History VideoGame / SakuraWars

27th Aug '16 10:35:34 PM Eyeshield
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* ThemeNaming: Flowers for the Hanagumi; stars, constellations and the like for the Hoshigumi

to:

* ThemeNaming: Flowers for the Hanagumi; stars, constellations and the like for the HoshigumiHoshigumi.
20th Aug '16 3:09:08 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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In Japan, these preparations take the form of the Teikokukagekidan, the Imperial Floral Defense Force. The Hanagumi ([[ThemeNaming "Flower Division"]]) is their elite squad of warriors, equipped with the steam-powered battle armor called ''kohbu'', and the weapons and skills needed to fight the demons when they return. Because of a quirk in the part-magical technology of the ''kohbu'', all the members of the Hanagumi (save for their commanding officer) are women. Taking advantage of a pun in Japanese ("Teikokukagekidan" can mean "Imperial Floral Defense '''Troop'''" or "Imperial Theatrical '''Troupe'''", depending on the kanji used), the Hanagumi make their headquarters underneath the Imperial Theater in Tokyo. When they are not fighting the forces of Hell, they maintain their cover identities as the cast and crew of the theater, allowing for a lot of music in between the battle scenes, and no small amount of incidental comedy.

Despite the Hanagumi's purpose as as combat unit, ''Sakura Taisen'' spends surprisingly little time in battle. Instead it focuses on first the background and establishment of the Imperial Defense Forces, the recruitment of its members, and follows that with close studies of the various characters. The second series of [=OVAs=] barely even mentions the demon conflict, instead focusing ''entirely'' on specific incidents within the lives of the Hanagumi and jumping among the time periods covered in the various video games. These stories are more self-contained and satisfying, and showcase the sense of "family" among the Hanagumi. In both series the animation is outstanding, and the English dubs (produced by Creator/ADVFilms) are quite good, featuring a cast that manages to deliver the multinational/multicultural feel of the team quite well. As of early 2005, there are also a third and fourth set of [=OVAs=], focusing on the new Hanagumi team established in Paris, France. The third series has been licensed by Creator/FUNimation, and was released under the name ''Sakura Taisen: École de Paris'' in North America in late 2005. The fourth series is named ''Sakura Taisen: Le Nouveau Paris'', and continues following the Paris Hanagumi. The fifth series of [=OVAs=] (based appropriately enough on the fifth game) is titled ''New York, New York'', with a new adventure for the New York-based Hoshigumi.

In addition to the [=OVAs=], there is a movie, released in 2001. Like the episodes of the second series, the film is also a self-contained story in the same continuity (no AlternateContinuity here, thankfully) and leaves no hanging plot threads behind; the new character introduced here even goes on to appear in the later ''Sakura Taisen V'' game. The movie also substantially expands the world of ''Sakura Taisen'' beyond Japan, exploring in greater depth the dynamics of the prototype team fielded in wartime Europe. The movie takes place just after the end of the third game (Paris) and before the beginning of the fourth (which ended the "Tokyo arc.") This makes extensive use of CGI effects, particularly for the ''kohbu''. Creator/{{Geneon}} (then known as Pioneer) licensed and dubbed the movie instead of Creator/ADVFilms (Note: Creator/FUNimation now owns the license to the film, along with other titles by Creator/{{Geneon}}), along with different voice actors and less attempts to provide diverse accents that ADV did.

to:

In Japan, these preparations take the form of the Teikokukagekidan, the Imperial Floral Defense Force. The Hanagumi ([[ThemeNaming "Flower Division"]]) is their elite squad of warriors, equipped with the steam-powered battle armor called ''kohbu'', and the weapons and skills needed to fight the demons when they return. Because of a quirk in the part-magical technology of the ''kohbu'', all the members of the Hanagumi (save for their commanding officer) are women. Taking advantage of a pun in Japanese ("Teikokukagekidan" can mean "Imperial Floral Defense '''Troop'''" or "Imperial Theatrical '''Troupe'''", depending on the kanji used), the Hanagumi make their headquarters underneath the Imperial Theater in Tokyo. When they are not fighting the forces of Hell, they maintain their cover identities as the cast and crew of the theater, allowing for a lot of music in between the battle scenes, and no small amount of incidental comedy.

comedy. Despite the Hanagumi's purpose as as combat unit, ''Sakura Taisen'' spends surprisingly little time in battle. Instead it focuses on first the background and establishment of the Imperial Defense Forces, the recruitment of its members, and follows that with close studies of the various characters. The

There are two OVA series covering the Tokyo Hanagumi; the first is a prequel depicting the formation of the Hanagumi, while the
second series of [=OVAs=] barely even mentions the demon conflict, instead focusing ''entirely'' on specific incidents within the lives of the Hanagumi and jumping among the time periods covered in the various video games. These stories are The latter series is more self-contained and satisfying, than the first, and showcase the sense of "family" among the Hanagumi. In both series the animation is outstanding, and the English dubs (produced by Creator/ADVFilms) are quite good, featuring a cast that manages to deliver the multinational/multicultural feel of the team quite well. As of early 2005, there There are also a third and fourth set of [=OVAs=], focusing on the new Hanagumi team established in Paris, France. The third series has been licensed by Creator/FUNimation, and was released under the name ''Sakura Taisen: École de Paris'' in North America in late 2005. The fourth series is named ''Sakura Taisen: Le Nouveau Paris'', and continues following the Paris Hanagumi. The fifth series of [=OVAs=] (based appropriately enough on the fifth game) is titled ''New York, New York'', with a new adventure for the New York-based Hoshigumi.

In addition to the [=OVAs=], there is a movie, released in 2001. Like the episodes of the second series, the film is also a self-contained story in the same continuity (no AlternateContinuity here, thankfully) and leaves no hanging plot threads behind; the new character introduced here even goes on to appear in the later ''Sakura Taisen V'' game. The movie also substantially expands the world of ''Sakura Taisen'' beyond Japan, exploring in greater depth the dynamics of the prototype team fielded in wartime Europe. The movie takes place just after the end of the third game (Paris) and before the beginning of the fourth (which ended the "Tokyo arc.") arc"). This makes extensive use of CGI effects, particularly for the ''kohbu''. Creator/{{Geneon}} (then known as Pioneer) licensed and dubbed the movie instead of Creator/ADVFilms (Note: Creator/FUNimation now owns the license to the film, along with other titles by Creator/{{Geneon}}), along with different voice actors and less attempts to provide diverse accents that ADV did.



See also: the [[Characters/SakuraTaisen character page]] and [[Recap/SakuraWarsTV recap page for the TV series]]. There are also trope pages for ''Anime/SakuraWarsTheMovie'', the ''Anime/SakuraWarsTV'' series, and [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove the fifth main game]], the only one so far to have gotten an official Western release.

to:

See also: the [[Characters/SakuraTaisen character page]] and [[Recap/SakuraWarsTV recap page for the TV series]]. There are also trope pages for ''Anime/SakuraWarsTheMovie'', the ''Anime/SakuraWarsTV'' series, and [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove the fifth main game]], the game]] (the only one so far to have gotten an official Western release.
release).
22nd Jul '16 5:13:34 PM tenuousbreaker
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Known as ''Sakura Taisen'' in UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}, this is a franchise starting with video games by Creator/{{Sega}} (starting on the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn) and RED Company (Creator/RedEntertainment), branching out into [[Main/OriginalVideoAnimation OVA's]], several TV series and a movie. The games, now at their sixth release in the series, are a combination of DatingSim and [[TurnBasedStrategy tactical combat]], and have a near-fanatical following. Though [[NoExportForYou most have seen no release outside Japan]], the first two games were officially released in UsefulNotes/{{Russia}} in 2006 and 2008 respectively, and the fifth game was released in North America on March 30, 2010. A hilariously fun play-through of the first ''Sakura Taisen'' game can be found at the Website/SomethingAwful.com forums [[note]]Now locked again with the images and whatnot fixed up.[[/note]], for those curious about just ''how'' this blend works. (Warning: May not be suitable for [[CreepyChild Iris]] and [[StalkerWithACrush Sakura]] fans.)

to:

Known as ''Sakura Taisen'' in UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}, this is a franchise starting with video games by Creator/{{Sega}} (starting on the UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn) and RED Company (Creator/RedEntertainment), branching out into [[Main/OriginalVideoAnimation OVA's]], several TV series and a movie. The games, now at their sixth release in the series, are a combination of DatingSim and [[TurnBasedStrategy tactical combat]], and have a near-fanatical following. Though [[NoExportForYou most have seen no release outside Japan]], the first two games were officially released in UsefulNotes/{{Russia}} in 2006 and 2008 respectively, and the fifth game was released in North America on March 30, 2010. A hilariously fun play-through of the first ''Sakura Taisen'' game can be found at the Website/SomethingAwful.com forums [[note]]Now locked again with the images and whatnot fixed up.[[/note]], for those curious about just ''how'' this blend works. (Warning: May not be suitable for [[CreepyChild Iris]] and [[StalkerWithACrush Sakura]] fans.)
2010.



In Japan, these preparations take the form of the Teikokukagekidan, the Imperial Floral Defense Force. The Hanagumi ([[ThemeNaming "Flower Division"]]) is their elite squad of warriors, equipped with the steam-powered battle armor called ''kohbu'', and the weapons and skills needed to fight the demons when they return. Because of a quirk in the part-magical technology of the ''kohbu'', all the members of the Hanagumi (save for their commanding officer) are women.

Taking advantage of a pun in Japanese ("Teikokukagekidan" can mean "Imperial Floral Defense '''Troop'''" or "Imperial Theatrical '''Troupe'''", depending on the kanji used), the Hanagumi make their headquarters underneath the Imperial Theater in Tokyo. When they are not fighting the forces of Hell, they maintain their cover identities as the cast and crew of the theater, allowing for a lot of music in between the battle scenes, and no small amount of incidental comedy.

Despite the Hanagumi's purpose as as combat unit, ''Sakura Taisen'' spends surprisingly little time in battle. Instead it focuses on first the background and establishment of the Imperial Defense Forces, the recruitment of its members, and follows that with close studies of the various characters. The [=OVAs'=] weak point is that they are intended to supplement the video games on which they are based, rather than expand on them for the non-gamer. As a result, entire plotlines are left hanging because they are resolved in the games. This can make the first six-episode series ''very'' unfulfilling unless the viewer is more concerned about the characters than about their situation.

The second series barely even mentions the demon conflict, instead focusing ''entirely'' on specific incidents within the lives of the Hanagumi and jumping among the time periods covered in the various video games. These stories are more self-contained and satisfying, and showcase the sense of "family" among the Hanagumi. In both series the animation is outstanding, and the English dubs (produced by Creator/ADVFilms) are quite good, featuring a cast that manages to deliver the multinational/multicultural feel of the team quite well.

As of early 2005, there are also a third and fourth set of [=OVAs=], focusing on the new Hanagumi team established in Paris, France. The third series has been licensed by Creator/FUNimation, and was released under the name ''Sakura Taisen: École de Paris'' in North America in late 2005. The fourth series is named ''Sakura Taisen: Le Nouveau Paris'', and continues following the Paris Hanagumi. The fifth series of [=OVAs=] (based appropriately enough on the fifth game) is titled ''New York, New York'', with a new adventure for the New York-based Hoshigumi.

In addition to the [=OVAs=], there is a movie, released in 2001. Like the episodes of the second series, the film is also a self-contained story in the same continuity (no AlternateContinuity here, thankfully) and leaves no hanging plot threads behind; the new character introduced here even goes on to appear in the later ''Sakura Taisen V'' game. The movie does assume you have familiarity with the characters and game timeline (providing no explanation as to why Ohgami isn't even present for almost the entire movie.) The movie also substantially expands the world of ''Sakura Taisen'' beyond Japan, exploring in greater depth the dynamics of the prototype team fielded in wartime Europe. The movie takes place just after the end of the third game (Paris) and before the beginning of the fourth (which ended the "Tokyo arc.") This makes extensive use of CGI effects, particularly for the ''kohbu''.

Note, however, that Creator/{{Geneon}} (then known as Pioneer) licensed and dubbed the movie instead of Creator/ADVFilms (Note: Creator/FUNimation now owns the license to the film, along with other titles by Creator/{{Geneon}}), and the voice actors they cast are (with a few exceptions) markedly inferior to their predecessors. This is a surprising failure on the part of Pioneer, which has made its reputation with outstanding casts. In particular, there are none of the wide variety of accents and dialects heard in the Creator/ADVFilms version. This can be quite jarring to a viewer used to the multinational sound of the [=OVAs=].

There is also a TV series version which is an AlternateContinuity from the [=OVAs=]. Aired in Japan in 2000, it follows the plotline of the first game but with multiple (and ''major'') alterations, particularly in the personalities of the villains and some of the principals themselves. The TV series bears an [[DarkerAndEdgier overall darker tone than even the original games]]. Despite being self-contained and largely separate from the [=OVAs=] and even somewhat from the franchise's personality, the TV series fails to solidly establish the Hanagumi's characters, almost unconsciously expecting the viewer to already know (to an extent) who's who. In the end it largely ends up an exercise in angering fans, but is a fair introduction for series neophytes. The animation betrays the lower quality typical of OVA-to-TV transitions but introduces a consistent, slightly altered, character design style and maintains the franchise's reputation for stellar voice acting and original music (in Japanese.)

And then there's the manga, which was released in Japan from 2003 to 2008 and adapts the first game again, without the drastic alterations of the TV series. Most of it has been released in English by Creator/{{Tokyopop}}. However, a few volumes were not translated since the company ended a majority of its operations. A motion comic production of the manga adaptations is currently in the works by [=TOMOTOON=].

An enjoyable, fun, and well-heeled franchise, ''Sakura Taisen'' is a legendary license and is one of the few franchises to make a truly successful expansion into nearly every form of media. The series' voice actors regularly performed (up to 2008) in sold-out Broadway-style "live shows" and radio dramas (all set in the ''Sakura Taisen'' universe), and a ''Sakura Taisen'' cafe/store stood in the SEGA amusement center in Tokyo until its closing in March 2008.

''Sakura Taisen'' remains a hallmark of anime culture, something of a paragon of what "old-school" shows were like, with upbeat, almost sickeningly positive characters and plots, ridiculous amounts of merchandise, and very little irony.

Today the series appears to be in an indefinite hiatus as a result of weak sales of the fifth title and its tie-in merchandise and anime, but every now and then rumors will come out of Sega of a sixth entry in the series or a revival.

An attempt to localize the series for digital distribution has [[http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kiss-Me-Sweet-The-Sakura-Wars-Localization-Project/382878205094476 sprung]] [[http://twitter.com/swkissmesweet up]]. There's also an [[https://iwakuraproductions.wordpress.com/?s=sakura+wars ongoing fan translation project]] for Sakura Taisen 1's PC-version done by Iwakura Productions.

A [[Characters/SakuraTaisen character page]] has been started.

Ichiro Ohgami, Sakura Shinguuji, Erica Fontaine, and Gemini Sunrise also made an appearance in ''VideoGame/ProjectXZone'', a cross over game between Creator/{{Namco}}, Creator/{{Sega}}, and Creator/{{Capcom}}. They return for the sequel as well, bringing none other than Advertising/SegataSanshiro with them.

A [[Recap/SakuraWarsTV recap for the TV series]] has been started.

Trope Pages for ''Anime/SakuraWarsTheMovie'', the ''Anime/SakuraWarsTV'' series, and [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove the fifth main game]] have been started.

to:

In Japan, these preparations take the form of the Teikokukagekidan, the Imperial Floral Defense Force. The Hanagumi ([[ThemeNaming "Flower Division"]]) is their elite squad of warriors, equipped with the steam-powered battle armor called ''kohbu'', and the weapons and skills needed to fight the demons when they return. Because of a quirk in the part-magical technology of the ''kohbu'', all the members of the Hanagumi (save for their commanding officer) are women.

women. Taking advantage of a pun in Japanese ("Teikokukagekidan" can mean "Imperial Floral Defense '''Troop'''" or "Imperial Theatrical '''Troupe'''", depending on the kanji used), the Hanagumi make their headquarters underneath the Imperial Theater in Tokyo. When they are not fighting the forces of Hell, they maintain their cover identities as the cast and crew of the theater, allowing for a lot of music in between the battle scenes, and no small amount of incidental comedy.

Despite the Hanagumi's purpose as as combat unit, ''Sakura Taisen'' spends surprisingly little time in battle. Instead it focuses on first the background and establishment of the Imperial Defense Forces, the recruitment of its members, and follows that with close studies of the various characters. The [=OVAs'=] weak point is that they are intended to supplement the video games on which they are based, rather than expand on them for the non-gamer. As a result, entire plotlines are left hanging because they are resolved in the games. This can make the first six-episode series ''very'' unfulfilling unless the viewer is more concerned about the characters than about their situation.

The second series of [=OVAs=] barely even mentions the demon conflict, instead focusing ''entirely'' on specific incidents within the lives of the Hanagumi and jumping among the time periods covered in the various video games. These stories are more self-contained and satisfying, and showcase the sense of "family" among the Hanagumi. In both series the animation is outstanding, and the English dubs (produced by Creator/ADVFilms) are quite good, featuring a cast that manages to deliver the multinational/multicultural feel of the team quite well.

well. As of early 2005, there are also a third and fourth set of [=OVAs=], focusing on the new Hanagumi team established in Paris, France. The third series has been licensed by Creator/FUNimation, and was released under the name ''Sakura Taisen: École de Paris'' in North America in late 2005. The fourth series is named ''Sakura Taisen: Le Nouveau Paris'', and continues following the Paris Hanagumi. The fifth series of [=OVAs=] (based appropriately enough on the fifth game) is titled ''New York, New York'', with a new adventure for the New York-based Hoshigumi.

In addition to the [=OVAs=], there is a movie, released in 2001. Like the episodes of the second series, the film is also a self-contained story in the same continuity (no AlternateContinuity here, thankfully) and leaves no hanging plot threads behind; the new character introduced here even goes on to appear in the later ''Sakura Taisen V'' game. The movie does assume you have familiarity with the characters and game timeline (providing no explanation as to why Ohgami isn't even present for almost the entire movie.) The movie also substantially expands the world of ''Sakura Taisen'' beyond Japan, exploring in greater depth the dynamics of the prototype team fielded in wartime Europe. The movie takes place just after the end of the third game (Paris) and before the beginning of the fourth (which ended the "Tokyo arc.") This makes extensive use of CGI effects, particularly for the ''kohbu''.

Note, however, that
''kohbu''. Creator/{{Geneon}} (then known as Pioneer) licensed and dubbed the movie instead of Creator/ADVFilms (Note: Creator/FUNimation now owns the license to the film, along with other titles by Creator/{{Geneon}}), and the along with different voice actors they cast are (with a few exceptions) markedly inferior and less attempts to their predecessors. This is a surprising failure on the part of Pioneer, which has made its reputation with outstanding casts. In particular, there are none of the wide variety of provide diverse accents and dialects heard in the Creator/ADVFilms version. This can be quite jarring to a viewer used to the multinational sound of the [=OVAs=].

that ADV did.

There is also a TV series version which is an AlternateContinuity from the [=OVAs=]. Aired in Japan in 2000, it follows the plotline of the first game but with multiple (and ''major'') alterations, particularly in the personalities of the villains and some of the principals themselves. The TV series bears an [[DarkerAndEdgier overall darker tone than even the original games]]. Despite being self-contained and largely separate from the [=OVAs=] and even somewhat from the franchise's personality, the TV series fails to solidly establish the Hanagumi's characters, almost unconsciously expecting the viewer to already know (to an extent) who's who. In the end it largely ends up an exercise in angering fans, but is a fair introduction for series neophytes.

The animation betrays the lower quality typical of OVA-to-TV transitions but introduces a consistent, slightly altered, character design style and maintains the franchise's reputation for stellar voice acting and original music (in Japanese.)

And then there's the
manga, which was released in Japan from 2003 to 2008 and adapts the first game again, without the drastic alterations of the TV series. Most of it has been released in English by Creator/{{Tokyopop}}. However, a few volumes were not translated since the company ended a majority of its operations. A motion comic production of the manga adaptations is currently in the works by [=TOMOTOON=].

An enjoyable, fun, and well-heeled franchise, ''Sakura Taisen'' is a legendary license and is one of the few franchises to make a truly successful expansion into nearly every form of media. The series' voice actors regularly performed (up to 2008) in sold-out Broadway-style "live shows" and radio dramas (all set in the ''Sakura Taisen'' universe), and a ''Sakura Taisen'' cafe/store stood in the SEGA amusement center in Tokyo until its closing in March 2008.

''Sakura Taisen'' remains a hallmark of anime culture, something of a paragon of what "old-school" shows were like, with upbeat, almost sickeningly positive characters and plots, ridiculous amounts of merchandise, and very little irony.

2008. Today the series appears to be in an indefinite hiatus as a result of weak sales of the fifth title and its tie-in merchandise and anime, but every now and then rumors will come out of Sega of a sixth entry in the series or a revival.

An attempt to localize the series for digital distribution has [[http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kiss-Me-Sweet-The-Sakura-Wars-Localization-Project/382878205094476 sprung]] [[http://twitter.com/swkissmesweet up]]. There's also an [[https://iwakuraproductions.wordpress.com/?s=sakura+wars ongoing fan translation project]] for Sakura Taisen 1's PC-version done by Iwakura Productions.

A [[Characters/SakuraTaisen character page]] has been started.

Productions. Ichiro Ohgami, Sakura Shinguuji, Erica Fontaine, and Gemini Sunrise also made an appearance in ''VideoGame/ProjectXZone'', a cross over game between Creator/{{Namco}}, Creator/{{Sega}}, and Creator/{{Capcom}}. They return for the sequel as well, bringing none other than Advertising/SegataSanshiro with them.

A See also: the [[Characters/SakuraTaisen character page]] and [[Recap/SakuraWarsTV recap page for the TV series]] has been started.

Trope Pages
series]]. There are also trope pages for ''Anime/SakuraWarsTheMovie'', the ''Anime/SakuraWarsTV'' series, and [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove the fifth main game]] game]], the only one so far to have been started.
gotten an official Western release.
14th Jul '16 3:34:55 AM Morgenthaler
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* RedheadedHero: A numbers of the girls are readheads. And depending on the endings, this turns into HeroesWantRedheads.
4th Jun '16 9:42:41 PM nombretomado
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* {{Filler}}: The PS2 Version of the first game has an exclusive chapter that was added on for the sole purpose of 1) providing a Kohran-centered chapter which the original version of the game lacked and 2) to provide [[spoiler:the Three Star Division pilots who appear in later sequels]] with an early cameo to keep their fans happy.

to:

* {{Filler}}: The PS2 Version [=PS2=] version of the first game has an exclusive chapter that was added on for the sole purpose of 1) providing a Kohran-centered chapter which the original version of the game lacked and 2) to provide [[spoiler:the Three Star Division pilots who appear in later sequels]] with an early cameo to keep their fans happy.



* OldSaveBonus Use the Same Memory Card on your PS2 that you saved Sakura Wars 1 with to play Sakura Wars 3 and Episode 5-0, and oh boy you'd be in for a world of fun!!

to:

* OldSaveBonus Use the Same Memory Card on your PS2 [=PS2=] that you saved Sakura Wars 1 with to play Sakura Wars 3 and Episode 5-0, and oh boy you'd be in for a world of fun!!
23rd Apr '16 7:59:01 AM Kaabisteru
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An attempt to localize the series for digital distribution has [[http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kiss-Me-Sweet-The-Sakura-Wars-Localization-Project/382878205094476 sprung]] [[http://twitter.com/swkissmesweet up]]. There's also an [[https://iwakuraproductions.wordpress.com/?s=sakura+wars ongoing fan translation]] for project Sakura Taisen 1's PC-version by Iwakura Productions.

to:

An attempt to localize the series for digital distribution has [[http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kiss-Me-Sweet-The-Sakura-Wars-Localization-Project/382878205094476 sprung]] [[http://twitter.com/swkissmesweet up]]. There's also an [[https://iwakuraproductions.wordpress.com/?s=sakura+wars ongoing fan translation]] translation project]] for project Sakura Taisen 1's PC-version done by Iwakura Productions.
23rd Apr '16 7:58:27 AM Kaabisteru
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An attempt to localize the series for digital distribution has [[http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kiss-Me-Sweet-The-Sakura-Wars-Localization-Project/382878205094476 sprung]] [[http://twitter.com/swkissmesweet up]].

to:

An attempt to localize the series for digital distribution has [[http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kiss-Me-Sweet-The-Sakura-Wars-Localization-Project/382878205094476 sprung]] [[http://twitter.com/swkissmesweet up]].
up]]. There's also an [[https://iwakuraproductions.wordpress.com/?s=sakura+wars ongoing fan translation]] for project Sakura Taisen 1's PC-version by Iwakura Productions.
5th Feb '16 12:46:56 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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Trope Pages for [[Anime/SakuraWarsTheMovie Sakura Wars: The Movie]], [[Anime/SakuraWarsTV the Sakura Wars TV series]], and [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove the fifth main game]] have been started.

to:

Trope Pages for [[Anime/SakuraWarsTheMovie Sakura Wars: The Movie]], [[Anime/SakuraWarsTV ''Anime/SakuraWarsTheMovie'', the Sakura Wars TV series]], ''Anime/SakuraWarsTV'' series, and [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove the fifth main game]] have been started.
5th Feb '16 12:45:50 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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''(This is the trope page for the series; you may be confusing this page with the page for the [[SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove sole game released in North America]]).''

to:

''(This is the trope page for the series; you may be confusing this page with the page for the [[SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove [[VideoGame/SakuraWarsSoLongMyLove sole game released in North America]]).''
6th Jan '16 11:50:05 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

* ParryingBullets: In the first episode of the second OVA, Sakura manages to deflect a full barrage from a machine gun with her sword.
This list shows the last 10 events of 125. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.SakuraWars