History WhatMeasureIsANonHuman / VideoGames

29th May '18 8:41:21 PM Loekman3
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* ''KingdomHearts'' has an odd relationship with this trope. Disney villains tend to retain their original fate, which often means that their deaths take place in a [[OneWingedAngel less-human]] form - though the ones who remain human aren't any less likely to die. Series-exclusive villains, on the other hand, are rarely fully human, even when they look like they should be.

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* ''KingdomHearts'' ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' has an odd relationship with this trope. Disney villains tend to retain their original fate, which often means that their deaths take place in a [[OneWingedAngel less-human]] form - though the ones who remain human aren't any less likely to die. Series-exclusive villains, on the other hand, are rarely fully human, even when they look like they should be.
30th Apr '18 9:48:11 PM LlamaAdventure
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* If you play ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' on the Expert level, you are forbidden to kill humans at all. Everything non-human is still fair game. Admittedly the restriction has nothing to do with Garret's moral grounds for the want of such, but rather with professional pride and reluctance to raise unnecessary ire in the authorities. By the time non-humans other than giant spiders are encountered, everything's gone to hell and a lone thief wandering around is the last thing the authorities have to worry about.

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* If you play ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' on the Expert level, you are forbidden to kill humans at all. Everything non-human is still fair game. Admittedly the restriction has nothing to do with Garret's moral grounds for the want of such, but rather with professional pride and reluctance to raise unnecessary ire in the authorities. By the time non-humans other than giant spiders are encountered, everything's gone to hell and a lone thief wandering around is the last thing the authorities have to worry about.
30th Apr '18 9:46:34 PM LlamaAdventure
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* If you play ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' on the Expert level, you are forbidden to kill humans at all. Everything non-human is still fair game. Admittedly the restriction has nothing to do with Garret's moral grounds for the want of such, but rather with professional pride and reluctance to raise unnecessary ire in the authorities.

to:

* If you play ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' on the Expert level, you are forbidden to kill humans at all. Everything non-human is still fair game. Admittedly the restriction has nothing to do with Garret's moral grounds for the want of such, but rather with professional pride and reluctance to raise unnecessary ire in the authorities. By the time non-humans other than giant spiders are encountered, everything's gone to hell and a lone thief wandering around is the last thing the authorities have to worry about.
30th Apr '18 9:44:11 PM LlamaAdventure
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* Much like its predecessor, ''VideoGame/NierAutomata'' lives and breathes this trope. The central conflict of the game is between humanity's android soldiers of [=YoRHa=] and invading machine lifeforms. Many androids, like [=9S=], are quick to dismiss the machines as lifeless and inhuman, but as you progress through the game, the machines display increasing levels of humanity. There is a commune of robots that attempt to emulate human behaviors and concepts, such as raising children, eating, and having sex, without knowing ''why'' humans do it. Some robots regard others as siblings. There is a village of robots that do not want to fight and want to achieve peace with other robots and the androids, naive and childlike though their idea of peace is. There are others that have developed a religion. And what of concepts such as life and death? Would one truly be considered "dead" if their memories and personality can simply be transferred to another vessel? Without the ability to transfer one's consciousness, would that give their life and their existence more meaning? In the end, are the androids and machine lifeforms really ''that'' different from one another? All this before going into what exactly [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Adam and Eve]] are...

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* Much like its predecessor, ''VideoGame/NierAutomata'' lives and breathes this trope. The central conflict of the game is between humanity's android soldiers of [=YoRHa=] and invading machine lifeforms. Many androids, like [=9S=], are quick to dismiss the machines as lifeless and inhuman, but as you progress through the game, the machines display increasing levels of humanity. There is a commune of robots that attempt to emulate human behaviors and concepts, such as raising children, eating, and having sex, without knowing ''why'' humans do it. Some robots regard others as siblings. There is a village of robots that do not want to fight and want to achieve peace with other robots and the androids, naive and childlike though their idea of peace is. There are others that have developed a religion. And what of concepts such as life and death? Would one truly be considered "dead" if their memories and personality can simply be transferred to another vessel? Without the ability to transfer one's consciousness, would that give their life and their existence more meaning? In the end, are the androids and machine lifeforms really ''that'' different from one another? All this before going into what exactly [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Adam and Eve]] are... [[spoiler: or the fact that [=YoRHa=] androids' black boxes are made from the cores of machine lifeforms, and thus the two really are NotSoDifferent.]]
26th Feb '18 3:36:26 PM SteelEdge
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** Almost every fighter in ''VideoGame/DigitalDevilSaga'' is a human that can transform into a demon at will, including the protagonists and enemy mooks. The main drawback of this power is that [[BlessedWithSuck they must]] [[CannibalismSuperpower eat the corpses of humans or demons]], or else they go insane. The party will not eat anyone who was in human form when they died, even if they are just as demonic as their comrades.
23rd Feb '18 5:31:10 PM KamiKaze
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* A major part of the plot of ''VisualNovel/DokiDokiLiteratureClub!'' focuses on [[spoiler:this trope as applied to video game artificial intelligence. Monika turns out to [[MediumAwareness be aware that she's a fictional character in a game]], which lead her to an existential crisis. She intentionally worsens her friends' mental health issues and [[{{Unperson}} ultimately deletes them from the game]], believing it to not be as bad as murder because none of them were "real" to begin with. In fact, her {{Yandere}} obsession with the player came about because she believes that they are the only real thing in her life.]]

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* A major part of the plot of ''VisualNovel/DokiDokiLiteratureClub!'' ''VisualNovel/DokiDokiLiteratureClub'' focuses on [[spoiler:this trope as applied to video game artificial intelligence. Monika turns out to [[MediumAwareness be aware that she's a fictional character in a game]], which lead her to an existential crisis. She intentionally worsens her friends' mental health issues and [[{{Unperson}} ultimately deletes them from the game]], believing it to not be as bad as murder because none of them were "real" to begin with. In fact, her {{Yandere}} obsession with the player came about because she believes that they are the only real thing in her life.]]
23rd Feb '18 5:30:31 PM KamiKaze
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Added DiffLines:

* A major part of the plot of ''VisualNovel/DokiDokiLiteratureClub!'' focuses on [[spoiler:this trope as applied to video game artificial intelligence. Monika turns out to [[MediumAwareness be aware that she's a fictional character in a game]], which lead her to an existential crisis. She intentionally worsens her friends' mental health issues and [[{{Unperson}} ultimately deletes them from the game]], believing it to not be as bad as murder because none of them were "real" to begin with. In fact, her {{Yandere}} obsession with the player came about because she believes that they are the only real thing in her life.]]
22nd Feb '18 9:00:57 AM morenohijazo
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\n\n* ''VideoGame/MasterOfTheMonsterLair'': Sure the enemies are all monsters who want to rule the world, but they're not all that bad. Some of them, like the Elder Dragon, [[YouWillBeSpared even offer to let Owen and Kate go if they surrender]], but that doesn't stop our heroes from killing them and stuffing their corpses to put on display.
17th Feb '18 2:40:15 PM nombretomado
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* ''ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage'' brings up this trope a small bit, right near the very end. [[spoiler:If the Golden Apple - the treasure, that is - is taken out of the village, all of the villagers will stop working and, effectively, die. Luke, Flora, and Layton don't lay a hand on it]].

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* ''ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage'' ''VideoGame/ProfessorLaytonAndTheCuriousVillage'' brings up this trope a small bit, right near the very end. [[spoiler:If the Golden Apple - the treasure, that is - is taken out of the village, all of the villagers will stop working and, effectively, die. Luke, Flora, and Layton don't lay a hand on it]].
28th Dec '17 9:55:30 PM superkeijikun
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* Much like its predecessor, ''VideoGame/NierAutomata'' lives and breathes this trope. The central conflict of the game is between humanity's android soldiers of [=YoRHa=] and invading machine lifeforms. Many androids, like [=9S=], are quick to dismiss the machines as lifeless and inhuman, but as you progress through the game, the machines display increasing levels of humanity. There is a commune of robots that attempt to emulate human behaviors and concepts, such as raising children, eating, and having sex, without knowing ''why'' humans do it. Some robots regard others as siblings. There is a village of robots that do not want to fight and want to achieve peace with other robots and the androids, naive and childlike though their idea of peace is. There are others that have developed a religion. And what of concepts such as life and death? Would one truly be considered "dead" if their memories and personality can simply be transferred to another vessel? Without the ability to transfer one's consciousness, would that give their life and their existence more meaning? All this before going into what exactly [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Adam and Eve]] are...

to:

* Much like its predecessor, ''VideoGame/NierAutomata'' lives and breathes this trope. The central conflict of the game is between humanity's android soldiers of [=YoRHa=] and invading machine lifeforms. Many androids, like [=9S=], are quick to dismiss the machines as lifeless and inhuman, but as you progress through the game, the machines display increasing levels of humanity. There is a commune of robots that attempt to emulate human behaviors and concepts, such as raising children, eating, and having sex, without knowing ''why'' humans do it. Some robots regard others as siblings. There is a village of robots that do not want to fight and want to achieve peace with other robots and the androids, naive and childlike though their idea of peace is. There are others that have developed a religion. And what of concepts such as life and death? Would one truly be considered "dead" if their memories and personality can simply be transferred to another vessel? Without the ability to transfer one's consciousness, would that give their life and their existence more meaning? In the end, are the androids and machine lifeforms really ''that'' different from one another? All this before going into what exactly [[RidiculouslyHumanRobot Adam and Eve]] are...
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