature/DonQuixote''’s {{Satire}} will live as long as the [[InherentInTheSystem justice system will be]] [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney made of]] [[HumansAreFlawed human judges]] [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney capable of corruption]] [[BuyThemOff that let criminals go for a price]]. Or as [[SleazyPolitician the people who direct]] TheGovernment only care about ruling the people without making any effort to enhance the live of his subjects. Or while the MoralGuardians are useless. Or while [[FanDumb there are people who fanatically defend any kind of entertainment work no matter its faults]]. Those examples are only a few of the issues the book attacks.

to:

* ValuesResonance: ''Literature/DonQuixote''’s {{Satire}} will live as long as the [[InherentInTheSystem justice system will be]] [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney is made of]] [[HumansAreFlawed of human judges]] [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney judges capable of corruption]] [[BuyThemOff corruption that let criminals go for a price]]. price. Or as [[SleazyPolitician the people people]] who direct]] direct TheGovernment only care about ruling the people without making any effort to enhance the live of his subjects. Or while the MoralGuardians are useless. Or while [[FanDumb there are people who fanatically defend any kind of entertainment work no matter its faults]].faults. Those examples are only a few of the issues the book attacks.
8th Jul '14 10:14:17 AM edara
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Added DiffLines:

* IconicCharacterForgottenTitle
9th Jan '14 9:56:03 PM ArthurS
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*** Indeed several critics in the 20th Century notably writer Harold Bloom has argued that Quixote is in fact sane and rational and is putting on an act at being crazy to show the absurdity of society. This is borne more in the melancholy Part 2, where Quixote discovers that he has become a cliche in his own lifetime and a LivingLegend much like the great heroes of the past he hoped to emulate.



* EvenBetterSequel / FirstInstallmentWins: Part II is considered deeper and more mature than Part I, but the most well-known and influential episodes (like the windmills) come from the first part.

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* EvenBetterSequel / FirstInstallmentWins: Part II is considered deeper and more mature than Part I, but the most well-known and influential episodes (like the windmills) come from the first part. Indeed its Don Quixote's first sally with Sancho Panza.


Added DiffLines:

** TakeAThirdOption: Some people argue that Don Quixote himself is more complex than either division, and that he's essentially a tragic figure who willingly chooses to go insane rather than live his banal life and that by willingly embodying outdated and chivalric ideas which probably never existed in a world of consequence, he's paradoxically more heroic than Amadis of Gaul or Lancelot or as heroic as the legends he hopes to emulate. This makes him a modern day existentialist hero.
12th Sep '13 12:57:08 PM Yuoaman
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* FridgeBrilliance: In the first part, Don Quixote uses AntiquatedLinguistics/[[{{YeOldeButcheredEnglish}} El Viejo Español Masacrado]], but in the Second Part, he almost doesn't use it. This is because in the first Part he is a DiscoDan in a world when ChivalricRomance is DeaderThanDisco, so he uses this trope to [[{{IRejectYourReality}} reject everyone’s reality and substitute her own]]. In the Second Part, [[MemeticMutation everyone has read the first Part]], knew about ChivalricRomance and stage {{MassiveMultiplayerScam}}s to convince Don Quixote he really is an KnightErrant… so this trope is unnecessary for him.

to:

* FridgeBrilliance: In the first part, Don Quixote uses AntiquatedLinguistics/[[{{YeOldeButcheredEnglish}} El Viejo Español Masacrado]], but in the Second Part, he almost doesn't use it. This is because in the first Part he is a DiscoDan in a world when ChivalricRomance is DeaderThanDisco, so he uses this trope to [[{{IRejectYourReality}} reject everyone’s reality and substitute her his own]]. In the Second Part, [[MemeticMutation everyone has read the first Part]], knew about ChivalricRomance and stage {{MassiveMultiplayerScam}}s to convince Don Quixote he really is an KnightErrant… so this trope is unnecessary for him.
12th Sep '13 12:56:40 PM Yuoaman
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17th Aug '13 11:25:00 AM Sukeban
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** [[strike:Don Quixote]] Alonso Quijano: What other way can you describe a man that belittles Cid Ruy Diaz, (a real badass warrior) and prefers a silly character of fiction? Part I Chapter I:

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** [[strike:Don Quixote]] Alonso Quijano: What other way can you describe a man that belittles [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Cid Cid Ruy Diaz, Diaz]], (a real badass warrior) and prefers a silly character of fiction? Part I Chapter I:
This list shows the last 10 events of 49. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.DonQuixote