History WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids / ComicBooks

10th Apr '17 11:02:34 AM CyberController
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* Somehow, the first six issues of Jeff Smith's ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'' were excerpted in issues of ''Magazine/DisneyAdventures''. Needless to say, it suffered some {{Bowdleri|se}}zation (including two whole scenes getting cut out and all mentions of "God" and "beer" being changed to "Gosh" and "soda"). Most bookstores carry it, especially the colorized version, in the children's section instead of the Graphic Novels/Comics area. The fact that it was published by scholastic doesn't help either.

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* Somehow, the first six issues of Jeff Smith's ''ComicBook/{{Bone}}'' were excerpted in issues of ''Magazine/DisneyAdventures''. Needless to say, it suffered some {{Bowdleri|se}}zation (including two whole scenes getting cut out and all mentions of "God" and "beer" being changed to "Gosh" and "soda"). Most bookstores carry it, especially the colorized version, in the children's section instead of the Graphic Novels/Comics area. The fact that it was published by scholastic Scholastic doesn't help either.
9th Apr '17 1:44:04 PM EDP
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* Anything Archie's has to be family friendly, right? Nevermind that the main comics have been risque in their own right, the recent spinoff series' like ''ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina'' and ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'' are at minimum PG-13 and rather graphic horror series. Even the [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 2015 reboot]] is a little HotterAndSexier than the original comics.

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* Anything Archie's has to be family friendly, right? Nevermind that the main comics have been risque in their own right, the recent spinoff series' like ''ComicBook/ChillingAdventuresOfSabrina'' and ''ComicBook/AfterlifeWithArchie'' are at minimum PG-13 and rather graphic horror series. Even the [[ComicBook/ArchieComics2015 2015 reboot]] is a little HotterAndSexier than the original comics.comics.
* ''ComicBook/{{Diabolik}}'' caused great controversy in Italy when it first debuted, because, being a comic book, was automatically assumed to be child-friendly, nevermind the series' title derived from the Italian word for "devilish" or that the first story was titled "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast The King of Terror]]". That first story features a series of gruesome murders (none seen on-page, but bloody nonetheless), a woman seeing her husband murdered and being DrivenToMadness ''twice'', and an implacable criminal chasing a sympathetic character to kill him ''all to commit a theft'', has the main character seduce a woman for a one-night-stand just because he was in the mood (and actually shows the aftermath of them having sex), and ends with [[SympatheticInspectorAntagonist Ginko]] shooting a group of scarecrows in the belief Diabolik was hidden in one, leaving when no corpse fell down, and then ''one of the scarecrows showed Diabolik's terrifying eyes and started bleeding''. Eventually protests from worried parents turned it more kid-friendly... But the series was ''still'' about a knife-happy criminal who could be ''anyone'' thanks to LatexPerfection and it did not shy away from the implications, before eventually returning closer to its roots.
5th Apr '17 4:50:08 PM staticat09
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* Any of Creator/AlanMoore's works will quickly crush the "comics are for kids" myth, as they deal with very complex social, political, and moral ambiguities, and do not shy away from depicting the most brutal sides of humanity. ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', his most admired work, is just as ruthless as [[Film/{{Watchmen}} the film]] it inspired, if not more so. Yet many parents mistakenly will not bat an eye when their child reads them, thinking that it's no different than ''Franchise/Batman'' (which has its own difficulties, as explained below...)

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* Any of Creator/AlanMoore's works will quickly crush the "comics are for kids" myth, as they deal with very complex social, political, and moral ambiguities, and do not shy away from depicting the most brutal sides of humanity. ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', his most admired work, is just as ruthless as [[Film/{{Watchmen}} the film]] it inspired, if not more so. Yet many parents mistakenly will not bat an eye when their child reads them, thinking that it's no different than ''Franchise/Batman'' (which has its own difficulties, as explained below...)Batman.
5th Apr '17 4:49:41 PM staticat09
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* Any of Creator/AlanMoore's works will quickly crush the "comics are for kids" myth, as they deal with very complex social, political, and moral ambiguities, and do not shy away from depicting the most brutal sides of humanity. ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', his most admired work, is just as ruthless as [[Film/Watchmen the film]] it inspired, if not more so. Yet many parents mistakenly will not bat an eye when their child reads them, thinking that it's no different than ''Franchies/Batman'' (which has its own difficulties, as explained below...)

to:

* Any of Creator/AlanMoore's works will quickly crush the "comics are for kids" myth, as they deal with very complex social, political, and moral ambiguities, and do not shy away from depicting the most brutal sides of humanity. ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', his most admired work, is just as ruthless as [[Film/Watchmen [[Film/{{Watchmen}} the film]] it inspired, if not more so. Yet many parents mistakenly will not bat an eye when their child reads them, thinking that it's no different than ''Franchies/Batman'' ''Franchise/Batman'' (which has its own difficulties, as explained below...)
5th Apr '17 4:49:05 PM staticat09
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* Any of Creator/AlanMoore's works will quickly crush the "comics are for kids" myth, as they deal with very complex social, political, and moral ambiguities, and do not shy away from depicting the most brutal sides of humanity. ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'', his most admired work, is just as ruthless as [[Film/Watchmen the film]] it inspired, if not more so. Yet many parents mistakenly will not bat an eye when their child reads them, thinking that it's no different than ''Franchies/Batman'' (which has its own difficulties, as explained below...)
2nd Mar '17 11:12:27 AM kingjello
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* Stephen Desberg created a cutesy comic together with Stéphane Colman called ''ComicBook/BillyTheCat'', which is about a teenage kid that gets transformed in a cute little yellow kitty. It features cute covers and equally cute friendly characters, but some of the comics (particularly issues 3, 5, 6 and 12) feature cats bleeding to death in alleys, a man getting impaled on one of his own statues, and a giant gorilla with a hook for a hand that kidnaps and harasses a little girl. The fact that a kid-friendly animated show was created based off the comic certainly wouldn't help matters much.

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* Stephen Desberg created a cutesy comic together with Stéphane Colman called ''ComicBook/BillyTheCat'', which is about a teenage kid that gets transformed in into a cute little yellow kitty. It features cute covers and equally cute friendly characters, but some of the comics (particularly issues 3, 5, 6 and 12) feature cats bleeding to death in alleys, a man getting impaled on one of his own statues, and a giant gorilla with a hook for a hand that kidnaps and harasses a little girl. The fact that a kid-friendly animated show was created based off the comic certainly wouldn't help matters much.
17th Jun '16 8:58:25 PM gewunomox
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** In an interview in Amazing Heroes #119, writer Max Allan Collins said that, in reference to a Creator/FrankMiller written story which had ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} as a former prostitute, he found that inappropriate--the equivalent of doing Literature/PeterPan and having them face [[ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything historically accurate pirates]]. Collins felt that Catwoman was derived from children’s entertainment, appearing in a series that had turned into a much more overtly juvenile version of Radio/TheShadow (Catwoman debuted soon after the début of the KidSidekick with shaved legs, short shorts and elf shoes) and therefore people should keep that in mind when handling her. Apparently, certain things about Catwoman that have always existed (the fact that she was directly modeled after Jean Harlow, the {{Madonna}} of her day, or that she carries a ''whip'') do not enter into the equation.

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** In an interview in Amazing Heroes #119, writer Max Allan Collins said that, in reference to a Creator/FrankMiller written story which had ComicBook/{{Catwoman}} as a former prostitute, he found that inappropriate--the equivalent of doing Literature/PeterPan and having them face [[ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything historically accurate pirates]]. Collins felt that Catwoman was derived from children’s entertainment, appearing in a series that had turned into a much more overtly juvenile version of Radio/TheShadow (Catwoman debuted soon after the début of the KidSidekick with shaved legs, short shorts and elf shoes) and therefore people should keep that in mind when handling her. Apparently, certain things about Catwoman that have always existed (the fact that she was directly modeled after Jean Harlow, the {{Madonna}} Music/{{Madonna}} of her day, or that she carries a ''whip'') do not enter into the equation.
1st May '16 3:29:08 PM WhatArtThee
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* While ''Disney/BigHero6'' is definitely for kids (albeit with a few mature, heartfelt moments), the comics upon which the Disney movie is based are... not. Honey Lemon is more voluptuous, Wasabi throws knives at his opponents, and Gogo has ties with the yakuza. And Baymax is more like a Transformer on crack than a cuddly, cute C3PO-like Michelin Man. It's very clear Disney cleaned up most of this for the kids.

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* While ''Disney/BigHero6'' is definitely for kids (albeit with a few mature, heartfelt moments), the comics upon which the Disney movie is based are... not. Honey The team was assembled in response to Hiroshima and Nagasaki's bombings, Hiro's parents were killed by a ''spirit made out of dead souls'' ,Honey Lemon is more voluptuous, Wasabi throws knives at his opponents, and Gogo has ties with the yakuza. And Baymax is more like a Transformer on crack than a cuddly, cute C3PO-like Michelin Man.made out of genetic material from Hiro's dead father. It's very clear Disney cleaned up most of this for the kids.



* ''ComicBook/TheMask''. While the comic book was not for children, and neither was [[Film/TheMask the movie]] based on it, [[WesternAnimation/TheMask the cartoon series]] based on ''that'' clearly was. This caused Dark Horse to [[http://web.archive.org/web/20071013194758/http://sequart.com/articles/?article=602 turn the comics more family-friendly]].

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* ''ComicBook/TheMask''. While the comic book was not for children, and neither was [[Film/TheMask the movie]] based on it, [[WesternAnimation/TheMask the cartoon series]] based on ''that'' , as well as the infamous ''Film/SonOfTheMask'' movie, clearly was. This caused Dark Horse to [[http://web.archive.org/web/20071013194758/http://sequart.com/articles/?article=602 turn the comics more family-friendly]].



* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' is a dark and gritty series, but still considered family friendly. ''ComicBook/TheBatmanAdventures'' tie-in comic is considerably darker, has more blood and violence, and has references to sexuality. One one-shot "annual" comic loosely based on the series was guest-illustrated by more mature comics artists (including Klaus Janson, Frank Miller's partner on ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns''!) and had a character saying [[PrecisionFStrike "Who the hell are you?"]] - the likes of which was ''never'' uttered on the TV series. It's taken even further in the ''Harley and Ivy'' subseries, where hinting at the sex lives of the title characters is arguably a large part of the point. In one, the two characters in question are sleeping in the same bed at one point, and Harley says that she loves Ivy "more than Mista J" and Ivy makes several direct references to the Joker's physical and psychological abuse of Harley, which she (Ivy) is disgusted with.

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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' is a dark and gritty series, but still considered family friendly. ''ComicBook/TheBatmanAdventures'' tie-in comic is considerably darker, has more blood and violence, and has references to sexuality. One one-shot "annual" comic loosely based on the series was guest-illustrated by more mature comics artists (including Klaus Janson, Frank Miller's partner on ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns''!) and had a character saying [[PrecisionFStrike "Who the hell are you?"]] - the likes of which was ''never'' uttered on the TV series. It's taken even further in the ''Harley and Ivy'' subseries, where hinting at the sex lives of the title characters is arguably a large part of the point. In one, the two characters in question are sleeping in the same bed at one point, and Harley says that she loves Ivy "more than Mista J" and Ivy makes several direct references to the Joker's physical and psychological abuse of Harley, which she (Ivy) is disgusted with.



* Swedish comic strips ''ComicBook/ArneAnka'' and ''ComicBook/{{Rocky}}'' are filled to the brim with funny animals. They're also filled with alcohol consumption, sex and deep, deep cynicism. Luckily, Swedes are generally smart enough to check the contents of such material before handing it to their kids.

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* Swedish comic strips ''ComicBook/ArneAnka'' and ''ComicBook/{{Rocky}}'' are filled to the brim with funny animals. They're also filled with alcohol consumption, sex and deep, deep cynicism. Luckily, Swedes are generally smart enough to check the contents of such material before handing it to their kids.



* Frankly, danged near ''any'' mainstream SuperHero comic produced during the DarkerAndEdgier [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age that ran from about 1988-1996.]] Between the ever-increasing levels of {{Gorn}} and the constant [[CrisisCrossover big damn universe-changing events]], the two biggest comic companies are ''still'' throwing as thick and fast as they can, the only Marvel and DC comics even ''remotely'' meant for kids these days are the Adventures and Johnny DC lines. It's gotten to the point that pasting "HEY, KIDS! COMICS!" over hyped up and massively nasty pages has become a wide-ranging Internet meme.
* It has been speculated that reason ComicBook/{{Batwoman}} (who was supposed to have her own series as far back as 2005) was kept on ice for so long is because WB execs were worried about upsetting parents by introducing a lesbian Bat-character in the wake of Batman's resurgence in mainstream popularity after the release of ''Film/BatmanBegins''. It apparently didn't matter that ''Batman Begins'' is a ''terrifying'' film, making ''BatmanReturns'' look like a Disney family comedy.

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* Frankly, danged near ''any'' mainstream SuperHero comic produced during the DarkerAndEdgier [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age that ran from about 1988-1996.]] Between the ever-increasing levels of {{Gorn}} and the constant [[CrisisCrossover big damn universe-changing events]], the two biggest comic companies are ''still'' throwing as thick and fast as they can, Even today, the only Marvel and DC comics even ''remotely'' meant for kids these days are the Adventures and Johnny DC lines. It's gotten to the point that pasting "HEY, KIDS! COMICS!" over hyped up and massively nasty pages has become a wide-ranging Internet meme.
* It has been speculated that reason ComicBook/{{Batwoman}} (who was supposed to have her own series as far back as 2005) was kept on ice for so long is because WB execs were worried about upsetting parents by introducing a lesbian Bat-character in the wake of Batman's resurgence in mainstream popularity after the release of ''Film/BatmanBegins''. It apparently didn't matter that ''Batman Begins'' is a ''terrifying'' film, making ''BatmanReturns'' look like a Disney family comedy.
meme.
3rd Apr '16 1:50:58 PM staticat09
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* While ''Disney/Big Hero 6'' is definitely for kids (albeit with a few mature, heartfelt moments), the comics upon which the Disney movie is based are... not. Honey Lemon is more voluptuous, Wasabi throws knives at his opponents, and Gogo has ties with the yakuza. And Baymax is more like a Transformer on crack than a cuddly, cute C3PO-like Michelin Man. It's very clear Disney cleaned up most of this for the kids.

to:

* While ''Disney/Big Hero 6'' ''Disney/BigHero6'' is definitely for kids (albeit with a few mature, heartfelt moments), the comics upon which the Disney movie is based are... not. Honey Lemon is more voluptuous, Wasabi throws knives at his opponents, and Gogo has ties with the yakuza. And Baymax is more like a Transformer on crack than a cuddly, cute C3PO-like Michelin Man. It's very clear Disney cleaned up most of this for the kids.
3rd Apr '16 1:50:32 PM staticat09
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* While ''Disney/Big Hero 6'' is definitely for kids (albeit with a few mature, heartfelt moments), the comics upon which the Disney movie is based are... not. Honey Lemon is more voluptuous, Wasabi throws knives at his opponents, and Gogo has ties with the yakuza. And Baymax is more like a Transformer on crack than a cuddly, cute C3PO-like Michelin Man. It's very clear Disney cleaned up most of this for the kids.
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