History YMMV / AChristmasCarol

13th Apr '18 7:08:34 PM lalalei2001
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** Jacob Marley's character pre-death is open to a lot of interpretation, as all that's told is Scrooge was as bad as he was at the time of Marley's death. Some adaptations make him more heroic, while others more villainous, and others present them as relatively equal.

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** Jacob Marley's character pre-death character, particularly pre-death, is open to a lot of interpretation, as all that's told is Scrooge was as bad as he was at the time of Marley's death. Some adaptations make him more heroic, while others more villainous, and others present them as relatively equal.
29th Mar '18 10:54:46 PM lalalei2001
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** The original version of the book was an example of this trope for the publisher. Unlike Dickens' other works, many of which were inexpensively printed as subscription or magazine serials, the first printing of ''A Christmas Carol'' was leather-bound with numerous illustrations and decorations. It was still cheap to buy but cost so much to produce but was that Dickens, who financed the publication himself, barely made a profit on its release, even though the first printing sold out in only a few days.

to:

** The original version of the book was an example of this trope for the publisher. Unlike Dickens' other works, many of which were inexpensively printed as subscription or magazine serials, the first printing of ''A Christmas Carol'' was leather-bound with numerous illustrations and decorations. It was still cheap to buy but cost so much to produce but was that Dickens, who financed the publication himself, barely made a profit on its release, even though the first printing sold out in only a few days.
29th Mar '18 10:54:22 PM lalalei2001
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* CrackIsCheaper: Owning just the book isn't so bad, but owning all the adaptations, derivative works, parodies, and whole-plot references will cost you as much as Scrooge and Marley made in their lifetimes, especially for out-of-print or hard-to-find versions.
** The original version of the book was an example of this trope. Unlike Dickens' other works, many of which were inexpensively printed as subscription or magazine serials, the first printing of ''A Christmas Carol'' was leather-bound with numerous illustrations and decorations. It cost so much to produce that Dickens, who financed the publication himself, barely made a profit on its release, even though the first printing sold out in only a few days.

to:

* CrackIsCheaper: CrackIsCheaper:
**
Owning just the book isn't so bad, but owning all the adaptations, derivative works, parodies, and whole-plot references will cost you as much as Scrooge and Marley made in their lifetimes, especially for out-of-print or hard-to-find versions.
** The original version of the book was an example of this trope.trope for the publisher. Unlike Dickens' other works, many of which were inexpensively printed as subscription or magazine serials, the first printing of ''A Christmas Carol'' was leather-bound with numerous illustrations and decorations. It was still cheap to buy but cost so much to produce but was that Dickens, who financed the publication himself, barely made a profit on its release, even though the first printing sold out in only a few days.
29th Mar '18 7:00:14 AM Kalmbach
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** The original version of the book was an example of this trope. Unlike Dickens' other works, many of which were inexpensively printed as subscription or magazine serials, the first printing of ''A Christmas Carol'' was leather-bound with numerous illustrations and decorations. It cost so much to produce that Dickens barely made a profit on its release, even though the first printing sold out in only a few days.

to:

** The original version of the book was an example of this trope. Unlike Dickens' other works, many of which were inexpensively printed as subscription or magazine serials, the first printing of ''A Christmas Carol'' was leather-bound with numerous illustrations and decorations. It cost so much to produce that Dickens Dickens, who financed the publication himself, barely made a profit on its release, even though the first printing sold out in only a few days.
29th Mar '18 6:59:03 AM Kalmbach
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Added DiffLines:

** The original version of the book was an example of this trope. Unlike Dickens' other works, many of which were inexpensively printed as subscription or magazine serials, the first printing of ''A Christmas Carol'' was leather-bound with numerous illustrations and decorations. It cost so much to produce that Dickens barely made a profit on its release, even though the first printing sold out in only a few days.
29th Mar '18 6:47:38 AM Kalmbach
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** The Ghosts, their personalities, and what they hope to accomplish can very between adaptations, with some more benevolent than others.

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** The Ghosts, their personalities, and what they hope to accomplish can very vary between adaptations, with some more benevolent than others.
27th Mar '18 8:46:04 PM lalalei2001
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Added DiffLines:

** The real-life inspiration for Tiny Tim, Dickens' nephew Henry Burnett Jr., died at age 10.
24th Mar '18 2:29:31 PM lalalei2001
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* DracoInLeatherPants: Some readers gloss over Scrooge's actions pre-reformation, claiming he's just trying to do his job or is right to save his money. This ignores the fact that it's said he overcharges his tenants for more than their measly houses are worth, and pays Bob Cratchit a pittance when he has six children to provide for. That's not to mention how cold and dismissive he is to his nephew. And his response to claims that they'll die if Scrooge puts them on the streets is that they should hurry up and do it to "decrease the surplus population".

to:

* DracoInLeatherPants: Some readers gloss over Scrooge's actions pre-reformation, claiming he's just trying to do his job or is right to save hoard his money. This ignores the fact that it's said he overcharges his tenants for more than their measly houses are worth, doesn't even spend his money on himself, and pays Bob Cratchit a pittance when he has six children to provide for. That's not to mention how cold and dismissive he is to his nephew. And his response to claims that they'll die if Scrooge puts them on the streets is that they should hurry up and do it to "decrease the surplus population".



** "Bah, humbug!"

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** "Bah, humbug!"humbug" has become shorthand for someone being like Scrooge and/or hating the holidays.



** "Scrooge" has become a euphemism for a stingy, cold-hearted person.

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** "Scrooge" has become a euphemism for a stingy, cold-hearted person.person, as well as a miser.
11th Mar '18 12:44:16 AM lalalei2001
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* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: Young Scrooge's book-reading causes the characters to manifest in his imagination, and they're described as if they're real.

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* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: BigLippedAlligatorMoment:
** The ghostly hearse on the stairs is a fairly random event, isn't connected with other characters like the other ghosts, and is never mentioned after it appears.
**
Young Scrooge's book-reading causes the characters to manifest in his imagination, and they're described as if they're real.



* CommonKnowledge: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come being portrayed as a skeleton in a cloak in any adaptation. While we never saw its actual face, the spirit is described in the book as having "a pale, gaunt hand", suggesting that said hand ''did'' have skin on it, it was just pale and thin.
* CrackIsCheaper: Owning just the book isn't so bad, but owning all the adaptations, derivative works, parodies, and whole-plot references will cost you as much as Scrooge and Marley made in their lifetimes, especially for out-of-print or hard-to-find ones.
* DracoInLeatherPants: Some readers gloss over Scrooge's actions pre-reformation, claiming he's just trying to do his job. This ignores the fact that it's said he overcharges his tenants for more than their measly houses are worth, and pays Bob Cratchit a pittance when he has six children to provide for. That's not to mention how cold and dismissive he is to his nephew. And his response to claims that they'll die if Scrooge puts them on the streets is that they should hurry up and do it to "decrease the surplus population".

to:

* CommonKnowledge: The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come being is often portrayed as a skeleton in a cloak in any adaptation. cloak. While we never saw see its actual face, the spirit is described in the book as having "a pale, gaunt hand", suggesting that said its hand ''did'' have skin on it, it was just pale and thin.
* CrackIsCheaper: Owning just the book isn't so bad, but owning all the adaptations, derivative works, parodies, and whole-plot references will cost you as much as Scrooge and Marley made in their lifetimes, especially for out-of-print or hard-to-find ones.
versions.
* DracoInLeatherPants: Some readers gloss over Scrooge's actions pre-reformation, claiming he's just trying to do his job.job or is right to save his money. This ignores the fact that it's said he overcharges his tenants for more than their measly houses are worth, and pays Bob Cratchit a pittance when he has six children to provide for. That's not to mention how cold and dismissive he is to his nephew. And his response to claims that they'll die if Scrooge puts them on the streets is that they should hurry up and do it to "decrease the surplus population".
6th Mar '18 3:54:56 PM lalalei2001
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* {{Anvilicious}}: But [[SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped good!]] Apparently Dickens even considered "The Sledgehammer" as a title. While the moral of charity and giving is obvious, more specifically, the novella was meant as a TakeThat to Thomas Malthus, whose warnings of overpopulation resulted in laws that Dickens hated because he felt they hurt the poor.

to:

* {{Anvilicious}}: But [[SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped good!]] Apparently Dickens even considered "The Sledgehammer" as a title. While the The moral of charity and giving is obvious, more specifically, the novella was meant as a TakeThat to Thomas Malthus, whose warnings of overpopulation resulted in laws that and Dickens hated because he felt they hurt also wrote it to call attention to the plight of the poor.
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