History WhatDoYouMeanItsForKids / LiveActionTV

28th Aug '16 11:52:43 AM nombretomado
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* ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' has its own unique feature, a huge amount of BrotherSisterIncest innuendo. Not to mention the [[Radar/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace crap past the radar]], and the [[NightmareFuel/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace Nightmare Fuel]][[note]]Yes, it has such things; the ''Wizards vs. Werewolves'' episode was rated PG, something that has never been done on the DisneyChannel before.[[/note]], the FetishFuel and there is much more. Before the trope was cut and locked, it had its own Incest Yay page. A character was also murdered on this show, and perhaps even more than one seeing as some scenes were downright ambiguous. In a DisneyChannel children's show. [[{{Squick}} Yeah]].

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* ''Series/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace'' has its own unique feature, a huge amount of BrotherSisterIncest innuendo. Not to mention the [[Radar/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace crap past the radar]], and the [[NightmareFuel/WizardsOfWaverlyPlace Nightmare Fuel]][[note]]Yes, it has such things; the ''Wizards vs. Werewolves'' episode was rated PG, something that has never been done on the DisneyChannel Creator/DisneyChannel before.[[/note]], the FetishFuel and there is much more. Before the trope was cut and locked, it had its own Incest Yay page. A character was also murdered on this show, and perhaps even more than one seeing as some scenes were downright ambiguous. In a DisneyChannel Disney Channel children's show. [[{{Squick}} Yeah]].
26th Aug '16 7:47:12 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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* -> Discipline? Naked... [turns book sideways] With a ''melon''?

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* -> --> Discipline? Naked... [turns book sideways] With a ''melon''?
22nd Jul '16 5:07:00 AM Anddrix
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* Most {{tokusatsu}} shows, most notably ''Series/SuperSentai'' and ''Franchise/KamenRider''. The fact that there have been a few toku productions aimed exclusively towards adults (''Film/ShinKamenRiderPrologue'' and ''Series/{{GARO}}'', to name a few) does not negate the fact that the vast majority are aimed towards children. (In fact, of those two listed productions, ''Shin'' is quite the BaseBreaker '''for''' being aimed at adults. Well, more precisely, for being a {{deconstruction}}.)

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* Most {{tokusatsu}} shows, most notably ''Series/SuperSentai'' and ''Franchise/KamenRider''. The fact that there have been a few toku productions aimed exclusively towards adults (''Film/ShinKamenRiderPrologue'' and ''Series/{{GARO}}'', to name a few) does not negate the fact that the vast majority are aimed towards children. (In fact, of those two listed productions, ''Shin'' is quite the BaseBreaker divisive '''for''' being aimed at adults. Well, more precisely, for being a {{deconstruction}}.)
16th Jun '16 11:30:26 AM WhatArtThee
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** Averted since 2005. To get the show restarted and get it adequately funded, Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch it to the BBC as a ''drama'' rather than as "science fiction" or "children's programme". However, the spinoff ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' (2007-2011) was explicitly aimed at kids. Although revival!Who doesn't shy away from grim themes and mature content (particularly where the characters' romantic relationships are concerned), as noted below, it is ''still'' regarded as a family program by the masses in the U.K.

to:

** Averted since 2005. To get the show restarted and get it adequately funded, Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch it to the BBC as a ''drama'' rather than as "science fiction" or "children's programme". However, the spinoff ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' (2007-2011) was explicitly aimed at kids. Although revival!Who doesn't shy away from grim themes and mature content (particularly where the characters' romantic relationships are concerned), content, as noted below, it is ''still'' regarded as a family program by the masses in the U.K.



** Aside from the above examples, the trope question itself is often uttered whenever fans -- particularly adult fans -- encounter someone who dismisses ''Doctor Who'' as "Just a show for kids." As of 2016, the general response is to hogtie the person to a chair and make them watch [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent "Heaven Sent"]].
** This question comes up particularly often in North America, because few shows at all are marketed to the ''whole'' family as ''Who'' is in the U.K.; in the U.S. it's marketed mostly to adults instead, with its kid-oriented merchandise offered in specialty/comic shops rather than mainstream toy stores. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-friendly tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/NewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy section alongside adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the DarkerAndEdgier ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' and ''Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium, which ''were not'' for kids. And now ''Magazine/DoctorWhoAdventures'' has been exported to the U.S.; those who don't realize the show is regarded as family viewing might be taken aback at a fun kiddie magazine featuring a maze game inspired by the aforementioned "Heaven Sent" in one issue: Dead ends represented by the Veil's hand and all those skulls! And hey, there's the portrait of [[spoiler: the late Clara Oswald]] in one room! Good times!
22nd May '16 2:26:28 PM Midna
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* ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'' is promoted as the family friendlier of the superhero shows currently on TV, and has a dedicated fanbase of young girls. That said, the show tackles mature topics, has the occasional sexual innuendo, and a fair amount of violence, including a rather shocking moment during the season 1 finale when [[spoiler: J'onn rips a female villain ''in half''. Being that she's an alien capable of taking her own body apart, this isn't as gory as you'd think, but you still see her two halves after and she does definitely die. At the same time, Supergirl is shown making her first kill as she burns a an enemy Kryptonian's eyes out.]]

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* ''Series/{{Supergirl}}'' is promoted as a more family-friendly alternative to the family friendlier glut of the DarkerAndEdgier superhero shows currently on TV, and has a dedicated fanbase of young girls. That said, the show tackles mature topics, has the occasional sexual innuendo, and a fair amount of violence, including a rather shocking moment during the season 1 finale when [[spoiler: J'onn rips a female villain ''in half''. Being that she's an alien capable of taking her own body apart, this isn't as gory as you'd think, but you still see her two halves after and she does definitely die. At the same time, Supergirl is shown making her first kill as she burns a an enemy Kryptonian's eyes out.]]
19th May '16 11:31:34 AM Sapphirea2
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** This question comes up particularly often in North America, because few shows at all are marketed to the ''whole'' family as ''Who'' is in the U.K.; in the U.S. it's marketed mostly to adults instead, with its kid-oriented merchandise offered in specialty/comic shops rather than mainstream toy stores. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-friendly tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/NewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy section alongside adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the DarkerAndEdgier ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' and ''Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium, which ''were not'' for kids. And now ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' has been exported to the U.S.; those who don't realize the show is regarded as family viewing might be taken aback at a fun kiddie magazine featuring a maze game inspired by the aforementioned "Heaven Sent" in one issue: Dead ends represented by the Veil's hand and all those skulls! And hey, there's the portrait of [[spoiler: the late Clara Oswald]] in one room! Good times!

to:

** This question comes up particularly often in North America, because few shows at all are marketed to the ''whole'' family as ''Who'' is in the U.K.; in the U.S. it's marketed mostly to adults instead, with its kid-oriented merchandise offered in specialty/comic shops rather than mainstream toy stores. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-friendly tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/NewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy section alongside adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the DarkerAndEdgier ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' and ''Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium, which ''were not'' for kids. And now ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' ''Magazine/DoctorWhoAdventures'' has been exported to the U.S.; those who don't realize the show is regarded as family viewing might be taken aback at a fun kiddie magazine featuring a maze game inspired by the aforementioned "Heaven Sent" in one issue: Dead ends represented by the Veil's hand and all those skulls! And hey, there's the portrait of [[spoiler: the late Clara Oswald]] in one room! Good times!
11th May '16 12:39:21 PM Sapphirea2
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** This question comes up particularly often in North America, because few shows at all are marketed to the ''whole'' family as ''Who'' is in the U.K.; in the U.S. it's marketed mostly to adults instead, with its kid-oriented merchandise offered in specialty/comic shops rather than mainstream toy stores. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-friendly tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/NewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy alongside the adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the much DarkerAndEdgier ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' and ''Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium, which certainly ''were not'' for kids. More recently, ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' has been exported to the U.S.; those who don't realize the show is regarded as family viewing might be taken aback at a fun kiddie magazine featuring a maze game inspired by the aforementioned "Heaven Sent" in one issue: Dead ends represented by the Veil's hand and all those skulls! And hey, there's the portrait of [[spoiler: the late Clara Oswald]] in one room! Good times!

to:

** This question comes up particularly often in North America, because few shows at all are marketed to the ''whole'' family as ''Who'' is in the U.K.; in the U.S. it's marketed mostly to adults instead, with its kid-oriented merchandise offered in specialty/comic shops rather than mainstream toy stores. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-friendly tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/NewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy section alongside the adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the much DarkerAndEdgier ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' and ''Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium, which certainly ''were not'' for kids. More recently, kids. And now ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' has been exported to the U.S.; those who don't realize the show is regarded as family viewing might be taken aback at a fun kiddie magazine featuring a maze game inspired by the aforementioned "Heaven Sent" in one issue: Dead ends represented by the Veil's hand and all those skulls! And hey, there's the portrait of [[spoiler: the late Clara Oswald]] in one room! Good times!
11th May '16 12:37:30 PM Sapphirea2
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** Averted since 2005. To get the show restarted and get it adequately funded, Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch it to the BBC as a ''drama'' rather than as "science fiction" or "children's programme". However, the spinoff ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' (2007-2011) was explicitly aimed at kids. Although revival!Who doesn't shy away from grim themes and mature content (particularly where the characters' romantic relationships are concerned), as noted below, it is ''still'' regarded as a family program by the masses in the U.K. This does cause some marketing oddities in North America, where it's a cult show marketed to adults. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-oriented tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy alongside the adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the DarkerAndEdgier, HotterAndSexier ExpandedUniverse novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium.

to:

** Averted since 2005. To get the show restarted and get it adequately funded, Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch it to the BBC as a ''drama'' rather than as "science fiction" or "children's programme". However, the spinoff ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' (2007-2011) was explicitly aimed at kids. Although revival!Who doesn't shy away from grim themes and mature content (particularly where the characters' romantic relationships are concerned), as noted below, it is ''still'' regarded as a family program by the masses in the U.K. This does cause some marketing oddities in North America, where it's a cult show marketed to adults. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-oriented tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy alongside the adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the DarkerAndEdgier, HotterAndSexier ExpandedUniverse novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium.



** Aside from the above examples, the trope question itself is often uttered whenever fans -- particularly adult fans -- encounter someone who dismisses ''Doctor Who'' as "Just a show for kids." These days the general response is to hogtie the person to a chair and make them watch [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent "Heaven Sent"]].

to:

** Aside from the above examples, the trope question itself is often uttered whenever fans -- particularly adult fans -- encounter someone who dismisses ''Doctor Who'' as "Just a show for kids." These days As of 2016, the general response is to hogtie the person to a chair and make them watch [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent "Heaven Sent"]]. Sent"]].
** This question comes up particularly often in North America, because few shows at all are marketed to the ''whole'' family as ''Who'' is in the U.K.; in the U.S. it's marketed mostly to adults instead, with its kid-oriented merchandise offered in specialty/comic shops rather than mainstream toy stores. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-friendly tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/NewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy alongside the adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the much DarkerAndEdgier ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewAdventures'' and ''Literature/EighthDoctorAdventures'' novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium, which certainly ''were not'' for kids. More recently, ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' has been exported to the U.S.; those who don't realize the show is regarded as family viewing might be taken aback at a fun kiddie magazine featuring a maze game inspired by the aforementioned "Heaven Sent" in one issue: Dead ends represented by the Veil's hand and all those skulls! And hey, there's the portrait of [[spoiler: the late Clara Oswald]] in one room! Good times!
11th May '16 12:26:04 PM Sapphirea2
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* ''Series/DoctorWho'' itself is considered family viewing, despite the dark tone of certain episodes and a surprising amount of [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar sexual innuendo]], and it is shown around the supper hour on a Saturday. ''Doctor Who'' is fifty years old and is very much seen as a family/children's show, but it's been violent from the very beginning. A BBC audience research survey conducted in 1972 found that Doctor Who was the most violent show it produced at the time. The show was especially violent during the first few Fourth Doctor seasons, consistently getting complaints, and the show was also so violent in 1985 that it got the show cancelled for 18 months. For instance, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainofMorbius "The Brain Of Morbius"]] (1976) features a man getting shot in the stomach with an explosion of blood, then crawling, dying, down a corridor.
** Even the first few stories could be really dark. In the first story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An Unearthly Child]]" [[CharacterizationMarchesOn the Doctor is a quite morally ambiguous figure]], and there are some surprisingly violent scenes, such as a Caveman with his chest ripped open and a cave of broken skulls. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeofDestruction The Edge of Destruction]]" uses haunted house tropes and has Susan wildly stabbing a bed with scissors.
** Season 22 is notorious for this, showing someone having their hands crushed and showing several people being stabbed to death. This is lampshaded in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E2VengeanceOnVaros "Vengeance on Varos"]].
** Averted since 2005. To get the show restarted and get it adequately funded, Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch it to the BBC as a ''drama'' rather than as "science fiction" or "children's programme". However, the spinoff ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' (2007-2011) continued the trend.
** Creator/JohnSimm stated that ''Doctor Who'' being a kids' show was the main reason why he decided to play TheMaster ([[SoMyKidsCanWatch He wanted to show his son that he could act]]). Of course, the episodes he ''was'' in involved twisted monsters from the future wiping out a good portion of humanity, the Master being [[GoneHorriblyWrong ressurected as a superpowered being]] [[HorrorHunger who devours humans to satisfy his endless hunger]], and turning the ''entire'' human population into copies of himself.
** Current show runner Creator/StevenMoffat has written about how annoyed and insulted he is whenever people use the phrase "kid's show" as a derogatory thing.
*** Moffat is very fond of proclaiming how much he enjoys terrifying children. That's basically his favorite part of running ''Series/DoctorWho''.
** Phillip Hinchcliffe, who was the producer (the term "showrunner" didn't exist) for the early Tom Baker seasons referred to above has said that he was being told by medical professionals that the series was helping children to articulate fears they hadn't been able to deal with, rather than give them new ones.
** Aside from the above examples, the trope question itself is often uttered whenever fans - particularly adult fans - encounter someone who dismisses ''Doctor Who'' as "just a show for kids". These days the general response is to hogtie the person to a chair and make them watch "Heaven Sent".

to:

* ''Series/DoctorWho'' itself is considered family viewing, despite the dark tone of certain episodes and a surprising amount of [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar sexual innuendo]], and it is shown around the supper hour on a Saturday. ''Doctor Who'' is fifty now fifty-plus years old and is very much seen as a family/children's show, show in the U.K., but it's been violent from the very beginning. A BBC audience research survey conducted in 1972 found that Doctor Who ''Doctor Who'' was the most violent show it produced at the time. time! The show was especially violent during the first few Fourth Doctor seasons, seasons (12-14), consistently getting complaints, complaints and the show was also so violent in 1985 that it got the show cancelled for 18 months. For eventually forcing a {{Retool}} (for instance, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainofMorbius "The Brain Of Morbius"]] (1976) features a man getting shot in the stomach with an explosion of blood, then crawling, dying, down a corridor.
corridor).
** Even the first few stories could be really dark. In the first story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E1AnUnearthlyChild An Unearthly Child]]" [[CharacterizationMarchesOn the Doctor is a quite morally ambiguous figure]], and there are some surprisingly violent scenes, such as a Caveman caveman with his chest ripped open and a cave of broken skulls. "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E3TheEdgeofDestruction The Edge of Destruction]]" uses haunted house tropes and has Susan wildly stabbing a bed with scissors.
** Phillip Hinchcliffe, who was the producer (the term "showrunner" didn't exist) for the early Creator/TomBaker seasons referred to above has said that he was being told by medical professionals that the series was helping children to ''articulate'' fears they hadn't been able to deal with, rather than give them new ones.
** Season 22 (1985; first season for the Sixth Doctor) is notorious for this, showing such grim sights as someone having their hands crushed and showing several people being stabbed to death. This is lampshaded in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS22E2VengeanceOnVaros "Vengeance on Varos"]].
Varos"]]. The violence and general mean-spirited nature of the proceedings effectively got the show cancelled for eighteen months.
** Averted since 2005. To get the show restarted and get it adequately funded, Creator/RussellTDavies had to pitch it to the BBC as a ''drama'' rather than as "science fiction" or "children's programme". However, the spinoff ''Series/TheSarahJaneAdventures'' (2007-2011) continued was explicitly aimed at kids. Although revival!Who doesn't shy away from grim themes and mature content (particularly where the trend.
characters' romantic relationships are concerned), as noted below, it is ''still'' regarded as a family program by the masses in the U.K. This does cause some marketing oddities in North America, where it's a cult show marketed to adults. Barnes & Noble shelves kid-oriented tie-in literature such as TheChristmasAnnual, ''How to Be a Time Lord'', and the ''Literature/DoctorWhoNewSeriesAdventures'' novels in the adult Science Fiction/Fantasy alongside the adult-oriented reference works and reissues of the DarkerAndEdgier, HotterAndSexier ExpandedUniverse novels from TheNineties and TurnOfTheMillennium.
** Creator/JohnSimm stated that ''Doctor Who'' being a kids' show was the main reason why he decided to play TheMaster ([[SoMyKidsCanWatch He wanted to show his son that he could act]]). Of course, the episodes he ''was'' ''he'' was in involved twisted monsters from the future wiping out a good portion of humanity, the Master being [[GoneHorriblyWrong ressurected as a superpowered being]] [[HorrorHunger who devours humans to satisfy his endless hunger]], and turning the ''entire'' human population into copies of himself.
himself!
** Current show runner Creator/StevenMoffat has written about how annoyed and insulted he is whenever people use the phrase "kid's show" as a derogatory thing.
*** Moffat
thing. And he is very fond of proclaiming how much he enjoys terrifying children. That's children; it's basically his favorite part of running ''Series/DoctorWho''.
** Phillip Hinchcliffe, who was the producer (the term "showrunner" didn't exist) for the early Tom Baker seasons referred to above has said that he was being told by medical professionals that the series was helping children to articulate fears they hadn't been able to deal with, rather than give them new ones.
''Series/DoctorWho''!
** Aside from the above examples, the trope question itself is often uttered whenever fans - -- particularly adult fans - -- encounter someone who dismisses ''Doctor Who'' as "just "Just a show for kids". kids." These days the general response is to hogtie the person to a chair and make them watch [[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E11HeavenSent "Heaven Sent".Sent"]].
27th Apr '16 11:20:45 AM WhatArtThee
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** ''Doctor Who's'' family friendly aspect is considered a strength today, given that most other science fiction series are either very violent, very sexual, or both. On several occasions in recent (as of 2015) years, WordOfGod (actors, producers, critics) have noted how rare it has become for a series to appeal to children and adults in equal measure. Compare, for example, with the MarvelCinematicUniverse series produced for {{Netflix}} that are thoroughly adults only. ''Doctor Who'' replaces sex scenes and graphic violence with storylines ripped from the headlines (such as a two-parter adapting the current war on terror and Syrian refugee crisis), and surprisingly sober ruminations on topics such as death. And this isn't new; a 1980 storyline called ''Nightmare of Eden'' tackled the topic of illegal narcotics, and a 1977 story called ''The Sun Makers'' was a condemnation of Britain's tax system.



* ''Series/KnightRider'' is often stereotyped as a kids' show because it has one hero and his super cool super car, but the first season itself is loaded with episodes about politics, corrupt police, framed murder charges, a lover implicated in soliciting crime and the murder of a sleaze magazine owner- plenty of murders in the first season. The pilot is surely not for kids. Plenty of gunshots fired in the show actually hit -- and a few kill. Contrast that with ''Series/TheATeam'' which has only two casualties in the whole run and almost none of the shots hit.



* Aired in syndication and not heavily promoted, ''Series/SuperhumanSamuraiSyberSquad'' got to fly under the radar. Though "destroying" the heroes came up as a villainous goal a lot just 'cause it's how bad guys talk, NeverSayDie wasn't in effect, and some of the things the MonsterOfTheWeek ''did'' to people could get kind of dark. All water faucets suddenly spew hydrochloric acid! Your wristwatch takes control of your hand and you nearly choke yourself to death while the monster laughs about how you're going to die! Kilokhan also once pulled a Venjix, taking over nukes and nearly causing World War Three. Oh, what about the ''Christmas episode'' where Kilokhan finds out who Servo is, transfers himself to Sam's computer, and outright ''kills'' him with an electric blast? Malcolm, Kilokhan's sidekick until Kilo tried to pull a YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness on him, is told to TakeUpMySword, but when he tries to transform, only the Servo wrist device is pulled into the digital world, and Servo--Sam within as always--activates. Sam defeats Kilokhan with a DangerousForbiddenTechnique, but doesn't know if he'll ever be able to return to his human form and departs into the information superhighway for parts unknown. Apparently, unexpected renewal is what kept this from being how the series ended. (More episodes were made, but the second full season that was talked about didn't come, so it actually gets NoEnding, the last episode being one just like any other.)

to:

* Aired in syndication and not heavily promoted, ''Series/SuperhumanSamuraiSyberSquad'' got to fly under the radar. Though "destroying" the heroes came up as a villainous goal a lot just 'cause it's how bad guys talk, NeverSayDie wasn't in effect, and some Lots of the things the MonsterOfTheWeek ''did'' to people could get kind of dark. All water faucets suddenly spew hydrochloric acid! Your wristwatch takes control of your hand and you nearly choke yourself to death while the monster laughs about how you're going to die! Kilokhan also once pulled a Venjix, taking over nukes and nearly causing World War Three. Oh, what about the ''Christmas episode'' where Kilokhan finds out who Servo is, transfers himself to Sam's computer, and outright ''kills'' him with an electric blast? Malcolm, Kilokhan's sidekick until Kilo tried to pull a YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness on him, is told to TakeUpMySword, but when he tries to transform, only the Servo wrist device is pulled into the digital world, and Servo--Sam within as always--activates. Sam defeats Kilokhan with a DangerousForbiddenTechnique, but doesn't know if he'll ever be able to return to his human form and departs into the information superhighway for parts unknown. Apparently, unexpected renewal is what kept this from being how the series ended. (More episodes were made, but the second full season that was talked about didn't come, so it actually gets NoEnding, the last episode being one just like any other.)



** Just a reminder: the plot of several seasons of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' is angels trying to start the Apocalypse. Just remember that. ''Wizards of Waverly Place'' and ''Supernatural'' used the same idea.



* BananasInPajamas had an episode where The Rat In The Hat cross-dressed because he wanted to be the lead in a Cinderella play. Now that's something you don't see on DoraTheExplorer!
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