History VideoGame / Gothic

26th Jul '16 12:58:36 AM SweatBoyX8
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* AerithAndBob - Predominantly an odd mix between German, English and Spanish names, with fantasy names mostly for important, powerful characters such as mages.
* AncientTomb - Quite a number of them, since both Khorinis and the mainland (specially the desert of Varant) house ruins of ancient civilizations. Unsurprisingly, they tend to be full of undead.
* AnimalMotifs - You'll never be able to guess what Raven's motif is.
* AntiGrinding - More or less. There aren't any RespawningEnemies except for the finite chapter transitions, so endless LevelGrinding (without the use of [[GoodBadBugs some bugs]] or {{Game Mod}}s) is impossible.

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* AerithAndBob - AerithAndBob: Predominantly an odd mix between German, English and Spanish names, with fantasy names mostly for important, powerful characters such as mages.
* AncientTomb - AncientTomb: Quite a number of them, since both Khorinis and the mainland (specially the desert of Varant) house ruins of ancient civilizations. Unsurprisingly, they tend to be full of undead.
* AnimalMotifs - AnimalMotifs: You'll never be able to guess what Raven's motif is.
* AntiGrinding - AntiGrinding: More or less. There aren't any RespawningEnemies except for the finite chapter transitions, so endless LevelGrinding (without the use of [[GoodBadBugs some bugs]] or {{Game Mod}}s) is impossible.



* AnyoneCanDie - Subverted in the first two games, where you can kill anyone but the plot-important [=NPCs=] (who are [[PlotArmor simply immune to all damage]]), played straight in the third one.

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* AnyoneCanDie - AnyoneCanDie: Subverted in the first two games, where you can kill anyone but the plot-important [=NPCs=] (who are [[PlotArmor simply immune to all damage]]), played straight in the third one.



* ArmlessBiped - Scavengers and the various Snapper species in the first two games. In ''Gothic III'', their designs was changed and the Snappers were given arms.
* ArtificialAtmosphericActions - {{NPC}}s go about their daily lives, and animals hunt each other and scavenge corpses. The player can also perform almost any action that an NPC does, no matter how pointless (sit on chairs, play instruments, ...).

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* ArmlessBiped - ArmlessBiped: Scavengers and the various Snapper species in the first two games. In ''Gothic III'', their designs was changed and the Snappers were given arms.
* ArtificialAtmosphericActions - {{NPC}}s ArtificialAtmosphericActions:{{NPC}}s go about their daily lives, and animals hunt each other and scavenge corpses. The player can also perform almost any action that an NPC does, no matter how pointless (sit on chairs, play instruments, ...).



* ArtificialStupidity - [=NPCs=] when acting as temporary companions in ''Gothic 3'' are walking examples of this. To be brief, they will only notice an enemy when said enemy gets close enough to hit them in the face (sometimes they'll actually need to receive damage in order to unsheathe their weapon and enter combat mode).

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* ArtificialStupidity - ArtificialStupidity: [=NPCs=] when acting as temporary companions in ''Gothic 3'' are walking examples of this. To be brief, they will only notice an enemy when said enemy gets close enough to hit them in the face (sometimes they'll actually need to receive damage in order to unsheathe their weapon and enter combat mode).



* TheArtifact - In ''Night of the Raven'' the Milita trainer still notes that one handed and two handed skills are linked and you need to learn one to master the other, despite the expansion doing away with that mechanic.
* AscendedExtra - Raven goes from being a quest giver/bodyguard for Gomez in the first game to the main enemy of the add-on.
* AskAStupidQuestion - Go ahead, ask the Fire Mage Parlan where the church is. While standing right in front of it.
* AssholeVictim - Come chapter 3 in 2, the [[spoiler:JerkAss "Paladin" Lothar]] is killed [[spoiler:so one of the mercencaries can be framed for it to ignite tensions between them and the city]].
* AutomaticCrossbow - Not quite, but, while still slower than bows, crossbows in the first two games had a fairly impressive rate of fire. This kind of makes sense with the setting being Renaissance-ish and was likely also done for balance reasons, see BowAndSwordInAccord below.
* AwesomeButImpractical - The Magic Crossbow and the Fire Bow from the Gothic II ExpansionPack are very powerful and deal high amounts of special-type damage, but they cannot use normal projectiles of their weapon type and once you used up the limited supply of special ammo you find next to them (there are two copies of the firebow+ammo to be found at least), they're useless, essentially downgrading them to a mere trophy or VendorTrash. There is also the impractically long casting time of powerful spells like Fire Rain and Army of Darkness in the first game, but that was fixed in Gothic II.
* {{Badass}} - Your player character attains this status after Gothic I [[spoiler: for destroying the barrier and The Sleeper]], but this can make certain parties hate you enough to want to kill you.
* BadassArmy - The Orcs, enmasse, are tough enough to qualify.
* BagOfSpilling - justified pretty well in Gothic II. By Gothic III it got silly.

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* TheArtifact - TheArtifact: In ''Night of the Raven'' the Milita Militia trainer still notes that one handed and two handed skills are linked and you need to learn one to master the other, despite the expansion doing away with that mechanic.
* AscendedExtra - AscendedExtra: Raven goes from being a quest giver/bodyguard for Gomez in the first game to the main enemy of the add-on.
* AskAStupidQuestion - AskAStupidQuestion: Go ahead, ask the Fire Mage Parlan where the church is. While standing right in front of it.
* AssholeVictim - AssholeVictim: Come chapter 3 in 2, the [[spoiler:JerkAss "Paladin" Lothar]] is killed [[spoiler:so one of the mercencaries can be framed for it to ignite tensions between them and the city]].
* AutomaticCrossbow - AutomaticCrossbow: Not quite, but, while still slower than bows, crossbows in the first two games had a fairly impressive rate of fire. This kind of makes sense with the setting being Renaissance-ish and was likely also done for balance reasons, see BowAndSwordInAccord below.
* AwesomeButImpractical - AwesomeButImpractical: The Magic Crossbow and the Fire Bow from the Gothic II ExpansionPack are very powerful and deal high amounts of special-type damage, but they cannot use normal projectiles of their weapon type and once you used up the limited supply of special ammo you find next to them (there are two copies of the firebow+ammo to be found at least), they're useless, essentially downgrading them to a mere trophy or VendorTrash. There is also the impractically long casting time of powerful spells like Fire Rain and Army of Darkness in the first game, but that was fixed in Gothic II.
* {{Badass}} - Badass: Your player character attains this status after Gothic I [[spoiler: for destroying the barrier and The Sleeper]], but this can make certain parties hate you enough to want to kill you.
* BadassArmy - BadassArmy: The Orcs, enmasse, en masse, are tough enough to qualify.
* BagOfSpilling - BagOfSpilling: justified pretty well in Gothic II. By Gothic III it got silly.



* BatmanGambit - [[spoiler: Your player character's progression [[TakeALevelInBadass from nobody to badass]] was part of one on the part of King Rhobar II]].
* [[BeatStillMyHeart Beat Still, My Heart]] - the final boss battle has five of these, and you have to stab all of them.
* BeefGate - Gothic I and II heavily utilize these to keep you out of certain areas of the game world early on. However, there usually are several different ways to still bypass them and get to most areas, anyway, preserving the open world feel.
* BerserkButton - Kharim. You can talk smack about his strength, his face, or his mother and he won't react, but if you imply he's not totally loyal to the New Camp...
* BigBrotherMentor - Diego.
* BigCreepyCrawlies - Bloodflies, Fieldraiders, Minecrawlers...
* BossBattle - most notably [[spoiler:the Sleeper]], although there are others.
* BossInMookClothing - in Gothic III, while several wild animals could qualify due to the severely unbalanced combat system, the Sabretooth tigers definetely take the cake. They can sustain moderate amounts of damage, hit quite hard and fast... and come in packs. A group of three can be found pretty early in the game in a cave which an orc patrol will task the player to investigate (and "cleanse" if neccesary); amusingly enough, the only way to complete the quest at a low level is to attract the tigers to the orcs' position and assist the orcs to take the beasts down. Packs of four or five (found in Nordland) will keep being quite a menace even to very well geared and high-leveled players.

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* BatmanGambit - BatmanGambit: [[spoiler: Your player character's progression [[TakeALevelInBadass from nobody to badass]] was part of one on the part of King Rhobar II]].
* [[BeatStillMyHeart Beat Still, My Heart]] - the BeatStillMyHeart: The final boss battle has five of these, and you have to stab all of them.
* BeefGate - BeefGate: Gothic I and II heavily utilize these to keep you out of certain areas of the game world early on. However, there usually are several different ways to still bypass them and get to most areas, anyway, preserving the open world feel.
* BerserkButton - BerserkButton: Kharim. You can talk smack about his strength, his face, or his mother and he won't react, but if you imply he's not totally loyal to the New Camp...
* BigBrotherMentor - BigBrotherMentor: Diego.
* BigCreepyCrawlies - BigCreepyCrawlies: Bloodflies, Fieldraiders, Minecrawlers...
* BossBattle - most BossBattle: Most notably [[spoiler:the Sleeper]], although there are others.
* BossInMookClothing - in BossInMookClothing: In Gothic III, while several wild animals could qualify due to the severely unbalanced combat system, the Sabretooth tigers definetely take the cake. They can sustain moderate amounts of damage, hit quite hard and fast... and come in packs. A group of three can be found pretty early in the game in a cave which an orc patrol will task the player to investigate (and "cleanse" if neccesary); amusingly enough, the only way to complete the quest at a low level is to attract the tigers to the orcs' position and assist the orcs to take the beasts down. Packs of four or five (found in Nordland) will keep being quite a menace even to very well geared and high-leveled players.



* BowAndSwordInAccord - Many characters, such as bandits, mercenaries, shadows of the Old Camp, and various hunters throughout the world favor this combination, and the hero can do it as well. Some factions, like guards of the Old Camp and knights/paladins, however, prefer using crossbows instead. The whole thing is also played with from a gameplay mechanics perspective in Night of the Raven: Bows correspond to Dexterity, while crossbows correspond to Strength. Strength is the main attribute required to use and wield melee weapons, making crossbows an ideal RangedEmergencyWeapon for melee characters. However, there are a handful of dexterity-based melee weapons in the game that can be of great use for archers, but they will still always be inferior to the weaponry a proper melee character can equip. Trying to skill both dexterity and strength, meanwhile, while likely result in your character becoming a MasterOfNone.

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* BowAndSwordInAccord - BowAndSwordInAccord: Many characters, such as bandits, mercenaries, shadows of the Old Camp, and various hunters throughout the world favor this combination, and the hero can do it as well. Some factions, like guards of the Old Camp and knights/paladins, however, prefer using crossbows instead. The whole thing is also played with from a gameplay mechanics perspective in Night of the Raven: Bows correspond to Dexterity, while crossbows correspond to Strength. Strength is the main attribute required to use and wield melee weapons, making crossbows an ideal RangedEmergencyWeapon for melee characters. However, there are a handful of dexterity-based melee weapons in the game that can be of great use for archers, but they will still always be inferior to the weaponry a proper melee character can equip. Trying to skill both dexterity and strength, meanwhile, while likely result in your character becoming a MasterOfNone.



* TheChewToy - Mud. Oh, Mud. To be chewed on is his raison d'etre. He develops a crush on the player character, follows him around, gets in the way and tells increasingly depressing stories about his abuse at the hands of every other character. The vast majority of players eventually kill him just to get him out of the way; he is the only NPC in the game whose death earns you ''zero'' XP (even a Meatbug, which can't retaliate at all, gives some XP).

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* TheChewToy - TheChewToy: Mud. Oh, Mud. To be chewed on is his raison d'etre. He develops a crush on the player character, follows him around, gets in the way and tells increasingly depressing stories about his abuse at the hands of every other character. The vast majority of players eventually kill him just to get him out of the way; he is the only NPC in the game whose death earns you ''zero'' XP (even a Meatbug, which can't retaliate at all, gives some XP).



* TheChosenOne - Subverted/defied. The Nameless Hero is treated as the Chosen of Innos, God of Fire, Light and Justice, even by Innos himself, but considers himself no one's champion but his own and is perfectly capable in the third game to join Innos's mortal enemy instead, or just screw them both over and end divine rule over the world for good. Bet you didn't expect that, oh God of Light?

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* TheChosenOne - TheChosenOne: Subverted/defied. The Nameless Hero is treated as the Chosen of Innos, God of Fire, Light and Justice, even by Innos himself, but considers himself no one's champion but his own and is perfectly capable in the third game to join Innos's mortal enemy instead, or just screw them both over and end divine rule over the world for good. Bet you didn't expect that, oh God of Light?



* {{Combos}} - In ''Gothic I'' and ''II'', you can chain multiple weapon swings together with properly timed presses of the "attack" key, instead of slower normal attacks. The combos also [[EvolvingAttack evolve]] as you improve your weapon proficiency skills, becoming longer and more efficient.
* CommonplaceRare - Armor, arguably. The Gothic series always made a great deal out of their importance, since they generally represented faction affiliation and status. Therefore wearing a Paladin armor gave you quite the sense of accomplishment for having worked yourself up all the way from a lowly militiaman with a cheap uniform. However, to achieve this, they obviously have to prevent you from simply looting armor off the corpses of [=NPCs=] that already wear that armor. It sometimes makes you wonder. "Why do I have to work for the pirates to earn that Bandit Armor to infiltrate their camp if I could just take out a bandit and wear his?". Made worse by the fact that the game states the "guard" ranked guards in the colony got the armor they have by killing the pre-barrier guards.

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* {{Combos}} - Combos: In ''Gothic I'' and ''II'', you can chain multiple weapon swings together with properly timed presses of the "attack" key, instead of slower normal attacks. The combos also [[EvolvingAttack evolve]] as you improve your weapon proficiency skills, becoming longer and more efficient.
* CommonplaceRare - CommonplaceRare: Armor, arguably. The Gothic series always made a great deal out of their importance, since they generally represented faction affiliation and status. Therefore wearing a Paladin armor gave you quite the sense of accomplishment for having worked yourself up all the way from a lowly militiaman with a cheap uniform. However, to achieve this, they obviously have to prevent you from simply looting armor off the corpses of [=NPCs=] that already wear that armor. It sometimes makes you wonder. "Why do I have to work for the pirates to earn that Bandit Armor to infiltrate their camp if I could just take out a bandit and wear his?". Made worse by the fact that the game states the "guard" ranked guards in the colony got the armor they have by killing the pre-barrier guards.



* CoolOldGuy - Diego, arguably. Xardas.
* CrapsackWorld - And how. What do you expect from a world where the traditional greeting to newcomers is a punch in the face?
* CriticalHit - Notable because of the way the game calculates damage. For example in Gothic II, in close combat, a regular hit will do roughly 1/10 of (strength + weapon damage), minus the target's armor protection value, down to a minimum of 5 (so in practice, you'll often do just that guaranteed 5 damage). However, the Hero can train in weapon skill, which is a percentage value, and aside from giving you new combos at 30% and 60%, regulates CriticalHit chance for close combat attacks. If such a critical is scored, the full strength + weapon damage value applies. This makes fighting [=NPCs=] (thank god you can block...) extremely dangerous, since they tend to have Weapon Skill of somewhere around 30%-70%, strength values of often 100 or above, and decent weapons, meaning there's about a 50% chance to be instantly downed every time an NPC hits you in early parts of the game.

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* CoolOldGuy - CoolOldGuy: Diego, arguably. Xardas.
* CrapsackWorld - CrapsackWorld: And how. What do you expect from a world where the traditional greeting to newcomers is a punch in the face?
* CriticalHit - CriticalHit: Notable because of the way the game calculates damage. For example in Gothic II, in close combat, a regular hit will do roughly 1/10 of (strength + weapon damage), minus the target's armor protection value, down to a minimum of 5 (so in practice, you'll often do just that guaranteed 5 damage). However, the Hero can train in weapon skill, which is a percentage value, and aside from giving you new combos at 30% and 60%, regulates CriticalHit chance for close combat attacks. If such a critical is scored, the full strength + weapon damage value applies. This makes fighting [=NPCs=] (thank god you can block...) extremely dangerous, since they tend to have Weapon Skill of somewhere around 30%-70%, strength values of often 100 or above, and decent weapons, meaning there's about a 50% chance to be instantly downed every time an NPC hits you in early parts of the game.



* CrutchCharacter - Diego in 2 joins you briefly in chapter 2. He is strong enough to plow through the, otherwise nigh-unkillable at this point, enemies encountered when he is with you and will generally earn you a few levels.
* DamnYouMuscleMemory - Combat controls are almost entirely changed between 1 and 2.

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* CrutchCharacter - CrutchCharacter: Diego in 2 joins you briefly in chapter 2. He is strong enough to plow through the, otherwise nigh-unkillable at this point, enemies encountered when he is with you and will generally earn you a few levels.
* DamnYouMuscleMemory - DamnYouMuscleMemory: Combat controls are almost entirely changed between 1 and 2.



* DarkIsNotEvil - Xardas, the elderly black-robed necromancer with pale white eyes who lives in a creepy tower and consorts with demons and orcs. On paper he looks like he might be the BigBad, but he's actually TheMentor. In the first game, he can actually teach a PC who has already taken both the Vow of Fire and the Vow of Water to become a Demon Summoner/Black Mage as well. So yes, you can totally be a hero that frequently uses a spell called "Army of Darkness" which summons six undead warriors. Though they will attack/be attacked when you summon them in a public zone.

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* DarkIsNotEvil - DarkIsNotEvil: Xardas, the elderly black-robed necromancer with pale white eyes who lives in a creepy tower and consorts with demons and orcs. On paper he looks like he might be the BigBad, but he's actually TheMentor. In the first game, he can actually teach a PC who has already taken both the Vow of Fire and the Vow of Water to become a Demon Summoner/Black Mage as well. So yes, you can totally be a hero that frequently uses a spell called "Army of Darkness" which summons six undead warriors. Though they will attack/be attacked when you summon them in a public zone.



* DeadpanSnarker - The Nameless Hero.
* DeathMountain - Gothic II, the volcano of the Fire Dragon.
* DeathOfAThousandCuts - In Gothic II, the easiest way to bring down the big Troll enemies ([[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards if you weren't a caster]]) was to just keep whacking at them. Averted in Gothic I by your attacks doing nothing against a sufficiently tough opponent.

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* DeadpanSnarker - DeadpanSnarker: The Nameless Hero.
* DeathMountain - DeathMountain: Gothic II, the volcano of the Fire Dragon.
* DeathOfAThousandCuts - DeathOfAThousandCuts: In Gothic II, the easiest way to bring down the big Troll enemies ([[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards if you weren't a caster]]) was to just keep whacking at them. Averted in Gothic I by your attacks doing nothing against a sufficiently tough opponent.



* {{Dracolich}} - The final boss of the second game.
* DoNotDropYourWeapon - Averted, as being knocked unconscious will make anyone drop it.
* DudeWheresMyRespect - The Nameless Hero's fairly understandable reaction at the beginning of Forsaken Gods.

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* {{Dracolich}} - Dracolich: The final boss of the second game.
* DoNotDropYourWeapon - DoNotDropYourWeapon: Averted, as being knocked unconscious will make anyone drop it.
* DudeWheresMyRespect - DudeWheresMyRespect: The Nameless Hero's fairly understandable reaction at the beginning of Forsaken Gods.



* EarlyBirdCameo - Pyrokar shows up in the first game's opening.
* EarlyGameHell - A deliberate use due to how character progression is handled from a story prospective, working to mirror how The Nameless Hero ''is'' completely inept at fighting.
* EasterEgg - In the ExpansionPack to Gothic II, Diego can temporarily become a companion. If you go to the place where you originally met him in the first game rather than to the other side of the Pass, he'll get all nostalgic and you'll get a few hundred bonus EXP labeled a "Nostalgia Bonus".

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* EarlyBirdCameo - EarlyBirdCameo: Pyrokar shows up in the first game's opening.
* EarlyGameHell - EarlyGameHell: A deliberate use due to how character progression is handled from a story prospective, working to mirror how The Nameless Hero ''is'' completely inept at fighting.
* EasterEgg - EasterEgg: In the ExpansionPack to Gothic II, Diego can temporarily become a companion. If you go to the place where you originally met him in the first game rather than to the other side of the Pass, he'll get all nostalgic and you'll get a few hundred bonus EXP labeled a "Nostalgia Bonus".



* ExcusePlot - Forsaken Gods' plot is essentially an excuse to explore Myrtana for another twenty hours.

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* ExcusePlot - ExcusePlot: Forsaken Gods' plot is essentially an excuse to explore Myrtana for another twenty hours.



* FakeUltimateMook - Shadow Beasts in caves in 2. While hyped in the setting and one of the more likely things to maul a new player, once you have a weapon+weapon skills+strength that can hurt them even the slightest bit, just repeatedly attacking can kill them due to their huge delay before attacking. The Black Troll is a very noticeable example, so threatening and prominent it's marked on your map, but it can't turn at a decent rate and is easily circle strafed.

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* FakeUltimateMook - FakeUltimateMook: Shadow Beasts in caves in 2. While hyped in the setting and one of the more likely things to maul a new player, once you have a weapon+weapon skills+strength that can hurt them even the slightest bit, just repeatedly attacking can kill them due to their huge delay before attacking. The Black Troll is a very noticeable example, so threatening and prominent it's marked on your map, but it can't turn at a decent rate and is easily circle strafed.



* FreudianTrio - The High Council of Fire, consisting of sceptical, jerk-ish Serpentes (Id), calm, understanding Ulthar (Superego), and serious, but reasonable Pyrokar (Ego).
* GargleBlaster - Double Lou's Hammer from the expansion pack.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar / EasterEgg - A name that will ring a bell for most Gothic fans is Velaya. She is the slave girl that appears in the opening and can be found in the room above the throne room in central hall of the Old Camp in the original ''Gothic''. Velaya has exactly one spoken line of dialogue. Yet, she has almost reached EnsembleDarkhorse status among some fans, so much that some German modders made a GameMod featuring her as the main character. The reason for this? Going into the room Velaya is locked in at certain times during the day will result in the player finding her completely naked (without any BarbieDollAnatomy, no less!) and seemingly having [[ADateWithRosiePalms a lot of fun while washing herself in a bathtub]].

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* FreudianTrio - FreudianTrio: The High Council of Fire, consisting of sceptical, jerk-ish Serpentes (Id), calm, understanding Ulthar (Superego), and serious, but reasonable Pyrokar (Ego).
* GargleBlaster - GargleBlaster: Double Lou's Hammer from the expansion pack.
* GettingCrapPastTheRadar / EasterEgg - EasterEgg: A name that will ring a bell for most Gothic fans is Velaya. She is the slave girl that appears in the opening and can be found in the room above the throne room in central hall of the Old Camp in the original ''Gothic''. Velaya has exactly one spoken line of dialogue. Yet, she has almost reached EnsembleDarkhorse status among some fans, so much that some German modders made a GameMod featuring her as the main character. The reason for this? Going into the room Velaya is locked in at certain times during the day will result in the player finding her completely naked (without any BarbieDollAnatomy, no less!) and seemingly having [[ADateWithRosiePalms a lot of fun while washing herself in a bathtub]].



* GladiatorSubquest - You get one in every single arena of ''Gothic 3''.

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* GladiatorSubquest - GladiatorSubquest: You get one in every single arena of ''Gothic 3''.



* GreyAndGrayMorality - The guilds that the player can join in Gothic 1/2 are this, you can choose between a militaristic, KnightTemplar faction, a freedom-loving and rough bandit/mercenary faction, or a group of religious fanatics. Averted with non-humans, Beliar and his "evil creatures" servants are AlwaysChaoticEvil.

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* GreyAndGrayMorality - GreyAndGrayMorality: The guilds that the player can join in Gothic 1/2 are this, you can choose between a militaristic, KnightTemplar faction, a freedom-loving and rough bandit/mercenary faction, or a group of religious fanatics. Averted with non-humans, Beliar and his "evil creatures" servants are AlwaysChaoticEvil.



* HangingJudge - The justice system after the discovery of magic ore was HARSH. It didn't matter if you killed someone or ignored a "keep off the grass" sign, the punishment was the same: you get thrown in a big prison colony where you either mine ore or get shanked by your fellow prisoners.
* HitboxDissonance - In ''Gothic II'', it is easy to avoid fire varan's [[BreathWeapon fire breath]] by a [[NonchalantDodge single step back]], even though visually the fire still reaches you. Same for troll's crushing attack.

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* HangingJudge - HangingJudge: The justice system after the discovery of magic ore was HARSH. It didn't matter if you killed someone or ignored a "keep off the grass" sign, the punishment was the same: you get thrown in a big prison colony where you either mine ore or get shanked by your fellow prisoners.
* HitboxDissonance - HitboxDissonance: In ''Gothic II'', it is easy to avoid fire varan's [[BreathWeapon fire breath]] by a [[NonchalantDodge single step back]], even though visually the fire still reaches you. Same for troll's crushing attack.



* HitchhikerHeroes - The ones in the first game turn are actually one group of conspirators. However it's played straight in the second one.

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* HitchhikerHeroes - HitchhikerHeroes: The ones in the first game turn are actually one group of conspirators. However it's played straight in the second one.



* ImpossibleItemDrop - Averted, the drops make almost total sense. If a humanoid [=NPC=] has a weapon in his hand at the moment of his death, he'll drop it - the player can pick it up and then go through the body's inventory, picking and choosing the best loot. Non-human monsters don't initially have a visible inventory; the player has to learn specific hunting skills in order to, for example, skin wolves for their pelts (which can then be sold to traders).
* InsurmountableWaistHighFence - That they ''avert'' this trope rather spectacularly is part of what makes Gothic games what they are. The Barrier in G1 is not a case of an InsurmountableWaistHighFence, not even metaphorically, because it makes perfect sense for it to stop you. Anything else - fences, roofs, city walls, the huge battering ram in G2, mountains - if it looks climbable, it almost always is. Hell, there are at least three little known ways to get into Khorinis in G2 that depend on this (though just using the gates and tricking the guards to let you through is easier, but perhaps not as rewarding). The game actively encourages you to look for creative ways to get to seemingly inaccessible places.

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* ImpossibleItemDrop - ImpossibleItemDrop: Averted, the drops make almost total sense. If a humanoid [=NPC=] has a weapon in his hand at the moment of his death, he'll drop it - the player can pick it up and then go through the body's inventory, picking and choosing the best loot. Non-human monsters don't initially have a visible inventory; the player has to learn specific hunting skills in order to, for example, skin wolves for their pelts (which can then be sold to traders).
* InsurmountableWaistHighFence - InsurmountableWaistHighFence: That they ''avert'' this trope rather spectacularly is part of what makes Gothic games what they are. The Barrier in G1 is not a case of an InsurmountableWaistHighFence, not even metaphorically, because it makes perfect sense for it to stop you. Anything else - fences, roofs, city walls, the huge battering ram in G2, mountains - if it looks climbable, it almost always is. Hell, there are at least three little known ways to get into Khorinis in G2 that depend on this (though just using the gates and tricking the guards to let you through is easier, but perhaps not as rewarding). The game actively encourages you to look for creative ways to get to seemingly inaccessible places.



* InvisibleWall - The Barrier. Which becomes more and more visible the closer you get to it, and starts manifesting as electric death when you get much too close.

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* InvisibleWall - InvisibleWall: The Barrier. Which becomes more and more visible the closer you get to it, and starts manifesting as electric death when you get much too close.



* ItOnlyWorksOnce - Spell scrolls. They are, however, surpremely useful, since they exist of any spell, yet have no spell level requirements like runic magic has, and only very basic mana requirements. Using them tactically is a key part of the metagame, especially in the ExpansionPack for Gothic II. Using summons, [=AoE=]-spells or scrolls of shapeshifting, the player can easily take down boss monsters or fierce packs of enemies way beyond his level, often enabling him to instantly gain 2 or 3 levels afterwards from all the foes destroyed.

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* ItOnlyWorksOnce - ItOnlyWorksOnce: Spell scrolls. They are, however, surpremely useful, since they exist of any spell, yet have no spell level requirements like runic magic has, and only very basic mana requirements. Using them tactically is a key part of the metagame, especially in the ExpansionPack for Gothic II. Using summons, [=AoE=]-spells or scrolls of shapeshifting, the player can easily take down boss monsters or fierce packs of enemies way beyond his level, often enabling him to instantly gain 2 or 3 levels afterwards from all the foes destroyed.



* KnightTemplar - Innos, mostly in the third game. He is as stubborn to wipe out all darkness and defeat Beliar and his hordes as Beliar is to corrupt and hurt the world. This fierce struggle of power causes a lot of suffering for the world's common population.
* LaResistance - The Human Rebels, united against Orcish oppression in Gothic 3. Arguably the "mercenary" factions in G1 and G2 too.
* LizardFolk - EliteMooks in the second game. They are implied to be a servant race of the Dragons, responsible for spreading their eggs across the land, but are never mentioned again after that. They probably all got wiped out when the Nameless Hero attacked Irdorath.
* LoadBearingBoss - [[spoiler:the Sleeper's temple collapses the moment it's defeated. On top of you.]]
* LostWorld - Jharkendar. An isolated valley full of ruins of an ancient civilization. Small dinosaurs included.
* LowFantasy - Yup. Magic directly comes from the gods and can only be cast using certain catalysts, it's also limited to the various priests. Magical creatures do exist, but there's usually nothing more mythical about most of them other than their design, they'll attack with their claws and fangs, not by shooting lightning out of their mouths or something. The only other vaguely civilized race like humans are the orcs. Moral points, the hero included, are generally varying shades of grey and people are usually aware of what a crappy world they live in, so they're appropriately cynical, disillusioned or just try to make a fortune off the situation.

to:

* KnightTemplar - KnightTemplar: Innos, mostly in the third game. He is as stubborn to wipe out all darkness and defeat Beliar and his hordes as Beliar is to corrupt and hurt the world. This fierce struggle of power causes a lot of suffering for the world's common population.
* LaResistance - LaResistance: The Human Rebels, united against Orcish oppression in Gothic 3. Arguably the "mercenary" factions in G1 and G2 too.
* LizardFolk - LizardFolk: EliteMooks in the second game. They are implied to be a servant race of the Dragons, responsible for spreading their eggs across the land, but are never mentioned again after that. They probably all got wiped out when the Nameless Hero attacked Irdorath.
* LoadBearingBoss - [[spoiler:the LoadBearingBoss: [[spoiler:The Sleeper's temple collapses the moment it's defeated. On top of you.]]
* LostWorld - LostWorld: Jharkendar. An isolated valley full of ruins of an ancient civilization. Small dinosaurs included.
* LowFantasy - LowFantasy: Yup. Magic directly comes from the gods and can only be cast using certain catalysts, it's also limited to the various priests. Magical creatures do exist, but there's usually nothing more mythical about most of them other than their design, they'll attack with their claws and fangs, not by shooting lightning out of their mouths or something. The only other vaguely civilized race like humans are the orcs. Moral points, the hero included, are generally varying shades of grey and people are usually aware of what a crappy world they live in, so they're appropriately cynical, disillusioned or just try to make a fortune off the situation.



* MassMonsterSlaughterSidequest - Often given justifications as in "Kill these Fieldraiders before they eat our crop!"

to:

* MassMonsterSlaughterSidequest - MassMonsterSlaughterSidequest: Often given justifications as in "Kill these Fieldraiders before they eat our crop!"



* MoneySpider - Goblins play this trope straight, but they're implied to be [[TheKleptomaniac little kleptomaniacs]]. Every other monster can be looted for [[VendorTrash claws, teeth etc.]], but not money.
* MultipleEndings - Gothic 3.
* MusicalSpoiler - the 'chase theme', which plays while a hostile NPC is still chasing the player character, and stops when they give up.
* NaiveNewcomer - The player character at the start of Gothic I, [[JustifiedTrope justified]] by the story.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero - Gothic 2 starts with this trope in effect.
* NintendoHard - When the fans complained that Gothic II was too easy, the developers raised the difficulty A LOT for the ExpansionPack. Now just about every enemy is a lot stronger, raising your stats on higher levels costs ludicrously large amounts of XP and you'd better get your fingers on each and every [[RareCandy Stat Boosting Item]] you can find, you'll need them.

to:

* MoneySpider - MoneySpider: Goblins play this trope straight, but they're implied to be [[TheKleptomaniac little kleptomaniacs]]. Every other monster can be looted for [[VendorTrash claws, teeth etc.]], but not money.
* MultipleEndings - MultipleEndings: Gothic 3.
* MusicalSpoiler - MusicalSpoiler: the 'chase theme', which plays while a hostile NPC is still chasing the player character, and stops when they give up.
* NaiveNewcomer - NaiveNewcomer: The player character at the start of Gothic I, [[JustifiedTrope justified]] by the story.
* NiceJobBreakingItHero - NiceJobBreakingItHero: Gothic 2 starts with this trope in effect.
* NintendoHard - NintendoHard: When the fans complained that Gothic II was too easy, the developers raised the difficulty A LOT for the ExpansionPack. Now just about every enemy is a lot stronger, raising your stats on higher levels costs ludicrously large amounts of XP and you'd better get your fingers on each and every [[RareCandy Stat Boosting Item]] you can find, you'll need them.



* NoNameGiven - the Nameless Hero. In fact, people actively try to shut him up whenever he attempts to introduce himself.

to:

* NoNameGiven - NoNameGiven: the Nameless Hero. In fact, people actively try to shut him up whenever he attempts to introduce himself.



* NonIndicativeName - "Scavengers" are agreesive and seemingly predatory.
* NonLethalKO - One of the parts that make this game unique is that characters enjoy engaging in close-combat duels with each other, where the looser will fall to the ground, have his HP reduced to 1 and will often afterwards be robbed and have his weapon taken away by the winner. In many parts of the Gothic world, this is a perfectly regular pastime and will even have nearby characters cheer on the fighters. A downed adversary can be finished off by [[ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice driving one's weapon into their chest while they still lie on the ground]], but this is generally looked upon less favorably by onlookers. If you don't finish them, they'll get up after a short time, usually acknowledging your victory with an annoyed comment or even running away from you. However, none of this is true for combat with any kind of monster (in which emptying the health bar is always fatal for either player or enemy), some always-hostile characters (like bandits), ranged weapons or most kinds of spells.
* NonStandardGameover - Swiming too far out to sea in 2 will result in a cutsceen of sea serpents eating your character.
* NowWhereWasIGoingAgain - The journal.
* ObviousBeta - Gothic 1 has such unstable game coding that it was even prone to crashing on systems available at time of release. Gothic 3 was this to some extent, but [[WordOfGod JoWood/Pirahna Bytes]] approved [[GameMod Community Patches]] have largely fixed this.

to:

* NonIndicativeName - NonIndicativeName: "Scavengers" are agreesive agressive and seemingly predatory.
* NonLethalKO - NonLethalKO: One of the parts that make this game unique is that characters enjoy engaging in close-combat duels with each other, where the looser will fall to the ground, have his HP reduced to 1 and will often afterwards be robbed and have his weapon taken away by the winner. In many parts of the Gothic world, this is a perfectly regular pastime and will even have nearby characters cheer on the fighters. A downed adversary can be finished off by [[ImpaledWithExtremePrejudice driving one's weapon into their chest while they still lie on the ground]], but this is generally looked upon less favorably by onlookers. If you don't finish them, they'll get up after a short time, usually acknowledging your victory with an annoyed comment or even running away from you. However, none of this is true for combat with any kind of monster (in which emptying the health bar is always fatal for either player or enemy), some always-hostile characters (like bandits), ranged weapons or most kinds of spells.
* NonStandardGameover - NonStandardGameover: Swiming too far out to sea in 2 will result in a cutsceen of sea serpents eating your character.
* NowWhereWasIGoingAgain - NowWhereWasIGoingAgain: The journal.
* ObviousBeta - ObviousBeta: Gothic 1 has such unstable game coding that it was even prone to crashing on systems available at time of release. Gothic 3 was this to some extent, but [[WordOfGod JoWood/Pirahna Bytes]] approved [[GameMod Community Patches]] have largely fixed this.



* OneHandedZweihander - Played with. Orcs are so strong that what appears to be a weapon made for one-handed use by orcs can barely be wielded with both hands by a human.

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* OneHandedZweihander - OneHandedZweihander: Played with. Orcs are so strong that what appears to be a weapon made for one-handed use by orcs can barely be wielded with both hands by a human.



* OneManArmy - Your character winds up becoming this for a lot of missions in Gothic III, as well as against the orcs for one mission in 2.

to:

* OneManArmy - OneManArmy: Your character winds up becoming this for a lot of missions in Gothic III, as well as against the orcs for one mission in 2.



* TheOtherDarrin - Rather noticeable in the english version, with characters changing voices between games. This is very noticeable for Diego, who doesn't even attempt to have the same ''type'' of voice (going from "deep" to "nasely")

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* TheOtherDarrin - TheOtherDarrin: Rather noticeable in the english English version, with characters changing voices between games. This is very noticeable for Diego, who doesn't even attempt to have the same ''type'' of voice (going from "deep" to "nasely")



* OxygenMeter - Interestingly, one of the few examples not instantly refilled on surfacing.

to:

* OxygenMeter - OxygenMeter: Interestingly, one of the few examples not instantly refilled on surfacing.



* PreexistingEncounters - [[AntiGrinding They also won't respawn if killed.]]
** Somewhat averted in the Community Patched versions of Gothic 3 and Forsaken Gods, with some enemies set to respawn with a given percentage of posssibility.
* PrestigeClass - Guards / Fire Magicians, Mercenaries / Water Magicians and Templars in Gothic 1, Paladins and Dragon Hunters in Gothic 2 %%Fire magicians in 2 aren't an example: Novice doesn't really count as a class.

to:

* PreexistingEncounters - PreexistingEncounters: [[AntiGrinding They also won't respawn if killed.]]
** Somewhat averted in the Community Patched versions of Gothic 3 and Forsaken Gods, with some enemies set to respawn with a given percentage of posssibility.
possibility.
* PrestigeClass - PrestigeClass: Guards / Fire Magicians, Mercenaries / Water Magicians and Templars in Gothic 1, Paladins and Dragon Hunters in Gothic 2 %%Fire magicians in 2 aren't an example: Novice doesn't really count as a class.



* QuicksandBox - ''Gothic 3'', specially if you haven't played any of the previous two games. The storyline is "tenuous" to say the best, and very few characters will actually get detailed at explaining anything. While this can be considered a token of realism (people aren't usually prone to give full elaborate explanations to a stranger that just knocked at their door), it also means you can easily get lost and walk around aimlessly without knowing what the hell is going on.

to:

* QuicksandBox - QuicksandBox: ''Gothic 3'', specially if you haven't played any of the previous two games. The storyline is "tenuous" to say the best, and very few characters will actually get detailed at explaining anything. While this can be considered a token of realism (people aren't usually prone to give full elaborate explanations to a stranger that just knocked at their door), it also means you can easily get lost and walk around aimlessly without knowing what the hell is going on.



* {{Retcon}} - A minor one: ''Gothic'' ends with the Nameless Hero leaving the [[spoiler:Sleeper-Temple completely unharmed]], ''Gothic 2'' starts with the Hero [[spoiler:buried beneath it]].

to:

* {{Retcon}} - {{Retcon}}: A minor one: ''Gothic'' ends with the Nameless Hero leaving the [[spoiler:Sleeper-Temple completely unharmed]], ''Gothic 2'' starts with the Hero [[spoiler:buried beneath it]].



* RodentsOfUnusualSize - One of the recurring monsters in this franchise.
* RogueProtagonist - King Rhobar III (the Nameless Hero from the previous games) in Arcania. [[spoiler:It turns out he's possessed by a demon and gets exorcised at the ending]].
* RoofHopping - While not required, the roofs of Khorinis have some ''very'' nice stuff for the early game that can be found if you do this.
* RuleOfThree - Three camps, three guilds, three deities, three endings...
* ScaryBlackMan - Gorn has the look, but is subverted by the fact he's a fairly nice guy (He's said to has "a lot to pay for" in the 2nd game, but it is never said what). Thorus plays this trope straight, though he gets less scarier each game.
* SceneryPorn - All of the games to some degree, but perhaps more notable in Gothic 3, since it has the most modern graphics of the three games.
* ScreenShake - Trolls
* SequenceBreaking - The InsurmountableWaistHighFence subversion above, combined with the willingness to run like a maniac past enemies you cannot overcome at low level, means you can get some nice loot early and basically run entire quests well before receiving them as actual tasks.
* SetSwordsToStun - See NonLethalKO above
* ShootTheShaggyDog - In 2, after spending 2 chapters [[spoiler:having Lothar insult you and call you mad, you've finally gotten something you can shove in his face to prove he is wrong and you're right, but by the time you get back to town, he has been murdered]].

to:

* RodentsOfUnusualSize - RodentsOfUnusualSize: One of the recurring monsters in this franchise.
* RogueProtagonist - RogueProtagonist: King Rhobar III (the Nameless Hero from the previous games) in Arcania. [[spoiler:It turns out he's possessed by a demon and gets exorcised at the ending]].
* RoofHopping - RoofHopping: While not required, the roofs of Khorinis have some ''very'' nice stuff for the early game that can be found if you do this.
* RuleOfThree - RuleOfThree: Three camps, three guilds, three deities, three endings...
* ScaryBlackMan - ScaryBlackMan: Gorn has the look, but is subverted by the fact he's a fairly nice guy (He's said to has "a lot to pay for" in the 2nd game, but it is never said what). Thorus plays this trope straight, though he gets less scarier each game.
* SceneryPorn - SceneryPorn: All of the games to some degree, but perhaps more notable in Gothic 3, since it has the most modern graphics of the three games.
* ScreenShake - ScreenShake: Trolls
* SequenceBreaking - SequenceBreaking: The InsurmountableWaistHighFence subversion above, combined with the willingness to run like a maniac past enemies you cannot overcome at low level, means you can get some nice loot early and basically run entire quests well before receiving them as actual tasks.
* SetSwordsToStun - SetSwordsToStun: See NonLethalKO above
* ShootTheShaggyDog - ShootTheShaggyDog: In 2, after spending 2 chapters [[spoiler:having Lothar insult you and call you mad, you've finally gotten something you can shove in his face to prove he is wrong and you're right, but by the time you get back to town, he has been murdered]].



* SpiritualSequel - ''VideoGame/{{Risen}}''.
* SpiritualSuccessor - To ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}''.
* SprintShoes - The running jump gave you just a little extra speed--enough to outrun most sword-wielding maniacs. Well, OTHER sword-wielding maniacs.

to:

* SpiritualSequel - SpiritualSequel: ''VideoGame/{{Risen}}''.
* SpiritualSuccessor - SpiritualSuccessor: To ''Franchise/{{Ultima}}''.
* SprintShoes - SprintShoes: The running jump gave you just a little extra speed--enough to outrun most sword-wielding maniacs. Well, OTHER sword-wielding maniacs.



* StormingTheCastle - Expect to spend a good portion of Gothic 3 doing this, since by meddling into ongoing struggles between rebels and orcs (in Myrtana), nomads and hashishin (Varant) and nordmarians and orcs (Nordmar) you'll usually end up assaulting fortified places full of defenders with little to no help from your chosen allies.

to:

* StormingTheCastle - StormingTheCastle: Expect to spend a good portion of Gothic 3 doing this, since by meddling into ongoing struggles between rebels and orcs (in Myrtana), nomads and hashishin (Varant) and nordmarians and orcs (Nordmar) you'll usually end up assaulting fortified places full of defenders with little to no help from your chosen allies.



* SuperPersistentPredator - Normally averted: "monster" enemies generally do give warning to back off for a few seconds and will break chase if you run far enough, though they don't react to being injured.
* [[CaffeineBulletTime Swampweed Bullet Time]] - Smoking a swampweed cigarette makes everything sloooooow, as well as [[InterfaceScrew distorting the screen]].
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard - In ''Gothic 3'', [=NPCs=] with magical abilities will never run out of mana, and sometimes will surprise you by throwing remote-controlled magic missiles at your face, with said 'nukes' even slipping through several other enemies - and even environmental objects - before hitting its moving target (usually, your ass) with deadly precision.
* ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything - [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The pirates]] in ''Night of the Raven''.
* TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized - Rebels and nomads are supposedly the "good guys" in Gothic 3, yet don't expect them to take prisoners when reconquering strongholds or villages.
* ThisLoserIsYou - Interestingly combined with eventual TakeALevelInBadass. Originally, the Nameless Hero starts out like a newbie (which, if you are playing for the first time, you are), and he's weak and has no clue how to fight and survive (again, for a first time gamer, this is also true). He also starts out not knowing what's going on and dependent on others for help (again, a new gamer will also be like this). This trope was strongest in Gothic II, but was dropped in Gothic III, where it would be in universe impossible to justify the Nameless Hero being a total newbie all over again, hence why he doesn't start off nearly as incompetent and dependent on others like the other games.
* ThreateningShark [=/=] SandWorm - Swamp Sharks combine traits of both and are very dangerous creatures early in the first game.
* TookALevelInBadass - Just compare what the Nameless Hero says in the start of either Gothic 1 or 2 to what he says when he [[spoiler:faces down the undead Shamans and Cor Kalom in 1]] or [[spoiler:makes his demands to the dragons when he has the Eye of Innos in 2]]

to:

* SuperPersistentPredator - SuperPersistentPredator: Normally averted: "monster" enemies generally do give warning to back off for a few seconds and will break chase if you run far enough, though they don't react to being injured.
* [[CaffeineBulletTime Swampweed Bullet Time]] - Time]]: Smoking a swampweed cigarette makes everything sloooooow, as well as [[InterfaceScrew distorting the screen]].
* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard - TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: In ''Gothic 3'', [=NPCs=] with magical abilities will never run out of mana, and sometimes will surprise you by throwing remote-controlled magic missiles at your face, with said 'nukes' even slipping through several other enemies - and even environmental objects - before hitting its moving target (usually, your ass) with deadly precision.
* ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything - ThePiratesWhoDontDoAnything: [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin The pirates]] in ''Night of the Raven''.
* TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized - TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized: Rebels and nomads are supposedly the "good guys" in Gothic 3, yet don't expect them to take prisoners when reconquering strongholds or villages.
* ThisLoserIsYou - ThisLoserIsYou: Interestingly combined with eventual TakeALevelInBadass. Originally, the Nameless Hero starts out like a newbie (which, if you are playing for the first time, you are), and he's weak and has no clue how to fight and survive (again, for a first time gamer, this is also true). He also starts out not knowing what's going on and dependent on others for help (again, a new gamer will also be like this). This trope was strongest in Gothic II, but was dropped in Gothic III, where it would be in universe impossible to justify the Nameless Hero being a total newbie all over again, hence why he doesn't start off nearly as incompetent and dependent on others like the other games.
* ThreateningShark [=/=] SandWorm - SandWorm: Swamp Sharks combine traits of both and are very dangerous creatures early in the first game.
* TookALevelInBadass - TookALevelInBadass: Just compare what the Nameless Hero says in the start of either Gothic 1 or 2 to what he says when he [[spoiler:faces down the undead Shamans and Cor Kalom in 1]] or [[spoiler:makes his demands to the dragons when he has the Eye of Innos in 2]]



* UnexplainedRecovery - One dialog option when meeting Bloodwyn in ''Night of the Raven'' is to comment that you killed him back in Gothic 1 [[note]]Note that killing an NPC is Gothic 1 meant ''impaling him while he's unconscious''[[/note]] (while never required or even recommended, killing him was common because he's pretty damn evil). His response is that he survived a lot of things.
* UnWinnable - The manual for the second game explicitly states that the dev team went out of their way to avoid this. The game should always be winnable in some form, even if you choose to go on a wild killing spree in a plot-critical zone. Within reason, of course. They said you can still break your game by, say, throwing the Eye of Innos into the sea. This is wrong, of course. [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything They prepared for that, too.]]
* VideoGameCrueltyPotential - With limited enemies / experience, it pays off to kill (or at least knock out) as many civilians as possible.
* VestigialEmpire - King Rhobar's kingdom is not all it used to be.

to:

* UnexplainedRecovery - UnexplainedRecovery: One dialog option when meeting Bloodwyn in ''Night of the Raven'' is to comment that you killed him back in Gothic 1 [[note]]Note that killing an NPC is Gothic 1 meant ''impaling him while he's unconscious''[[/note]] (while never required or even recommended, killing him was common because he's pretty damn evil). His response is that he survived a lot of things.
* UnWinnable - UnWinnable: The manual for the second game explicitly states that the dev team went out of their way to avoid this. The game should always be winnable in some form, even if you choose to go on a wild killing spree in a plot-critical zone. Within reason, of course. They said you can still break your game by, say, throwing the Eye of Innos into the sea. This is wrong, of course. [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything They prepared for that, too.]]
* VideoGameCrueltyPotential - VideoGameCrueltyPotential: With limited enemies / experience, it pays off to kill (or at least knock out) as many civilians as possible.
* VestigialEmpire - VestigialEmpire: King Rhobar's kingdom is not all it used to be.



* WhatCouldHaveBeen - ''Gothic 3'' could have been one of the best open-world [=RPGs=] of all time [[ExecutiveMeddling if only the publisher hadn't decided to release it about six months before it was actually finished]].
* WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue - In Gothic III. Not much point to it, though, since Forsaken Gods picks up the story at the end of G3 again anyway...

to:

* WhatCouldHaveBeen - WhatCouldHaveBeen: ''Gothic 3'' could have been one of the best open-world [=RPGs=] of all time [[ExecutiveMeddling if only the publisher hadn't decided to release it about six months before it was actually finished]].
* WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue - WhereAreTheyNowEpilogue: In Gothic III. Not much point to it, though, since Forsaken Gods picks up the story at the end of G3 again anyway...



* WhosLaughingNow - Remember Bullit, the guy from the opening who punched you in the face? You can go back to him near the end of the first game, wearing the most powerful equipment there is and by this point, being strong enough to slaughter the likes of his in droves. The Nameless Hero will even remark on how nicely the situation is reversed now. Then you can butcher the guy. Or, for added irony, punch him until he drops, provided you have trained your strength enough to do damage despite his armor.
* WideOpenSandbox - Gothic 3.

to:

* WhosLaughingNow - WhosLaughingNow: Remember Bullit, the guy from the opening who punched you in the face? You can go back to him near the end of the first game, wearing the most powerful equipment there is and by this point, being strong enough to slaughter the likes of his in droves. The Nameless Hero will even remark on how nicely the situation is reversed now. Then you can butcher the guy. Or, for added irony, punch him until he drops, provided you have trained your strength enough to do damage despite his armor.
* WideOpenSandbox - WideOpenSandbox: Gothic 3.



* WhatHappenedToTheMouse? - Most minor characters from I either die offscreen or become nameless bandits infesting much of the Khorinis island, since they are nowhere to be found and they had no means of leaving the island.

to:

* WhatHappenedToTheMouse? - WhatHappenedToTheMouse?: Most minor characters from I either die offscreen or become nameless bandits infesting much of the Khorinis island, since they are nowhere to be found and they had no means of leaving the island.



* WithThisHerring - the start of Gothic II.

to:

* WithThisHerring - WithThisHerring: the start of Gothic II.



* YouBastard - Thorus in III feels this way about your protagonist.
* YouHaveToBelieveMe - {{Averted}}[=/=]{{Defied}} in ''Gothic II''. When the Nameless Hero has to gain Paladins' support against the dragons in Valley of Mines, he simply tells Lord Hagen, "The question is not if [[YouHaveToBelieveMe you should believe me]], but whether you can afford to ''not'' believe me if I'm telling truth." It works pretty well -- the Hero is sent to the Valley for confirmation.

to:

* YouBastard - YouBastard: Thorus in III feels this way about your protagonist.
* YouHaveToBelieveMe - YouHaveToBelieveMe: {{Averted}}[=/=]{{Defied}} in ''Gothic II''. When the Nameless Hero has to gain Paladins' support against the dragons in Valley of Mines, he simply tells Lord Hagen, "The question is not if [[YouHaveToBelieveMe you should believe me]], but whether you can afford to ''not'' believe me if I'm telling truth." It works pretty well -- the Hero is sent to the Valley for confirmation.
20th Jul '16 10:02:17 AM Forenperser
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Added DiffLines:

* MentorArcheType: Vatras plays this role for the hero in Gothic 2, especially in the ExpansionPack. Xardas is this for the hero in the overall series, though a much darker version than the usual trope.
9th Jul '16 6:31:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* FiveManBand - In Gothic III, albeit they split up from the beginning.
** TheHero - The Nameless Hero
** TheLancer - Diego, who is also TheObiWan
** TheBigGuy - Gorn
** TheSmartGuy - Milten
** TheHeart and alternate TheBigGuy - Lester
** Actually, the dynamic of the five friends has existed since Gothic I and is a popular concept with the fans, though the first time they actually all fought side by side was in TheVeryDefinitelyFinalDungeon in Gothic II. Hell, when German fans made TheMovie (with in-game graphics, of course) they decided to have [[AdaptationExpansion the five go into the final dungeon together]], [[CrowningMomentOfAwesome taking on an entire city of orcs in the process.]]
9th Jul '16 6:31:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* DarkIsNotEvil - Xardas, the elderly black-robed necromancer with pale white eyes who lives in a creepy tower and consorts with demons and orcs. On paper he looks like he might be the BigBad, but he's actually TheObiWan. In the first game, he can actually teach a PC who has already taken both the Vow of Fire and the Vow of Water to become a Demon Summoner/Black Mage as well. So yes, you can totally be a hero that frequently uses a spell called "Army of Darkness" which summons six undead warriors. Though they will attack/be attacked when you summon them in a public zone.

to:

* DarkIsNotEvil - Xardas, the elderly black-robed necromancer with pale white eyes who lives in a creepy tower and consorts with demons and orcs. On paper he looks like he might be the BigBad, but he's actually TheObiWan.TheMentor. In the first game, he can actually teach a PC who has already taken both the Vow of Fire and the Vow of Water to become a Demon Summoner/Black Mage as well. So yes, you can totally be a hero that frequently uses a spell called "Army of Darkness" which summons six undead warriors. Though they will attack/be attacked when you summon them in a public zone.



* TheObiWan: Vatras plays this role for the hero in Gothic 2. Xardas is this for the hero in the overall series, though a much darker version than the usual trope.
13th Jun '16 3:38:22 PM val
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Added DiffLines:

** Enemies with bows and crossbows never lead their target. Because they also have excellent aim, you can just walk sideways while shooting at them, easily defeating any number of enemy archers (if they don't have melee guards nearby) without taking damage.
5th Jun '16 7:01:47 AM Vox
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* DarkIsNotEvil - Xardas, the elderly black-robed necromancer with pale white eyes who lives in a creepy tower and consorts with demons. On paper he looks like the BigBad, but he's actually TheObiWan. In the first game, he can actually teach a PC who has already taken both the Vow of Fire and the Vow of Water to become a Demon Summoner/Black Mage as well. So yes, you can totally be a hero that frequently uses a spell called "Army of Darkness" which summons six undead warriors. Though they will attack/be attacked when you summon them in a public zone.

to:

* DarkIsNotEvil - Xardas, the elderly black-robed necromancer with pale white eyes who lives in a creepy tower and consorts with demons. demons and orcs. On paper he looks like he might be the BigBad, but he's actually TheObiWan. In the first game, he can actually teach a PC who has already taken both the Vow of Fire and the Vow of Water to become a Demon Summoner/Black Mage as well. So yes, you can totally be a hero that frequently uses a spell called "Army of Darkness" which summons six undead warriors. Though they will attack/be attacked when you summon them in a public zone.
26th Apr '16 7:53:15 PM SweatBoyX8
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** It's not exactly true. The Skeleton mages can summon endless waves of undead skeletons to their protection, unless you kill them. It's a good way to grinding, especially if you have Death to the Undead magic rune.

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** It's not exactly true. The Skeleton mages can summon endless waves of undead skeletons to their protection, unless you kill them. It's a good way to grinding, grind, especially if you have Death to the Undead magic rune.
31st Mar '16 1:21:57 PM Forenperser
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* TheObiWan: Vatras plays this role for the hero in Gothic 2. Xardas is this for the hero in the overall series, though a much darker version than the usual trope.
7th Feb '16 1:40:57 PM Vox
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* EvilSorcerer: Xardas the {{Necromancer}} is a subversion - he certainly looks and acts like one, but he's one of the good guys (even if he verges on being a WellIntentionedExtremist a bit).
26th Jan '16 11:13:56 PM 43110
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* UnexplainedRecovery - One dialog option when meeting Bloodwyn in ''Night of the Raven'' is to comment that you killed him back in Gothic 1 [[note]]Note that killing an NPC is Gothic 1 meat ''impaling him while he's unconscious''[[/note]] (while never required or even recommended, killing him was common because he's pretty damn evil). His response is that he survived a lot of things.

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* UnexplainedRecovery - One dialog option when meeting Bloodwyn in ''Night of the Raven'' is to comment that you killed him back in Gothic 1 [[note]]Note that killing an NPC is Gothic 1 meat meant ''impaling him while he's unconscious''[[/note]] (while never required or even recommended, killing him was common because he's pretty damn evil). His response is that he survived a lot of things.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.Gothic