History Videogame / FireEmblemElibe

18th Jul '16 6:33:15 AM Morgenthaler
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* DangerouslyGenreSavvy: The first thing Zephiel does when he reaches Lycia is lead a direct assault on Lycia's main army, going ''personally'' with two of his best generals to make sure Hector doesn't make it out alive. The result being that Lycia is very nearly defeated by Bern days after the two go to war.



* DangerouslyGenreSavvy: ArtificialStupidity aside, the AI of these games became ''highly'' pronounced as simply not caring about whether or not they won...so much as they kill ''one'' of your units and make you RageQuit and restart the chapter.
13th Jul '16 12:06:17 PM QueenBEAUTY
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* LongLostRelative: [[spoiler:It's all but stated that Nergal is Ninian and Nils' father, with the biggest hint being his extended death quote, which you can only get by doing an extremely obscure sidequest in Hector's Hard mode. In it, he mentions the children's mother Aenir. Other relatives are Dart, who is Rebecca's long-lost brother Dan, Priscilla's brother Raymond is Raven, and it's strongly hinted that Canas is Nino's uncle]]. The main plot of Lyn's story has her discovering an entire long-lost ''side of her family'', as she was unaware of her Lycian heritage up until Chapter 2. What's more, by the end of her story, only she and her grandfather are the remaining members of House Caelin.

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* LongLostRelative: [[spoiler:It's all but stated that Nergal is Ninian and Nils' father, with the biggest hint being his extended death quote, which you can only get by doing an extremely obscure sidequest in Hector's Hard mode. In it, he mentions the children's mother Aenir. Other relatives are Dart, who is Rebecca's long-lost brother Dan, Priscilla's brother Raymond is Raven, and it's strongly hinted that Canas is Nino's uncle]]. The main plot of Lyn's story has her discovering an entire long-lost ''side of her family'', as she was unaware of her Lycian heritage up until Chapter 2. What's more, by the end of her story, only she met Sain and Kent. To compound this, she and her elderly grandfather are the remaining only members of House Caelin.Caelin left when her story ends, [[spoiler:and then ''he'' passes away after the main story and regardless of Lyn's fate (which can involve either staying in Lycia via marriage or returning to the Sacae Plains), she requests Caelin be folded into Ostia.]]
4th Jul '16 4:31:56 AM SpaceDrake
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* ''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword'' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name -- ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" -- or by its number for the sake of differentiation. ''Blazing Sword'' is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (Game Boy Advance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut, with only a single game released since then lacking an official localization. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because, in addition to being a [[FirstInstallmentWins first installment]] for a great many fans, it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.

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* ''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword'' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name -- ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" -- or by its number for the sake of differentiation. ''Blazing Sword'' is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (Game Boy Advance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut, with only a single game released since then lacking an official localization. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because, in addition to being a [[FirstInstallmentWins first installment]] installment in English]] and thus for a great many fans, it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.
4th Jul '16 4:31:25 AM SpaceDrake
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* ''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword'' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name -- ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" -- or by its number for the sake of differentiation. ''Blazing Sword'' is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (Game Boy Advance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut, with only a single game released since then lacking an official localization. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.

to:

* ''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword'' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name -- ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" -- or by its number for the sake of differentiation. ''Blazing Sword'' is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (Game Boy Advance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut, with only a single game released since then lacking an official localization. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because because, in addition to being a [[FirstInstallmentWins first installment]] for a great many fans, it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.
4th Jul '16 4:28:57 AM SpaceDrake
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** Sacae: A far-eastern nation with a notable tradition of horseback riding and archery, and a traditional religion that worships the sky and earth. Clearly meant to be based upon Mongolia.

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** Sacae: A far-eastern nation with a notable tradition of horseback riding and archery, and a traditional religion that worships the sky and earth. Clearly meant to be based upon Mongolia.Mongolia, with a dash of Japan (Myrmidons clearly use katanas and many of them, ''especially'' Karel, are heavy with "wandering samurai" tropes).
3rd Jul '16 1:20:34 PM SoapheadChurch
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** Etruia: Clearly meant to be based on Medieval Rome: it is the seat of the Church of the game's resident CrystalDragonJesus and a nation with a high level of civilization. Notably, the real life civilization of Etruria was a state in what is now Central Italy which was conquered by Rome.

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** Etruia: Clearly meant to be based Based on Medieval Rome: it is the seat of the Church of the game's resident CrystalDragonJesus and a nation with a high level of civilization. Notably, the real life civilization of Etruria was a state in what is now Central Italy which was conquered by Rome.
2nd Jul '16 2:51:53 PM SoapheadChurch
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Added DiffLines:

* FantasyCounterpartCulture:
** Sacae: A far-eastern nation with a notable tradition of horseback riding and archery, and a traditional religion that worships the sky and earth. Clearly meant to be based upon Mongolia.
** Etruia: Clearly meant to be based on Medieval Rome: it is the seat of the Church of the game's resident CrystalDragonJesus and a nation with a high level of civilization. Notably, the real life civilization of Etruria was a state in what is now Central Italy which was conquered by Rome.
** Ilia: In real life, Ilia is the poetic name for the city-state of Troy. Very little is known about ancient Troy except for what is found in Greek epic poetry and medieval knightly romances, which is probably why the in-game Ilia is entirely populated by mercenaries and knights.
** Bern: Named after the capital of Switzerland. It may seem odd that the capital of a nation famed for neutrality would be the basis of a brutal, militaristic empire like Bern, but in the Middle Ages, Bern was a powerful and brutal city state that had conquered and ruled substantial parts of Switzerland and Continental Europe. Much like the in-game Bern, it was also famed for being mountainous and difficult to assail.
** Lycia: Based directly on the real-life Lycian League, a confederation of Roman city-states bound by agreement to assist each other in times of war. Much like in the game, the real life Lycian League had problems with member states not honoring the alliance or trying to sell each other out to larger, more powerful nations.
30th Jun '16 4:55:12 PM ChrisX
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* HateSink: Nergal and his minions are evil, sure, but even they have their fans and [[spoiler: Nergal has a fairly sympathetic backstory if you jump through hoops to get the secret sidequest mentioned above]]. The Black Fang are ultimately sympathetic despite their terrible deeds. But pretty much the entire fandom wants King Desmond dead.

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* HateSink: Nergal and his minions are evil, sure, but even they have their fans and [[spoiler: Nergal has a fairly sympathetic backstory if you jump through hoops to get the secret sidequest mentioned above]]. The Black Fang are ultimately sympathetic despite their terrible deeds. But pretty much the entire fandom wants King Desmond dead. Want explanation? Here's a rundown... [[spoiler:shall we say that ''if'' he got over his loser complex, then Zephiel wouldn't be driven to misanthropy and turn out to be a good King, thereby averting the events of ''Sword of Seals'' and the deaths of many innocents ''and Hector''. Yep, [[UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom Desmond actually caused the horrible war and the deaths of many favorites by being a horrible father to Zephiel.]]]]
30th May '16 12:16:38 AM GastonRabbit
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* ''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword'' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name -- ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" -- or by its number for the sake of differentiation. ''Blazing Sword'' is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (Game Boy Advance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut and the beginning of it finally averting NoExportForYou. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.

to:

* ''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword'' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name -- ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" -- or by its number for the sake of differentiation. ''Blazing Sword'' is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (Game Boy Advance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut and the beginning of it finally averting NoExportForYou.debut, with only a single game released since then lacking an official localization. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.
30th May '16 12:12:16 AM GastonRabbit
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* '''''Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade''''' [[note]]Japanese title ''Fuuin no Tsurugi'', meaning "Sword of Seals".[[/note]] (GameBoyAdvance, 2002) stars Roy, ''Fire Emblem'''s other representative in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'', as he attempts to repel the invading forces of Bern. The game was well-received in Japan, but in the west, the reception among fans was more mixed. On the one hand, it was praised for introducing the super-popular "[[RelationshipValues Support]]" feature, which allows characters to build their relationships by spending a lot of time together in battle and remains a big draw for the series. At the same time, due to technological constraints, it was forced to drop many of the mechanics introduced in the console-era, though it was able to add its own as well.
* '''''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword''''' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name - ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" - or by its number for the sake of differentiation. Blazing Sword is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (GameBoyAdvance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut and the beginning of it finally averting NoExportForYou. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.

An 11-volume manga adaptation, ''[[http://www.mangahere.co/manga/fire_emblem_hasha_no_tsurugi/ Fire Emblem: Champion's Sword]]'' [[note]]Commonly known just by its untranslated Japanese name, ''Hasha no Tsurugi''[[/note]], was also published between 2002 and 2005. It revisits and modifies the plot of ''The Binding Blade'' through the point of view of four original characters exclusive to this manga: young swordsman (well, teen) Al, Princess Tiena of Tania Castle, her loyal knight Gant, and MasterSwordsman Kilmar. They help Roy and his troops in the war against Bern, while on their own quest: searching for the [[McGuffin Fire]] [[TitleDrop Emblem]].

to:

* '''''Fire ''Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade''''' Blade'' [[note]]Japanese title ''Fuuin no Tsurugi'', meaning "Sword of Seals".[[/note]] (GameBoyAdvance, (UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance, 2002) stars Roy, ''Fire Emblem'''s other representative in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'', as he attempts to repel the invading forces of Bern. The game was well-received in Japan, but in the west, the reception among fans was more mixed. On the one hand, it was praised for introducing the super-popular "[[RelationshipValues Support]]" feature, which allows characters to build their relationships by spending a lot of time together in battle and remains a big draw for the series. At the same time, due to technological constraints, it was forced to drop many of the mechanics introduced in the console-era, though it was able to add its own as well.
* '''''Fire ''Fire Emblem: Blazing Sword''''' Sword'' [[note]]Released as just ''Fire Emblem'' in the west, but near-universally called by its Japanese name - -- ''Rekka no Ken'', meaning "Sword of Flame" - -- or by its number for the sake of differentiation. Blazing Sword ''Blazing Sword'' is a fan translation; "Sword of Flame" was translated as Blazing ''Blade'' within the game itself.[[/note]] (GameBoyAdvance, (Game Boy Advance, 2003) was the franchise's international debut and the beginning of it finally averting NoExportForYou. A {{prequel}} to ''The Binding Blade'', it stars Roy's father, Eliwood, as he investigates the disappearance of his own father with his friends Hector and Lyn, leading them to clash with a brotherhood of assassins called the Black Fang. This game remains a favorite of many western fans because it features one of the longer quests of the Western released games, features a large amount of replay value, and boasts a story that's rather unique in relation to the rest of the franchise.

An 11-volume manga adaptation, ''[[http://www.mangahere.co/manga/fire_emblem_hasha_no_tsurugi/ Fire Emblem: Champion's Sword]]'' [[note]]Commonly known just by its untranslated Japanese name, ''Hasha no Tsurugi''[[/note]], was also published between 2002 and 2005. It revisits and modifies the plot of ''The Binding Blade'' through the point of view of four original characters exclusive to this manga: young Young swordsman (well, teen) Al, Princess Tiena of Tania Castle, her loyal knight Gant, and MasterSwordsman Kilmar. They help Roy and his troops in the war against Bern, while on their own quest: searching for the [[McGuffin Fire]] [[TitleDrop Emblem]].



* BeautyEqualsGoodness: ''The Binding Blade'' gives us some subversions in a series that plays this trope straighter than an arrow most of the time: The axe-wielding Gonzales (whose ugliness and low intelligence makes him feared), and the plain-looking Dorothy (with her small eyes and plain, boyish clothing).

to:

* BeautyEqualsGoodness: ''The Binding Blade'' gives us some subversions in a series that plays this trope straighter than an arrow most of the time: The axe-wielding Gonzales (whose ugliness and low intelligence makes make him feared), and the plain-looking Dorothy (with her small eyes and plain, boyish clothing).



* SpellMyNameWithAnS: Characters with official English names may have differing transliterations in Japanese materials, while characters without official names may be subject to even more inconsistent transliterations. For example, the first Myrmidon's name would more accurately transliterated as Rutger, which is the name used in both fan translations, but ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''[[note]]Which also uses the name Nabaaru for the ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'' character known as Navarre and Nabarl in the North American and European versions of ''Shadow Dragon'', respectively[[/note]] calls him Rutoga instead.



* TheUnfought: [[spoiler: Idoun, mentioned in the manga.]]

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* TheUnfought: [[spoiler: Idoun, Idenn, mentioned in the manga.]]
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