History YMMV / DonQuixote

4th Jun '18 10:32:08 AM Cieloazul
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** In Part II, Chapter XI, Don Quixote claims: ''"from a child I was fond of the play, and in my youth a keen lover of the actor's art"''. Several critics have toyed with the idea that Don Quixote never lost that passion for theater and behaves like an actor: [[ObfuscatingInsanity he does not believe to be a knight, but pretends to be one]], as if he were on stage. Indeed, several critics in the 20th Century, notably writer Harold Bloom, have argued that Quixote is in fact sane and rational and is putting on an act at being crazy to show the absurdity of society. This is borne more in Part 2, where Quixote discovers that he has become a cliche in his own lifetime and a LivingLegend much like the great heroes of the past he hoped to emulate.
** The third most popular interpretation of Don Quixote is that he isn't actually insane, but acting deliberately as an insane person in order to [[IRejectYourReality live a fulfilling fantasy instead of his boring real environment]]. This was lampshaded in the 2002 Spanish film adaptation ''El Caballero Don Quijote'', where after Quijano's death, a crying Sancho states that even if he knows his master was crazy, if Don Quixote got up and asked him to accompany him in more of his crazy hijinks, he would do without a shadow of doubt.

to:

** In Part II, Chapter XI, Don Quixote claims: ''"from a child I was fond of the play, and in my youth a keen lover of the actor's art"''. Several critics have toyed with the idea that Don Quixote never lost that passion for theater and behaves like an actor: [[ObfuscatingInsanity he does not believe to be a knight, but pretends to be one]], as if he were on stage. Indeed, several critics in the 20th Century, notably writer Harold Bloom, have argued that Quixote is in fact sane and rational and is putting on an act at of being crazy to show the absurdity of society. This is borne more in Part 2, where Quixote discovers that he has become a cliche in his own lifetime and a LivingLegend much like the great heroes of the past he hoped to emulate.
** The third most popular interpretation of Don Quixote is that he isn't actually insane, but acting deliberately as an insane person in order to [[IRejectYourReality live a fulfilling fantasy instead of his boring real environment]]. This was lampshaded in the 2002 Spanish film adaptation ''El Caballero Don Quijote'', where after Quijano's death, a crying mournful Sancho states that even if he knows despite knowing his master was crazy, if Don Quixote got up and asked him to accompany him come along in more of his crazy hijinks, he would do without a shadow of doubt.



* MagnificentBastard: Gines de Pasamonte is an ungrateful galley slave whom Don Quixote frees. Gines is a vain, shameless, cynical bandit, thief, swindler [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and picaresque writer]]. Then, in the second part, we discover that Gines is a [[spoiler: MasterOfDisguise]].

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* MagnificentBastard: Gines Ginés de Pasamonte is an ungrateful galley slave whom Don Quixote frees. Gines Ginés is a vain, shameless, cynical bandit, thief, swindler [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking and picaresque writer]]. Then, in the second part, we discover that Gines he is a [[spoiler: MasterOfDisguise]].MasterOfDisguise]] as well.



** Many people have misunderstood the point of the parody. Romantic writers lionized ''Don Quixote'' as a praise of hopeless noble ideals in an increasingly cynical and materialistic world. Then, followers of literary Naturalism praised the novel... for {{deconstruct|ion}}ing groundless Romantic enthusiasm.

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** Many people have misunderstood the point of the parody. Romantic writers lionized ''Don Quixote'' as a praise of hopeless noble ideals in an increasingly cynical and materialistic world. Then, followers of literary Naturalism praised the novel... precisely for {{deconstruct|ion}}ing [[{{deconstruction}} showing the inherent hilarity of groundless Romantic enthusiasm. enthusiasm.]]
4th Jun '18 10:19:28 AM Cieloazul
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** Who's crazier, the madman or the sane man that follows him? It's lampshaded several times in the first part, that Sancho Panza is a sane man with a very limited intelligence. In the second part, through fifty chapters, [[CharacterDevelopment we'll see him display his common sense]].
** In Part II, Chapter XI, Don Quixote claims: ''"from a child I was fond of the play, and in my youth a keen lover of the actor's art"''. Several critics have toyed with the idea that Don Quixote never lost that passion for theater and behaves like an actor: [[ObfuscatingInsanity he does not believe to be a knight, but pretends to be one]], as if he were on stage. Indeed, several critics in the 20th Century, notably writer Harold Bloom, have argued that Quixote is in fact sane and rational and is putting on an act at being crazy to show the absurdity of society. This is borne more in the melancholy Part 2, where Quixote discovers that he has become a cliche in his own lifetime and a LivingLegend much like the great heroes of the past he hoped to emulate.
** Let's be fair, though: A lot of people like to point and giggle at Quixote's insanity, but a lot of them would also love to have a hallucination that elaborate, assuming they could recover. Why else would we have games like ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' or ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''?

to:

** Who's crazier, the madman or the sane man that follows him? It's lampshaded several times in the first part, part that Sancho Panza is a sane man with a very limited intelligence. In intelligence, but in the second part, through fifty chapters, [[CharacterDevelopment we'll we get to see him display his common sense]].
** In Part II, Chapter XI, Don Quixote claims: ''"from a child I was fond of the play, and in my youth a keen lover of the actor's art"''. Several critics have toyed with the idea that Don Quixote never lost that passion for theater and behaves like an actor: [[ObfuscatingInsanity he does not believe to be a knight, but pretends to be one]], as if he were on stage. Indeed, several critics in the 20th Century, notably writer Harold Bloom, have argued that Quixote is in fact sane and rational and is putting on an act at being crazy to show the absurdity of society. This is borne more in the melancholy Part 2, where Quixote discovers that he has become a cliche in his own lifetime and a LivingLegend much like the great heroes of the past he hoped to emulate.
emulate.
** Let's be fair, though: A lot The third most popular interpretation of people like Don Quixote is that he isn't actually insane, but acting deliberately as an insane person in order to point [[IRejectYourReality live a fulfilling fantasy instead of his boring real environment]]. This was lampshaded in the 2002 Spanish film adaptation ''El Caballero Don Quijote'', where after Quijano's death, a crying Sancho states that even if he knows his master was crazy, if Don Quixote got up and giggle at Quixote's insanity, but a lot asked him to accompany him in more of them his crazy hijinks, he would also love to have do without a hallucination that elaborate, assuming they could recover. Why else would we have games like ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' or ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''?shadow of doubt.



** Most native Spanish speakers who have completed high school can quote the first few lines by heart.

to:

** Most native Spanish speakers who have completed high school can quote the first few lines by heart.heart, at least before the 1990 education reform.



* MisaimedFandom: Many people have misunderstood the point of the parody. Romantic writers lionized ''Don Quixote'' as a praise of hopeless noble ideals in an increasingly cynical and materialistic world. Then, followers of literary Naturalism praised the novel... for {{deconstruct|ion}}ing groundless Romantic enthusiasm.
** Some people TakeAThirdOption and argue that Don Quixote himself is more complex than either division, and that he's essentially a tragic figure who willingly chooses to go insane rather than live his banal life and that by willingly embodying virtues that are outdated, if not ever existing in the first place, he's paradoxically just as, if not more heroic as the legends he hopes to emulate. This makes him more or less, [[ValuesResonance a modern day existentialist hero]].

to:

* MisaimedFandom: MisaimedFandom:
**
Many people have misunderstood the point of the parody. Romantic writers lionized ''Don Quixote'' as a praise of hopeless noble ideals in an increasingly cynical and materialistic world. Then, followers of literary Naturalism praised the novel... for {{deconstruct|ion}}ing groundless Romantic enthusiasm.
** Some people TakeAThirdOption and argue that Don Quixote himself is more complex than either division, and that he's essentially a tragic figure who willingly chooses to go insane rather than live his banal life life, and that by willingly embodying virtues that are outdated, if outdated (if not ever existing in the first place, place) he's paradoxically just as, if not more as heroic as the legends he hopes to emulate. emulate, if not more. This makes him more or less, [[ValuesResonance a modern day existentialist hero]]. hero]].
** Let's be fair, though: A lot of people like to point and giggle at Quixote's insanity, but a lot of them would also love to have a hallucination that elaborate, assuming it would not be fatal for them. Why else would we have games like ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' or ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''?



* SurprisinglyImprovedSequel: Although Don Quixote is published as a one volume today, it is generally agreed that the mostly philosophical second part is better that the mostly farcical first one. Perhaps related to the fact that the first part was written while Cervantes was in jail (Sancho Panza's wife has 2 different names in the same page, neither of which would be the definitive Teresa Panza).
* ValuesDissonance: Several of the attitudes expressed by the characters are enough to make modern sensibilities cringe. Sancho, a man usually associated with being a loyal and amiable sort actually considers taking up selling people as slaves and turning 'black into gold'.
* WeirdAlEffect: Barring a few exceptions such as ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tirant_lo_Blanc Tirant lo Blanc]]'' (which is remembered for being one of the first literary texts written in Catalan/Valencian, and has a recent FilmOfTheBook made of it) few people today remember the novels that Don Quixote read and Cervantes lists before throwing them in the bonfire in Chapter 3, and most of them are philologers and historians. One of those novels is remembered today in the USA, sort of: a land conquered for Spain got named for a character in one of those novels - the nymph California.
* TheWoobie: Particularly in the era where Don Quixote was considered a tragic hero. Admit it, sometimes you just want to give him a hug. He is after all, ''El caballero de la triste figura'', translated by Edith Grossmann as ''The Knight of the Sorrowful Face''. He is the Knight of all woobies.

to:

* SurprisinglyImprovedSequel: Although Don Quixote is published as a one volume today, it is generally agreed that the mostly philosophical second part is better that the mostly farcical first one. Perhaps related to the fact that the first part was written while Cervantes was in jail (Sancho Panza's wife has 2 different names in the same page, Juana and Mari, neither of which would be the definitive Teresa Panza).
Teresa).
* ValuesDissonance: Several of the attitudes expressed by the characters are enough to make modern sensibilities cringe. Sancho, a man usually associated with being a loyal and amiable sort sort, actually considers taking up selling people as slaves and turning 'black "turning black into gold'.
gold".
* WeirdAlEffect: Barring a few exceptions such as ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tirant_lo_Blanc Tirant lo Blanc]]'' (which is remembered for being one of the first literary texts written in Catalan/Valencian, and has had a recent FilmOfTheBook made of it) few people today remember the novels that Don Quixote read and Cervantes lists before throwing them in the bonfire in Chapter 3, and most of them are philologers and historians. One of those novels is remembered today in the USA, sort of: a land conquered for Spain got named for a character in one of those novels - the nymph California.
* TheWoobie: Particularly in the era where Don Quixote was considered a tragic hero. Admit it, sometimes you just want to give him a hug. He is after all, ''El caballero ''ElCaballero de la triste figura'', Triste Figura'', translated by Edith Grossmann as ''The Knight of the Sorrowful Face''. He is the Knight of all woobies.
25th Mar '18 2:25:47 PM SheldonDinkleburg
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Added DiffLines:

* HilariousInHindsight: The main character is a nobleman who spends most of his time staying at home reading chivalry books, obsesses over a woman and refers to her as "my lady" even though she doesn't even know him, and the story is all about his {{LARP}}ing adventures. ''Don Quixote'' could easily be satirizing modern nerd culture, and just goes to show how little things have changed in 400 years.
16th Mar '18 1:51:11 AM Kamiguy123
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* TheWoobie: Particularly in the era where Don Quixote was considered a tragic hero. Admit it, sometimes you just want to give him a hug. He is after all, ''El caballero de la triste figura'' translated by Edith Grossmann as ''The Knight of the Sorrowful Face''. He is the Knight of all woobies.

to:

* TheWoobie: Particularly in the era where Don Quixote was considered a tragic hero. Admit it, sometimes you just want to give him a hug. He is after all, ''El caballero de la triste figura'' figura'', translated by Edith Grossmann as ''The Knight of the Sorrowful Face''. He is the Knight of all woobies.
1st Oct '17 1:13:53 PM DoctorCooper
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* MagnumOpus: Not only for its writer, Miguel de Cervantes, but also largely for Spanish-written literature in general.
30th Sep '17 7:18:56 AM XanderVJ
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*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Little lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?". The quote is basically modified each time, changing the "leoncitos" part for whatever you want to show you're not scared of, serving as a BadassBoast. A popular recent example that English speakers can relate to is in the European Spanish dub of ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', where they translated Hulk's "''[[MemeticMutation Punny god]]''" as ''"¿Dioses a mí?"'' ("¿Gods to me?")[[note]]Whether this is genuine {{Woolseyism}} or [[BlindIdiotTranslation the dubbing team overstepping their boundaries]] is kind of a point of debate in Spain[[/note]].

to:

*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Little lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?". The quote is basically modified each time, changing the "leoncitos" part for whatever you want to show you're not scared of, serving as a BadassBoast. A popular recent example that English speakers can relate to is in the European Spanish dub of ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', where they translated Hulk's "''[[MemeticMutation Punny god]]''" as ''"¿Dioses a mí?"'' ("¿Gods ("Gods to me?")[[note]]Whether this is genuine {{Woolseyism}} or [[BlindIdiotTranslation the dubbing team overstepping their boundaries]] is kind of a point of debate in Spain[[/note]].
30th Sep '17 7:15:17 AM XanderVJ
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*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Little lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?". The quote is basically modified each time, changing the "leoncitos" part for whatever you want to show you're not scared of, serving as a BadassBoast. A popular recent example that English speakers can relate to is in the European Spanish dub of ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', where they translated Hulk's ''[[MemeticMutation Punny god]]'' as ''"¿Dioses a mí?"'' ("¿Gods to me?")[[note]]Whether this is genuine {{Woolseysm}} or [[BlindIdiotTranslation the dubbing team overstepping their boundaries]] is kind of a point of debate in Spain[[/note]].

to:

*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Little lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?". The quote is basically modified each time, changing the "leoncitos" part for whatever you want to show you're not scared of, serving as a BadassBoast. A popular recent example that English speakers can relate to is in the European Spanish dub of ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', where they translated Hulk's ''[[MemeticMutation "''[[MemeticMutation Punny god]]'' god]]''" as ''"¿Dioses a mí?"'' ("¿Gods to me?")[[note]]Whether this is genuine {{Woolseysm}} {{Woolseyism}} or [[BlindIdiotTranslation the dubbing team overstepping their boundaries]] is kind of a point of debate in Spain[[/note]].
30th Sep '17 7:13:29 AM XanderVJ
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*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Little lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?"

to:

*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Little lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?" lions?". The quote is basically modified each time, changing the "leoncitos" part for whatever you want to show you're not scared of, serving as a BadassBoast. A popular recent example that English speakers can relate to is in the European Spanish dub of ''Film/TheAvengers2012'', where they translated Hulk's ''[[MemeticMutation Punny god]]'' as ''"¿Dioses a mí?"'' ("¿Gods to me?")[[note]]Whether this is genuine {{Woolseysm}} or [[BlindIdiotTranslation the dubbing team overstepping their boundaries]] is kind of a point of debate in Spain[[/note]].
30th Sep '17 7:04:28 AM XanderVJ
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*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?"

to:

*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Literally, "Lions "Little lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?"
30th Sep '17 6:51:34 AM XanderVJ
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* MagnumOpus: Not only for its writer, Miguel de Cervantes, but also largely for Spanish-written literature in general.



*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Could be translated as "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?"

to:

*** '''"¿Leoncitos a mi?"''' Could be translated as Literally, "Lions to me?". More figuratively, "Do they want to scare me with those little lions?"


Added DiffLines:

** As a matter of fact, quoting this book in general is often considered a sign of being a well read person, just like quoting Shakespeare is in English-speaking countries.


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* SequelDisplacement: Variation. A lot of people don't know that this was originally ''two'' separate books, with the sequel being written ''a full decade'' after its predecessor. It just so happens that now they are almost always printed together, but even then both parts are clearly marked inside of them.
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