History YMMV / AmericanDad

9th Aug '17 9:53:43 AM ThomasVeggieDramaFan
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** So "Family Plan" is about Francine reconnecting with her birth family. You can get so much mileage just based on her meeting her birth parents for the very first time alone, right? Nah! Let's completely shit all over that bed by revealing that [[spoiler:Cassandra (Francine's birth mother) committed suicide via hanging herself]] and turn Nicholas (Francine's birth father) into an outright monster by having him make everyone in the Dawson family (which includes Francine) fight each other to the death with the sole survivor becoming the heir to the family fortune because [[DisproportionateRetribution he's angry that everybody is using their own data plans instead of the family plan he set up.]] In other words, they took an interesting premise and threw it out the window for an out of nowhere pointless ''Family Guy'' style glorified gore fest. And that's not even mentioning how it's never once acknowledged the fact that Stan already tracked down Francine's birth parents all the way back in "Big Trouble in Little Langley".

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** So "Family Plan" is about Francine reconnecting with her birth family. You can get so much mileage just based on her meeting her birth parents for the very first time alone, right? Nah! Let's completely take a diarrhea filled shit all over that bed by revealing that [[spoiler:Cassandra (Francine's birth mother) committed suicide via hanging hanged herself]] and turn Nicholas (Francine's birth father) into an outright monster by having him make everyone in the Dawson family (which includes Francine) fight each other to the death with the sole survivor becoming the heir to the family fortune because [[DisproportionateRetribution he's angry that everybody is using their own data plans instead of the family plan he set up.home network.]] In other words, they took an interesting premise and threw it out the window for an out of nowhere a pointless parody of ''The Hunger Games'' full of disturbingly glorified gore that one would've expected on Seasons 8-13 of ''Family Guy'' style glorified gore fest.Guy''. And that's not even mentioning how it's never once acknowledged the fact that Stan already tracked down Francine's birth parents all the way back in "Big Trouble in Little Langley".
8th Aug '17 2:08:39 PM ThomasVeggieDramaFan
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** Francine's biological parents ''abandoning her as a baby because babies can't ride first class'' without even batting an eye, then they wouldn't save Stan from being trapped under a wooden beam in his burning house because ''they didn't want to become a liability.''

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** Francine's biological parents ''abandoning parents, Nicholas and Cassandra Dawson, ''abandoned her as a baby because babies can't ride first class'' without even batting an eye, then they wouldn't save Stan from being trapped under a wooden beam in his burning house because ''they didn't want to become a liability.'''' Nicholas managed to one-up himself by turning into a complete monster in "Family Plan" by forcing everyone in his family (including Francine) to fight to the death with the last person standing becoming the sole heir to his fortune, all because [[DisproportionateRetribution he was angry that everybody was using their own data plans instead of the family plan he set up...]]



** So "Family Plan" is about Francine reconnecting with her birth family. You can get so much mileage just based on her meeting her birth parents for the very first time alone, right? Nah! Let's completely shit all over that bed by revealing that [[spoiler:Cassandra (Francine's birth mother) committed suicide]] and turn Nicholas (Francine's birth father) into an outright monster by having him make everyone in the Dawson family (which includes Francine) fight each other to the death because he's angry that they're all using their own Wi-Fi as part of the family plan. In other words, they took an interesting premise and threw it out the window for an out of nowhere pointless ''Family Guy'' style glorified gore fest.

to:

** So "Family Plan" is about Francine reconnecting with her birth family. You can get so much mileage just based on her meeting her birth parents for the very first time alone, right? Nah! Let's completely shit all over that bed by revealing that [[spoiler:Cassandra (Francine's birth mother) committed suicide]] suicide via hanging herself]] and turn Nicholas (Francine's birth father) into an outright monster by having him make everyone in the Dawson family (which includes Francine) fight each other to the death with the sole survivor becoming the heir to the family fortune because [[DisproportionateRetribution he's angry that they're all everybody is using their own Wi-Fi as part data plans instead of the family plan. plan he set up.]] In other words, they took an interesting premise and threw it out the window for an out of nowhere pointless ''Family Guy'' style glorified gore fest.fest. And that's not even mentioning how it's never once acknowledged the fact that Stan already tracked down Francine's birth parents all the way back in "Big Trouble in Little Langley".
8th Aug '17 8:38:35 AM Piterpicher
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* LoveItOrHateIt: ďAmerican Fung.Ē Some people love the absurdism and fourth-wall breaking, others find it jarring and too nonsensical to enjoy even as an experiment and cite it as the reason why ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' is going downhill. This episode is to ''American Dad'' what "Saddlesore Galactica", "Behind the Laughter," and "The Computer Wore Menace Shoes" are to ''The Simpsons''.
8th Aug '17 4:57:53 AM ThomasVeggieDramaFan
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** Francine's biological parents, the Dawsons (the ones who abandoned her at the airport). They're AffablyEvil, unlike her nice but racist-written and not-that-funny adopted parents.

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** Francine's biological parents, the Dawsons (the ones who abandoned her at the airport). They're AffablyEvil, unlike her nice but racist-written and not-that-funny adopted parents. This is more noticeable in "Family Plan" where we find out that [[spoiler:Cassandra ultimately committed suicide]] and Nicholas is Flanderized to become straight up evil when he forces everyone in his family (including Francine) to fight each other to the death because he's pissed that they're all using their own Wi-Fi on the family plan.


Added DiffLines:

** So "Family Plan" is about Francine reconnecting with her birth family. You can get so much mileage just based on her meeting her birth parents for the very first time alone, right? Nah! Let's completely shit all over that bed by revealing that [[spoiler:Cassandra (Francine's birth mother) committed suicide]] and turn Nicholas (Francine's birth father) into an outright monster by having him make everyone in the Dawson family (which includes Francine) fight each other to the death because he's angry that they're all using their own Wi-Fi as part of the family plan. In other words, they took an interesting premise and threw it out the window for an out of nowhere pointless ''Family Guy'' style glorified gore fest.
7th Aug '17 7:06:23 AM ThomasVeggieDramaFan
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* RomanticPlotTumor: Steve and Snot's relationship, which has had the HoYay ramped up or outright confirmed them gay or together in the future. It becomes jarring when literally every episode with Snot in it will mention or hint at this, no matter how unfitting or unnecessary it is.

to:

* RomanticPlotTumor: Steve and Snot's relationship, which has had the HoYay ramped up or outright confirmed them gay or together in the future. It becomes jarring when literally nearly every episode with Snot in it will mention or hint at this, no matter how unfitting or unnecessary it is.
6th Aug '17 5:08:20 AM SorPepita
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* UnintentionallySympathetic: Stanís status as the show's DesignatedVillain makes him this most of the time (though there are exceptions, see MoralEventHorizon above) There's "Stan acts like a jerk and must learn a lesson" formula. It doesnít help that most of Stanís flaws have been given very understandable [[FreudianExcuse Freudian Excuses]], something that in a lot of cases those that he opposes donít have.

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* UnintentionallySympathetic: Stanís status as the show's DesignatedVillain makes him this most of the time (though there are exceptions, see MoralEventHorizon above) above). There's "Stan acts like a jerk and must learn a lesson" formula. It doesnít help that most of Stanís flaws have been given very understandable [[FreudianExcuse Freudian Excuses]], something that in a lot of cases those that he opposes donít have.



** The family is this as a whole as seen in DesignatedVillain and StrawmanHasAPoint they have a serious case of all take and no give when it concerns Stan. So it's hard to feel sorry for them when they complain about Stanís antics or his rules when they arenít willing to fend for themselves and one of the most recurring plots is that Stan has no right to spend anytime for himself.
** Francine in ďWhen a Stan Loves a Woman". We are supposed to see Stan as a {{Jerkass}} and sympathize with Francine for being angry that Stan went through with it. The problem with the is that the problem only started after Francine showed her love for Stan by planting the rose after ď18 YEARSĒ. Also the episodeís Aesop about the difference between love and meaningless sex doesnít make much since when you realize that Francineís gift was basically lumping Stan together with all those people she claims were meaningless. Essentially, Francine caused the problem in the first place through being InnocentlyInsensitive, pushed for the outcome [[BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor only to get angry when she got what she wanted]], and thus realizing exactly how Stan felt.

to:

** The family is this as a whole whole; as seen in DesignatedVillain and StrawmanHasAPoint they have a serious case of all take and no give when it concerns Stan. So it's hard to feel sorry for them when they complain about Stanís antics or his rules when they arenít willing to fend for themselves and one of the most recurring plots is that Stan has no right to spend anytime for himself.
** Francine in ďWhen a Stan Loves a Woman". We are supposed to see Stan as a {{Jerkass}} and sympathize with Francine for being angry that Stan went through with it. The problem with the that is that the problem only started after Francine showed her love for Stan by planting the rose after ď18 YEARSĒ. Also the episodeís Aesop about the difference between love and meaningless sex doesnít make much since sense when you realize that Francineís gift was basically lumping Stan together with all those people she claims were meaningless. Essentially, Francine caused the problem in the first place through being InnocentlyInsensitive, pushed for the outcome [[BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor only to get angry when she got what she wanted]], and thus realizing realized exactly how Stan felt.
6th Aug '17 4:57:02 AM SorPepita
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* RomanticPlotTumor: Steve and Snot's relationship, which has had the HoYay ramped up or outright confirmed them gay or together the future. It becomes jarring when literally every episode with Snot in it will mention or hint at this, no matter how unfitting or unnecessary it is.

to:

* RomanticPlotTumor: Steve and Snot's relationship, which has had the HoYay ramped up or outright confirmed them gay or together in the future. It becomes jarring when literally every episode with Snot in it will mention or hint at this, no matter how unfitting or unnecessary it is.
6th Aug '17 4:50:42 AM SorPepita
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** Stan. His father abandoned him as a child, his mother made him grow up too soon and he was even unluckier than Steve was as a teenager with girls. Since then, no matter how hard he tries, he's in a dead end in his career, he can never make a long term connection with his kids (It's a mix between his general disinterest in the stuff they say and their having an incredibly low opinion of him most of the time), his only friend is a sociopathic alien and anytime he has a chance of making his own life better, he has to give it up for Francine or his kids.

to:

** Stan. His father abandoned him as a child, his mother made him grow up too soon and he was even unluckier than Steve was as a teenager with girls. Since then, no matter how hard he tries, he's in a dead end in his career, he can never make a long term connection with his kids (It's (it's a mix between his general disinterest in the stuff they say and their having an incredibly low opinion of him most of the time), his only friend is a sociopathic alien and anytime he has a chance of making his own life better, he has to give it up for Francine or his kids.
6th Aug '17 4:39:17 AM SorPepita
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** As seen below in StrawmanHasAPoint[=/=]InformedWrongness, many of the Aesops learned by Stan are broken due to the fact the universe repeatedly skews things so that he is wrong. This usually due to a CompressedVice, PlotInducedStupidity, TookALevelInJerkass, TookALevelInDumbass or a combination of all four. However given that one of the most recurring {{Recycled Script}}s is Stan finally deciding to spend some time for himself and his family falling apart because of their AllTakeAndNoGive mentality means that they are unable to function without him, forcing Stan to give up his me time, is Stan meant to deconstruct the BumblingDad trope by playing it straight up to eleven.

to:

** As seen below in StrawmanHasAPoint[=/=]InformedWrongness, many of the Aesops learned by Stan are broken due to the fact the universe repeatedly skews things so that he is wrong. This usually due to a CompressedVice, PlotInducedStupidity, TookALevelInJerkass, TookALevelInDumbass or a combination of all four. However given that one of the most recurring {{Recycled Script}}s is Stan finally deciding to spend some time for himself and his family falling apart because of their AllTakeAndNoGive mentality means that they are unable to function without him, forcing Stan to give up his me time, is Stan meant to deconstruct the BumblingDad trope by playing it straight up to eleven.UpToEleven?
29th Jul '17 10:40:44 AM BatmanKalEl
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** Even though it is non canon, the episode Blood Crieth Unto Heaven takes Stan's status as the DesignatedVillain to ridiculous extremes. Both before and after this episode Stanís parents have shown to be incredibly abusive heaping huge amounts of psychological abuse and neglect ending with his father abandoning him and his mother (and lying to him about it for years), and his mother forcing him to take his father's place. This episode absolves his parents of all responsibility for their actions by saying it was Stanís fault, because they threw him a surprise party. And since they regularly forget who he is, it completely averts WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief.

to:

** Even though it is non canon, the episode Blood "Blood Crieth Unto Heaven Heaven" takes Stan's status as the DesignatedVillain to ridiculous extremes. Both before and after this episode Stanís parents have shown to be incredibly abusive heaping huge amounts of psychological abuse and neglect ending with his father abandoning him and his mother (and lying to him about it for years), and his mother forcing him to take his father's place. This episode absolves his parents of all responsibility for their actions by saying it was Stanís fault, because they threw him a surprise party. And since they regularly forget who he is, it completely averts WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.AmericanDad