History VideoGame / FireEmblem

27th Apr '16 1:56:37 PM talewind
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* ''Fire Emblem'' (working title): A smartphone title releasing in fall 2016.
22nd Apr '16 7:36:45 AM QueenBEAUTY
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** [[spoiler:Anankos]]'' in ''Fates'' to King Garon. [[spoiler:In a twist, Anankos is ''completely absent'' unless you're playing ''Revelation'' (he gets mentioned a few times in ''Conquest,'' but the Avatar thinks he's a part of Garon's delusions). What's more, the Garon seen in the game is actually Anankos speaking through him; the real king's been dead for a long time. He does something similar to Takumi in ''Conquest.'']]

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** [[spoiler:Anankos]]'' [[spoiler:Anankos]] in ''Fates'' to King Garon. [[spoiler:In a twist, Anankos is ''completely absent'' unless you're playing ''Revelation'' (he gets mentioned a few times in ''Conquest,'' but the Avatar thinks he's a part of Garon's delusions). What's more, the Garon seen in the game is actually Anankos speaking through him; the real king's been dead for a long time. He does something similar to Takumi in ''Conquest.'']]''Conquest'']].
22nd Apr '16 7:33:35 AM QueenBEAUTY
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Added DiffLines:

** [[spoiler:Anankos]]'' in ''Fates'' to King Garon. [[spoiler:In a twist, Anankos is ''completely absent'' unless you're playing ''Revelation'' (he gets mentioned a few times in ''Conquest,'' but the Avatar thinks he's a part of Garon's delusions). What's more, the Garon seen in the game is actually Anankos speaking through him; the real king's been dead for a long time. He does something similar to Takumi in ''Conquest.'']]
22nd Apr '16 7:16:59 AM QueenBEAUTY
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*** Magic was all lumped under one category (''Fates'' actually brings this back), with no differentiating types until ''Genealogy.'' For the ''Akaneia'' games, many spells could only be used by one unit (Excalibur for Merric, Aura for Linde, etc.), and in ''Mystery of the Emblem,'' Nosferatu in particular could only be used by female mages! And while the Jugdral games created the magic triangle along with Light and Dark magic, there were oddities:
**** a.) Light and Dark were equal to one another and superior to Anima.
**** b.) There was no playable Dark magic user until ''Thracia 776'', and he could only use ''two'' of the Dark tomes used in that game (Fenrir and Yotsmungand).



** Most have agreed that ''Thracia 776'' is the forefather to the "modern" games as we know them, albeit with its own oddities that were dropped, namely the fatigue meter, capturing enemies, the fact that healing staves could miss, movement stars, and growth rates for Build and Movement.
*** Funnily enough, the ability to capture enemies eventually made a return in ''Fates''.

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** Most have agreed that ''Thracia 776'' is the forefather to the "modern" games as we know them, albeit with its own oddities that were dropped, namely dropped: the fatigue meter, capturing enemies, the fact that healing staves could miss, movement stars, and growth rates for Build and Movement.
*** Funnily enough,
Movement, and enemy Dancers.
** ''Fates'' actually returns four old mechanics that were otherwise only used once: in both it and ''Gaiden'',
the ability to capture enemies eventually made iconic breakable weapon mechanic was absent, meaning weapons could be used infinitely, and units could equip stat-boosting items, which was given a spiritual successor with the Accessory mechanic in ''Fates.'' Capturing from ''Thracia 776'' also makes a return in ''Fates''.''Fates,'' albeit heavily modified (not all units can be captured, and you can have the captured enemy join your side instead of stealing items from them). Finally, magic is now part of the main weapon triangle, and all spells (sans Nosferatu) are all lumped under one category; the latter fact holds true in the Akaneia games.
19th Apr '16 9:53:16 PM Wuz
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** ''Awakening'' is a weird case. While ''New Mystery'' is far and away the hardest entry in the series thanks to its absurd highest difficulty mode and game mechanics, ''Awakening''[='=]s Lunatic Mode+ is potentially the hardest mode in the series, but only because it is a LuckBasedMission. ''Awakening''[='=}s Normal and Hard modes are extremely easy, while the Lunatic Mode can be easily trivialized.

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** ''Awakening'' is a weird case. While ''New Mystery'' is far and away the hardest entry in the series thanks to its absurd highest difficulty mode and game mechanics, ''Awakening''[='=]s Lunatic Mode+ is potentially the hardest mode in the series, but only because it is a LuckBasedMission. ''Awakening''[='=}s ''Awakening''[='=]s Normal and Hard modes are extremely easy, while the Lunatic Mode can be easily trivialized.
19th Apr '16 9:53:16 PM Wuz
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** ''Awakening'' is a weird case. While ''New Mystery'' is far and away the hardest entry in the series thanks to its absurd highest difficulty mode and game mechanics, ''Awakening''[='=]s Lunatic Mode+ is potentially the hardest mode in the series, but only because it is a LuckBasedMission. ''Awakening''[='=}s Normal and Hard modes are extremely easy, while the Lunatic Mode can be easily trivialized.

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** ''Awakening'' is a weird case. While ''New Mystery'' is far and away the hardest entry in the series thanks to its absurd highest difficulty mode and game mechanics, ''Awakening''[='=]s Lunatic Mode+ is potentially the hardest mode in the series, but only because it is a LuckBasedMission. ''Awakening''[='=}s ''Awakening''[='=]s Normal and Hard modes are extremely easy, while the Lunatic Mode can be easily trivialized.
19th Apr '16 9:52:19 PM Wuz
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral'': After the release of the third game (''Mystery of the Emblem'') on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] the series moved on to a new set of characters and a new world, with the release of ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' (Seisen no Keifu) in 1996 and its sequel/{{Interquel}}, ''Thracia 776'' in 1999. Set in the same universe as the Akaneia games but hundreds or thousands of years in the past, according to WordOfGod. The games are notable for having the darkest storyline of the entire franchise, and ''Thracia 776'' is known for being extremely difficult [[UpToEleven even by the frachise's own standards]].

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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral'': After the release of the third game (''Mystery of the Emblem'') on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]] the series moved on to a new set of characters and a new world, with the release of ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' (Seisen no Keifu) in 1996 and its sequel/{{Interquel}}, ''Thracia 776'' in 1999. Set in the same universe as the Akaneia games but hundreds or thousands of years in the past, according to WordOfGod. The games are notable for having the darkest storyline of the entire franchise, and ''Thracia 776'' is known for being extremely difficult [[UpToEleven even by the frachise's franchise's own standards]].



''Fire Emblem'' is one of the featured series in the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' franchise, debuting in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' due to popular demand from the Japanese fanbase. ''Melee'' features Marth and Roy as unlockable playable characters; ''Brawl'' has Marth and Ike playable, Lyndis as an Assist Trophy, and the Castle Siege stage, a nonspecific amalgamation of typical location themes and tropes present throughout the series as a whole with a stylistic focus on the Tellius canon. The fourth entry has Marth, Ike, and Lyndis returning in their respective roles, and introduces content from Awakening, namely Lucina and the PlayerCharacter Robin (taking on his/her default name and appearance of the game, while retaining the choice of both male and female variations) as playable fighters, Chrom cameoing in Lucina's trailer and Robin's Final Smash, and Regna Ferox's arena as a stage for the 3DS version, as well as bringing back Roy and introducing Corrin as DLC.

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''Fire Emblem'' is one of the featured series in the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' franchise, debuting in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' due to popular demand from the Japanese fanbase. ''Melee'' features Marth and Roy as unlockable playable characters; ''Brawl'' has Marth and Ike playable, Lyndis as an Assist Trophy, and the Castle Siege stage, a nonspecific amalgamation of typical location themes and tropes present throughout the series as a whole with a stylistic focus on the Tellius canon. The fourth entry has Marth, Ike, and Lyndis returning in their respective roles, and introduces content from Awakening, ''Awakening'', namely Lucina and the PlayerCharacter Robin (taking on his/her default name and appearance of the game, while retaining the choice of both male and female variations) as playable fighters, Chrom cameoing in Lucina's trailer and Robin's Final Smash, and Regna Ferox's arena as a stage for the 3DS version, as well as bringing back Roy and introducing Corrin as DLC.



** Part of the reason for the Game Boy Advance titles' ArtEvolution was that they were on the Game Boy Advance, at a time when the standard model was still out there. When Sacred Stones came out, the frontlit SP was around for ''awhile'', and thus they used a slightly darker palette (Especially evident in the menus, which are a ''lot'' darker brown.)

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** Part of the reason for the Game Boy Advance titles' ArtEvolution was that they were on the Game Boy Advance, at a time when the standard model was still out there. When Sacred Stones ''Sacred Stones'' came out, the frontlit SP was around for ''awhile'', and thus they used a slightly darker palette (Especially evident in the menus, which are a ''lot'' darker brown.)



** Assassins get this in Awakening, and the possibility of close and far ranged attack coupled with the ability to land an instant kill and pass through enemy spaces makes them the deadliest incarnation of the class yet.

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** Assassins get this in Awakening, ''Awakening'', and the possibility of close and far ranged attack coupled with the ability to land an instant kill and pass through enemy spaces makes them the deadliest incarnation of the class yet.



** Seems to be gone completely as of Awakening, which went with a T-Rating, very small instances of blood the ESRB didn't pick up on, and deliberate mention of drinking as well as swearing or what would be considered swearing in a medieval setting.

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** Seems to be gone completely as of Awakening, ''Awakening'', which went with a T-Rating, very small instances of blood the ESRB didn't pick up on, and deliberate mention of drinking as well as swearing or what would be considered swearing in a medieval setting.



** They even had a common second tier class (Wyvern Knight) in Sacred Stones, but they diverged more in Awakening which enforces that Pegasi are female only and Wyvern Riders are both genders; in addition, they lost the common promotion. Now Wyvern Riders can promote to Wyvern Lords and Griffon Knights, which use axes/lances and all axes respectively, and have high physical stats; and Pegasus Knights become either Falcon Knights, which can heal with staves as well as attack with lances, or Dark Fliers, which can attack with lances and tomes. On the other hand, they share the common weaknesses of bows and wind magic again, though bows hurt the less physical pegasi more whereas wind hurts the low resistance wyverns a lot more.

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** They even had a common second tier class (Wyvern Knight) in Sacred Stones, ''Sacred Stones'', but they diverged more in Awakening ''Awakening'' which enforces that Pegasi are female only and Wyvern Riders are both genders; in addition, they lost the common promotion. Now Wyvern Riders can promote to Wyvern Lords and Griffon Knights, which use axes/lances and all axes respectively, and have high physical stats; and Pegasus Knights become either Falcon Knights, which can heal with staves as well as attack with lances, or Dark Fliers, which can attack with lances and tomes. On the other hand, they share the common weaknesses of bows and wind magic again, though bows hurt the less physical pegasi more whereas wind hurts the low resistance wyverns a lot more.



* DragonRider: A group of character classes; initially renamed "Wyvern Riders" when the games started being translated, probably to prevent FridgeLogic regarding how the main point of ''Blazing Sword'' was to prevent dragons from returning to the world; from ''Radiant Dawn'' onward, they reverted to being called dragons. The Japanese version is also inconsistent on this; in the Archanea games and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]], they are wyverns (here a degenerate dragon subspecies). VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones is thus far the only game in which both types of Dragon mounts appear together (as separate but related classes).

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* DragonRider: A group of character classes; initially renamed "Wyvern Riders" when the games started being translated, probably to prevent FridgeLogic regarding how the main point of ''Blazing Sword'' was to prevent dragons from returning to the world; from ''Radiant Dawn'' onward, they reverted to being called dragons. The Japanese version is also inconsistent on this; in the Archanea games and [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]], ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]]'', they are wyverns (here a degenerate dragon subspecies). VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones'' is thus far the only game in which both types of Dragon mounts appear together (as separate but related classes).



** Subverted in Awakening, where in postgame it's defense, resistance and luck that are considered to be the dump stats, and skill is actually quite valuable for every unit since it increases the rate of skill activation and dual strikes. Played straight on higher-difficulties in-game, where skill is considered the least important.

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** Subverted in Awakening, ''Awakening'', where in postgame it's defense, resistance and luck that are considered to be the dump stats, and skill is actually quite valuable for every unit since it increases the rate of skill activation and dual strikes. Played straight on higher-difficulties in-game, where skill is considered the least important.



*** While a walkable world map was re-inserted into the series in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones several]] [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening ways]], ''Gaiden,'' to this day, remains the sole ''Fire Emblem'' game to have players freely roam towns and villages a la ''VideoGame/ShiningForce''.

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*** While a walkable world map was re-inserted into the series in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones several]] [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening ways]], ''Gaiden,'' ''Gaiden'', to this day, remains the sole ''Fire Emblem'' game to have players freely roam towns and villages a la ''VideoGame/ShiningForce''.



* EvenEvilHasStandards: Every ''Fire Emblem'' has at least one scene where one of the villains -- and not a sympathetic one -- comments on how even more evil one of his comrades is, and how that's terrible. A good example is how Caellach and Riev view Valter in the Sacred Stones, due to the way he is [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil implied to victimize women]]. Caellach is a [[SociopathicSoldier sociopathic]] ProfessionalKiller who [[spoiler:killed Queen Ismaire]] and Riev is a [[CorruptChurch fallen priest who worships and seeks to resurrect the god of evil]].

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* EvenEvilHasStandards: Every ''Fire Emblem'' has at least one scene where one of the villains -- and not a sympathetic one -- comments on how even more evil one of his comrades is, and how that's terrible. A good example is how Caellach and Riev view Valter in the ''The Sacred Stones, Stones'', due to the way he is [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil implied to victimize women]]. Caellach is a [[SociopathicSoldier sociopathic]] ProfessionalKiller who [[spoiler:killed Queen Ismaire]] and Riev is a [[CorruptChurch fallen priest who worships and seeks to resurrect the god of evil]].



* KingIncognito: Two of note, both of whom happen to have StrongFamilyResemblance to their respective mothers: [[spoiler:Joshua in The Sacred Stones and Soren in the Tellius saga]].

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* KingIncognito: Two of note, both of whom happen to have StrongFamilyResemblance to their respective mothers: [[spoiler:Joshua in The ''The Sacred Stones Stones'' and Soren in the Tellius saga]].



** Virion, Owain, and Inigo from Awakening. Special mention to Owain naming his moves after previous games in the series. RADIANT..... DAAAAAAAWWWN.

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** Virion, Owain, and Inigo from Awakening.''Awakening''. Special mention to Owain naming his moves after previous games in the series. RADIANT..... DAAAAAAAWWWN.



* NonLinearSequel: There are several different universes. However, it's been confirmed that Archanea and Jugdral take place in the same world, and so does Awakening.

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* NonLinearSequel: There are several different universes. However, it's been confirmed that Archanea and Jugdral take place in the same world, and so does Awakening.''Awakening''.



** Grado's generals in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones Sacred Stones]] are each given a gemstone nickname by the emperor when they are promoted to that rank (Moonstone, Blood Beryl, Flourspar, etc).

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** Grado's generals in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones Sacred Stones]] Stones]]'' are each given a gemstone nickname by the emperor when they are promoted to that rank (Moonstone, Blood Beryl, Flourspar, etc).



* SamusIsAGirl: [[spoiler:Marth]] from Awakening.

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* SamusIsAGirl: [[spoiler:Marth]] from Awakening.''Awakening''.



** Became an ArtifactTitle of sorts when Anna is referred to as "The Secret Seller" in Awakening, even though she pops up all over the place in clear sight, but still with rare and valuable items.

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** Became an ArtifactTitle of sorts when Anna is referred to as "The Secret Seller" in Awakening, ''Awakening'', even though she pops up all over the place in clear sight, but still with rare and valuable items.



** Awakening is a weird case. While ''New Mystery'' is far and away the hardest entry in the series thanks to its absurd highest difficulty mode and game mechanics, Awakening's Lunatic Mode+ is potentially the hardest mode in the series, but only because it is a LuckBasedMission. Awakening's Normal and Hard modes are extremely easy, while the Lunatic Mode can be easily trivialized.

to:

** Awakening ''Awakening'' is a weird case. While ''New Mystery'' is far and away the hardest entry in the series thanks to its absurd highest difficulty mode and game mechanics, Awakening's ''Awakening''[='=]s Lunatic Mode+ is potentially the hardest mode in the series, but only because it is a LuckBasedMission. Awakening's ''Awakening''[='=}s Normal and Hard modes are extremely easy, while the Lunatic Mode can be easily trivialized.



** His name is now Seliph according to Awakening.

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** His name is now Seliph according to Awakening.''Awakening''.



** Oddly enough, however, swords are the only weapon type that doesn't have a common throwable version. The rare sword types that do have a ranged option are usually magical. Awakening finally adds a throwable sword in the form of Yen'Fay's signature weapon, dropped by him when defeated and useable by only Myrmidon classes,

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** Oddly enough, however, swords are the only weapon type that doesn't have a common throwable version. The rare sword types that do have a ranged option are usually magical. Awakening ''Awakening'' finally adds a throwable sword in the form of Yen'Fay's signature weapon, dropped by him when defeated and useable by only Myrmidon classes,
10th Apr '16 5:16:45 PM Wuz
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'': The final Super Famicom games in the series were released long after the Super Famicom's successor, the {{Nintendo64}}, had been released worldwide. The N64 would be the only Nintendo home console not to see a ''Fire Emblem'' release, though one had been announced as a fourth game in the Akaneia saga. That game was scrapped, but according to some accounts, its elements were recycled into a game subtitled ''Maiden of Darkness'', which eventually became ''Sword of Seals'' (officially referred to as ''The Binding Blade'' in English material). This game was released in 2002, three years after ''Thracia 776'' in a completely new universe and in portable form on the GameBoyAdvance as two games, ''The Binding Blade'' and later the prequel ''Sword of Flame'', commonly known as ''Blazing Sword'' in the English fandom. It was here that interest in the series among western gamers was sparked, with the other ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' recruit, Roy, starring in ''The Binding Blade''. His popularity lead to the 2003 release of ''Blazing Sword'' internationally (under the title of ''Fire Emblem''), as the first Fire Emblem released outside Asia.
* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones'' (GameBoyAdvance, 2004) took place in a new world, Magvel, and starred the twins Eirika and Ephraim of Renais, as they dealt with the sudden antagonism of their southern neighbor Grado and tried to stop the resurrection of the [[SealedEvilInACan Demon King]]. It serves as something of a SpiritualSuccessor to ''Gaiden'', bringing back some of said game's exclusive mechanics such as a traversable world map and random monster encounters on said map, as well as implementing its own ideas like branching class promotion. It was re-released on the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS as one of the ten GBA games distributed for free as part of the Ambassador Program.
* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius'': With this series, ''Path of Radiance'' on the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube and ''Radiant Dawn'' released on the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}, Fire Emblem made its long-awaited return to home consoles, starting in 2005 with another new universe. Starring Ike, the series first non-noble born main character, ''Path of Radiance'' marked the franchise first attempt at making the VideoGame3DLeap and the first home console game in the series released outside of Japan. Ike would later be the first Fire Emblem character to come to ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' after his game was released stateside, with the release of ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''.
* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'': After the two remakes of Marth's games on the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS, a new ''Fire Emblem'' title for the Nintendo3DS was announced on September 13th 2011. ''Awakening'' (UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS, 2012/2013) stars yet another royal blue haired swordsman named Chrom, set in the same universe as Akaneia and Jugdral but thousands of years in the future. The game brings back the world map system of ''Gaiden'' and ''The Sacred Stones'', reintroduces the skill system along with a graphical style reminiscent of the Tellius games with CGI models for cutscenes and a {{Seinen}} art style for character portraits, with a TwoPointFiveD map and 3D fights. A new feature introduced allows units to join in on allies' attacks or block enemy attacks for one another. The game was released in April of 2012 in Japan, in the United States on February 4th, 2013, and in PAL regions on April 19, 2013. [[/index]]

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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'': The final Super Famicom games in the series were released long after the Super Famicom's successor, the {{Nintendo64}}, UsefulNotes/Nintendo64, had been released worldwide. The N64 would be the only Nintendo home console not to see a ''Fire Emblem'' release, though one had been announced as a fourth game in the Akaneia saga. That game was scrapped, but according to some accounts, its elements were recycled into a game subtitled ''Maiden of Darkness'', which eventually became ''Sword of Seals'' (officially referred to as ''The Binding Blade'' in English material). This game was released in 2002, three years after ''Thracia 776'' in a completely new universe and in portable form on the GameBoyAdvance UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance as two games, ''The Binding Blade'' and later the prequel ''Sword of Flame'', commonly known as ''Blazing Sword'' in the English fandom. It was here that interest in the series among western gamers was sparked, with the other ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' recruit, Roy, starring in ''The Binding Blade''. His popularity lead to the 2003 release of ''Blazing Sword'' internationally (under the title of ''Fire Emblem''), as the first Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' released outside Asia.
* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones'' (GameBoyAdvance, (UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance, 2004) took place in a new world, Magvel, and starred the twins Eirika and Ephraim of Renais, as they dealt with the sudden antagonism of their southern neighbor Grado and tried to stop the resurrection of the [[SealedEvilInACan Demon King]]. It serves as something of a SpiritualSuccessor to ''Gaiden'', bringing back some of said game's exclusive mechanics such as a traversable world map and random monster encounters on said map, as well as implementing its own ideas like branching class promotion. It was re-released on the UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS as one of the ten GBA games distributed for free as part of the Ambassador Program.
* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius'': With this series, ''Path of Radiance'' on the UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube and ''Radiant Dawn'' released on the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}, Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' made its long-awaited return to home consoles, starting in 2005 with another new universe. Starring Ike, the series first non-noble born main character, ''Path of Radiance'' marked the franchise first attempt at making the VideoGame3DLeap and the first home console game in the series released outside of Japan. Ike would later be the first Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' character to come to ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' after his game was released stateside, with the release of ''Super Smash Bros. Brawl''.
* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'': After the two remakes of Marth's games on the UsefulNotes/NintendoDS, a new ''Fire Emblem'' title for the Nintendo3DS UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS was announced on September 13th 2011. ''Awakening'' (UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS, 2012/2013) stars yet another royal blue haired swordsman named Chrom, set in the same universe as Akaneia and Jugdral but thousands of years in the future. The game brings back the world map system of ''Gaiden'' and ''The Sacred Stones'', reintroduces the skill system along with a graphical style reminiscent of the Tellius games with CGI models for cutscenes and a {{Seinen}} art style for character portraits, with a TwoPointFiveD map and 3D fights. A new feature introduced allows units to join in on allies' attacks or block enemy attacks for one another. The game was released in April of 2012 in Japan, in the United States on February 4th, 2013, and in PAL regions on April 19, 2013. [[/index]]



** Tons of them. Once you start playing a game, expect your army to be joined by plenty of enormous {{Badass}}es both male and female, including some beautiful girls who kick tons of ass. Armies and mercenary groups in Fire Emblem are very equal-opportunity as far as gender is concerned, which is quite surprising considering the medieval-fantasy setting the series takes place in.

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** Tons of them. Once you start playing a game, expect your army to be joined by plenty of enormous {{Badass}}es both male and female, including some beautiful girls who kick tons of ass. Armies and mercenary groups in Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' are very equal-opportunity as far as gender is concerned, which is quite surprising considering the medieval-fantasy setting the series takes place in.



* AllThereInTheManual: A crapload of info about ''Fire Emblem 4'''s universe and background story is only revealed and / or told with more details in author's notes and guidebooks, such as the ''Treasure'' book and the now-closed blog of Shouzou Kaga (the creator of the series). The same applies to ''Fire Emblem 1, 3'', and ''Gaiden'' with notably the ''Fire Emblem: The Complete'' book, and Drama [=CDs=].
* AnachronismStew: Happens a lot where fashion is involved in the pseudo-European worlds of Fire Emblem. The biggest offender is Vika, whose outfit looks like it came hot off the runway in modern Milan.

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* AllThereInTheManual: A crapload of info about ''Fire Emblem 4'''s ''Genealogy'''s universe and background story is only revealed and / or told with more details in author's notes and guidebooks, such as the ''Treasure'' book and the now-closed blog of Shouzou Kaga (the creator of the series). The same applies to ''Fire Emblem 1, 3'', and ''Gaiden'' the Akaneia games, with notably the ''Fire Emblem: The Complete'' book, and Drama [=CDs=].
* AnachronismStew: Happens a lot where fashion is involved in the pseudo-European worlds of Fire Emblem.''Fire Emblem''. The biggest offender is Vika, whose outfit looks like it came hot off the runway in modern Milan.



* AnyoneCanDie: With how they treat death, the game was apparently designed with that thought in mind. The player ''can'' avert this, but it becomes irritatingly difficult. The latest games in the series introduce a "Casual" mode that Averts this, but most Fire Emblem fans stuck with "Classic". Most also choose to count any death as a GameOver and reset. However, if any of the main characters or protected die, it's a legit Game Over.

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* AnyoneCanDie: With how they treat death, the game was apparently designed with that thought in mind. The player ''can'' avert this, but it becomes irritatingly difficult. The latest games in the series introduce a "Casual" mode that Averts this, but most Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' fans stuck with "Classic". Most also choose to count any death as a GameOver and reset. However, if any of the main characters or protected die, it's a legit Game Over.



** Mages in ''Path of Radiance'', upon promotion, can learn to use knives instead of staves, if they want. While it sounds theoretically awesome to have a unit that can both use weapons and magic, in practice, it's really useless, because: 1) Physical strength and magic are separate stats. Guess which one knives use, and which one mages barely have anything of! 2) [[SquishyWizard Mages are really squishy]], so they're better off attacking from range anyway. 3) The most practical use for knives, therefore, would be to defeat an enemy with a high magic resistance. In that case, you'd be better off using a physical fighter to begin with. 4) Healing staves in Fire Emblem are BoringButPractical to the max and even grant a mage extra EXP when in use. Trading them off for knives is a very bad deal.

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** Mages in ''Path of Radiance'', upon promotion, can learn to use knives instead of staves, if they want. While it sounds theoretically awesome to have a unit that can both use weapons and magic, in practice, it's really useless, because: 1) Physical strength and magic are separate stats. Guess which one knives use, and which one mages barely have anything of! 2) [[SquishyWizard Mages are really squishy]], so they're better off attacking from range anyway. 3) The most practical use for knives, therefore, would be to defeat an enemy with a high magic resistance. In that case, you'd be better off using a physical fighter to begin with. 4) Healing staves in Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' are BoringButPractical to the max and even grant a mage extra EXP when in use. Trading them off for knives is a very bad deal.



* {{Badass}}: Each Fire Emblem game is basically a WorldOfBadass.

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* {{Badass}}: Each Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' game is basically a WorldOfBadass.



* ClassChangeLevelReset: The method of promotion in the series. After a character reaches a high enough level in their base class and uses a special class changing item (in the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Tellius games]], one only needs to gain a level after reaching [[{{Cap}} level 20]]), that character's level reverts to 1. However, their stats, stat caps, and abilities sharply increase in the process. The exception being [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War]], where you don't reset to level 1 and have a 30 level cap instead of the traditional 20.

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* ClassChangeLevelReset: The method of promotion in the series. After a character reaches a high enough level in their base class and uses a special class changing item (in the [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Tellius games]], one only needs to gain a level after reaching [[{{Cap}} level 20]]), that character's level reverts to 1. However, their stats, stat caps, and abilities sharply increase in the process. The exception being [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War]], War]]'', where you don't reset to level 1 and have a 30 level cap instead of the traditional 20.



** However, while Dark isn't evil, [[EvilIsNotAToy it's still not a toy]]; just look at Bramimond, likely the most powerful heroic darkness user in Fire Emblem history. It practically cost him his soul to master the darkness.

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** However, while Dark isn't evil, [[EvilIsNotAToy it's still not a toy]]; just look at Bramimond, likely the most powerful heroic darkness user in Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' history. It practically cost him his soul to master the darkness.



*** While a walkable world map was re-inserted into the series in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones several]] [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening ways]], ''Gaiden,'' to this day, remains the sole ''Fire Emblem'' game to have players freely roam towns and villages a la ''ShiningForce''.

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*** While a walkable world map was re-inserted into the series in [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones several]] [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening ways]], ''Gaiden,'' to this day, remains the sole ''Fire Emblem'' game to have players freely roam towns and villages a la ''ShiningForce''.''VideoGame/ShiningForce''.



* ElementalCrafting: Typical order is Iron < Steel < Silver in terms of damage output and the reverse for durability, so weapon selection is not as straightfoward as in some other games. Legendary or unique weapons typically have high damage and decent durability. In ''Genealogy of the Holy War'', all weapons had a flat 50 uses, so there was no reason not to switch to silver weapons when available except maybe the cost of keeping them in good repair.

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* ElementalCrafting: Typical order is Iron < Steel < Silver in terms of damage output and the reverse for durability, so weapon selection is not as straightfoward straightforward as in some other games. Legendary or unique weapons typically have high damage and decent durability. In ''Genealogy of the Holy War'', all weapons had a flat 50 uses, so there was no reason not to switch to silver weapons when available except maybe the cost of keeping them in good repair.



* EvenEvilHasStandards: Every Fire Emblem has at least one scene where one of the villains -- and not a sympathetic one -- comments on how even more evil one of his comrades is, and how that's terrible. A good example is how Caellach and Riev view Valter in the Sacred Stones, due to the way he is [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil implied to victimize women]]. Caellach is a [[SociopathicSoldier sociopathic]] ProfessionalKiller who [[spoiler:killed Queen Ismaire]] and Riev is a [[CorruptChurch fallen priest who worships and seeks to resurrect the god of evil]].

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* EvenEvilHasStandards: Every Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' has at least one scene where one of the villains -- and not a sympathetic one -- comments on how even more evil one of his comrades is, and how that's terrible. A good example is how Caellach and Riev view Valter in the Sacred Stones, due to the way he is [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil implied to victimize women]]. Caellach is a [[SociopathicSoldier sociopathic]] ProfessionalKiller who [[spoiler:killed Queen Ismaire]] and Riev is a [[CorruptChurch fallen priest who worships and seeks to resurrect the god of evil]].



** The [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/File:Myunit_f.png female default "My Unit"]] can easily be mistaken for Mia while the [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/File:Myunit2.png male]] [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/File:Myunit_m.png "My Unit"]] looks more than a little like Ike (it gets even closer when you add a headband through an info conversation). They both even share a default class [[note]]Ike's official class is "Ranger" which is the Mercenary class in all but name, right down to the caps.[[/note]]
* ExtraTurn: The [[MagicDance Dancers]] (Fire Emblem 3 onward), Bards (Fire Emblem 6 and 7), and Heron Laguz (Tellius) can give Extra Turns to their allies. There is also Azura the Songstress, [[MagicMusic who can sing]] in ''Fates''.

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** The In ''New Mystery of the Emblem'', the [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/File:Myunit_f.png female default "My Unit"]] can easily be mistaken for Mia while the [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/File:Myunit2.png male]] [[http://fireemblem.wikia.com/wiki/File:Myunit_m.png "My Unit"]] looks more than a little like Ike (it gets even closer when you add a headband through an info conversation). They both even share a default class [[note]]Ike's official class is "Ranger" which is the Mercenary class in all but name, right down to the caps.[[/note]]
* ExtraTurn: The [[MagicDance Dancers]] (Fire Emblem 3 (''Mystery of the Emblem'' onward), Bards (Fire Emblem 6 (''Binding Blade'' and 7), ''Blazing Sword''), and Heron Laguz (Tellius) (Tellius games) can give Extra Turns to their allies. There is also Azura the Songstress, [[MagicMusic who can sing]] in ''Fates''.



** Even earlier than in the Tellius games, the games set in Archanea have the Earth Dragons degenerating and attacking humanity, which leads to them being sealed away. Later on, several dragons became the manaketes, who were apparently mistreated by humans. This led to Medeus and other dragons making a new empire that would attack humanity, with Naga helping the humans through Falchion. Xane and Gotoh both didn't rate humans that highly as well, although Gotoh eventually {{Regained His Faith In Humanity}} while Xane gets along with Marth.

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** Even earlier than in the Tellius games, the games set in Archanea have the Earth Dragons degenerating and attacking humanity, which leads to them being sealed away. Later on, several dragons became the manaketes, who were apparently mistreated by humans. This led to Medeus and other dragons making a new empire that would attack humanity, with Naga helping the humans through Falchion. Xane and Gotoh both didn't rate humans that highly as well, although Gotoh eventually {{Regained His Faith In Humanity}} [[RestoredMyFaithInHumanity regained his faith in humanity]] while Xane gets along with Marth.



* HeroOfAnotherStory: Fire Emblem 4 is particularly susceptible to this, given the epic nature of the storyline and cast. Examples include Eltshan and Leif (who actually gets to BE the hero of his "other story" in Fire Emblem 5.)

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* HeroOfAnotherStory: Fire Emblem 4 ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' is particularly susceptible to this, given the epic nature of the storyline and cast. Examples include Eltshan and Leif (who actually gets to BE the hero of his "other story" in Fire Emblem 5.''Thracia 776''.)



* HolyHandGrenade: All of the Fire Emblem games except ''Awakening'' feature offensive Light-based magic, and even ''Awakening'' features, among the legendary weapons from previous games in the series, the Book of Naga from VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral.

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* HolyHandGrenade: All of the Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' games except ''Awakening'' feature offensive Light-based magic, and even ''Awakening'' features, among the legendary weapons from previous games in the series, the Book of Naga from VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral.[[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Jugdral]].



* JigsawPuzzlePlot: VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral and VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius play this trope at its best. Both have rather rich worlds, developed characters, and complex story lines with mysteries that are delivered little by little.

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* JigsawPuzzlePlot: VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral The [[VideoGame/FireEmblemJugdral Jugdral]] and VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Tellius]] games play this trope at its best. Both have rather rich worlds, developed characters, and complex story lines with mysteries that are delivered little by little.



** Also happened within the series. Later installments of Fire Emblem regularly took up features and game elements again that had been absent from the franchise since a certain earlier game. The 8th game can be stated pretty surely to be this for the 2nd game. The 9th and 10th game bring back game elements from the fourth game.

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** Also happened within the series. Later installments of Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' regularly took up features and game elements again that had been absent from the franchise since a certain earlier game. The 8th game can be stated pretty surely to be this for the 2nd game. The 9th and 10th game bring back game elements from the fourth game.
9th Apr '16 10:18:30 PM henrymidfields
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Added DiffLines:

** This is averted in critical percentage and is the reason with the rage against critical hits. Unlike the "roll twice, take average" of hits, the numbers shown for critical activation are actually those numbers as percentages. Thus a 10% critical rate activates more often than a "10%" hit rate, which is actually more like 1-2%.
9th Apr '16 8:52:21 PM Wuz
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* YouALLLookFamiliar: All generic enemies look the same. [[JustifiedTrope Justified -- sort of]] -- that nine times out of ten, you're fighting an opposing ''army'' and your enemies are uniformed soldiers. However, if there's an enemy unit that both has a name and isn't a boss, there's a very good chance they can be convinced to defect.

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* YouALLLookFamiliar: YouAllLookFamiliar:
**
All generic enemies look the same. [[JustifiedTrope Justified -- sort of]] -- that nine times out of ten, you're fighting an opposing ''army'' and your enemies are uniformed soldiers. However, if there's an enemy unit that both has a name and isn't a boss, there's a very good chance they can be convinced to defect.defect.
** In ''Blazing Sword'', some of the characters share mug sprites. For example, Puzon, who is the boss in the level where you meet Merlinus, was apparently killed by Rath in an earlier chapter. And Rebecca's father can be found in a variety of locales. And Marquess Araphen seems to have gotten a dye-job and joined the Black Fang in the intervening year.
** The earlier games used shared mugs as well ([=FE4=]'s "Harolds" are a popular example), but the Famicom games are ridiculous with this: each game has maybe 3 or 4 mugs that are reused for all the oneshot bosses, and even for some of the plot-important ones (like Jiol in the first game, and Dozah and Judah in ''Gaiden''.)
** In ''Awakening'', the bosses of certain side missions reuse portraits from the main story. In fact, the only enemy portraits that aren't used anywhere else are those of the Valmese generals.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.FireEmblem