History WesternAnimation / WoodyWoodpecker

23rd Mar '16 8:58:52 PM maylove25
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* AlternativeForeignThemeSong: The Japanese version had a different opening song as heard [[http://www.nicozon.net/watch/sm3484279 here]] and ending theme as heard [[http://www.nicozon.net/watch/sm17073869 here]].

to:

* AlternativeForeignThemeSong: The Japanese version had a different opening song as heard [[http://www.nicozon.net/watch/sm3484279 [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rnJ6JFcDzok here]] and ending theme as heard [[http://www.nicozon.net/watch/sm17073869 here]].
20th Mar '16 9:33:46 PM ryanasaurus0077
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During this time, director, animator and writer Ben "Bugs" Hardaway, fresh off of working on WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes, arrived at Lantz's studio and began work there, and with his help, Lantz created a brand new star in an attempt to give his studio the kick in the pants it needed badly initially appearing as the villain of the Andy Panda short ''Knock Knock'' in 1940 ([[PoorlyDisguisedPilot with Andy himself playing a minor role compared to him]]), Woody Woodpecker was an [[BreakoutCharacter instant success]] -- [[CompositeCharacter being a hybrid]] of Classic WesternAnimation/DaffyDuck's [[ScrewySquirrel troublemaking]], [[{{Cloudcuckoolander"" eccentric]] and over the top persona with the wiseacre attitude of WesternAnimation/BugsBunny, and initially combined with the vocal talents of Creator/MelBlanc, the character quickly earned his own series the following year, starting with 1941's "WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut".

to:

During this time, director, animator and writer Ben "Bugs" Hardaway, fresh off of working on WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes, arrived at Lantz's studio and began work there, and with his help, Lantz created a brand new star in an attempt to give his studio the kick in the pants it needed badly initially appearing as the villain of the Andy Panda short ''Knock Knock'' in 1940 ([[PoorlyDisguisedPilot with Andy himself playing a minor role compared to him]]), Woody Woodpecker was an [[BreakoutCharacter instant success]] -- [[CompositeCharacter being a hybrid]] of Classic WesternAnimation/DaffyDuck's [[ScrewySquirrel troublemaking]], [[{{Cloudcuckoolander"" [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} eccentric]] and over the top persona with the wiseacre attitude of WesternAnimation/BugsBunny, and initially combined with the vocal talents of Creator/MelBlanc, the character quickly earned his own series the following year, starting with 1941's "WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut".
20th Mar '16 3:21:54 PM aye_amber
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''Woody Woodpecker'' is an iconic cartoon star, the mascot and [[BreakthroughHit most successful cartoon series]] of the Creator/WalterLantz and {{Universal}} studios, from his [[BreakoutCharacter breakout debut]] in the AndyPanda short "WesternAnimation/KnockKnock" [[note]]Although ''WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut'', released the following year, was the debut of his own series.[[/note]], in [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1940]], to the end of his theatrical run in [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation 1972,]] lasting for 198 shorts, supplemented by appearances in comics, merchandise, a long-running TV anthology show, a short-lived contemporary TV revival, and an upcoming CGI animated feature, thus establishing him as an animation LongRunner.

to:

''Woody Woodpecker'' is an iconic cartoon star, the mascot and [[BreakthroughHit most successful cartoon series]] of the Creator/WalterLantz and {{Universal}} studios, from his [[BreakoutCharacter breakout debut]] in the AndyPanda short "WesternAnimation/KnockKnock" [[note]]Although ''WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut'', released the following year, was the debut of his own series.[[/note]], in [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1940]], to the end of his theatrical run in [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation 1972,]] lasting for 198 shorts, supplemented by appearances in comics, merchandise, a long-running TV anthology show, a short-lived contemporary TV revival, and an upcoming CGI animated feature, thus establishing him as an animation LongRunner.
{{Long Runner|s}}.
19th Mar '16 8:52:16 PM Angeldeb82
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''Woody Woodpecker'' is an iconic cartoon star, the mascot and [[BreakthroughHit most successful cartoon series]] of the Creator/WalterLantz and {{Universal}} studios, from his [[BreakoutCharacter breakout debut]] in the AndyPanda short [[WesternAnimation/KnockKnock "Knock Knock"]] [[note]]Although ''WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut'', released the following year, was the debut of his own series.[[/note]], in [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1940]], to the end of his theatrical run in [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation 1972,]] lasting for 198 shorts, supplemented by appearances in comics, merchandise, a long-running TV anthology show, a short-lived contemporary TV revival, and an upcoming CGI animated feature, thus establishing him as an animation LongRunner.

to:

''Woody Woodpecker'' is an iconic cartoon star, the mascot and [[BreakthroughHit most successful cartoon series]] of the Creator/WalterLantz and {{Universal}} studios, from his [[BreakoutCharacter breakout debut]] in the AndyPanda short [[WesternAnimation/KnockKnock "Knock Knock"]] "WesternAnimation/KnockKnock" [[note]]Although ''WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut'', released the following year, was the debut of his own series.[[/note]], in [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1940]], to the end of his theatrical run in [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation 1972,]] lasting for 198 shorts, supplemented by appearances in comics, merchandise, a long-running TV anthology show, a short-lived contemporary TV revival, and an upcoming CGI animated feature, thus establishing him as an animation LongRunner.



During this time, director, animator and writer Ben "Bugs" Hardaway, fresh off of working on WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes, arrived at Lantz's studio and began work there, and with his help, Lantz created a brand new star in an attempt to give his studio the kick in the pants it needed badly initially appearing as the villain of the Andy Panda short ''Knock Knock'' in 1940 ([[PoorlyDisguisedPilot with Andy himself playing a minor role compared to him]]), Woody Woodpecker was an [[BreakoutCharacter instant success]] -- [[CompositeCharacter being a hybrid]] of Classic WesternAnimation/DaffyDuck's [[ScrewySquirrel troublemaking]], [[CloudCuckoolander eccentric]] and over the top persona with the wiseacre attitude of WesternAnimation/BugsBunny, and initially combined with the vocal talents of MelBlanc, the character quickly earned his own series the following year, starting with 1941's [[WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut "The Cracked Nut".]]

to:

During this time, director, animator and writer Ben "Bugs" Hardaway, fresh off of working on WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes, arrived at Lantz's studio and began work there, and with his help, Lantz created a brand new star in an attempt to give his studio the kick in the pants it needed badly initially appearing as the villain of the Andy Panda short ''Knock Knock'' in 1940 ([[PoorlyDisguisedPilot with Andy himself playing a minor role compared to him]]), Woody Woodpecker was an [[BreakoutCharacter instant success]] -- [[CompositeCharacter being a hybrid]] of Classic WesternAnimation/DaffyDuck's [[ScrewySquirrel troublemaking]], [[CloudCuckoolander [[{{Cloudcuckoolander"" eccentric]] and over the top persona with the wiseacre attitude of WesternAnimation/BugsBunny, and initially combined with the vocal talents of MelBlanc, Creator/MelBlanc, the character quickly earned his own series the following year, starting with 1941's [[WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut "The Cracked Nut".]]
"WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut".



* LongRunner: Woody first appeared in 1940 and new cartoons with the character were being made until Lantz shut down his studio in 1972, with a 30 year run. (Note that there was a hiatus between 1948-1950)

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* LongRunner: {{Long Runner|s}}: Woody first appeared in 1940 and new cartoons with the character were being made until Lantz shut down his studio in 1972, with a 30 year run. (Note that there was a hiatus between 1948-1950)



* MadDoctor: In "The Cracked Nut", Woody, told he's crazy by his fellow WoodlandCreatures, goes to seek help...from a psychologist who's even more nuts than he is. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity]] (and much HamToHamCombat) [[HilarityEnsues Ensues]].

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* MadDoctor: In "The Cracked Nut", Woody, told he's crazy by his fellow WoodlandCreatures, goes to seek help...from a psychologist who's even more nuts than he is. [[HilarityEnsues Hilarity]] {{Hilarity|Ensues}} (and much HamToHamCombat) [[HilarityEnsues Ensues]].



* TheyKilledKenny: They Killed Buzz in "Wild and Woody" and "Buccaneer Woodpecker".

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* TheyKilledKenny: TheyKilledKennyAgain: They Killed Buzz Again in "Wild and Woody" and "Buccaneer Woodpecker".
12th Mar '16 11:49:45 AM MarkLungo
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* Musical Moments from Chopin: A ''Musical Miniature'' Cartune, starring both Woody Woodpecker and AndyPanda. Woody was redesigned ''again'' in this cartoon by Disney veteran [[UsefulNotes/NoteworthyDisneyStaff Fred Moore]], looking even softer than he did in the past. Second Woody cartoon to be nominated for the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward.

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* Musical Moments from Chopin: A ''Musical Miniature'' Cartune, starring both Woody Woodpecker and AndyPanda. Woody was redesigned ''again'' in this cartoon by Disney veteran [[UsefulNotes/NoteworthyDisneyStaff Fred Moore]], Creator/FredMoore, looking even softer than he did in the past. Second Woody cartoon to be nominated for the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward.
12th Mar '16 10:56:43 AM MarkLungo
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* Musical Moments from Chopin: A ''Musical Miniature'' Cartune, starring both Woody Woodpecker and AndyPanda. Woody was redesigned ''again'' in this cartoon by Disney veteran [[NoteworthyDisneyStaff Fred Moore]], looking even softer than he did in the past. Second Woody cartoon to be nominated for the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward.

to:

* Musical Moments from Chopin: A ''Musical Miniature'' Cartune, starring both Woody Woodpecker and AndyPanda. Woody was redesigned ''again'' in this cartoon by Disney veteran [[NoteworthyDisneyStaff [[UsefulNotes/NoteworthyDisneyStaff Fred Moore]], looking even softer than he did in the past. Second Woody cartoon to be nominated for the UsefulNotes/AcademyAward.
11th Mar '16 10:31:10 AM DrNoPuma
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Added DiffLines:

* WilyWalrus: Wally Walrus is Woody's stuffy archnemesis who constantly tries to put an end to Woody's fun.
5th Mar '16 8:22:52 PM NOYB
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Then the series then took another change in direction when ex-Creator/{{Disney}} veteran Dick Lundy arrived at Lantz, and starting with ''Bathing Buddies'' as his first Woody short, took over direction of the series from 1947 to 1949. While his cartoons [[LighterAndSofter lack the brutal comedy]] and richer personalities of the previous shorts, Lundy's shorts received a considerable upgrade not only in terms of animation and design, but also faster timing, resulting in classics like "Solid Ivory," "Smoked Hams", "Banquet Busters" and "Wet Blanket Policy." After the end of the 1940's and the brief shutdown and reopening of the Lantz studio between 1949 and 1951, Woody Woodpecker was gradually softened as a character to downplay his previous heckler persona and play up more childlike, heroic qualities in him instead (with in and out returns to his previous qualities, if in much subdued form). Despite these changes, the series stayed extremely popular among theatergoers.

to:

Then the series then took another change in direction when ex-Creator/{{Disney}} veteran Dick Lundy arrived at Lantz, and starting with ''Bathing Buddies'' as his first Woody short, took over direction of the series from 1947 to 1949. While his cartoons [[LighterAndSofter lack the brutal comedy]] and richer personalities of the previous shorts, Lundy's shorts received a considerable upgrade not only in terms of animation and design, but also faster timing, resulting in classics like "Solid Ivory," "Smoked Hams", "Banquet Busters" and "Wet Blanket Policy." After the end of the 1940's 1940s and the brief shutdown and reopening of the Lantz studio between 1949 and 1951, Woody Woodpecker was gradually softened as a character to downplay his previous heckler persona and play up more childlike, heroic qualities in him instead (with in and out returns to his previous qualities, if in much subdued form). Despite these changes, the series stayed extremely popular among theatergoers.



Thankfully, many of the early theatrical Woody Woodpecker shorts up to the late 1950's have been compiled into a two-volume set of DVD collections called '''The Woody Woodpecker and Friends Classic Cartoon Collection: The Walter Lantz Archive''' which also has several other Universal cartoon character shorts thrown in, including Andy Panda, Chilly Willy and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit (the post-Disney shorts done by Walter Lantz, anyway). The [=DVDs=] are also reasonably priced, which is a great alternative to more expensive sets like "Walt Disney Treasures" and "Looney Tunes Golden Collection". And don't try to cut even more corners hoping to get one of those mediocre [[VanillaEdition public domain cartoon collections]] to get them. The only one of Woody's shorts you'll ever find in those is "Pantry Panic", which is the only Woody Woodpecker cartoon in the public domain to date.

to:

Thankfully, many of the early theatrical Woody Woodpecker shorts up to the late 1950's 1950s have been compiled into a two-volume set of DVD collections called '''The Woody Woodpecker and Friends Classic Cartoon Collection: The Walter Lantz Archive''' which also has several other Universal cartoon character shorts thrown in, including Andy Panda, Chilly Willy and Oswald the Lucky Rabbit (the post-Disney shorts done by Walter Lantz, anyway). The [=DVDs=] are also reasonably priced, which is a great alternative to more expensive sets like "Walt Disney Treasures" and "Looney Tunes Golden Collection". And don't try to cut even more corners hoping to get one of those mediocre [[VanillaEdition public domain cartoon collections]] to get them. The only one of Woody's shorts you'll ever find in those is "Pantry Panic", which is the only Woody Woodpecker cartoon in the public domain to date.



** Woody is rarely the true villain, especally in the later episodes which is the bulk of them. In spite of what Jerry Seinfeld thinks, he was rarely the instigator. He is like Bugs Bunny in that he always got the best of his enemies, but they almost always started the confrontation somehow. Where Woody differed from Bugs a bit was that Woody went WAY more overboard with his revenge.
* ArtEvolution: Woody went through several redesigns as the series ran its course. He started off looking like a ghoulish, needle-nosed ragdoll in his first batch of shorts, but his original design became a little softer starting with Ace in the Hole. His buck teeth began to disappear, as Lantz realized this feature was extraneous. In addition, the beak and feet colors became slightly brighter and more vibrant. He also does not have a big chin anymore. "Ration Bored" also tweaked his design a little by making his hands colored white, so they would read better. His first (and most famous) redesign came around in the short "WesternAnimation/TheBarberOfSeville" [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_GJ4GvNsomrU/RaHJgh5Q7_I/AAAAAAAAAFs/kFOKouPxAok/s320/Emery+Hawkins+Woody+1944+copy.jpg This design]] was much more streamlined (just look at the ''The Coo Coo Bird'' title card!) and cuter looking than the previous one, and Woody even got [[WhiteGloves gloves!]] Come the late 40's, Fred Moore from Disney briefly worked at Lantz and supplied Woody with a [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-nZcVNF-UNmE/TlGpJ4wcDuI/AAAAAAAAAZU/ilguYTsJjHA/s1600/Woody+Woodpecker-Fred+Moore+copy.jpg third, more handsome tweak]] on his design. [[http://tortolatailspin.onmason.com/files/2012/02/Woody-50-60.jpg Yet another redesign]] came around by the 1950's, this time streamlining Woody's design down to it's bare essence, and making him incredibly tiny as well. The rest of the theatrical cartoons would stick with variations on the "Tiny" design, while contemporary appearances of Woody tend to settle for his mid 40's design.

to:

** Woody is rarely the true villain, especally in the later episodes episodes, which is the bulk of them. In spite of what Jerry Seinfeld thinks, he was rarely the instigator. He is like Bugs Bunny in that he always got the best of his enemies, but they almost always started the confrontation somehow. Where Woody differed from Bugs a bit was that Woody went WAY more overboard with his revenge.
* ArtEvolution: Woody went through several redesigns as the series ran its course. He started off looking like a ghoulish, needle-nosed ragdoll in his first batch of shorts, but his original design became a little softer starting with Ace in the Hole. His buck teeth began to disappear, as Lantz realized this feature was extraneous. In addition, the beak and feet colors became slightly brighter and more vibrant. He also does not have a big chin anymore. "Ration Bored" also tweaked his design a little by making his hands colored white, so they would read better. His first (and most famous) redesign came around in the short "WesternAnimation/TheBarberOfSeville" [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_GJ4GvNsomrU/RaHJgh5Q7_I/AAAAAAAAAFs/kFOKouPxAok/s320/Emery+Hawkins+Woody+1944+copy.jpg This design]] was much more streamlined (just look at the ''The Coo Coo Bird'' title card!) and cuter looking than the previous one, and Woody even got [[WhiteGloves gloves!]] Come the late 40's, 40s, Fred Moore from Disney briefly worked at Lantz and supplied Woody with a [[http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-nZcVNF-UNmE/TlGpJ4wcDuI/AAAAAAAAAZU/ilguYTsJjHA/s1600/Woody+Woodpecker-Fred+Moore+copy.jpg third, more handsome tweak]] on his design. [[http://tortolatailspin.onmason.com/files/2012/02/Woody-50-60.jpg Yet another redesign]] came around by the 1950's, 1950s, this time streamlining Woody's design down to it's bare essence, and making him incredibly tiny as well. The rest of the theatrical cartoons would stick with variations on the "Tiny" design, while contemporary appearances of Woody tend to settle for his mid 40's mid-40s design.



* EraSpecificPersonality: The early 40's CloudCuckoolander Woody, the mid to late 40's jerk Woody, and the more conservative, less screwy Woody from the 50's and onward.

to:

* EraSpecificPersonality: The early 40's 40s CloudCuckoolander Woody, the mid to late 40's mid-to-late 40s jerk Woody, and the more conservative, less screwy Woody from the 50's 50s and onward.



* NamesTheSame: "Bats in the Belfry" is a name that is shared with a Creator/HarmanAndIsing oneshot cartoon from the 40's. "Hassle in a Castle" is also very similar to the ScoobyDoo cartoon episode "Hassle in the Castle".

to:

* NamesTheSame: "Bats in the Belfry" is a name that is shared with a Creator/HarmanAndIsing oneshot cartoon from the 40's.40s. "Hassle in a Castle" is also very similar to the ScoobyDoo cartoon episode "Hassle in the Castle".



* UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist: Woody's original portrayal, but he got toned down as time went by, starting with Dick Lundy's rule upon taking the directorial reins that Woody cannot go crazy without being given a legitimate reason to, and being completely averted by Woody's flanderized portrayal from the 50's cartoons.

to:

* UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist: Woody's original portrayal, but he got toned down as time went by, starting with Dick Lundy's rule upon taking the directorial reins that Woody cannot go crazy without being given a legitimate reason to, and being completely averted by Woody's flanderized portrayal from the 50's 50s cartoons.



* WartimeCartoon: Many of the 40's cartoons have references to home front conditions or the wartime rationing of that time period. ''Ration Bored'' also parodies wartime rationing that was going on with the U.S. at the time period the short was made. The title is even a pun on the Ration Board. The end of the short also asks the audience to buy war bonds. A running gag in some of these shorts is the slogan "Is this trip really necessary?"

to:

* WartimeCartoon: Many of the 40's 40s cartoons have references to home front conditions or the wartime rationing of that time period. ''Ration Bored'' also parodies wartime rationing that was going on with the U.S. at the time period the short was made. The title is even a pun on the Ration Board. The end of the short also asks the audience to buy war bonds. A running gag in some of these shorts is the slogan "Is this trip really necessary?"
8th Feb '16 6:17:41 AM crazysamaritan
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* [[TheyKilledKenny They Killed Buzz]]: "Wild and Woody" and "Buccaneer Woodpecker".
* ThreeDFilm: ''Hypnotic Hick''.

to:

* [[TheyKilledKenny TheyKilledKenny: They Killed Buzz]]: Buzz in "Wild and Woody" and "Buccaneer Woodpecker".
* ThreeDFilm: ''Hypnotic Hick''.
Woodpecker".
7th Feb '16 1:24:40 PM GrammarNavi
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''Woody Woodpecker'' is an iconic cartoon star, the mascot and [[BreakthroughHit most successful cartoon series]] of the Creator/WalterLantz and {{Universal}} studios, from his [[BreakoutCharacter breakout debut]] in the AndyPanda short [[WesternAnimation/KnockKnock "Knock Knock"]] [[note]]Although ''WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut'', released the following year, was the debut of his own series.[[/note]], in [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1940]], to the end of his theatrical run in [[TheDarkAgeOfAnimation 1972,]] lasting for 198 shorts, supplemented by appearances in comics, merchandise, a long-running TV anthology show, a short-lived contemporary TV revival, and an upcoming CGI animated feature, thus establishing him as an animation LongRunner.

to:

''Woody Woodpecker'' is an iconic cartoon star, the mascot and [[BreakthroughHit most successful cartoon series]] of the Creator/WalterLantz and {{Universal}} studios, from his [[BreakoutCharacter breakout debut]] in the AndyPanda short [[WesternAnimation/KnockKnock "Knock Knock"]] [[note]]Although ''WesternAnimation/TheCrackedNut'', released the following year, was the debut of his own series.[[/note]], in [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1940]], to the end of his theatrical run in [[TheDarkAgeOfAnimation [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation 1972,]] lasting for 198 shorts, supplemented by appearances in comics, merchandise, a long-running TV anthology show, a short-lived contemporary TV revival, and an upcoming CGI animated feature, thus establishing him as an animation LongRunner.



In fact, Woody was so popular among theatergoers that he managed to have a much longer track record than most theatrical cartoon series, his run lasting all the way up to 1972, straight into TheDarkAgeOfAnimation, about 30 years in work [[note]] although Lantz's studio briefly shut down in 1949 and reopened in 1950[[/note]], lasting even after his competition had long since faded away and/or branched out to television this is due to the fact that the Woody Woodpecker cartoons were made on much lower budgets than most animation studios worked with at the time to begin with, so the series had little problems adjusting to the rise of TheDarkAgeOfAnimation with rising production costs and the fallout of popularity with theatrical cartoons. It helped matters that the bird even had a hit TV series which debuted in the 1950s, guest-starring Walter Lantz in live action segments, running at the same time he was still appearing in theaters. In fact, Lantz claimed the reason he stopped making Woody shorts was not because they weren't popular, but rather because theatrical shorts had become completely unprofitable by that point!

to:

In fact, Woody was so popular among theatergoers that he managed to have a much longer track record than most theatrical cartoon series, his run lasting all the way up to 1972, straight into TheDarkAgeOfAnimation, UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation, about 30 years in work [[note]] although Lantz's studio briefly shut down in 1949 and reopened in 1950[[/note]], lasting even after his competition had long since faded away and/or branched out to television this is due to the fact that the Woody Woodpecker cartoons were made on much lower budgets than most animation studios worked with at the time to begin with, so the series had little problems adjusting to the rise of TheDarkAgeOfAnimation UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation with rising production costs and the fallout of popularity with theatrical cartoons. It helped matters that the bird even had a hit TV series which debuted in the 1950s, guest-starring Walter Lantz in live action segments, running at the same time he was still appearing in theaters. In fact, Lantz claimed the reason he stopped making Woody shorts was not because they weren't popular, but rather because theatrical shorts had become completely unprofitable by that point!



* TheDarkAgeOfAnimation
* TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation

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* TheDarkAgeOfAnimation
UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfAnimation
* TheGoldenAgeOfAnimationUsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation



* TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation

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* TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimationUsefulNotes/TheRenaissanceAgeOfAnimation
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WesternAnimation.WoodyWoodpecker