History WhatMeasureIsANonHuman / VideoGames

20th Apr '17 2:25:01 PM TheDapperArsonist
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* ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'': [[{{DiscussedTrope}} Discussed]] by the interactions with Milton and some of the text fragments.

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* ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'': [[{{DiscussedTrope}} Discussed]] by the interactions with Milton and some of the text fragments.fragments.
* Played with in ''VideoGame/{{Overwatch}}''. While the FantasticRascism directed toward Omnics (sentient robots) clearly shows this (King's Row has 'NOT HUMAN' sprayed over an Omnic Rights poster, gang members trying to pressure a girl into beating up an Omnic by assuring her the same), a good bit of animosity comes from the fact that the [[GreatOffscreenWar Omnic War]] DEVASTATED the world. Even some of the heroes aren't willing to trust the robots anymore.
16th Apr '17 12:07:30 PM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/PuzzleQuest: Galactrix'' has a mission in which you must obtain a present for a member of the Jahrwoxi leadership. The Jahrwoxi, being a scavenger race, have something of a blood feud with the Keck, an avian merchant race. The present suggested by the Jahrwoxi member of your crew is a Keck egg. First, you request one at their home planet, which your crew member laughs at you for, then tells you to go look at the trade station. The quest ends with you abducting a Keck egg, since none were for sale, and then delivering it personally, meaning you either just orphaned a kid and sold him into slavery, or just destroyed a family and fed Jahrwoxi leadership some SoylentGreen. Nobody on your crew bats an eyelash, and it's a required quest to get to ANY end of the game--good, bad, or morally ambiguous.

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* ''VideoGame/PuzzleQuest: Galactrix'' has a mission in which you must obtain a present for a member of the Jahrwoxi leadership. The Jahrwoxi, being a scavenger race, have something of a blood feud with the Keck, an avian merchant race. The present suggested by the Jahrwoxi member of your crew is a Keck egg. First, you request one at their home planet, which your crew member laughs at you for, then tells you to go look at the trade station. The quest ends with you abducting a Keck egg, since none were for sale, and then delivering it personally, meaning you either just orphaned a kid and sold him into slavery, or just destroyed a family and fed Jahrwoxi leadership some SoylentGreen.Film/SoylentGreen. Nobody on your crew bats an eyelash, and it's a required quest to get to ANY end of the game--good, bad, or morally ambiguous.
19th Mar '17 10:05:35 AM Sammettik
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** VideoGame/TalesOfTheAbyss has the main character killing monsters for a while without a second thought. The first time he has to kill a human {{mook}}, though, it's a horribly traumatic event. Furthermore, he regularly kicks, stomps, and yells at his TeamPet, with abandon, anytime it says or does something he doesn't like, but never goes any further than [[RoyalBrat general snootiness]] at his teammates.

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** VideoGame/TalesOfTheAbyss ''VideoGame/TalesOfTheAbyss'' has the main character killing monsters for a while without a second thought. The first time he has to kill a human {{mook}}, though, it's a horribly traumatic event. Furthermore, he regularly kicks, stomps, and yells at his TeamPet, with abandon, anytime it says or does something he doesn't like, but never goes any further than [[RoyalBrat general snootiness]] at his teammates.



* If you play VideoGame/{{Thief}} on the Expert level, you are forbidden to kill humans at all. Everything non-human is still fair game. Admittedly the restriction has nothing to do with Garret's moral grounds for the want of such, but rather with professional pride and reluctance to raise unnecessary ire in the authorities.

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* If you play VideoGame/{{Thief}} ''VideoGame/{{Thief}}'' on the Expert level, you are forbidden to kill humans at all. Everything non-human is still fair game. Admittedly the restriction has nothing to do with Garret's moral grounds for the want of such, but rather with professional pride and reluctance to raise unnecessary ire in the authorities.
19th Mar '17 10:02:12 AM Sammettik
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* Inverted in TransformersDevastation, [[spoiler:Megatron considers human life to be expendable in favor of mechanical life, and is thus confused by Optimus' choice in defending them over the chance of resurrecting their home planet.]]

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* Inverted in TransformersDevastation, ''VideoGame/TransformersDevastation'', [[spoiler:Megatron considers human life to be expendable in favor of mechanical life, and is thus confused by Optimus' choice in defending them over the chance of resurrecting their home planet.]]



** To be fair most of the other monsters aren't trying to destroy the world



* The Space Pirates in the ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' series were originally random space aliens with little backstory. The ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeTrilogy'', however, includes hundreds of pieces of flavor text on computers in their various research stations, explaining their hierarchy, society, and culture, and giving them a sense of purpose. In the third installment, Samus even [[spoiler:visits their homeworld]].
** Which may well have been relegated into CanonDiscontinuity after ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'', which specifically showed the Space Pirates as a mindless race that require a higher intellect (namely Mother Brain) to direct them, though this might only strictly apply to the Zebesian space pirates and not to others. Given that Sakamoto does not acknowledge the Prime series, this is a question that may never be resolved.

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* The Space Pirates in the ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' series were originally random space aliens with little backstory. The ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeTrilogy'', however, includes hundreds of pieces of flavor text on computers in their various research stations, explaining their hierarchy, society, and culture, and giving them a sense of purpose. In the third installment, Samus even [[spoiler:visits their homeworld]].
** Which may well have been relegated into CanonDiscontinuity after
homeworld]]. ''VideoGame/MetroidOtherM'', which specifically on the other hand showed the Space Pirates as a mindless race that require a higher intellect (namely Mother Brain) to direct them, though this might only strictly apply to the Zebesian space pirates and not to others. Given that Sakamoto does not acknowledge the Prime series, this is a question that may never be resolved.



** Although the Big Bad of Chapters 1,2, and 3 are all human, the BIG Big Bad is a creepy Lizard-Woman.
*** In the expansion, the Big Bad is yet another reptilian monster. What's up with Bioiware and scaley critters?
*** The most humanoid Big Bad may just be The Valsharess...
*** Until you free the Devil

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** Although the Big Bad of Chapters 1,2, and 3 are all human, the BIG Big Bad is a creepy Lizard-Woman.
***
Lizard-Woman. In the expansion, the Big Bad is yet another reptilian monster. What's up with Bioiware Bioware and scaley critters?
*** The most humanoid Big Bad may just be The Valsharess...
*** Until you free the Devil
scaly critters?



* The result of this trope is touched upon in some of the enemy entries of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow''. For example, you know Goblins? Those little rascally monsters you kill en masse in other action, adventure and rpg games? According to their entry, they are on the verge of extinction and will, in only a few decades, have passed on to become the stuff of myths and legends, all thanks to human expansion and adventurers... You kill them en masse in this game, too, you bastard. They only have themselves to blame, since they are the ones picking a fight with a badass warrior capable of killing scores of them by himself.

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* The result of this trope is touched upon in some of the enemy entries of ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaLordsOfShadow''. For example, you know Goblins? Those little rascally monsters you kill en masse in other action, adventure and rpg games? According to their entry, they are on the verge of extinction and will, in only a few decades, have passed on to become the stuff of myths and legends, all thanks to human expansion and adventurers... You kill them en masse in this game, too, you bastard. They only have themselves to blame, since they are the ones picking a fight with a badass warrior capable of killing scores of them by himself.
5th Mar '17 5:12:53 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[DungeonSiege Dungeon Siege II: Broken World]]'': Even though a lot of peoples' friends and loved ones have been turned into murderous Bound creatures and insane [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity Rogue Magi]], said people still get mad at you for killing the Bound creatures. As a matter of fact, only the first questgiver in the game sees the wisdom of [[IDidWhatIHadToDo what you needed to do]].

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* ''[[DungeonSiege ''[[VideoGame/DungeonSiegeII Dungeon Siege II: Broken World]]'': Even though a lot of peoples' friends and loved ones have been turned into murderous Bound creatures and insane [[WithGreatPowerComesGreatInsanity Rogue Magi]], said people still get mad at you for killing the Bound creatures. As a matter of fact, only the first questgiver in the game sees the wisdom of [[IDidWhatIHadToDo what you needed to do]].
21st Feb '17 6:23:30 PM nombretomado
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*** [[spoiler:Genesis' copies]] that we fight do not seem to have any intellect or feelings to speak of, so there is no real difference between them and other monsters. At the same time however, they are also very closely connected to him and he still counts as a human. When you think about it, there is simply no clear line dividing monsters and human beings in CrisisCore, which puts the characters' angst into an interesting [[FridgeBrilliance light]].

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*** [[spoiler:Genesis' copies]] that we fight do not seem to have any intellect or feelings to speak of, so there is no real difference between them and other monsters. At the same time however, they are also very closely connected to him and he still counts as a human. When you think about it, there is simply no clear line dividing monsters and human beings in CrisisCore, ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'', which puts the characters' angst into an interesting [[FridgeBrilliance light]].
10th Jan '17 4:15:19 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** Another example is ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Blazing Sword'' (released simply as ''Fire Emblem'' in North America). Your major enemies are {{Beta Test Baddie}}s who are human except for their eye & hair color. Your army has no problem destroying them by the hundreds, yet go out of their way to subdue and capture human opponents. The game justifies this, explaining that the non-human enemies are sins against nature. It also helps that most of the party are professional solders and mercenaries (in-fact, ''Blazing Sword'' is unique in that only two units able to attack don't fit that description), who ''should'' be fine with killing enemy combatants on a battlefield.

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** Another example is ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Blazing Sword'' Sword]]'' (released simply as ''Fire Emblem'' in North America). Your major enemies are {{Beta Test Baddie}}s who are human except for their eye & hair color. Your army has no problem destroying them by the hundreds, yet go out of their way to subdue and capture human opponents. The game justifies this, explaining that the non-human enemies are sins against nature. It also helps that most of the party are professional solders and mercenaries (in-fact, ''Blazing Sword'' is unique in that only two units able to attack don't fit that description), who ''should'' be fine with killing enemy combatants on a battlefield.
10th Jan '17 4:14:54 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** Another example is ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElite Blazing Sword'' (released simply as ''Fire Emblem'' in North America). Your major enemies are {{Beta Test Baddie}}s who are human except for their eye & hair color. Your army has no problem destroying them by the hundreds, yet go out of their way to subdue and capture human opponents. The game justifies this, explaining that the non-human enemies are sins against nature. It also helps that most of the party are professional solders and mercenaries (in-fact, ''Blazing Sword'' is unique in that only two units able to attack don't fit that description), who ''should'' be fine with killing enemy combatants on a battlefield.

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** Another example is ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElite ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Blazing Sword'' (released simply as ''Fire Emblem'' in North America). Your major enemies are {{Beta Test Baddie}}s who are human except for their eye & hair color. Your army has no problem destroying them by the hundreds, yet go out of their way to subdue and capture human opponents. The game justifies this, explaining that the non-human enemies are sins against nature. It also helps that most of the party are professional solders and mercenaries (in-fact, ''Blazing Sword'' is unique in that only two units able to attack don't fit that description), who ''should'' be fine with killing enemy combatants on a battlefield.
10th Jan '17 4:09:44 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* It's a major recurring theme in ''FireEmblem: Path of Radiance'' and its sequel ''Radiant Dawn'' that the Laguz, [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]] PettingZooPeople who can [[{{Animorphism}} turn into animals]], are discriminated against by the majority of their "Beorc" (Human) neighbors. The [[HalfHumanHybrid offspring of a Beorc and a Laguz]], called Branded because of the markings on their skin, isn't always accepted by either, though a Branded may be able to pass off as an ordinary Beorc if the brand is covered or passed off as the mark of a spirit charmer (Beorc who have gained magic abilities by forming pacts with spirits, which results in the pact-maker having a mark similar to that of a Branded). The Begnion Empire in particular kept the Cat and Tiger tribes as slaves for many years, and the corrupt Senators of the empire had the entire population of the Heron Tribe massacred (except [[spoiler:four members]] of the royal family) and their forest burned to the ground after blaming them for the assassination of their previous Empress, which [[spoiler:the Senators themselves orchestrated]]. Furthermore, the BigBad of the first game, the Mad King Ashnard of Daein, was an outspoken bigot against the Laguz, as were most of the people of Daein. Ashnard married [[spoiler:the princess of the Dragon Tribe]], knowing that she would lose her [[spoiler:power to transform]] after conceiving their son. He even enslaved [[spoiler:his wife's brother]], using him as a mount like a common Wyvern just to further insult the Dragon Tribe.
** Racism is actually something Ashnard is not guilty of. He's a true SocialDarwinist and BloodKnight.
** [[spoiler: Pelleas is not related to Ashnard. It's Soren, the wind mage and Ike's tactician, who's actually his son. And judging by the fact that there was someone who was taking care of him, Ashnard might have had some care for him, however little that may be.]]

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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'':
**
It's a major recurring theme in ''FireEmblem: ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Path of Radiance'' Radiance]]'' and its sequel ''Radiant Dawn'' that the Laguz, [[VoluntaryShapeshifting shapeshifting]] PettingZooPeople who can [[{{Animorphism}} turn into animals]], are discriminated against by the majority of their "Beorc" (Human) neighbors. The [[HalfHumanHybrid offspring of a Beorc and a Laguz]], called Branded because of the markings on their skin, isn't always accepted by either, though a Branded may be able to pass off as an ordinary Beorc if the brand is covered or passed off as the mark of a spirit charmer (Beorc who have gained magic abilities by forming pacts with spirits, which results in the pact-maker having a mark similar to that of a Branded). The Begnion Empire in particular kept the Cat and Tiger tribes as slaves for many years, and the corrupt Senators of the empire Empire had the entire population of the Heron Tribe massacred (except [[spoiler:four members]] of the royal family) and their forest burned to the ground after blaming them for the assassination of their previous Empress, which [[spoiler:the Senators themselves orchestrated]]. Furthermore, While the BigBad of the first game, the Mad King Ashnard of Daein, was an outspoken bigot against the Laguz, as were most of the people of Daein. Ashnard married [[spoiler:the princess of the Dragon Tribe]], knowing that she would lose her [[spoiler:power to transform]] after conceiving their son. He even enslaved [[spoiler:his wife's brother]], using him as a mount like a common Wyvern just to further insult the Dragon Tribe.
** Racism
is actually something Ashnard is not guilty of. He's at heart a true SocialDarwinist and BloodKnight.
** [[spoiler: Pelleas is not related to Ashnard. It's Soren,
BloodKnight who respects strength regardless of origin, most of his subjects legitimately hate the wind mage and Ike's tactician, who's actually his son. And judging by Laguz, since their country was originally founded for the fact that there was someone who was taking care explicit purpose of him, opposing Laguz rights. As such, Ashnard might have had some care promotes anti-Laguz propaganda simply because it's the easiest way to get the war he wants.
** Another example is ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElite Blazing Sword'' (released simply as ''Fire Emblem'' in North America). Your major enemies are {{Beta Test Baddie}}s who are human except
for him, however little their eye & hair color. Your army has no problem destroying them by the hundreds, yet go out of their way to subdue and capture human opponents. The game justifies this, explaining that may be.]]the non-human enemies are sins against nature. It also helps that most of the party are professional solders and mercenaries (in-fact, ''Blazing Sword'' is unique in that only two units able to attack don't fit that description), who ''should'' be fine with killing enemy combatants on a battlefield.
** Another ''Blazing Sword'' example involves the several side missions that deal with Kishuna, the first (and incomplete) artificial creature. During several flashbacks, the BigBad contemplates on whether Kishuna was alive or not, eventually banishing it for not being good enough. The heroes never fully understand why Kishuna blocks their path with armed guards, though the game implies that Kishuna is a DeathSeeker that [[ICannotSelfTerminate can't kill himself]].



* Another ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' example is the 7th game (first one released in North America.) Your major enemies are {{BetaBaddie}}s who are human except for their eye & hair color. Your army has no problem destroying them by the hundreds, yet go out of their way to subdue and capture human opponents. The game justifies this, explaining that the non-human enemies are sins against nature. It also helps that most of the party are professional solders and mercenaries (in-fact, 7 is unique in that only 2 units able to attack don't fit that description), who ''should'' be fine with killing enemy combatants on a battlefield.
** Another issue involves the several side missions that deal with Kishuna, the first (and incomplete) artificial creature. During several flashbacks, the BigBad contemplates on whether Kishuna was alive or not, eventually banishing it for not being good enough. The heroes never fully understand why Kishuna blocks their path with armed guards, though the game implies that Kishuna is a DeathSeeker that [[ICannotSelfTerminate can't kill himself]].



* ''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' uses it twice, with [[spoiler:Aigis and once with Ryoji.]] In the first example, it's an inversion, since [[spoiler:Aigis is questioning her life's worth as it compares to the humans on the team, who all consider her to be just as important as they are. This is driven home when she's repaired near the end of the game, and it's clear that the other members of the team wanted her back not just for her power in combat, but so that she would be back.]] The second may also be an inversion, [[spoiler:as it's a non-human character begging to be killed in order to spare the rest of the main characters from suffering. After you refuse to once, he delibarately invokes this by taking a more monstrous form, hoping this will make things easier for you. Doing so nets you a NonstandardGameOver.]]
** Also in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', one of your party members [[spoiler:(Teddie)]] is [[spoiler:a lonely shadow who took a more family friendly form and learned to speak so that he could be friends with humans (despite being a shadow he has to face his own shadow and later summons a persona).]]. After getting his persona he [[spoiler:gets a human form.]].
** You can avert combat with everyone in previous installments (the creatures of myth and legend and some just completely random looking) by talking to them. Well, except the humans in some installments[[note]] they can be recruited, negotiated with, and fused with other demons in at least in the original SNES game[[/note]], because HumansAreTheRealMonsters and will try to kill you no matter what you say. Kind of an inversion, but only kind of as they have story-related reasons for their shoot-first-ask-later mentality. You aren't really killing anyone in an unjustified manner, no matter how many humans you randomly encounter and slaughter. Also many of the boss enemies are human and must be killed, or under the control of said humans.

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* The ''Franchise/ShinMegamiTensei'' games play with this in a number of ways.
** The negotiation mechanic present in most of the games is somewhat of an inversion; while you can potentially avert combat with the various demons (generally creatures of myth and legend, with the occasional pop culture reference) by talking to them, human enemies in most installments[[note]]they ''can'' be recruited, negotiated with, and fused with other demons in ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiI''[[/note]] can't be negotiated with because HumansAreTheRealMonsters and will try to kill you no matter what you say (granted, they often have story-related reasons for their shoot-first-ask-later mentality... but so do you).
** The treatment of the demons themselves go all over the place with the trope. While most of them are clearly sapient and have culture (though generally of the OrangeAndBlueMorality sort), the games mostly encourage you to view them more as tools (or at best, useful employees) rather than as comrades, given their usually capricious nature and questionable morality. That said, demons who are legitimately friendly to humanity (or at least have bonded closely with one) tend to receive much more sympathetic portrayals.
** While ''VideoGame/ShinMegamiTenseiStrangeJourney''[='s=] demons are no angels themselves (except for the actual angels, who are still assholes anyways), the game has a very strong HumansAreTheRealMonsters tone; one part of the game even involves [[spoiler:saving demons from being brutally experimented on by your fellow humans]].
**
''VideoGame/{{Persona 3}}'' uses it twice, with [[spoiler:Aigis and once with Ryoji.]] In the first example, it's an inversion, since [[spoiler:Aigis is questioning her life's worth as it compares to the humans on the team, who all consider her to be just as important as they are. This is driven home when she's repaired near the end of the game, and it's clear that the other members of the team wanted her back not just for her power in combat, but so that she would be back.]] The second may also be an inversion, [[spoiler:as it's a non-human character begging to be killed in order to spare the rest of the main characters from suffering. After you refuse to once, he delibarately deliberately invokes this by taking a more monstrous form, hoping this will make things easier for you. Doing so nets you a NonstandardGameOver.]]
** Also in ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'', one of your party members [[spoiler:(Teddie)]] is [[spoiler:a lonely shadow who took a more family friendly form and learned to speak so that he could be friends with humans (despite being a shadow himself, he still has to face his own shadow and later summons a persona).]]. in order to summon his own Persona)]]. After getting his persona Persona, he [[spoiler:gets a human form.]].
** You can avert combat with everyone in previous installments (the creatures of myth and legend and some just completely random looking) by talking to them. Well, except the humans in some installments[[note]] they can be recruited, negotiated with, and fused with other demons in at least in the original SNES game[[/note]], because HumansAreTheRealMonsters and will try to kill you no matter what you say. Kind of an inversion, but only kind of as they have story-related reasons for their shoot-first-ask-later mentality. You aren't really killing anyone in an unjustified manner, no matter how many humans you randomly encounter and slaughter. Also many of the boss enemies are human and must be killed, or under the control of said humans.
form]].
15th Dec '16 10:03:55 AM Dechstreme
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* ''VideoGame/MegaManX4'' could be argued to be an attempt to invoke this trope as a central theme of it's plot. But lack of clarity regarding the actual reactions of the humans and the focus being solely on the Reploid POV made it seem like the Repliforce rebelled with little prompting due to the massive frame-up against them and made the players consider them unreasonable idiots. The fact that there is also no clear time frame regarding the General's Reploid Independence proclamation makes it seem like the Repliforce just went on a revolt right after the Colonel refused to be detained for questioning.

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* ''VideoGame/MegaManX4'' could be argued to be an attempt to invoke this trope as a central theme of it's plot. But lack of clarity regarding the actual reactions of the humans and the focus being solely on the Reploid Maverick Hunter's POV made it seem like the Repliforce rebelled with little prompting due to the massive frame-up against them and made the players consider them unreasonable idiots. The fact that there is also no clear time frame regarding the General's Reploid Independence proclamation makes it seem like the Repliforce just went on a revolt right after the Colonel refused to be detained for questioning.



* In ''VideoGame/MegaManZero4'', we FINALLY get some focus on the human side of things regarding the Reploids. Turns out, very few humans actually recognized Reploids as people, and didn't care if innocent Reploids were killed to allow more energy to be available to humans so long as humans were not inconvenienced. Considering that these humans were ruled by the original Mega Man X, who was all but TheParagon for reploids AND humans, and didn't bat an eye when Copy-X started genociding other Reploids for the sake of humanity without a good reason, and it's clear that humanity's disregard for the Reploids is something that has been going on for a very long time, in spite of X's best efforts to attain peace for both sides.

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* In ''VideoGame/MegaManZero4'', we FINALLY get some focus on the human side of things regarding the Reploids. Turns out, very few humans actually recognized Reploids as people, and didn't care if innocent Reploids were killed to allow more energy to be available to humans so long as humans were not inconvenienced. inconvenienced and could keep living in luxury. Considering that these humans were ruled by the original Mega Man X, who was all but TheParagon for reploids AND humans, and didn't bat an eye when Copy-X started genociding other Reploids to get just a bit more energy for the sake of humanity without a good reason, humans, and it's clear that humanity's disregard for the Reploids is something that has been going on for a very long time, in spite of X's best efforts to attain peace for both sides.
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