History Videogame / FinalFantasyI

18th Jul '17 1:15:21 PM 32_Footsteps
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** In all versions, the Castle of Ordeals/Citadel of Trials is one. Due to a river near it, it's the one location on the northern continent that can be reached before acquiring the airship (though it does require getting the canoe, which requires beating Lich). While potentially difficult, the hostile fauna doesn't have nearly as many cheap tricks as some of the random encounters in the next two dungeons that the party is directed towards, the level layout is much simpler and less deadly (''i.e.'' no floors that damage the party), and the equipment found inside is around on par with the best loot at the lowest levels of those two areas. Plus, the bosses of the Castle/Citadel are [[{{Dracolich Zombie Dragons]], which have [[WeaksauceWeakness several easily exploited vulnerabilities]]. Stopping by there before trying to defeat Kary/Marillith or acquiring the Floater/Float Stone makes those two tasks significantly easier, both in terms of having more experience and better gear.

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** In all versions, the Castle of Ordeals/Citadel of Trials is one. Due to a river near it, it's the one location on the northern continent that can be reached before acquiring the airship (though it does require getting the canoe, which requires beating Lich). While potentially difficult, the hostile fauna doesn't have nearly as many cheap tricks as some of the random encounters in the next two dungeons that the party is directed towards, the level layout is much simpler and less deadly (''i.e.'' no floors that damage the party), and the equipment found inside is around on par with the best loot at the lowest levels of those two areas. Plus, the bosses of the Castle/Citadel are [[{{Dracolich [[{{Dracolich}} Zombie Dragons]], which have [[WeaksauceWeakness several easily exploited vulnerabilities]]. Stopping by there before trying to defeat Kary/Marillith or acquiring the Floater/Float Stone makes those two tasks significantly easier, both in terms of having more experience and better gear.
18th Jul '17 1:14:50 PM 32_Footsteps
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* DiscOneNuke:
** In all versions, the Castle of Ordeals/Citadel of Trials is one. Due to a river near it, it's the one location on the northern continent that can be reached before acquiring the airship (though it does require getting the canoe, which requires beating Lich). While potentially difficult, the hostile fauna doesn't have nearly as many cheap tricks as some of the random encounters in the next two dungeons that the party is directed towards, the level layout is much simpler and less deadly (''i.e.'' no floors that damage the party), and the equipment found inside is around on par with the best loot at the lowest levels of those two areas. Plus, the bosses of the Castle/Citadel are [[{{Dracolich Zombie Dragons]], which have [[WeaksauceWeakness several easily exploited vulnerabilities]]. Stopping by there before trying to defeat Kary/Marillith or acquiring the Floater/Float Stone makes those two tasks significantly easier, both in terms of having more experience and better gear.
** In the remakes, the FifteenPuzzle can give out rather nice rewards, so that farming it to clean out Elfheim's shops is much more reasonable than the "grind for money against ogres and/or pirates" method needed in the original release. Its usefulness, however, wanes afterwards, as loot from chests becomes generally better than what's in stores.
12th Jul '17 11:29:06 AM rjd1922
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Excuse plot or no, ''Final Fantasy'' became Square's [[BreakthroughHit first big hit]] -- and it helped [[TropeCodifier change]] the {{RPG}} industry to boot. Many more titles followed. However, the rumor of the game being named '''''Final''''' ''Fantasy'' because it was the game that saved Square from bankruptcy isn't true. It was originally going to be named '''''Fighting''''' ''Fantasy'', but there was already a board game based off of a successful series of adventure books with that name, so they went with ''Final'' instead.

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Excuse plot or no, ''Final Fantasy'' became Square's [[BreakthroughHit first big hit]] -- and it helped [[TropeCodifier change]] the {{RPG}} industry to boot. Many more titles followed. However, the rumor of the game being named '''''Final''''' ''Fantasy'' because it was the game that saved Square from bankruptcy isn't true. It was originally going to be named '''''Fighting''''' ''Fantasy'', but there was already a board game based off of [[Literature/FightingFantasy a successful series of adventure books with that name, name]], so they went with ''Final'' instead.
1st Jul '17 8:58:02 PM Phediuk
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** Lots of it, due largely to the fact that the game is, effectively, an unlicensed adaptation of the 1st edition of ''TapletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Most of the more blatant ''D&D'' elements were abandoned beginning with ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyII'', and the series began to craft its own identity from there.
24th Jun '17 2:33:27 PM nombretomado
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* FollowTheLeader: This was intended to be a ''DragonQuest'' killer. Although it didn't come close, as DQ is still more popular in Japan, the Final Fantasy series is the world's most famous JRPG series.

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* FollowTheLeader: This was intended to be a ''DragonQuest'' ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' killer. Although it didn't come close, as DQ is still more popular in Japan, the Final Fantasy series is the world's most famous JRPG series.
28th Apr '17 4:49:34 PM MissConception
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* LawyerFriendlyCameo: The bestiary of ''Final Fantasy'' was essentially the same as that of 1st edition D&D. Several monsters were renamed in the NES release, to prevent any possible lawsuit with Creator/{{TSR}}, then-owners of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Most prominently, Fiend of Fire Marilith, based on a high-ranking demon in D&D, became Kary (though she went by her original name in [[UpdatedRerelease re-releases]]). Similarly, the [[{{Oculothorax}} Beholder]] and [[PaletteSwap Death Beholder]] was altered into the Eye and Phantom (respectively renamed Evil Evil and Death Eye in re-releases).

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* LawyerFriendlyCameo: The bestiary of ''Final Fantasy'' was essentially the same as that of 1st edition D&D. Several monsters were renamed in the NES release, release to prevent any possible lawsuit with Creator/{{TSR}}, then-owners of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Most prominently, Fiend of Fire Marilith, based on a high-ranking demon in D&D, became Kary (though she went by her original name in [[UpdatedRerelease re-releases]]). Similarly, the [[{{Oculothorax}} Beholder]] and [[PaletteSwap Death Beholder]] was altered into the Eye and Phantom (respectively renamed Evil Evil and Death Eye in re-releases).
28th Apr '17 4:47:19 PM MissConception
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* LawyerFriendlyCameo: The bestiary of Final Fantasy was essentially the same as that of 1st edition D&D. Several monsters were renamed in the original release, to prevent any possible lawsuit with Creator/{{TSR}}, then-owners of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Most prominently, Fiend of Fire Marilith, based on a high-ranking demon in D&D, became Kary (though she went by her original name in later remakes). Similarly, the [[{{Oculothorax}} Beholder]] sprite was altered and renamed Eye/Evil Eye.

to:

* LawyerFriendlyCameo: The bestiary of Final Fantasy ''Final Fantasy'' was essentially the same as that of 1st edition D&D. Several monsters were renamed in the original NES release, to prevent any possible lawsuit with Creator/{{TSR}}, then-owners of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Most prominently, Fiend of Fire Marilith, based on a high-ranking demon in D&D, became Kary (though she went by her original name in later remakes). [[UpdatedRerelease re-releases]]). Similarly, the [[{{Oculothorax}} Beholder]] sprite and [[PaletteSwap Death Beholder]] was altered into the Eye and Phantom (respectively renamed Eye/Evil Eye.Evil Evil and Death Eye in re-releases).
9th Apr '17 9:27:09 AM HTD
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* ArtifactTitle: The game was originally intended to be Hironobu Sakaguchi's swansong, who intended to quit Square and leave the gaming industry if ''Final Fantasy'' didn't sell well. Although Sakaguchi now works for Mistwalker instead of Square, ''Final Fantasy'' itself has inspired numerous sequels and spin-offs.
** Whilst this may still have partly influenced the name, Sakaguchi has since said that [[http://kotaku.com/debunking-the-final-fantasy-naming-myth-1707389344 they would've pretty much settled for anything that stood for "FF"]], as apparently they wanted that acronym specifically, once intending to name it ''Literature/FightingFantasy'', which was already taken.
* AscendedGlitch: The original PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling north of Pravoka has been kept in all rereleases.

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* ArtifactTitle: The game was originally intended to be Hironobu Sakaguchi's swansong, who intended to quit Square and leave the gaming industry if ''Final Fantasy'' didn't sell well. Although Sakaguchi now works for Mistwalker instead of Square, ''Final Fantasy'' itself has inspired numerous sequels and spin-offs.
**
spin-offs. Whilst this may still have partly influenced the name, Sakaguchi has since said that [[http://kotaku.com/debunking-the-final-fantasy-naming-myth-1707389344 they would've pretty much settled for anything that stood for "FF"]], as apparently they wanted that acronym specifically, once intending to name it ''Literature/FightingFantasy'', which was already taken.
* AscendedGlitch: AscendedGlitch:
**
The original PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling north of Pravoka has been kept in all rereleases.



* BilingualBonus: Mt. Duergar. "[[TheUnpronouncable Dvergr]]" is Old Norse for "dwarf".

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* BilingualBonus: BilingualBonus:
**
Mt. Duergar. "[[TheUnpronouncable Dvergr]]" "Dvergr" is Old Norse for "dwarf".



* BlockingStopsAllDamage: Equipping certain shields allows you to block damage more often. [[GoodBadBugs Including poison damage.]] The rest of the series simply reduces the damage taken from attacks.

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* BlockingStopsAllDamage: BlockingStopsAllDamage:
**
Equipping certain shields allows you to block damage more often. [[GoodBadBugs Including poison damage.]] The rest of the series simply reduces the damage taken from attacks.



* BonusBoss: The elemental bonus dungeons in the GameBoyAdvance version have four bosses to fight each, and they're all taken from later ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games. Earthgift Shrine has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII Two-Headed Dragon, Echidna, Ahriman, and Cerberus]]; Hellfire Chasm has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Cagnazzo, Barbariccia, Scarmiglione, and Rubicante]]; Lifespring Grotto has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyV Gilgamesh, Atomos, Omega, and Shinryu]]; and Whisperwind Cove has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Typhon, Orthros, Phantom Train, and Death Gaze]]. The Labyrinth of Time in the PSP version has ''eight different versions'' of Chronodia, based on the number of blue and red seals you open in the Labyrinth.
** Warmech. He could only be found through a long and useless hallway on the way to the fourth Fiend. Although he had half the HP of the final boss, he compensated by ''hitting twice as hard.'' This amounts to hitting about 200-500 damage per turn to everyone in your party. This has made many gamers curse the heavens when they accidentally run into it and get destroyed in literally two turns, tops.

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* BonusBoss: The elemental bonus dungeons in the GameBoyAdvance UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version have four bosses to fight each, and they're all taken from later ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games. Earthgift Shrine has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII Two-Headed Dragon, Echidna, Ahriman, and Cerberus]]; Hellfire Chasm has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Cagnazzo, Barbariccia, Scarmiglione, and Rubicante]]; Lifespring Grotto has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyV Gilgamesh, Atomos, Omega, and Shinryu]]; and Whisperwind Cove has [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI Typhon, Orthros, Phantom Train, and Death Gaze]]. The Labyrinth of Time in the PSP version has ''eight different versions'' of Chronodia, based on the number of blue and red seals you open in the Labyrinth.
** Warmech. He could only be found through a long and useless hallway on the way to the fourth Fiend. Although he had half the HP of the final boss, he compensated by ''hitting twice as hard.'' This amounts to hitting about 200-500 damage per turn to everyone in your party. This has made many gamers curse the heavens when they accidentally run into it and get destroyed in literally two turns, tops.
Labyrinth.



* BossInMookClothing: Several, like the [[{{Cthulhumanoid}} Wizards/Piscodemons]] in the Marsh Cave, and especially Warmech.
* {{Bowdlerise}}: Because Nintendo of America's censorship policy at the time was heavy against religious references, the churches where you needed to bring dead party members to be revived were turned into clinics. [[{{HolyBurnsEvil}} This creates a bit of weirdness when you arrive in Melmond and wonder why the local vampire went and burned down Melmond's clinic]]. Of course, the remakes changed the clinics back into churches.

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* BossInMookClothing: Several, like the [[{{Cthulhumanoid}} Wizards/Piscodemons]] in the Marsh Cave, and especially Warmech.
Warmech. He could only be encountered randomly in a hallway on the way to Tiamat. Although he had half the HP of the final boss, he compensated by ''hitting twice as hard.'' This amounts to hitting about 200-500 damage per turn to everyone in your party. This has made many gamers curse the heavens when they accidentally run into it and get destroyed in literally two turns, tops.
* {{Bowdlerise}}: Because Nintendo of America's censorship policy at the time was heavy against religious references, the churches where you needed to bring dead party members to be revived were turned into clinics. [[{{HolyBurnsEvil}} This creates a bit of weirdness when you arrive in Melmond and wonder why the local vampire went and burned down Melmond's clinic]]. Of course, the The remakes changed the clinics back into churches.



* DummiedOut: The Angel's Ring item can only be found under a set of conditions that can never actually happen, namely that you open the 10th chest on [=B33F=]. The only floor in the dungeon that has 10 chests is the "undead castle", which is never made the 33rd floor of the dungeon, and as such there's no way to obtain the Angel's Ring without hacking the game.

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* DummiedOut: The Angel's Ring item can only be found under a set of conditions that can never actually happen, namely that you open the 10th chest on [=B33F=].the 33rd floor of Whisperwind Cove. The only floor in the dungeon that has 10 chests is the "undead castle", which is never made the 33rd floor of the dungeon, and as such there's no way to obtain the Angel's Ring without hacking the game.



* EasyLevelsHardBosses: The bonus dungeons are mostly a cakewalk filled with relatively wimpy recolors of common baddies ([[BossInMookClothing much tougher enemies]] do exist but are very rare). The bosses, on the other hand, will annihilate you pretty quickly unless you've been doing some serious LevelGrinding.

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* EasyLevelsHardBosses: The bonus dungeons are mostly a cakewalk filled with relatively wimpy recolors of common baddies ([[BossInMookClothing much tougher enemies]] do exist but are very rare). The bosses, on the other hand, will annihilate you pretty quickly unless you've been doing some serious LevelGrinding.EasyLevelsHardBosses:



** The bonus dungeons are mostly a cakewalk filled with relatively wimpy recolors of common baddies ([[BossInMookClothing much tougher enemies]] do exist but are very rare). The bosses, on the other hand, will annihilate you pretty quickly unless you've been doing some serious LevelGrinding.



** In a lot of FF games, there are more uncommon elements like Air and Earth, but are harder to come by or use and are a UselessUsefulSpell.
** You also fight the Four Fiends in order of their power, although elements are swapped around : Lich (Earth), Marilith (Fire), Kraken (Water), and lastly Tiamat (Wind).
* [[spoiler: EverybodyLives. According to the text scroll at the end of the game, breaking the StableTimeLoop means you save ''everyone''. Including the queen of Cornelia. Including [[SaveTheVillain Garland]], who by implication never undergoes his FaceHeelTurn.]]

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** In a lot of FF games, there are more uncommon elements like Air and Earth, but are harder to come by or use and are a UselessUsefulSpell.
** You also fight the Four Fiends in order of their power, although elements are swapped around : Lich (Earth), Marilith (Fire), Kraken (Water), and lastly Tiamat (Wind).
* EverybodyLives: [[spoiler: EverybodyLives. According to the text scroll at the end of the game, breaking the StableTimeLoop means you save ''everyone''. Including the queen of Cornelia. Including [[SaveTheVillain Garland]], who by implication never undergoes his FaceHeelTurn.]]



** The [[http://jeffludwig.com/finalfantasy/download.php Mod of Balance]] for the ''Dawn of Souls'' version (GameBoyAdvance remake), which changes things to not only make more sense (no [[UselessUsefulSpell Vox spell]] for starters) but retains the difficulty from the NES version.

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** The [[http://jeffludwig.com/finalfantasy/download.php Mod of Balance]] for the ''Dawn of Souls'' version (GameBoyAdvance (UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance remake), which changes things to not only make more sense (no [[UselessUsefulSpell Vox spell]] for starters) but retains the difficulty from the NES version.



* GoodBadTranslation: "I, Garland, will ''knock you all down!''" The GBA, PSP, and iPhone remakes retain this line.

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* GoodBadTranslation: GoodBadTranslation:
**
"I, Garland, will ''knock you all down!''" The GBA, PSP, and iPhone remakes retain this line.



* HeroesFightBarehanded: Can be played straight with a Monk/Master as a party member. Because of his unique mechanics, the Monk actually does ''less'' damage when a weapon is equipped, except very early in the game.
** Inexperienced players often make it to Garland or further while doing this inadvertently, due to forgetting to equip their gear, especially in the NES original. None of the early game monsters are that hard to beat with your bare hands, even without a monk!

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* HeroesFightBarehanded: Can be played straight with a Monk/Master as a party member. Because of his unique mechanics, the Monk actually does ''less'' damage when a weapon is equipped, except very early in the game.
**
game. Inexperienced players often make it to Garland or further while doing this inadvertently, due to forgetting to equip their gear, especially in the NES original. None of the early game monsters are that hard to beat with your bare hands, even without a monk!



* InfinityPlusOneSword[=/=]InfinityMinusOneSword: There's about three:
** EXCALIBUR! Made of Adamantium and forged by an ambitious dwarf blacksmith named... [[PunnyName Smyth]]. In the original NES release, it ends up as the InfinityMinusOneSword due to a bug[[note]]In the remakes, where the bug is fixed, Excalibur deals bonus damage to certain enemies: if an enemy has ANY weakness on the ElementalRockPaperScissors table, Excalibur counts as the element the enemy is weak to![[/note]].
** Masamune. The InfinityPlusOneSword for a variety of reasons, not least of which is (slightly) higher attack power than Excalibur, and the fact that it can be used by ''any'' class.
** The remakes that include the bonus dungeons add several much more powerful weapons, of course. The absolute strongest weapon is now the Barbarian's Sword, in terms of sheer damage output.

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* InfinityPlusOneSword[=/=]InfinityMinusOneSword: There's about three:
** EXCALIBUR! Made
InfinityMinusOneSword: Excalibur, made of Adamantium Adamantite and forged by an ambitious dwarf blacksmith named... [[PunnyName Smyth]]. In Though not the original NES release, it ends up as strongest weapon in the InfinityMinusOneSword due to a bug[[note]]In game, it is relatively accessible, since the remakes, where Adamantite is easily available from a chest in the bug is fixed, Excalibur deals bonus damage to certain enemies: if an enemy has ANY weakness on the ElementalRockPaperScissors table, Excalibur counts as the element the enemy is weak to![[/note]].
Flying Fortress.
* InfinityPlusOneSword:
** Masamune. The InfinityPlusOneSword for a variety of reasons, not least of which is (slightly) higher attack power than Excalibur, and the fact that it can be used by availability ''any'' class.
class, and the fact that it can only be obtained in the final dungeon.
** The remakes that include the bonus dungeons add several much more powerful weapons, of course.which usually require beating a difficult BonusBoss. The absolute strongest weapon is now the Barbarian's Sword, in terms of sheer damage output.



* LawyerFriendlyCameo: Several monsters were renamed in the original release, to prevent any possible lawsuit with Creator/{{TSR}}, then-owners of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Most prominently, Fiend of Fire Marilith, based on a high-ranking demon in D&D, became Kary (though she went by her original name in later remakes).
** In fact, the bestiary of Final Fantasy was essentially the same as that of 1st edition D&D.
** Similarly, the [[{{Oculothorax}} Beholder]] sprite was altered and renamed Eye/Evil Eye.
* LegacyBossBattle: Starting with the GameBoyAdvance version, there are bonus dungeons featuring four bosses each from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' , ''[[Videogame/FinalFantasyIV IV]]'', ''[[Videogame/FinalFantasyV V]]'' and ''[[Videogame/FinalFantasyVI VI]]''. There are no bosses from ''Videogame/FinalFantasyII'' because that game is usually bundled with ''I''.

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* LawyerFriendlyCameo: The bestiary of Final Fantasy was essentially the same as that of 1st edition D&D. Several monsters were renamed in the original release, to prevent any possible lawsuit with Creator/{{TSR}}, then-owners of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons''. Most prominently, Fiend of Fire Marilith, based on a high-ranking demon in D&D, became Kary (though she went by her original name in later remakes).
** In fact, the bestiary of Final Fantasy was essentially the same as that of 1st edition D&D.
**
remakes). Similarly, the [[{{Oculothorax}} Beholder]] sprite was altered and renamed Eye/Evil Eye.
* LegacyBossBattle: Starting with the GameBoyAdvance UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance version, there are bonus dungeons featuring four bosses each from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' , ''[[Videogame/FinalFantasyIV IV]]'', ''[[Videogame/FinalFantasyV V]]'' and ''[[Videogame/FinalFantasyVI VI]]''. There are no bosses from ''Videogame/FinalFantasyII'' because that game is usually bundled with ''I''.the first one.



* LuckBasedMission: The Cavern of Ice. While in the Cavern of Ice, you can meet three different types of enemies: Piscodemons, Mindflayers, and Dark Wizards. Dark Wizards can cast Death, which has a chance to instantly kill one of your party members, and at this point you still don't have anything to protect against it. Mindflayers[[note]]they're actually pretty rare in the Ice Cave, but they do show up[[/note]] do minimal damage, but have a high chance of instantly killing a party member when they attack. Piscodemons aren't changed at all from the ones you encountered in the Marsh Cave a full act earlier, but because they are classified as boss-type enemies, you can't run away from them. They also like to show up in groups of 6 to 9. So you can randomly encounter an enemy that will kill you, another enemy that will kill you, and an enemy group that will beat you up severely because you can't run.
** In addition, the boss of the Cavern of Ice, Evil Eye, has the spell Kill, that has a much higher chance to kill than Death. While it will use it infrequently in most cases, AIRoulette means that it could use it as much as it wants, and you're likely dead.

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* LuckBasedMission: The Cavern of Ice. While in the Cavern of Ice, you can meet three different types of enemies: Piscodemons, Mindflayers, and Dark Wizards. Dark Wizards can cast Death, which has a chance to instantly kill one of your party members, and at this point you still don't have anything to protect against it. Mindflayers[[note]]they're actually pretty rare in the Ice Cave, but they do show up[[/note]] do minimal damage, but have a high chance of instantly killing a party member when they attack. Piscodemons aren't changed at all from the ones you encountered in the Marsh Cave a full act earlier, but because they are classified as boss-type enemies, you can't run away from them. They also like to show up in groups of 6 to 9. So you can randomly encounter an enemy that will kill you, another enemy that will kill you, and an enemy group that will beat you up severely because you can't run.
**
run. In addition, the boss of the Cavern of Ice, Evil Eye, has the spell Kill, that has a much higher chance to kill than Death. While it will use it infrequently in most cases, AIRoulette means that it could use it as much as it wants, and you're likely dead.



* MagikarpPower: Monks are rather weak in the beginning, doing less damage than Thieves and Red Mages. What makes them unique is that they are actually stronger unarmed than with a nunchuck. Around level 10 you can just disequip his weapons forever and watch him outdamage your Warrior with multiple hits each round. A party of four Masters can destroy Chaos in a single round. (This was fixed in Dawn of Souls, however, where Chaos has more HP.)
** The Thief is another example. Thieves start out weaker than Fighters and Red Mages, and their equipment selection isn't as good. But once he class changes to a Ninja, his equipment selection becomes much better, and he also gets Black Magic.

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* MagikarpPower: Monks are rather weak in the beginning, doing less damage than Thieves and Red Mages. What makes them unique is that they are actually stronger unarmed than with a nunchuck. Around level 10 you can just disequip his weapons forever and watch him outdamage your Warrior with multiple hits each round. A party of four Masters can destroy Chaos in a single round. (This was fixed in Dawn of Souls, however, where Chaos has more HP.)
**
) The Thief is another example. Thieves start out weaker than Fighters and Red Mages, and their equipment selection isn't as good. But once he class changes to a Ninja, his equipment selection becomes much better, and he also gets Black Magic.



* NeverSayDie: ZigZagged. There's Garland's [[MemeticMutation famous line]], that used to be quoted at the top of the page, but the game does use "perished" and "slain", which were apparently tame enough to get by NOA.
** The Death spells in this game and some of its remakes were affected. In the NES version, Death was renamed "RUB", as in "to rub someone out"; similarly, the spell to grant immunity to instant death was "ARUB". An improved variation of Death, flat-out known as Kill, was renamed "XXXX". The UsefulNotes/PlayStation game, despite having more lenient translation policies, translated Death and Kill as "Reaper" (named after the Grim Reaper-like creature the spell summons) and "Doom".

to:

* NeverSayDie: ZigZagged. There's Garland's [[MemeticMutation famous line]], that used to be quoted at the top of the page, but the game does use "perished" and "slain", which were apparently tame enough to get by NOA.
**
NOA. The Death spells in this game and some of its remakes were affected. In the NES version, Death was renamed "RUB", as in "to rub someone out"; similarly, the spell to grant immunity to instant death was "ARUB". An improved variation of Death, flat-out known as Kill, was renamed "XXXX". The UsefulNotes/PlayStation game, despite having more lenient translation policies, translated Death and Kill as "Reaper" (named after the Grim Reaper-like creature the spell summons) and "Doom".



* OntologicalInertia: Interestingly, TimeTravel apparently shunts you to an alternate timeline, and you keep existing regardless of potential paradox. One of the remarkably few games featuring time travel to do this.
** The Light Warriors are returned to their own time (and forget the whole ordeal) in the remakes.

to:

* OntologicalInertia: Interestingly, TimeTravel apparently shunts you to an alternate timeline, and you keep existing regardless of potential paradox. One of the remarkably few games featuring time travel to do this.
**
this. The Light Warriors are returned to their own time (and forget the whole ordeal) in the remakes.



* OutsideTheBoxTactic: Tiamat dies with one use of the instant-death spell BANE/Scourge.

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* OutsideTheBoxTactic: OutsideTheBoxTactic:
**
Tiamat dies with one use of the instant-death spell BANE/Scourge.



* RandomEncounters: It gets ridiculous in one path of the Cavern of Earth, where you have to fight a troop of one to four Giants ''every step''! Appropriately named the "Giant's Cave", it is great for leveling, and, like the Peninsula of Power, was left in every subsequent version.

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* RandomEncounters: RandomEncounters:
**
It gets ridiculous in one path of the Cavern of Earth, where you have to fight a troop of one to four Giants ''every step''! Appropriately named the "Giant's Cave", it is great for leveling, and, like the Peninsula of Power, was left in every subsequent version.



* {{Retcon}}: The sequel/prequel ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' has [[AllThereInTheManual reports]] that seem to reword the mention of the "four warriors of light" to mention a single warrior, implying a revised Final Fantasy I continuity.
** However, in some of those same reports in ''012'', it mentions three warriors who couldn't survive the purification process and perished in that world (similar to how [[spoiler: [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Kain]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII Vaan]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Tifa]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyX Yuna]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Laguna]], and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII Lightning]]]] did), which meant Shinryu would have teleported them out of the cycle. It's also known that the Warrior of Light came after all three of them, and that each warrior only entered as another perished. [[ShrugOfGod Square have yet to give a straight answer when asked how it all works.]]

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* {{Retcon}}: The sequel/prequel ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' has [[AllThereInTheManual reports]] that seem to reword the mention of the "four warriors of light" to mention a single warrior, implying a revised Final Fantasy I continuity.
**
continuity. However, in some of those same reports in ''012'', it mentions three warriors who couldn't survive the purification process and perished in that world (similar to how [[spoiler: [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Kain]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII Vaan]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII Tifa]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyX Yuna]], [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Laguna]], and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyXIII Lightning]]]] did), which meant Shinryu would have teleported them out of the cycle. It's also known that the Warrior of Light came after all three of them, and that each warrior only entered as another perished. [[ShrugOfGod Square have yet to give a straight answer when asked how it all works.]]



* RocksFallEveryoneDies: It's quite possible to be ambushed by a large group of Cockatrices or any other monster that has a [[TakenForGranite petrification]] or [[OneHitKill instant death]] ability and [[TotalPartyKill annihilate you]] before you can take a single action.
** The same thing can happen if you are ambushed by a group of monsters that have a tier-2 or 3 elemental attack that hits everyone. If enough of them decide to use it, your party is likely dead no matter how much HP they have.

to:

* RocksFallEveryoneDies: It's quite possible to be ambushed by a large group of Cockatrices or any other monster that has a [[TakenForGranite petrification]] or [[OneHitKill instant death]] ability and [[TotalPartyKill annihilate you]] before you can take a single action.
** The same thing can happen if you are ambushed by a group of monsters that have a tier-2 or 3 elemental attack that hits everyone.
action. If enough of them decide to use it, your party is likely dead no matter how much HP they have.



* [[spoiler: SaveTheVillain: Finally defeating Chaos not only breaks the StableTimeLoop everything is trapped in, it also resurrects Garland in the present and implies he never turns evil to start with. Thanks to the events of ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'', this means [[TheHero The Warrior of Light]] made good on his vow.]]

to:

* [[spoiler: SaveTheVillain: [[spoiler: Finally defeating Chaos not only breaks the StableTimeLoop everything is trapped in, it also resurrects Garland in the present and implies he never turns evil to start with. Thanks to the events of ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'', this means [[TheHero The Warrior of Light]] made good on his vow.]]



* SequenceBreaking: You can sail to the Citadel of Trials and complete the class change quest before most of the Fire Fiend plot.

to:

* SequenceBreaking: You can sail to the Citadel of Trials and complete the class change quest before most of the Fire Fiend plot.SequenceBreaking:



* StableTimeLoop: The Four Fiends send [[spoiler:the dying Garland]] back in time 2,000 years, where he becomes the demon Chaos. Chaos sends the Four Fiends forward in time to seize the Crystals and send [[spoiler:the dying Garland]] back in time...
** Which [[TimeTravelTenseTrouble creates some rather odd grammar]]: 2000 years from now, you killed me.
** It's also a case of {{Screw Destiny}}, since the time travel isn't literal "travel," but a variant in which all the events after a specific time are undone, with the traveler happening to be immune to any changes. Most of the time, this sort of time travel would be the practical equivalent to the standard kind, but in a StableTimeLoop, the repeated undoing "traps" everyone and everything in a specific period, [[GroundhogDayLoop going through it over and over, unable to progress]]. [[spoiler:The villain Garland]] can only win if he defeats you in his first battle, and you can only win if you beat him in the final battle--each of which has turned out the same way ''thousands of times already''.

to:

* StableTimeLoop: The Four Fiends send [[spoiler:the dying Garland]] back in time 2,000 years, where he becomes the demon Chaos. Chaos sends the Four Fiends forward in time to seize the Crystals and send [[spoiler:the dying Garland]] back in time...
**
time... Which [[TimeTravelTenseTrouble creates some rather odd grammar]]: 2000 years from now, you killed me.
**
me. It's also a case of {{Screw Destiny}}, since the time travel isn't literal "travel," but a variant in which all the events after a specific time are undone, with the traveler happening to be immune to any changes. Most of the time, this sort of time travel would be the practical equivalent to the standard kind, but in a StableTimeLoop, the repeated undoing "traps" everyone and everything in a specific period, [[GroundhogDayLoop going through it over and over, unable to progress]]. [[spoiler:The villain Garland]] can only win if he defeats you in his first battle, and you can only win if you beat him in the final battle--each of which has turned out the same way ''thousands of times already''.



* UselessItem: AMUT (Vox) cures your characters of Silence. That would be useful... if any enemy in the game cast silence. So it cures a status effect you can never even get.
** Four enemies (Eye, Phantom, Wizard Vampire, and Grey Naga) have the Mute spell. For Eyes and Phantoms, it's the sixth or seventh spell in the spell cycle, and the odds of your party surviving to see it are remote. For the other two, it's not their first spell, and at the point in the game where you run into them, the odds of any enemy surviving the 2-4 rounds necessary to reach the second spell in its spell cycle are slim. So it's still useless.
** In the remakes a few enemies now know Silence. However they are so few and far between, you have the gauntlets (which cast Bolt2 for free and aren't blocked by Silence) by the time you encounter any of them, and Silence disappears after the battle, so the spell is still fairly useless.

to:

* UselessItem: UselessUsefulSpell:
**
AMUT (Vox) cures your characters of Silence. That would be useful... if any enemy in the game cast silence. So it cures a status effect you can never even get.
**
Four enemies (Eye, Phantom, Wizard Vampire, and Grey Naga) have the Mute spell. For Eyes and Phantoms, it's the sixth or seventh spell in the spell cycle, and the odds of your party surviving to see it are remote. For the other two, it's not their first spell, and at the point in the game where you run into them, the odds of any enemy surviving the 2-4 rounds necessary to reach the second spell in its spell cycle are slim. So it's still useless.
**
this item cures a status effect you can never even get. In the remakes a few enemies now know Silence. However they are so few and far between, you have the gauntlets (which cast Bolt2 for free and aren't blocked by Silence) by the time you encounter any of them, and Silence disappears after the battle, so the spell is still fairly useless.



* UselessUsefulSpell: Subverted, as many of the bosses were vulnerable to at least one StandardStatusAilment.



** It's worth noting that the White/Red/Black differences between the Mages were probably inspired by Literature/{{Dragonlance}} (White and Black are easy enough to derive on your own, but is red that obvious for the middle ground?).



* WhereItAllBegan: The first dungeon is also the entrance to the [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon much more impressive final dungeon]]. On top of that, the first boss is also the FinalBoss after pulling a OneWingedAngel.

to:

* WhereItAllBegan: WhereItAllBegan:
**
The first dungeon is also the entrance to the [[TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon much more impressive final dungeon]]. On top of that, the first boss is also the FinalBoss after pulling a OneWingedAngel.
3rd Apr '17 3:48:45 PM Hashil
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Added DiffLines:

** In the original game, rather than its actual critical hit rate, weapons used their index number in the game's code instead. While likely a bug in its first appearance, this quirk has been kept without change in all re-releases.
2nd Apr '17 7:49:22 PM sarysa
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* PredestinationParadox: [[spoiler:2000 years before the game begins, Chaos sent the Four Fiends into the future to send Garland even further into the past. Garland is sent back by said fiends before the Light Warriors can finish him off, and he eventually becomes the same Chaos who creates the Four Fiends.]] How the loop originates is [[TimeyWimeyBall never explained]].

to:

* PredestinationParadox: [[spoiler:2000 years before the game begins, Chaos sent creates the Four Fiends and sends them into the future to send Garland even further into the past. Garland is sent back by said fiends before the Light Warriors can finish him off, and he eventually becomes the same Chaos who creates the Four Fiends.]] How the loop originates is [[TimeyWimeyBall never explained]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 272. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Videogame.FinalFantasyI