History YMMV / Chess

25th Sep '15 6:53:27 AM ATK
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** To put this in perspective; the 2010 World Championship (India's Viswanathan Anand vs. Bulgaria's Veselin Topalov) was the first championship since ''1921'' to have no Russian-born participant.
22nd Aug '15 5:03:18 PM ThallianGold
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* DesignatedHero: Deconstructed. Freddie is a DecoyProtagonist in some advertising, with Florence as the actual protagonist. Florence is still an adulterer who's arguably committing treason.

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** "Nobody's Side" is Florence's HeroicBSOD. It's also her LeitMotif. [[FridgeHorror Let that sink in.]]
22nd Aug '15 4:23:09 PM ThallianGold
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** "The Game of Chess" -- is it really about the backstory of the game itself, or is it about the ManipulativeBastard who invented the game purely to get his mother on his side to betray his brother.

** I hear "One Night in Bangkok" has its fans.

** "Someone Else's Story" is Florence's MomentOfClarity: Freddie doesn't and probably never loved her, and she realizes it objectively, just as she admits she's lying to herself about it even now. Set as a gentle, uplifting song, it's about a woman who forces herself to see the world as it really is, and that she's approaching the DespairEventHorizon, and can't change it. ** "I Know Him So Well" has at least one of Anatoly's lover or wife realize they're aware of his infidelity, but can't bring themselves to hate him (or, in some versions, each other).

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** Svetlana and Florence can be this, especially in "I Know Him So Well."
9th Aug '15 11:35:30 PM modgethanc
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** [[DarkIsNotEvil Poor, maligned Black:]] just minding his business on the other side of the demilitarized zone until one day White stages a surprise attack and leaves him with no choice but to [[OccupiersOutOfOurCountry defend his homeland]] with violence. When will White be taken to account for his crimes against chess pieces? There is no justice in this board. * CharacterTiers: Called relative value. The key word is relative; each piece is worth, on average, a certain number of points but they can all vary according to the situation (open vs. closed game, midgame vs. endgame, etc.). These points are a marker of who's ahead in material and don't count at all for gameplay purposes. This isn't the only important indicator of who's winning (having a good position or control of the board can balance it out) and the player with weaker or fewer pieces sometimes wins; all the material advantage in the world won't save you from a SurpriseCheckmate. ** ''Top Tier'': The queen is by far the most overpowered piece, and is one of the ''major pieces''. Worth 9 points. ** ''High Tier'': The rooks are, along with the queen, considered the ''major pieces''. Worth 5 points each, it's generally bad to lose one of them in exchange for, say, a bishop. Two rooks are slightly better than a queen. ** ''Mid Tier'': The bishops and knights are both considered the ''minor pieces'' and are worth about 3 points each. A bishop is worth slightly more than a knight and two bishops together are better than two knights or a mixture of both. However, the knight is better in closed games while the bishop needs a lot of room to be effective. Three of these equal a queen, or a rook plus a pawn. ** ''Low Tier'': Pawns, who are mostly your first line of defense and are used to open up positions for the more powerful pieces to attack. However, they become much more important in the endgame when the board opens up and they are able to promote. Isolated pawns are very weak; connected pawns are, however, much stronger because an opponent won't want to sacrifice a more valuable piece to break them up. [[ForWantOfANail A single pawn can decide a game in some situations.]] Worth one point each. ** ''Bottom Tier'': A blocked bishop (one that is hemmed in by its own pawns) is useless except for defending the pawns. Even worse is a backward or doubled pawn (has a friendly pawn in front of it and can't advance).

* EndingFatigue: Some novice games can drag on for quite a while, especially when it's just chasing the king around the board. Professional players would have resigned long ago at this stage. This is the reason why the fifty-move rule was invented (which is still pretty long for an average game). Even some professional games can last well over a hundred moves if one player is unwilling to offer a draw in a drawing position, in the opponent his opponent will make a mistake.
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* EndingFatigue: Some novice games can drag on for quite a while, especially when it's just chasing the king around the board. Professional players would have resigned long ago at this stage. This is the reason why the fifty-move rule was invented (which is still pretty long for an average game). Even some professional games can last well over a hundred moves if one player is unwilling to offer a draw in a drawing position, in the opponent hopes his opponent will make a mistake.

* EndingFatigue: Some novice games can drag on for quite ** There's a while, especially when it's just chasing the king around the board. Professional players would have resigned long ago at this stage. This is the reason why the fifty-move rule was invented (which a popular in-joke/meme among amateur enthusiasts is still pretty long for an average game). Even some professional games can last well over a hundred moves if one [[SeriousBusiness "every chess player is unwilling to offer should have a draw in a drawing position, in the opponent his opponent will make a mistake.hobby".]]

** En Passant can cause a lot of trouble in novice games due to the obscure nature of the rule. * StopHelpingMe[=/=]SurroundedByIdiots: The famous ''smothered mate'' where a single knight forces a king into a corner, surrounded by its own "protective" pieces who block out all escape squares, allowing this beautiful (and somewhat embarassing) checkmate. There are countless other checkmates where the King's only escape(s) are blocked by its own pieces, the most common of which (among relative novices) is that of the King being mated by an opposing Queen or Rook on the back rank because he's hemmed in by the three pawns in front of him.
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** En Passant passant can cause a lot of trouble in novice games due to the obscure nature of the rule. * StopHelpingMe[=/=]SurroundedByIdiots: The famous ''smothered mate'' where a single knight forces a king into a corner, surrounded by its own "protective" pieces who block out all escape squares, allowing this beautiful (and somewhat embarassing) embarrassing) checkmate. There are countless other checkmates where the King's only escape(s) are blocked by its own pieces, the most common of which (among relative novices) is that of the King being mated by an opposing Queen or Rook on the back rank because he's hemmed in by the three pawns in front of him.
15th Apr '15 5:21:08 PM Statzkeen
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* UnwinnableByInsanity: A stalemate occurs if the player whose turn it is cannot make any legal moves, but his king is not in check. This is extremely unlikely to occur unless said player has no chessmen left except pawns and king (and thus is losing). It takes a certain amount of insanity to capture most of your opponent's pieces, put the rest of them in such a position that they can't make any legal moves, and NOT put the king in check. ** This is not true. Stalemate is a recurring element in chess, and very much on expert level. Many famous games ended with it and it's often used for traps by the losing player (see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stalemate here]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swindle_(chess) here]] for more information). Because it's so common, there are many players who want to change the rule so it's considered a win for the stalemating side.
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* UnwinnableByInsanity: A stalemate occurs if the player whose turn it is cannot make any legal moves, but his king is not in check. This is extremely unlikely to occur unless usually only occurs said player has no chessmen left except pawns and king (and thus is losing). It takes a certain amount of insanity to capture most of your opponent's pieces, put the rest of them in such a position that they can't make any legal moves, and NOT put the king in check. ** This check. But if said opponent is not true. Stalemate is a recurring element crafty, his strategy in chess, and that position may very much on expert level. Many famous games ended with it and it's often used for traps by well be to get himself stalemated to snatch a draw out of the losing player (see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stalemate here]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swindle_(chess) here]] for more information). Because it's so common, there are many players who want to change the rule so it's considered a win for the stalemating side. jaws of defeat.
5th Apr '15 5:04:29 PM Gemser
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** This is not true. Stalemate is a recurring element in chess, and very much on expert level. Many famous games ended with it and it's often used for traps by the losing player (see [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stalemate here]] and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swindle_(chess) here]] for more information). Because it's so common, there are many players who want to change the rule so it's considered a win for the stalemating side.

** Depending on the production (and the actor), "Pity the Child" can almost turn Freddie into one.
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** Depending on the production (and the actor), "Pity the Child" can almost turn Freddie into one.one.
3rd Mar '15 6:22:17 PM PlatinumGlitchMint
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* AdaptationDisplacement: It's not hard to find people who know and love ''One Night in Bangkok'', but have no idea that it came from this musical.
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* AdaptationDisplacement: It's not hard to find people who know and love ''One "One Night in Bangkok'', Bangkok", but have no idea that it came from this musical.
3rd Mar '15 6:21:18 PM PlatinumGlitchMint
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*AdaptationDisplacement: It's not hard to find people who know and love ''One Night in Bangkok'', but have no idea that it came from this musical.
24th Feb '15 6:40:03 AM TheLyniezian
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* NeverSayDie[=/=]NobodyCanDie: despite it being a strategy game with allusions to battle, your pieces (excluding, played properly, the king) are said to be "captured" but never "killed" when removed from play. However, since said pieces are invariably returned to the board for future games (which if we were pretending it was RealLife, would make no sense if they were "dead"), this terminology is justified.
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* NeverSayDie[=/=]NobodyCanDie: despite depending on your perspective. Despite it being a strategy game with allusions to battle, your pieces (excluding, played properly, the king) are said to be "captured" but never "killed" when removed from play. However, since said pieces are invariably returned to the board for future games (which if we were pretending it was RealLife, would make no sense if they were "dead"), this terminology is justified.
24th Feb '15 6:39:34 AM TheLyniezian
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* NeverSayDie[=/=]NobodyCanDie: despite it being a strategy game with allusions to battle, your pieces (excluding, played properly, the king) are said to be "captured" but never "killed" when removed from play. However, since said pieces are invariably returned to the board for future games (which if we were pretending it was RealLife, would make no sense if they were "dead"), this terminology is justified.
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