History YMMV / AfterSchoolNightmare

3rd Mar '16 3:24:45 PM MiracleChange
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* BrokenBase: The manga's character design is seen as really pretty or quite ugly.



* ValuesDissonance: The way Mashiro's gender identity is handled can come across as offensive to some Western readers, to the point where a few actually stopped reading.

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* ValuesDissonance: The way Mashiro's gender identity is handled can come across as offensive to some Western readers, to the point where a few actually stopped reading.
reading.
26th Feb '16 5:53:50 PM MiracleChange
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to:

* ValuesDissonance: The way Mashiro's gender identity is handled can come across as offensive to some Western readers, to the point where a few actually stopped reading.
19th Nov '15 1:40:13 AM LondonKdS
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Added DiffLines:

* EndingAversion: The ending upset a lot of different fan factions for different reasons:
** The people who were reading for the mystery arc thought that the final explanation was simply too silly and bizarre.
** The shippers were unhappy that [[spoiler:Mashiro and Sou end up in the real world but with no knowledge of each other or memory of their love]].
** The people who were reading for the exploration of ambiguous gender thought that the revelation that [[spoiler:Mashiro's gender ambiguity is because they are actually fraternal twin foetuses sharing a mind]] meant that the situation was either reactionary or too fantastic to have any real-world relevance.
13th Aug '14 2:09:47 PM MagBas
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* UnfortunateImplications: Considering this is a manga about a hermaphrodite facing his/her fears and dealing with his/her sexuality, you would think that its stance on gender roles would be quite progressive. For the most part, this is true. Sort of. It's understandable when Mashiro defines what a man and what a woman is through stereotypes since it is his/her learning that those idealizations are just stereotypes that allows him/her to grow in the manga. It's less understandable when Kureha realizes that Mashiro actually wants to be a girl because he/she slapped her and "A man would never hit her".
** Then there's the whole issue with Sou. On the one hand, Sou does a great job of making Mashiro realize his own inner desires to be a girl through loving him. In fact, Sou is able to make Mashiro not only come to accept himself and possibly love himself, but also accept and love others. However, Sou's tactic? To constantly subject Mashiro to his masculinity, ridicule Mashiro's sense of manhood, continuously play up Mashiro's femininity and submissiveness, and basically forcing Sou's own desire for Mashiro to be a girl on to him. Sou makes it more than clear that he loves Mashiro, but only sees him as a woman and only loves her as such.
*** Even that could be seen as unfortunate if you have an AlternateCharacterInterpretation of Sou. Is he really a guy that saw Mashiro's inner femininity, fell in love with it, and wants to draw it out to the surface or is he a guy struggling with his own sexuality that cannot accept being in love with a man and therefore forces the man (who is conveniently a hermaphrodite) to become a woman? Viewed as the latter, Sou becomes a sad example of homosexuality portrayed in the media.

to:

* UnfortunateImplications: Considering this is a manga about a hermaphrodite facing his/her fears and dealing with his/her sexuality, you would think that its stance on gender roles would be quite progressive. For the most part, this is true. Sort of. It's understandable when Mashiro defines what a man and what a woman is through stereotypes since it is his/her learning that those idealizations are just stereotypes that allows him/her to grow in the manga. It's less understandable when Kureha realizes that Mashiro actually wants to be a girl because he/she slapped her and "A man would never hit her".
** Then there's the whole issue with Sou. On the one hand, Sou does a great job of making Mashiro realize his own inner desires to be a girl through loving him. In fact, Sou is able to make Mashiro not only come to accept himself and possibly love himself, but also accept and love others. However, Sou's tactic? To constantly subject Mashiro to his masculinity, ridicule Mashiro's sense of manhood, continuously play up Mashiro's femininity and submissiveness, and basically forcing Sou's own desire for Mashiro to be a girl on to him. Sou makes it more than clear that he loves Mashiro, but only sees him as a woman and only loves her as such.
*** Even that could be seen as unfortunate if you have an AlternateCharacterInterpretation of Sou. Is he really a guy that saw Mashiro's inner femininity, fell in love with it, and wants to draw it out to the surface or is he a guy struggling with his own sexuality that cannot accept being in love with a man and therefore forces the man (who is conveniently a hermaphrodite) to become a woman? Viewed as the latter, Sou becomes a sad example of homosexuality portrayed in the media.
29th Jun '12 10:17:59 AM amathie13
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** Then there's the whole issue with Sou. On the one hand, Sou does a great job of making Mashiro realize his own inner desires to be a girl through loving him. In fact, Sou is able to make Mashiro not only come to accept himself and possibly love himself, but also accept and love others. However, Sou's tactic? To constantly subject Mashiro to his masculinity, ridicule Mashiro's sense of manhood, continuously play up Mashiro's femininity and submissiveness, and basically forcing his own desire for Mashiro to be a girl on to him. Sou makes it more than clear that he loves Mashiro, but only sees him as a woman and only loves her as such.

to:

** Then there's the whole issue with Sou. On the one hand, Sou does a great job of making Mashiro realize his own inner desires to be a girl through loving him. In fact, Sou is able to make Mashiro not only come to accept himself and possibly love himself, but also accept and love others. However, Sou's tactic? To constantly subject Mashiro to his masculinity, ridicule Mashiro's sense of manhood, continuously play up Mashiro's femininity and submissiveness, and basically forcing his Sou's own desire for Mashiro to be a girl on to him. Sou makes it more than clear that he loves Mashiro, but only sees him as a woman and only loves her as such.
29th Jun '12 10:16:39 AM amathie13
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* NightmareFuel: [[http://www.mangafox.com/manga/after_school_nightmare/v09/c035/19.html Oh dear god.]]

to:

* NightmareFuel: [[http://www.mangafox.com/manga/after_school_nightmare/v09/c035/19.html Oh dear god.]]]]
* UnfortunateImplications: Considering this is a manga about a hermaphrodite facing his/her fears and dealing with his/her sexuality, you would think that its stance on gender roles would be quite progressive. For the most part, this is true. Sort of. It's understandable when Mashiro defines what a man and what a woman is through stereotypes since it is his/her learning that those idealizations are just stereotypes that allows him/her to grow in the manga. It's less understandable when Kureha realizes that Mashiro actually wants to be a girl because he/she slapped her and "A man would never hit her".
** Then there's the whole issue with Sou. On the one hand, Sou does a great job of making Mashiro realize his own inner desires to be a girl through loving him. In fact, Sou is able to make Mashiro not only come to accept himself and possibly love himself, but also accept and love others. However, Sou's tactic? To constantly subject Mashiro to his masculinity, ridicule Mashiro's sense of manhood, continuously play up Mashiro's femininity and submissiveness, and basically forcing his own desire for Mashiro to be a girl on to him. Sou makes it more than clear that he loves Mashiro, but only sees him as a woman and only loves her as such.
*** Even that could be seen as unfortunate if you have an AlternateCharacterInterpretation of Sou. Is he really a guy that saw Mashiro's inner femininity, fell in love with it, and wants to draw it out to the surface or is he a guy struggling with his own sexuality that cannot accept being in love with a man and therefore forces the man (who is conveniently a hermaphrodite) to become a woman? Viewed as the latter, Sou becomes a sad example of homosexuality portrayed in the media.
29th Jun '12 2:10:56 AM amathie13
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Sou. In an idealist light, he comes off as a guy who used his love to teach Mashiro not only how to love him/herself and accept his/her own sexuality, but also how to truly love others and let others into his/her heart. In a more cynical light, Sou comes off as a guy who refuses to accept that the person he's in love with may not be female and therefore feels the need to assert his masculinity and play up Mashiro's femininity to force Mashiro to classify him/herself "appropriately".
29th Jun '12 1:34:45 AM amathie13
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* AlternateInterpretation: Sou. In an idealist light, he comes off as a guy who used his love to teach Mashiro not only how to love him/herself and accept his/her own sexuality, but also how to truly love others and let others into his/her heart. In a more cynical light, Sou comes off as a guy who refuses to accept that the person he's in love with may not be female and therefore feels the need to assert his masculinity and play up Mashiro's femininity to force Mashiro to classify him/herself "appropriately".

to:

* AlternateInterpretation: AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Sou. In an idealist light, he comes off as a guy who used his love to teach Mashiro not only how to love him/herself and accept his/her own sexuality, but also how to truly love others and let others into his/her heart. In a more cynical light, Sou comes off as a guy who refuses to accept that the person he's in love with may not be female and therefore feels the need to assert his masculinity and play up Mashiro's femininity to force Mashiro to classify him/herself "appropriately".
29th Jun '12 1:34:11 AM amathie13
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Added DiffLines:

* AlternateInterpretation: Sou. In an idealist light, he comes off as a guy who used his love to teach Mashiro not only how to love him/herself and accept his/her own sexuality, but also how to truly love others and let others into his/her heart. In a more cynical light, Sou comes off as a guy who refuses to accept that the person he's in love with may not be female and therefore feels the need to assert his masculinity and play up Mashiro's femininity to force Mashiro to classify him/herself "appropriately".
22nd Jun '12 9:59:28 AM CaitsMeow
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Added DiffLines:

* HoYay: Between Sou and Mashiro, who doesn't belong to either sex but identifies as male. Sometimes. That's sort of the entire point of Mashiro's journey. [[spoiler: And by the end, Mashiro identifies as female, full stop.]]
** Some consider Kureha x Mashiro to be LesYay.
This list shows the last 10 events of 11. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.AfterSchoolNightmare