History YMMV / AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt

11th Oct '15 11:11:50 PM TheGreatSkrond
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Added DiffLines:

* FridgeBrilliance: The "golden age" of King Arthur was just Hank's technology making people's lives better.
24th Sep '14 5:18:50 PM MagBas
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* UnfortunateImplications: Twain refers to a group of prisoners' stoic acceptance of their brutal treatment as being like "White Indians", the implication being that their fortitude is not due to any form of heroism but the brutal nature of their society which neither gives or expects mercy. His view of medieval peoples is similar to the patronising view of aboriginal peoples at the time, as being naive "childlike savages". Of course, this is mostly FairForItsDay.

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* UnfortunateImplications: Twain refers to a group of prisoners' stoic acceptance of their brutal treatment as being like "White Indians", the implication being that their fortitude is not due to any form of heroism but the brutal nature of their society which neither gives or expects mercy. His view of medieval peoples is similar to the patronising view of aboriginal peoples at the time, as being naive "childlike savages". Of course, this is mostly FairForItsDay.
8th Mar '14 11:42:19 AM Tarlonniel
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* UnfortunateImplications: Twain refers to a group of prisoners' stoic acceptance of their brutal treatment as being like "White Indians", the implication being that their fortitude is not due to any form of heroism but the brutal nature of their society which neither gives or expects mercy. His view of medieval peoples is similar to the patronising view of aboriginal peoples at the time, as being naive "childlike savages". Of course, this is mostly FairForItsDay.

to:

* UnfortunateImplications: Twain refers to a group of prisoners' stoic acceptance of their brutal treatment as being like "White Indians", the implication being that their fortitude is not due to any form of heroism but the brutal nature of their society which neither gives or expects mercy. His view of medieval peoples is similar to the patronising view of aboriginal peoples at the time, as being naive "childlike savages". Of course, this is mostly FairForItsDay.FairForItsDay.
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10th Feb '13 9:22:15 AM AmusedTroperGuy
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* UnfortunateImplications: Twain refers to a group of prisoners' stoic acceptance of their brutal treatment as being like "White Indians", the implication being that their fortitude is not due to any form of heroism but the brutal nature of their society which neither gives or expects mercy. His view of medieval peoples is similar to the patronising view of aboriginal peoples at the time, as being naive "childlike savages". Of course, this is mostly FairForItsDay.

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: What exactly is the protagonist? A lost man trying to make the best of a situation? Or a man without respect for traditions, culture and history, trying to transform England into the next (first, whatever) United States with a jingoist POV? Or both/none?
* UnfortunateImplications: Twain refers to a group of prisoners' stoic acceptance of their brutal treatment as being like "White Indians", the implication being that their fortitude is not due to any form of heroism but the brutal nature of their society which neither gives or expects mercy. His view of medieval peoples is similar to the patronising view of aboriginal peoples at the time, as being naive "childlike savages". Of course, this is mostly FairForItsDay.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt