History VillainDecay / LiveActionTV

20th Apr '17 2:16:01 AM Morgenthaler
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* Partly due to SeinfeldIsUnfunny, Jerri Manthey in ''Series/{{Survivor}}''. She was seen as the original survivor villain mostly because she was the first to be called that. (Richard Hatch is probably more of the "original" survivor villain) She was actually booed off the stage in ''All Stars'', yet years later after the likes of Boston Rob controlling the game, Russell Hantz sociopathically pushing his way to the finals and ''admittedly'' griefing his fellow players, Jonny Fairplay lying to get a sympathetic advantage, Ami Cusack, and players like Naonka, Corrine, and Randy just being a JerkAss...When Jerri showed up on stage in ''Heroes vs. Villains'' and wasn't like ''any'' of those, people actually ''applauded'' for her.

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* ''Series/{{Survivor}}'':
**
Partly due to SeinfeldIsUnfunny, Jerri Manthey in ''Series/{{Survivor}}''.Manthey. She was seen as the original survivor villain mostly because she was the first to be called that. (Richard Hatch is probably more of the "original" survivor villain) She was actually booed off the stage in ''All Stars'', yet years later after the likes of Boston Rob controlling the game, Russell Hantz sociopathically pushing his way to the finals and ''admittedly'' griefing his fellow players, Jonny Fairplay lying to get a sympathetic advantage, Ami Cusack, and players like Naonka, Corrine, and Randy just being a JerkAss...When Jerri showed up on stage in ''Heroes vs. Villains'' and wasn't like ''any'' of those, people actually ''applauded'' for her.
20th Apr '17 2:15:25 AM Morgenthaler
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* Adam Monroe, formerly BigBad of ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' season 2. When he returned in Season 3, he was downgraded from a MagnificentBastard to comic relief. ''Then'' he was killed off by the new villain, [[spoiler:Mr. Petrelli]], in an EvilerThanThou moment. Oh, and all this took less than ''two episodes'', possibly setting a new record for 'fastest villain decay ever'.
** Likewise, Maury Parkman was originally toted as "The Nightmare Man", someone ''worse'' than Sylar. As an experienced psychic, he managed to [[KickTheDog put a little girl into a coma]] and [[MindRape continually mess with the heroes' heads]], until he was defeated in a [[CallingTheOldManOut close confrontation with Matt]]. Come Season 3, he is passively following the BigBad's orders, right til he [[spoiler: objects to Petrelli ordering Matt's death]], and has his neck unceremoniously snapped in ''another'' EvilerThanThou moment.

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* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'':
**
Adam Monroe, formerly BigBad of ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' season 2. When he returned in Season 3, he was downgraded from a MagnificentBastard to comic relief. ''Then'' he was killed off by the new villain, [[spoiler:Mr. Petrelli]], in an EvilerThanThou moment. Oh, and all this took less than ''two episodes'', possibly setting a new record for 'fastest villain decay ever'.
** Likewise, Maury Parkman was originally toted as "The Nightmare Man", someone ''worse'' than Sylar. As an experienced psychic, he managed to [[KickTheDog put a little girl into a coma]] and [[MindRape continually mess with the heroes' heads]], until he was defeated in a [[CallingTheOldManOut close confrontation with Matt]]. Come Season 3, he is passively following the BigBad's orders, right til he [[spoiler: objects to Petrelli ordering Matt's death]], and has his neck unceremoniously snapped in ''another'' EvilerThanThou moment.
20th Apr '17 2:14:44 AM Morgenthaler
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** This is somewhat justified by the fact that Sweeny was never really "evil" in the first place. Ned just thought he was, and as the series progresses, Ned stops portraying him as an evil scientist and more as a strict teacher who helps him out from time to time.
22nd Jan '17 4:24:22 AM ChristianLaFleur
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* Ben Linus from ''Series/{{Lost}}'', through a mix of SortingAlgorithmOfEvil and CharacterDevelopment. In seasons 2 and 3, he comes across as the ultimate in {{Magnificent Bastard}}ry (and he's still got most of those skills), but season 4 saw the introduction of his arch-nemesis, Charles Widmore, a guy that Ben is actually afraid of, and the conclusion of season 5 reveals that Ben [[spoiler:has been the [[BigBad Man in Black]]'s unwitting pawn all along]]. Adding to that, circumstances saw Ben becoming the Losties' TokenEvilTeammate from season 4 onwards. But in this case, Villain Decay doesn't preclude being awesome, thanks to Ben's always-entertaining approach to solving problems and Michael Emerson's award-winning performance, and despite working with the Losties for three seasons he doesn't actually make a HeelFaceTurn until [[spoiler:season 6's "Dr. Linus"]].

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* Ben Linus from ''Series/{{Lost}}'', through a mix of SortingAlgorithmOfEvil and CharacterDevelopment. In seasons 2 and 3, he comes across as the ultimate in {{Magnificent Bastard}}ry (and he's still got most of those skills), but season 4 saw the introduction of his arch-nemesis, Charles Widmore, a guy that Ben is actually afraid of, and the conclusion of season 5 reveals that Ben [[spoiler:has been the [[BigBad Man in Black]]'s unwitting pawn all along]]. Adding to that, circumstances saw Ben becoming the Losties' TokenEvilTeammate from season 4 onwards. But in this case, Villain Decay doesn't preclude being awesome, thanks to Ben's always-entertaining approach to solving problems and Michael Emerson's award-winning performance, and despite working with the Losties for three seasons he doesn't actually make a HeelFaceTurn until [[spoiler:season 6's "Dr. Linus"]].
21st Dec '16 2:40:25 AM Morgenthaler
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** The Master particularly suffered from this, with many writers simply using him as a convenient bad guy with little motivation beyond being "eeeevil". The trend arguably started from his very first appearances, since he appeared as the BigBad in every episode of Season Eight of the classic series, which arguably diluted his effectiveness right from the off. He always allied with another evil power, which then betrayed him, forcing him to work with the Doctor. Over his many appearances in both classic and new series, writers have tried most of the tricks above to avert Villain Decay, including threat escalation, frequent EnemyMine plots, AlternateUniverse victories, and having him murder the family members of series regulars. Probably for the same reasons that the series itself has been so long-lived, despite succumbing to Villain Decay several times over, the character somehow keeps bouncing back as a MagnificentBastard. [[spoiler: The new series attempted to correct this both by giving him a plausible motivation - complete insanity - and by showing how BadAss he could be; not least by stranding the Doctor at the end of time itself, becoming [[PresidentEvil Prime Minister of Great Britain]], massacring a tenth of the population of Earth and all in all being a rather MagnificentBastard before the Doctor managed to [[ResetButton undo everything]].]]

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** The Master particularly suffered from this, with many writers simply using him as a convenient bad guy with little motivation beyond being "eeeevil". The trend arguably started from his very first appearances, since he appeared as the BigBad in every episode of Season Eight of the classic series, which arguably diluted his effectiveness right from the off. He always allied with another evil power, which then betrayed him, forcing him to work with the Doctor. Over his many appearances in both classic and new series, writers have tried most of the tricks above to avert Villain Decay, including threat escalation, frequent EnemyMine plots, AlternateUniverse victories, and having him murder the family members of series regulars. Probably for the same reasons that the series itself has been so long-lived, despite succumbing to Villain Decay several times over, the character somehow keeps bouncing back as a MagnificentBastard. [[spoiler: The new series attempted to correct this both by giving him a plausible motivation - complete insanity - and by showing how BadAss badass he could be; not least by stranding the Doctor at the end of time itself, becoming [[PresidentEvil Prime Minister of Great Britain]], massacring a tenth of the population of Earth and all in all being a rather MagnificentBastard before the Doctor managed to [[ResetButton undo everything]].]]
10th Dec '16 8:51:29 AM Morgenthaler
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*** The only time the Cybermen get to be properly {{Badass}} after their reintroduction is "Nightmare in Silver," where none of their weaknesses can be brought to bear in a way that lets you kill 'em all at once, ''and they're faster.'' All the doctor can do is play for time. In the end, ''the king of the planet evacuates it, destroys it, and everyone runs away. Dayum.)''

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*** The only time the Cybermen get to be properly {{Badass}} badass after their reintroduction is "Nightmare in Silver," where none of their weaknesses can be brought to bear in a way that lets you kill 'em all at once, ''and they're faster.'' All the doctor can do is play for time. In the end, ''the king of the planet evacuates it, destroys it, and everyone runs away. Dayum.)''
16th Oct '16 1:57:03 PM StFan
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** It goes both ways, though: While they're defeated much more quickly, the crossovers became such MassivelyMultiplayerCrossover affairs that the number of heroes they face make them seem a lot ''stronger,'' as well. Each of these villains were long-running foes of ''one'' hero, eventually defeated in one-on-one combat. Now you've got these same guys effortlessly handling ''multiple'' Riders or Sentai teams or ''multiple Riders and multiple Sentai teams at once'' until they manage to defeat them using powers they didn't have in the original series. Doras from ''KamenRiderZO'' is the best example: the fight against him in the ''Series/KamenRiderDecade'' finale movie doesn't last two full minutes, but it consists of him handing thirteen Riders a CurbStompBattle. To beat him they ''all'' (well, the ten who had them) had to use their SuperMode, two using their super-er modes that they didn't ''get'' until ''Decade.'' This makes Doras the single most powerful enemy in Kamen Rider history, something no one Rider could have ever taken even (in the case of Kuuga) using powers that could supposedly destroy a whole planet.

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** It goes both ways, though: While they're defeated much more quickly, the crossovers became such MassivelyMultiplayerCrossover affairs that the number of heroes they face make them seem a lot ''stronger,'' as well. Each of these villains were long-running foes of ''one'' hero, eventually defeated in one-on-one combat. Now you've got these same guys effortlessly handling ''multiple'' Riders or Sentai teams or ''multiple Riders and multiple Sentai teams at once'' until they manage to defeat them using powers they didn't have in the original series. Doras from ''KamenRiderZO'' ''Film/KamenRiderZO'' is the best example: the fight against him in the ''Series/KamenRiderDecade'' finale movie doesn't last two full minutes, but it consists of him handing thirteen Riders a CurbStompBattle. To beat him they ''all'' (well, the ten who had them) had to use their SuperMode, two using their super-er modes that they didn't ''get'' until ''Decade.'' This makes Doras the single most powerful enemy in Kamen Rider history, something no one Rider could have ever taken even (in the case of Kuuga) using powers that could supposedly destroy a whole planet.
19th Aug '16 6:44:19 AM SirPellucidar
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** The Borg are probably the most infamous example, gradually going from a once-a-season menace to a routine annoyance. In their original appearance in the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Q Who?", they were a faceless, inscrutable HiveMind who could never be truly defeated because they always acted in perfect synchronicity, and could never be reasoned or bargained with. This gradually changed with "I, Borg" and ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', which presented the idea that the Borg could be taught to act as individuals, and introduced the Borg Queen as a physical leader figure whose defeat could provide an easy way to resolve plots. Then came ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', which took place entirely in the Delta Quadrant (the site of the Borg's homeworld), thus making the Borg regular antagonists for the first time in the franchise's history. Since tangles with the Borg suddenly became frequent occurrences, the writers of ''Voyager'' had to regularly depict them being defeated by the crew of the titular lone starship (in contrast to appearances in previous shows, where the Borg mopped the floor with entire ''fleets'') in order to keep the story moving, thus robbing them of a good deal of their original scare value.

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** The Borg are probably the most infamous example, gradually going from a once-a-season menace to a routine annoyance. In their original appearance in the ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration'' episode "Q Who?", they were a faceless, inscrutable HiveMind who could never be truly defeated because they always acted in perfect synchronicity, and could never be reasoned or bargained with. This gradually changed with "I, Borg" and ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact'', which presented the idea that the Borg could be taught to act as individuals, and introduced the Borg Queen as a physical leader figure whose defeat could provide an easy way to resolve plots. Then came ''Series/StarTrekVoyager'', which took place entirely in the Delta Quadrant (the site of the Borg's homeworld), home territory), thus making the Borg regular antagonists for the first time in the franchise's history. Since tangles with the Borg suddenly became frequent occurrences, the writers of ''Voyager'' had to regularly depict them being defeated by the crew of the titular lone starship (in contrast to appearances in previous shows, where the Borg mopped the floor with entire ''fleets'') in order to keep the story moving, thus robbing them of a good deal of their original scare value.
12th Aug '16 11:44:47 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** That being said, in Season 3 they become secondary antagonists to Holtz and Sahjhan, and are portrayed as generally craven and incompetent. It gets even worse in Season 4, where [[spoiler: their LA offices are destroyed and the staff killed by the Beast]].

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** That being said, in Season 3 they become secondary antagonists to Holtz and Sahjhan, and are portrayed as generally craven and incompetent. It gets even worse in Season 4, where [[spoiler: their LA offices are destroyed and the staff killed by the Beast]]. And then backtracked when [[spoiler: they let the team ''run'' the rebuilt LA branch in season 5 just to keep them busy; nothing in that theater of operations ultimately affected them at all.]]
21st Jul '16 10:17:29 AM Morgenthaler
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** Crowley's character arc has taken a few weird turns over the seasons to the point where he [[ZigzaggingTrope zigzaggs the trope]]. He was genuinely threatening in season 5-7 and a rare DangerouslyGenreSavvy demon, but not above entering an EnemyMine with the Winchesters solely for his own benefit. In season 8 he became more evil than ever, capping it off with [[spoiler:trying to kill ''everyone'' the Winchesters have ever saved]]. Due to a partial demon cure trial, he becomes a lot more emotional in season 9, and spends most of his time chained up in a cellar. His position is all but usurped by Abaddon, and the Winchesters openly express their disgust at [[HowTheMightyHaveFallen how inconsequential the supposed King of Hell has become]]. Then a gambit of Crowley's played out at season's end - [[spoiler:Dean is now a Demon, and in Crowley's claws.]] This is eventually lampshaded when his mother rants that he's not the king of hell but the Winchesters' bitch.

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** Crowley's character arc has taken a few weird turns over the seasons to the point where he [[ZigzaggingTrope zigzaggs the trope]]. He was genuinely threatening in season 5-7 and a rare DangerouslyGenreSavvy demon, demon who avoids the VillainBall, but not above entering an EnemyMine with the Winchesters solely for his own benefit. In season 8 he became more evil than ever, capping it off with [[spoiler:trying to kill ''everyone'' the Winchesters have ever saved]]. Due to a partial demon cure trial, he becomes a lot more emotional in season 9, and spends most of his time chained up in a cellar. His position is all but usurped by Abaddon, and the Winchesters openly express their disgust at [[HowTheMightyHaveFallen how inconsequential the supposed King of Hell has become]]. Then a gambit of Crowley's played out at season's end - [[spoiler:Dean is now a Demon, and in Crowley's claws.]] This is eventually lampshaded when his mother rants that he's not the king of hell but the Winchesters' bitch.
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