History VideoGame / MegamanBattleNetwork

21st Feb '18 8:46:49 AM Gadjiltron
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* OneGameForThePriceOfTwo: Beginning with the third game, there have been two versions of every installment of the main franchise. ** ''Battle Network Rockman.EXE 3 Black'' is actually an UpdatedRerelease that fixes some issues that the original version had and added some new stuff, like Mr. Famous and Punk.EXE. To capitalize on ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'''s success, though, Capcom decided to release both versions internationally as ''Blue'' and ''White,'' with ''White'' being the original while ''Blue'' is the updated ''Black'' version.

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* OneGameForThePriceOfTwo: Beginning with the third game, there have been two versions of every installment of the main franchise. franchise.
** ''Battle Network Rockman.EXE 3 Black'' is actually an UpdatedRerelease that fixes some issues that the original version had and added some new stuff, like Mr. Famous and Punk.EXE. To capitalize on ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'''s success, though, Capcom decided to release both versions internationally as ''Blue'' and ''White,'' with ''White'' being the original while ''Blue'' is the updated ''Black'' version.



** The Muramasa chip deals damage based on how much HP you've lost (with the cap of 999), making it a good DesperationAttack.

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** The Muramasa chip deals damage based on how much HP you've lost (with the cap of 999), 999 or 500 depending on game), making it a good DesperationAttack.
21st Feb '18 8:43:15 AM Gadjiltron
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* UselessUsefulSpell:
** The Aqua Aura chip is laughably weak, being capable of repelling all attacks doing under ''10'' damage but breaking to anything equivalent or stronger. Even a bog-standard Mettaur can break it!
** Recover 10 heals for a pitiful amount of health, and is often among the first chips to be replaced, especially when the player starts finding stronger recovery chips.
13th Feb '18 9:21:27 PM MayIncon
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** Overall, the series changes art style in between 3 and 4. The character's eyes are rounded instead of semicircular (most prominent on [=MegaMan=]) and the shapes of their bodies feel more slender and less blocky, though the recurring characters are prone to some wacky, far-fetched expressions on their mugshots. The games themselves shrink down sprite dimension and gain thick outlines to create a crisp feel of objects. The colors also become brighter and more saturated, which is probably a measure to combat the GBA's infamously dark screen. Character designs for the generic [=NPCs=] went from semi-realistic (especially the foreigners) to cartoony-looking.

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** Overall, the series changes art style in between 3 and 4. The character's eyes are rounded instead of semicircular (most prominent on [=MegaMan=]) and the shapes of their bodies feel more slender and less blocky, though the recurring characters are prone to some wacky, far-fetched expressions on their mugshots. The games themselves shrink down sprite dimension and gain thick outlines to create a crisp feel of objects. The colors also become brighter and more saturated, which is probably a measure to combat the GBA's infamously dark screen. Character designs for the generic [=NPCs=] went from semi-realistic (especially the foreigners) non-Electopians) to cartoony-looking.
13th Feb '18 4:28:39 PM urutapu
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*** There was also a general willingness to be more sexually explicit in the early games. In the first game, you can walk in on Mayl changing clothes or discover Dex has a PornStash. Battle Network 2 did away with most of the directly sexual content, but it also had Ms. Millions, whose dialogue is infused with TheInterplayOfSexAndViolence.

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*** There was also a general willingness to be more sexually explicit in the early games. In the first game, you can walk in on Mayl changing clothes or discover Dex has a PornStash. Battle Network 2 did away with most of the directly sexual content, but it also had Ms. Millions, whose dialogue is infused with TheInterplayOfSexAndViolence.simultaneously [[InterplayOfSexAndViolence sensual and physically threatening]].
13th Feb '18 4:23:48 PM Tavernier
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* EarthDrift: In the WWW lab in the first game, a screen of the world map indicates that the Battle Network series takes place basically on Earth (in keeping with its connections to the Classic series). ''Battle Network 4'' burned that bridge with a vengeance, introducing an all-new globe.
13th Feb '18 2:57:25 PM MayIncon
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** Magnetman's Liberation ability lets him shield the party from attacks outside of battle for a turn at the cost of an Order Point...and Magnetman's turn. Since field damage is pitiful and can't bring HP below 1, it's very rarely worthwhile to use it instead of liberate a panel.

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** Magnetman's Liberation ability lets him shield the party from attacks outside of battle for a turn at the cost of an a rare Order Point...and Magnetman's turn. Since field damage is pitiful and can't bring HP below 1, it's very rarely worthwhile to use it instead of liberate a panel.
13th Feb '18 10:18:53 AM Tavernier
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*** There was also a general willingness to be more sexually explicit in the early games. In the first game, you can walk in on Mayl changing clothes or discover Dex has a PornStash. Battle Network 2 did away with most of the directly sexual content, but it also had Ms. Millions, whose dialogue is infused with TheInterplayOfSexAndViolence.
12th Feb '18 10:37:46 PM Tavernier
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** In the third game, [[spoiler: Lan falls victim to a play on his ego and a complex gambit (which results in a handful of WWW "agents" getting deleted) that leads him to help install malware in [=SciLab=] computers. Now, it's hard to blame an emotionally manipulated 10-year-old for his part in that, but what's especially vexing is that the Mr. Progs he's helping to modify sit there and let themselves get (1) an unscheduled upgrade from (2) unknown packages by (3) non-personnel. Even after one or two of them starts ''feeling pain'', they do nothing until it's too late.]]
* ImmuneToFlinching: Certain bosses such as [=MetalMan=].EXE or stronger versions of [=GutsMan=].EXE will not flinch to strong attacks, though paralysis or stun attacks will still prevent movement or attacks. [=MegaMan=].EXE can invoke this himself with the Super Armor program.

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** In the third game, the FlameMan scenario is ''[[IdiotPlot the perfect storm]]'' of idiocy, requiring stupidity on the part of Lan, [=MegaMan=], and the entire [=SciLab=] staff. [[spoiler: Lan falls victim to a play on his ego and a complex gambit (which results in a handful of WWW "agents" getting deleted) that leads him to help install malware in [=SciLab=] computers. Now, it's hard to blame an emotionally manipulated 10-year-old 11-year-old for his part in that, but what's especially vexing is that the Mr. Progs he's helping to modify sit there and let themselves get (1) an unscheduled upgrade from (2) unknown packages by (3) non-personnel. Even after one or two of them starts ''feeling pain'', they do nothing until it's too late.]]
And Mega, who knows the guy isn't operating aboveboard due to how he manipulates Lan into playing along, lets it all happen]].
* ImmuneToFlinching: Certain bosses such The SuperArmor ability allows a Net Navi to power through strong attacks without being knocked out of their own; typically available as a Navi Customizer program, some [=NetNavis=] like [=MetalMan=].EXE or stronger versions of [=GutsMan=].EXE will not flinch to strong attacks, though paralysis or stun attacks will still prevent movement or attacks. [=MegaMan=].EXE can invoke have this himself with the Super Armor program.ability naturally.



* IndustrializedEvil: The Nebula HQ is a factory that mass-produces Dark Chips.

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* IndustrializedEvil: The Nebula HQ is a factory that mass-produces [[TheCorruption Dark Chips.Chips]].



** The third game gives us the N-1 Grand Prix, the preliminaries for which define a significant portion of the first half of the game.

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** The third game gives us the N-1 Grand Prix, the preliminaries for which define a significant portion of the first half of the early game.



* InterfaceScrew: The confusion effect from ''3'' onward, but most egregiously [=VideoMan=]'s scenario in ''4''.

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* InterfaceScrew: The confusion effect from ''3'' onward, which changes the orientation of how your [=NetNavi=] moves, but most egregiously [=VideoMan=]'s scenario in ''4''.''4'', which inflicts the status on Mega both in the overworld and in-battle until the scenario is over.



* InvincibilityPowerUp: In the franchise there are four different types of defenses that render Mega immune to everything except [[ArmorPiercing a few specific types of damage]]. Shielding[[note]]As provided by Guard type chips, maybe Stone Body type[[/note]], Barrier/Auras, [[MercyInvincibility Invisibility]][[note]]Including [=DropDown=] and [=PopUp=], which last longer than the proper Invis chips, but don't defend Mega when he attacks[[/note]], and Shadow. The last two in particular render cyber-bodies immune to all but a handful of specific attacks.
** A better example of a ''full'' Invincibility Power-Up is a special condition introduced in the third game, marked by the user glowing green for a period of time. There are a variety of controllable ways to achieve this in the 5th game[[note]]Invincibility in the third game can only be attained randomly under the effects of Bug Style[[/note]]: as a Bonus Panel prize in Liberation Missions, as Knight Soul (who becomes invincible whenever he uses a non-dimming battle chip in his front column), or using the [=DarkInvis=] chip, the last of which also causes the Navi to enter a berserk Dark Soul state, randomly warping around the field and using random attacks selected from his battle history.

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* InvincibilityPowerUp: In the InvincibilityPowerUp:
** The
franchise there are features four different types of defenses defense that render Mega cyber-bodies immune to everything except [[ArmorPiercing a few specific types of damage]]. Shielding[[note]]As provided by Guard type chips, chips and maybe Stone Body type[[/note]], Body[[/note]], Barrier/Auras, [[MercyInvincibility Invisibility]][[note]]Including [=DropDown=] and [=PopUp=], which last longer than the proper Invis chips, but don't defend Mega when he attacks[[/note]], and Shadow. Shadow.
**
The last two in particular render cyber-bodies immune to all but a handful of specific attacks.
** A better example of a ''full''
''true'' Invincibility Power-Up is a special condition introduced in the third game, marked by the user glowing green for a period of time. There are Usually this effect is only provided by the Trumpy virus to its allies via MagicMusic, but the player can summon his own Trumpy by using a Fanfare chip; it also occasionally appears as one of Bug Style [=MegaMan's=] random {{Buff}}s. ''Battle Network 5'' notably included a variety of controllable new ways to achieve this in gain the 5th game[[note]]Invincibility in status, including through the third game can only be attained randomly under the effects of Bug Style[[/note]]: as a Bonus Panel prize in Liberation Missions, as Knight Soul (who becomes invincible whenever he uses a non-dimming battle chip in his front column), or using the [=DarkInvis=] chip, the last of which also causes the Navi to enter a berserk Dark Soul state, go berserk, randomly warping around the field and using random attacks techniques selected from his battle history.



* JokeItem: There are three levels of bugs for [=MegaMan=]'s Charged Shot. The first creates Rock Cubes. Those you can airshoot/punch into enemies for 200 damage. The second level is a silly 1 panel-ranged water gun. Somehow it does 100 damage. The final glitch, however, just makes harmless flowers pop out of the Buster.

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* JokeItem: There are three levels of bugs for [=MegaMan=]'s Charged Shot. The first creates Rock Cubes. Those you can airshoot/punch into enemies [[LethalJokeItem for 200 damage.damage]]. The second level is a silly 1 panel-ranged water gun. Somehow it does 100 damage. The final glitch, however, just makes harmless flowers pop out of the Buster.



** Match, who is the only tertiary character to appear in 5 main series games plus {{spin off}}s despite supposedly being arrested at least twice for serious crimes. By the end of the series, he has become a schoolteacher.
*** 4 is a rather noticeable one (at least in Red Sun). Match willingly turns himself in by telling Lan and the tournament emcee to call the officials. Lan however, refuses because of their tournament Match.
** There is also [=ShadowMan=] & Dark, something no one even mentions when he appears as a teammate in ''5'' despite being the ones who wiped out Yumland's Net population and invaded Electopia's Mother Computer.

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** Match, who is the only tertiary character to appear in 5 more than two of the main series games plus (appearing a total of ''five times'', not counting {{spin off}}s off}}s) despite supposedly being arrested at least twice for serious crimes. By the end of the series, he has become a schoolteacher.
*** 4 is a rather noticeable one (at least in Red Sun). Match willingly turns himself in by telling Lan and the tournament emcee to call the officials. Lan however, refuses because of their tournament Match.
match.
** There is also [=ShadowMan=] & Dark, who are canonically mercenary killers, something no one even mentions when he appears as a teammate in ''5'' despite being the ones who wiped out Yumland's Net population and invaded Electopia's Mother Computer.



** Wily, [[spoiler:having personally started 3 terrorist organizations and masterminding the creation of a 4th]], actually gets punished with jail time when he is finally caught, [[spoiler:but somehow, despite being a notorious criminal with a knack for computers, manages to build ''two'' [=AIs=] while in prison.]]
** Almost every single opponent you fight in ''Battle Network 4'' that commits a crime seems to get off the hook one way or another. Including Ivan who ''makes the temperature in the world go down to the point where it's snowing in a naturally hot country'' and Paulie who ''depletes their own village's only water source''. The former is seen in Sharo (despite being imprisoned in Netfrica) around the end of the game, and the latter is immediately forgiven after the battle with him.

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** Wily, [[spoiler:having personally started 3 three terrorist organizations and masterminding masterminded the creation of a 4th]], fourth]], actually gets punished with jail time when he is finally caught, [[spoiler:but somehow, despite being a notorious criminal with a knack for computers, manages is authorized to build ''two'' [=AIs=] while in prison.]]
** Almost every single opponent you fight in ''Battle Network 4'' that commits a crime seems to get off the hook one way or another. Including Take Ivan Chillski, for example, the self-absorbed prat who ''makes hacked government satellites in his own country to cause a blizzard in another (Capcom Science is [[MohsScaleOfSciFiHardness very, very soft]]) for the temperature sake of his own personal comfort; now, he gets arrested for this, and even gets a personal interrogation room [[LaserGuidedKarma in Netfrica]] for it, but is somehow freed and returned to his own country in time to make an appearance for the world go down finale. Or take Paulie, from Netfrica, who nearly caused his village to the point where it's snowing in a naturally hot country'' die of thirst out of childish spite, and Paulie who ''depletes their own village's only water source''. The former is seen in Sharo (despite being imprisoned in Netfrica) around the end of the game, and the latter is immediately yet Lan personally asks for him to be forgiven after the battle with him.when punishment looms its head.



* KnightOfCerebus: [=ShadeMan=], the very first boss in ''Red Sun'' and ''Blue Moon''. When you first see him, he's just floating in a corner, being creepy and creaking to himself, when you leave and come back, people are screaming, Navis are lying dead all over the network (not deleted, ''dead'': limp, motionless, and unresponding), and now that he's speaking in sentences, he tells you with perfect manners that he's off to find a nice lady Navi for dessert. [[FromBadToWorse He finds Roll]].
* LamePunReaction: In ''3'', there is a recycle canister with a kangaroo shape. In game text? "(used for recycling cans) maybe we should call it the [=CANgaroo=]? ... We apologize for that last joke. It wasn't punny at all." The game apologizes for a pun, even if it is making another pun in the process.
* LateArrivalSpoiler: Almost every game in the series assumes the audience is aware of the big reveal at the end of the first ''Battle Network'' game (save for the second game has an NPC that restates this fact and explains it for players who didn't play the first). [[spoiler: [=MegaMan=] is actually created from the DNA and memories of Lan's late twin brother, Hub Hikari. The third game specifies that Hub died of a heart disease called HBD, which Mamoru shares, though Mega's discussion of the disease makes little sense until Lan starts talking about his dead brother]].

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* KnightOfCerebus: [=ShadeMan=], the very first boss in ''Red Sun'' and ''Blue Moon''. When you first see him, he's just floating in a corner, being creepy and creaking to himself, when but once you leave and come back, people are screaming, Navis are lying dead all over the network (not deleted, ''dead'': limp, motionless, and unresponding), and now that he's speaking in sentences, he tells you with perfect manners that he's off to find a nice lady Navi for dessert. [[FromBadToWorse He finds Roll]].
* LamePunReaction: LamePunReaction:
**
In ''3'', there is a recycle canister with a kangaroo shape. In game text? "(used for recycling cans) maybe we should call it the [=CANgaroo=]? ... We apologize for that last joke. It wasn't punny at all." The game apologizes for a pun, even if it is making another pun in the process.
** The Humor program consistently spits out awful jokes and plays on words; whenever Mega is using it, Lan is just as consistently unimpressed.
* LateArrivalSpoiler: Almost every game in the series assumes the audience is aware of the big reveal at the end of the first ''Battle Network'' game (save for the second game has an NPC that restates this fact and explains it for players who didn't play the first). [[spoiler: [=MegaMan=] is actually created from the DNA and memories of Lan's late twin brother, Hub Hikari. The third game specifies that Hub died of a heart disease called HBD, which Mamoru shares, though Mega's discussion of the disease makes little sense until Lan starts talking about his dead brother]].
12th Feb '18 9:37:18 PM Tavernier
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* DudeWheresMyRespect: The only people who know who Lan and [=MegaMan=] are? The ''villains''. No, seriously, Lan and Mega only matter to the Big Bad and his organization; they matter so much that by Battle Network 6, even Chaud's been reduced to "that Official brat".
** So Lan and Mega save the entire internet (and the world, sometimes) every game. You'd think they'd at least get recognized by the Officials and be acknowledged as being more than [[JustAKid just some kids]], right? Haha '''no'''. (Every once in a blue moon, you'll find someone who knows them, but it's rare and usually completely irrelevant).
** Chaud spends the first two games (and [[GaidenGame Network Transmission]], which occurs between them) consistently treating Lan as an annoyance running about underfoot, despite the fact that Lan's taking care of the problems Chaud should be (Chaud did really very little in the first game). He's less obnoxious about in the third game, where he recognizes Lan. In the fifth, he goes so far as to make Lan the NumberTwo (and chief field officer) of his Anti-Nebula team. Even the second game was an improvement over the first in this regard; Chaud, though clearly annoyed at Lan and Mega, stopped trying to block them from interfering and instead began instructing them on what they could do to help. He wasn't all that ''nice'' about it, but he still let them help.
** ''Battle Network 3'' can't decide whether it wants to play this straight or not. Lan and Mega remain functional nobodies despite their accomplishments, though Sunayama introduces Lan as the hero who stopped the WWW during the N1 Grand Prix opening. That said, Sunayama is really the only one who knows or cares. Incidentally, the entire N1 Grand Prix scenario is actually about [[WellDoneSonGuy Chaud]][[note]]Whom Sunayama is specifically targeting, so forget about him caring about Lan[[/note]]. [[HeroOfAnotherStory Lan's really just there to watch]]. Lan gets an award for his heroics in the latter half of the game... but this only allows a villain to set up one of the nastiest scenarios in all of Battle Network via social engineering. After said event, Lan doesn't really care much about fame and glory anymore. This is carried over to future installments.
** There are even ''more'' cases where this is played annoyingly straight. Perfect example: ''[=BN4=]'', [=SearchMan=]'s scenario. Raika, despite being a high ranking military officer, has apparently never heard of Lan, Mr. Saved the Internet Four Times At This Point. He treats Lan as a joke, and when Lan heads over to Sharo to help Raika out in a mission, an official all but tells him to go home, saying the Undernet is far too dangerous for him[[note]]The Bonus Dungeon in Battle Network 3 ends with Mega being crowned King of the Undernet, and later the strongest fighter in the whole Cyberworld. Thus you freaking own the place and they still tell you it's too dangerous![[/note]]. [[spoiler: Then [=SearchMan=] spends the rest of the scenario sniping [=MegaMan=] to "test" him]].
** Battle Network 4's [=ProtoMan=] Scenario also does this to Lan, indirectly. He overhears a couple of men talking about problems befalling "Electopia's ace", which title does not actually refer to Lan, who has been established at this point in the game as ''being the best in all of Electopia'', but (surprise!) Chaud.
** Not even the Undernetters recognize the boys, which is especially curious, [[spoiler: given that Mega is technically their King]]. On the other hand, you could handwave this on the grounds that the Undernet is too disorganized to have denizens who know who their King is beyond a handful of individuals.

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* DudeWheresMyRespect: The only people who know who Lan In a bizarre application of the BagOfSpilling, one of the things that the heroes consistently lose between games is ''social status''. Even excluding the questionably canonical and [=MegaMan=] are? The ''villains''. No, seriously, unquestionably grandiose post-game content, Lan and Mega only matter to the Big Bad confront and his organization; they matter so much that by Battle Network 6, even Chaud's been reduced to "that Official brat".
** So Lan
undo high-profile, international crime organizations and Mega save the entire internet (and the world, sometimes) every game. You'd think they'd global catastrophes at least get half-a-dozen times in two years... and yet are only consistently recognized by small groups of individuals, usually the villains. The rest of the world -- even the boys' own hometown -- treats them like normal kids.
** The
Officials and be acknowledged as being more than [[JustAKid just some kids]], right? Haha '''no'''. (Every once in a blue moon, you'll find someone who knows them, but it's rare and usually completely irrelevant).
** Chaud spends the first two games (and [[GaidenGame Network Transmission]], which occurs between them)
organization consistently treats Lan as JustAKid, even when, as an international police force that he occasionally allies with, they have direct knowledge of all of his world-saving feats.
** It's worth pointing out Chaud and [=ProtoMan=], the heroes' peers and primary rivals, are the consistent recipients of all the prestige that by rights belongs to Lan and Mega. The games will often go out of their way to pimp the rivals over and above the heroes, no matter how many times you canonically show them up. A good example is in ''Battle Network 4'' when during one particular scenario some Officials talk about "Electopia's Ace" -- do they mean repeat world-saver and (currently in-universe) national champion Lan Hikari? No, they mean Chaud.
*** Chaud himself tends to zig-zag on this,
treating them like minor nuisances even after they do his job better than he does. Thanks to character development, he and [=ProtoMan=] grow more willing to recognize Team Lan and Mega's significance as an annoyance running about underfoot, despite the fact that Lan's taking care of the problems Chaud should be (Chaud did really very little in the first game). He's less obnoxious about in the third game, where he recognizes Lan. In the fifth, he goes their WorthyOpponent, even going so far as to make Lan the NumberTwo (and chief field officer) of his Anti-Nebula team. Even the second game was an improvement over the first in this regard; Chaud, though clearly annoyed at Lan and Mega, stopped trying to block recruit them from interfering and instead began instructing them on what they could do to help. He wasn't all that ''nice'' about it, but he still let them help.
for a specialized task force in ''Team [=ProtoMan=]''.
** ''Battle Network 3'' can't decide whether it wants to play this straight or not.
*** Lan's friends and the villains make repeated {{Continuity Nod}}s to the fact that
Lan and Mega remain functional nobodies despite have heroic feats under their accomplishments, though Sunayama introduces Lan as the hero who stopped the WWW belt, and during the N1 N-1 Grand Prix opening. That said, Sunayama is the boys are noted -- on worldwide television, no less -- to be world-saving heroes. But most people still treat them like normal kids, and the next game behaves as if nothing ever really the only one who knows or cares. Incidentally, happened. (Incidentally, the entire N1 Grand Prix scenario is actually about [[WellDoneSonGuy Chaud]][[note]]Whom Sunayama is specifically targeting, so forget about him caring about Lan[[/note]]. Chaud]]. [[HeroOfAnotherStory Lan's really just there to watch]]. watch]]).
*** The [=FlameMan=] scenario near the end of the game deliberately gives
Lan gets recognition in the form of an award for his heroics a prior in-game feat of heroism... as a set up to force him to make himself complicit of the most contrived examples of NiceJobBreakingItHero in the latter half series. Following discussions of the game... but this him being a "hero" only allows a villain to set up one of the nastiest scenarios in all of Battle Network via social engineering. After said event, Lan doesn't really care much about fame and glory anymore. This is carried over to future installments.
upset him.
** There are even ''more'' cases where this is played annoyingly straight. Perfect example: ''[=BN4=]'', [=SearchMan=]'s scenario. Raika, despite being a high ranking military officer, has apparently never heard of Lan, Mr. Saved the Internet Four Times At This Point. He treats Lan as a joke, recognized world-class Net Battler, Electopia's current national champion, and when Lan heads over to Sharo to help Raika out in a mission, (incidentally) repeated world-saving child prodigy. He also runs into trouble with an official all but tells Official, who warns him to go home, saying the Undernet is far too dangerous for him[[note]]The Bonus Dungeon in Battle Network 3 ends with Mega being crowned King of the Undernet, and later the strongest fighter in the whole Cyberworld. Thus you freaking own the no place and they still tell you it's too dangerous![[/note]]. [[spoiler: Then [=SearchMan=] spends the rest of the scenario sniping [=MegaMan=] to "test" him]].
** Battle Network 4's [=ProtoMan=] Scenario also does this to Lan, indirectly. He overhears a couple of men talking about problems befalling "Electopia's ace", which title does not actually refer to Lan, who has
for children (which ''can'' be excused, but, come on, Lan's been established at this point up to his eyeballs in the game as ''being the best in all of Electopia'', but (surprise!) Chaud.
** Not even the Undernetters recognize the boys, which is especially curious, [[spoiler: given that Mega is technically their King]]. On the other hand, you could handwave this on the grounds that
the Undernet since the series ''started'').
** Despite certain plot developments in ''Battle Network 3'' pertaining to the Ranking (the Undernet's "government") [[spoiler: of which [=MegaMan=]
is too disorganized to have denizens who know who their King canonically a part]], the Ranking itself is beyond a handful of individuals.never again mentioned.



* EldritchAbomination: Cache, from an obscure GaidenGame as well as the FinalBoss during the Beast+ season in the anime. In the main games themselves, all final bosses qualify; especially Gospel as it's made of multiple bugs (and by the same token, Gregar), and Nebula Grey, which is literally MadeOfEvil (of the human mind, specifically).

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* EldritchAbomination: EldritchAbomination:
**
Cache, from an obscure GaidenGame as well as the FinalBoss during the Beast+ season in the anime. anime.
**
In the main games themselves, all final bosses qualify; qualify, but most especially Gospel as it's Gospel, which is made of multiple bugs (and by the same token, Gregar), and Nebula Grey, which is literally MadeOfEvil (of the human mind, specifically).
12th Feb '18 8:11:25 PM Tavernier
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** Played with in the first three games' version of ACDC Town. The school grounds and Lan's friends' houses don't actually change design between installments, but which parts of those buildings you have access to does. It's only in the first game, for example, that you can even ''see'' the entrance to the school grounds, while the third game gives you access to the principal's office.
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