History VideoGame / FireEmblem

20th Jan '17 9:25:07 AM Silverblade2
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* [[DivergentCharacterEvolution Divergent Class Evolution]]: {{Dragon Rider}}s and Pegasus Knights were essentially the same class in most games, using the same weapons and having the same vulnerability to Bows and (where applicable) Wind Magic. The former had more Strength and Defense, and the latter had more Speed and Resistance. ''Radiant Dawn'' switched the Dragon Knights' Lances for Axes, and switched their Bow[=/=]Wind vulnerability for a vulnerability to Thunder magic.

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* [[DivergentCharacterEvolution Divergent Class Evolution]]: DivergentCharacterEvolution: {{Dragon Rider}}s and Pegasus Knights were essentially the same class in most games, using the same weapons and having the same vulnerability to Bows and (where applicable) Wind Magic. The former had more Strength and Defense, and the latter had more Speed and Resistance. ''Radiant Dawn'' switched the Dragon Knights' Lances for Axes, and switched their Bow[=/=]Wind vulnerability for a vulnerability to Thunder magic.



* [[PrecisionFStrike Precision D Strike]]: In the NA localizations, The word "damn" is reserved for the worst moments (e.g. main character dying).

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* [[PrecisionFStrike Precision D Strike]]: PrecisionFStrike: In the NA localizations, The word "damn" is reserved for the worst moments (e.g. main character dying).
19th Jan '17 5:47:58 PM Strife89
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The series was originally a Japan-exclusive series with no western releases that started in 1990 with its first releases on the [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]] with later games landing on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]]. It wasn't until 2001, just before the release of the 6th game on the GameBoyAdvance that two characters from the series, Marth and Roy, [[MarthDebutedInSmashBros appeared as unlockable fighters]] in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'', introducing the series as a whole to western gamers. They proved to be very popular characters among the English fanbase, garnering enough interest in the franchise to warrant the international release of the next game; all subsequent games in the series have been released worldwide, save for the twelfth title. Incidentally, Marth and Roy were originally only supposed to be in the Japanese version, included to promote the upcoming release of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade]]''; the intent was for the localization team to [[DummiedOut dummy them out]] in the translation process as they would theoretically hold no interest to international gamers.

to:

The series was series, originally a Japan-exclusive series with no western releases that releases, started in 1990 1990, with its first releases on the [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]] with Famicom]], and later games landing on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]]. It wasn't until 2001, just before the release of the 6th game on the GameBoyAdvance GameBoyAdvance, that two characters from the series, Marth and Roy, [[MarthDebutedInSmashBros appeared as unlockable fighters]] in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'', introducing the series as a whole to western gamers. They proved to be very popular characters among the English fanbase, garnering enough interest in the franchise to warrant the international release of the next game; all subsequent games in the series have been released worldwide, save for the twelfth title. Incidentally, Marth and Roy were originally only supposed to be in the Japanese version, included to promote the upcoming release of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade]]''; the intent was for the localization team to [[DummiedOut dummy them out]] in the translation process as they would theoretically hold no interest to international gamers.
19th Jan '17 2:39:23 PM Kayube
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'': The final Super Famicom games in the series were released long after the Super Famicom's successor, the UsefulNotes/Nintendo64, had been released worldwide. The N64 would be the only Nintendo home console not to see a ''Fire Emblem'' release, though one had been announced as a fourth game in the Akaneia saga. That game was scrapped, but according to some accounts, its elements were recycled into a game subtitled ''Maiden of Darkness'', which eventually became ''Sword of Seals'' (officially referred to as ''The Binding Blade'' in English material). This game was released in 2002, three years after ''Thracia 776'' in a completely new universe and in portable form on the UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance as two games, ''The Binding Blade'' and later the prequel ''Sword of Flame'', commonly known as ''Blazing Sword'' in the English fandom. It was here that interest in the series among western gamers was sparked, with the other ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' recruit, Roy, starring in ''The Binding Blade''. His popularity lead to the 2003 release of ''Blazing Sword'' internationally (under the title of ''Fire Emblem''), as the first ''Fire Emblem'' released outside Asia.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'': The final Super Famicom games in the series were released long after the Super Famicom's successor, the UsefulNotes/Nintendo64, had been released worldwide. The N64 would be the only Nintendo home console not to see a ''Fire Emblem'' release, though one had been announced as a fourth game in the Akaneia saga. That game was scrapped, but according to some accounts, its elements were recycled into a game subtitled ''Maiden of Darkness'', which eventually became ''Sword of Seals'' (officially referred to as ''The Binding Blade'' in English material). This game was released in 2002, three years after ''Thracia 776'' in a completely new universe and in portable form on the UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance as two games, ''The Binding Blade'' and later the prequel ''Sword of Flame'', commonly known as ''Blazing Sword'' in the English fandom.''The Blazing Blade''. It was here that interest in the series among western gamers was sparked, with the other ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' recruit, Roy, starring in ''The Binding Blade''. His popularity lead to the 2003 release of ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' internationally (under the title of ''Fire Emblem''), as the first ''Fire Emblem'' released outside Asia.



** In ''Blazing Sword'', you play as Lyn for the first 10 chapters, then switch to Eliwood for the rest of the game.

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** In ''Blazing Sword'', ''The Blazing Blade'', you play as Lyn for the first 10 chapters, then switch to Eliwood for the rest of the game.



** Nino from ''Blazing Sword'' is definitely this, though with magic instead of swords and steel.

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** Nino from ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' is definitely this, though with magic instead of swords and steel.



* CallForward: Plenty of them exist in ''Shadow Dragon'' and ''Blazing Sword''. Often, neither of them make sense to non-Japanese players, as the games to which they call forward [[NoExportForYou never got released outside of Japan]].

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* CallForward: Plenty of them exist in ''Shadow Dragon'' and ''Blazing Sword''.''The Blazing Blade''. Often, neither of them make sense to non-Japanese players, as the games to which they call forward [[NoExportForYou never got released outside of Japan]].



* CaptainObvious: In ''Blazing Sword'', you can pay a fortune teller to give you mission-specific advice. It's almost always along the lines of "Bring lots of lances. Swords and axes are good, too. You want magic and healing, so bring casters. You know what? Just bring everything you can. Use the forest for cover. Talk to green units and visit villages and stuff. Don't die." However, occasionally the fortune-teller will mention a particular unit -- this means you need that unit to recruit another unit.

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* CaptainObvious: In ''Blazing Sword'', ''The Blazing Blade'', you can pay a fortune teller to give you mission-specific advice. It's almost always along the lines of "Bring lots of lances. Swords and axes are good, too. You want magic and healing, so bring casters. You know what? Just bring everything you can. Use the forest for cover. Talk to green units and visit villages and stuff. Don't die." However, occasionally the fortune-teller will mention a particular unit -- this means you need that unit to recruit another unit.



* DragonRider: A group of character classes; initially renamed "Wyvern Riders" when the games started being translated, probably to prevent FridgeLogic regarding how the main point of ''Blazing Sword'' was to prevent dragons from returning to the world; from ''Radiant Dawn'' onward, they reverted to being called dragons. The Japanese version is also inconsistent on this; in the Archanea games and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]]'', they are wyverns (here a degenerate dragon subspecies). ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones'' is thus far the only game in which both types of Dragon mounts appear together (as separate but related classes).

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* DragonRider: A group of character classes; initially renamed "Wyvern Riders" when the games started being translated, probably to prevent FridgeLogic regarding how the main point of ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' was to prevent dragons from returning to the world; from ''Radiant Dawn'' onward, they reverted to being called dragons. The Japanese version is also inconsistent on this; in the Archanea games and ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Awakening]]'', they are wyverns (here a degenerate dragon subspecies). ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheSacredStones'' is thus far the only game in which both types of Dragon mounts appear together (as separate but related classes).



** For ''Binding Blade'', there's [[spoiler:Karel]], although you can only get him if you managed to get all the requirements for the true ending; for ''Blazing Sword'', there's [[spoiler:Athos]].

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** For ''Binding Blade'', there's [[spoiler:Karel]], although you can only get him if you managed to get all the requirements for the true ending; for ''Blazing Sword'', ''The Blazing Blade'', there's [[spoiler:Athos]].



** The Holy Weapons in all of the GBA games; you get all of them in ''The Binding Blade'', but only four, plus a unique sword for Lyn, are available in ''Blazing Sword''. Finally, in ''The Sacred Stones'', there is one Holy tome for each school of magic, two swords, two lances, an axe, a bow, ''and'' an all-healing staff on top of that. The Elibe weapons can fight off dragons (and are the only things aside from [[GameBreaker Luna]] capable of significantly damaging the Fire Dragon in ''Blazing Sword''), while ''The Sacred Stones'' weapons can kill monsters, the undead, [[spoiler:and the FinalBoss]] in one to two hits.

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** The Holy Weapons in all of the GBA games; you get all of them in ''The Binding Blade'', but only four, plus a unique sword for Lyn, are available in ''Blazing Sword''.''The Blazing Blade''. Finally, in ''The Sacred Stones'', there is one Holy tome for each school of magic, two swords, two lances, an axe, a bow, ''and'' an all-healing staff on top of that. The Elibe weapons can fight off dragons (and are the only things aside from [[GameBreaker Luna]] capable of significantly damaging the Fire Dragon in ''Blazing Sword''), ''The Blazing Blade''), while ''The Sacred Stones'' weapons can kill monsters, the undead, [[spoiler:and the FinalBoss]] in one to two hits.



* ExtraTurn: The [[MagicDance Dancers]] (''Mystery of the Emblem'' onward), Bards (''Binding Blade'' and ''Blazing Sword''), and Heron Laguz (Tellius games) can give Extra Turns to their allies. There is also Azura the Songstress, [[MagicMusic who can sing]] in ''Fates''.

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* ExtraTurn: The [[MagicDance Dancers]] (''Mystery of the Emblem'' onward), Bards (''Binding Blade'' and ''Blazing Sword''), ''The Blazing Blade''), and Heron Laguz (Tellius games) can give Extra Turns to their allies. There is also Azura the Songstress, [[MagicMusic who can sing]] in ''Fates''.



** There's also the Sacaens in ''Blazing Sword'', which are referred to as "nomadic mongrels" and such by the villains.

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** There's also the Sacaens in ''Blazing Sword'', ''The Blazing Blade'', which are referred to as "nomadic mongrels" and such by the villains.



** ''Blazing Sword'' didn't enforce permadeath during Lyn's Story -- defeated units retreated and were unusable for the rest of the story, but they still could be recruited in the main campaign. This was repeated in ''Fates'' for chapters before the route split.

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** ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' didn't enforce permadeath during Lyn's Story -- defeated units retreated and were unusable for the rest of the story, but they still could be recruited in the main campaign. This was repeated in ''Fates'' for chapters before the route split.



* ForcedTutorial: ''Blazing Sword'' has Lyn's story. It's only forced on Normal mode, though.

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* ForcedTutorial: ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' has Lyn's story. It's only forced on Normal mode, though.



* LuckBasedMission: Battle Before Dawn in ''Blazing Sword'' gives no guarantee that you'll reach Jaffar in time to keep him alive in Hector's Hard Mode. If he dies, you don't get a side chapter.

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* LuckBasedMission: Battle Before Dawn in ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' gives no guarantee that you'll reach Jaffar in time to keep him alive in Hector's Hard Mode. If he dies, you don't get a side chapter.



** ''Blazing Sword'': Arena battle theme is a remix of the player battle theme from [=FE5=].

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** ''Blazing Sword'': ''The Blazing Blade'': Arena battle theme is a remix of the player battle theme from [=FE5=].



* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In ''Blazing Sword'', if you get the best Tactician rating, the game says that you "changed the course of history" and that "Bern and Etruria (the countries fighting in ''Binding Blade'') so desired this skilled mind that they went to war". Granted, they still go to war if you do poorly, but...

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* NiceJobBreakingItHero: In ''Blazing Sword'', ''The Blazing Blade'', if you get the best Tactician rating, the game says that you "changed the course of history" and that "Bern and Etruria (the countries fighting in ''Binding Blade'') so desired this skilled mind that they went to war". Granted, they still go to war if you do poorly, but...



* NostalgiaLevel: Chapter 14 (with 1-10 being a tutorial) of ''Blazing Sword'' is in the same place and identical to Chapter 4 of ''Binding Blade,'' with the same character as the boss. Hector Chapter 25 of ''Blazing Sword'' has an objective to capture every castle, mirroring the objective of every chapter from the 4th game.

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* NostalgiaLevel: Chapter 14 (with 1-10 being a tutorial) of ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' is in the same place and identical to Chapter 4 of ''Binding Blade,'' with the same character as the boss. Hector Chapter 25 of ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' has an objective to capture every castle, mirroring the objective of every chapter from the 4th game.



** There are a lot of these parallels in areas between Blazing Sword and Binding Blade, especially near the end.

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** There are a lot of these parallels in areas between The Blazing Sword Blade and Binding Blade, especially near the end.



* OneSteveLimit: A few exceptions exist, like Aran from ''Radiant Dawn'' and Arran from ''Shadow Dragon'', but the first was named Brad in the Japanese version. A legitimate exception is Lynn from ''Genealogy of Holy War'' and Lyn(dis) from ''The Blazing Sword'' as well as Linde/Linda from Archanea and Linda from ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' (recurring NPC Jake will comment on how Jugdral!Linda's name is familiar).

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* OneSteveLimit: A few exceptions exist, like Aran from ''Radiant Dawn'' and Arran from ''Shadow Dragon'', but the first was named Brad in the Japanese version. A legitimate exception is Lynn from ''Genealogy of Holy War'' and Lyn(dis) from ''The Blazing Sword'' Blade'' as well as Linde/Linda from Archanea and Linda from ''Genealogy of the Holy War'' (recurring NPC Jake will comment on how Jugdral!Linda's name is familiar).



* PersonalityBloodTypes: The Japanese version of ''The Blazing Sword'' allows you to ''choose''' the blood type of Mark, the player character. To absolutely no effect.

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* PersonalityBloodTypes: The Japanese version of ''The Blazing Sword'' Blade'' allows you to ''choose''' the blood type of Mark, the player character. To absolutely no effect.



* PlotlineDeath: [[spoiler:Lorenz in ''Mystery of The Emblem'''s Book 2, Sigurd and almost all of his army halfway through ''Genealogy of Holy War''; Hector near the beginning of ''Binding Blade'', Leila roughly halfway through ''Blazing Sword'' and Ninian towards the end; Greil and Rajaion in ''Path of Radiance''; Pelleas in ''Radiant Dawn'' under most circumstances; your [[SomeoneHasToDie decoy]] in ''Shadow Dragon'']].

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* PlotlineDeath: [[spoiler:Lorenz in ''Mystery of The Emblem'''s Book 2, Sigurd and almost all of his army halfway through ''Genealogy of Holy War''; Hector near the beginning of ''Binding Blade'', Leila roughly halfway through ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' and Ninian towards the end; Greil and Rajaion in ''Path of Radiance''; Pelleas in ''Radiant Dawn'' under most circumstances; your [[SomeoneHasToDie decoy]] in ''Shadow Dragon'']].



** In ''The Blazing Sword'', the player is given both the magic general of all of Etruria (the most magically proficient country in the world) and an illiterate fourteen-year-old girl you recruit from the bad guys. The girl has the potential to be one of the best magic users in the game (it is debatable if she has enough time to realize that potential, though).

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** In ''The Blazing Sword'', Blade'', the player is given both the magic general of all of Etruria (the most magically proficient country in the world) and an illiterate fourteen-year-old girl you recruit from the bad guys. The girl has the potential to be one of the best magic users in the game (it is debatable if she has enough time to realize that potential, though).



* RedBaron: Nearly everyone has a nickname, from Karel "The Sword Demon" to most of the bosses you face; in particular, in ''Blazing Sword'', any Black Fang worth his/her salt has a nickname, from Jaffar, "Angel of Death" to Lloyd the "White Wolf". Even the weaker members get their own nicknames, like Teodor the [[strike:Shrike]] Shadow Hawk, that they prefer to go by rather than their real names.

to:

* RedBaron: Nearly everyone has a nickname, from Karel "The Sword Demon" to most of the bosses you face; in particular, in ''Blazing Sword'', ''The Blazing Blade'', any Black Fang worth his/her salt has a nickname, from Jaffar, "Angel of Death" to Lloyd the "White Wolf". Even the weaker members get their own nicknames, like Teodor the [[strike:Shrike]] Shadow Hawk, that they prefer to go by rather than their real names.



** Also, in ''The Blazing Sword'', a good half of the dialogue between Eliwood and Ninian consists of them saying each other's name.

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** Also, in ''The Blazing Sword'', Blade'', a good half of the dialogue between Eliwood and Ninian consists of them saying each other's name.



* SequelDifficultyDrop: The series has been relatively easy until ''Thracia 776'', which is followed by ''Sword of Seals'' which has a rather absurd Hard Mode. ''Blazing Sword'' is considerably easier than ''Sword of Seals'' and ''Sacred Stones'' is even easier. It goes up from there.

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* SequelDifficultyDrop: The series has been relatively easy until ''Thracia 776'', which is followed by ''Sword of Seals'' ''The Binding Blade'' which has a rather absurd Hard Mode. ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' is considerably easier than ''Sword of Seals'' ''The Binding Blade'' and ''Sacred Stones'' is even easier. It goes up from there.



* SpannerInTheWorks: Kishuna in the first chapter he appears in ''Blazing Sword''. The boss of that chapter (who, incidentally, comes off as a [[TheChessmaster chessmaster]]-type character, what with remarks like "battle is an equation") has long-range magic that will do some nasty damage to your non-magic party members... had the aforementioned Magic Seal not made his conveniently-timed unexpected appearance.

to:

* SpannerInTheWorks: Kishuna in the first chapter he appears in ''Blazing Sword''.''The Blazing Blade''. The boss of that chapter (who, incidentally, comes off as a [[TheChessmaster chessmaster]]-type character, what with remarks like "battle is an equation") has long-range magic that will do some nasty damage to your non-magic party members... had the aforementioned Magic Seal not made his conveniently-timed unexpected appearance.



** The European version of ''Blazing Sword'' can't seem to decide whether it's Ostia or Ositia; Laus or Lahus; Bern or Biran. The world map tends to use the former name, while the rest of the dialogue uses the latter.
** A strange case is Seliph, the second protagonist of ''Seisen no Keifu''. He's near-universally referred to as "Celice" by the fandom, but in their summary of the history of the franchise on their ''Blazing Sword'' website, [[Creator/{{Nintendo}} Nintendo of America]] calls him "Serlis". It's possible this was done to differentiate him from Celica, protagonist of ''Gaiden'' who was mentioned several paragraphs before, but...

to:

** The European version of ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' can't seem to decide whether it's Ostia or Ositia; Laus or Lahus; Bern or Biran. The world map tends to use the former name, while the rest of the dialogue uses the latter.
** A strange case is Seliph, the second protagonist of ''Seisen no Keifu''. He's near-universally referred to as "Celice" by the fandom, but in their summary of the history of the franchise on their ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' website, [[Creator/{{Nintendo}} Nintendo of America]] calls him "Serlis". It's possible this was done to differentiate him from Celica, protagonist of ''Gaiden'' who was mentioned several paragraphs before, but...



* TheStrategist: The player character in ''The Blazing Sword''.

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* TheStrategist: The player character in ''The Blazing Sword''.Blade''.



** Jasmine and Paul in ''Blazing Sword''

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** Jasmine and Paul in ''Blazing Sword''''The Blazing Blade''



** Traditionally, they also have a RedOniBlueOni dynamic, with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin red being red]] and [[GreenIsBlue green being blue]]; furthermore, the red one usually has higher strength and defense while the green has higher speed and skill. ''Blazing Sword'' inverts this fully, while ''Sacred Stones'' returns the personalities to their original colors but keeps the statistical inversion.

to:

** Traditionally, they also have a RedOniBlueOni dynamic, with [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin red being red]] and [[GreenIsBlue green being blue]]; furthermore, the red one usually has higher strength and defense while the green has higher speed and skill. ''Blazing Sword'' ''The Blazing Blade'' inverts this fully, while ''Sacred Stones'' returns the personalities to their original colors but keeps the statistical inversion.



** The Dragon's Gate in ''Blazing Sword.''

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** The Dragon's Gate in ''Blazing Sword.''The Blazing Blade.''



* TheWisePrince: Sigurd in ''Genealogy of Holy War'', Eliwood in ''The Blazing Sword'', Elincia in ''Path of Radiance'', and Pelleas in ''Radiant Dawn''.

to:

* TheWisePrince: Sigurd in ''Genealogy of Holy War'', Eliwood in ''The Blazing Sword'', Blade'', Elincia in ''Path of Radiance'', and Pelleas in ''Radiant Dawn''.



** In ''Blazing Sword'', some of the characters share mug sprites. For example, Puzon, who is the boss in the level where you meet Merlinus, was apparently killed by Rath in an earlier chapter. And Rebecca's father can be found in a variety of locales. And Marquess Araphen seems to have gotten a dye-job and joined the Black Fang in the intervening year.

to:

** In ''Blazing Sword'', ''The Blazing Blade'', some of the characters share mug sprites. For example, Puzon, who is the boss in the level where you meet Merlinus, was apparently killed by Rath in an earlier chapter. And Rebecca's father can be found in a variety of locales. And Marquess Araphen seems to have gotten a dye-job and joined the Black Fang in the intervening year.
19th Jan '17 9:31:19 AM GoldenDarkness
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The series was originally a Japan-exclusive series with no western releases that started in 1990 with its first releases on the [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]] with later games landing on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]]. It wasn't until 2001, just before the release of the 6th game on the GameBoyAdvance that two characters from the series, Marth and Roy, [[MarthDebutedInSmashBros appeared as unlockable fighters]] in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'', introducing the series as a whole to western gamers. They proved to be very popular characters among the English fanbase, garnering enough interest in the franchise to warrant the international release of the next game; all subsequent games in the series have been released worldwide, save for the twelfth title. Incidentally, Marth and Roy were originally only supposed to be in the Japanese version, included to promote the upcoming release of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade]]''; the intent was for the localization team to [[DummiedOut dummy them out]] in the translation process as they would theoretically hold no interest to international games.

to:

The series was originally a Japan-exclusive series with no western releases that started in 1990 with its first releases on the [[NintendoEntertainmentSystem Famicom]] with later games landing on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super Famicom]]. It wasn't until 2001, just before the release of the 6th game on the GameBoyAdvance that two characters from the series, Marth and Roy, [[MarthDebutedInSmashBros appeared as unlockable fighters]] in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'', introducing the series as a whole to western gamers. They proved to be very popular characters among the English fanbase, garnering enough interest in the franchise to warrant the international release of the next game; all subsequent games in the series have been released worldwide, save for the twelfth title. Incidentally, Marth and Roy were originally only supposed to be in the Japanese version, included to promote the upcoming release of ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Fire Emblem: The Binding Blade]]''; the intent was for the localization team to [[DummiedOut dummy them out]] in the translation process as they would theoretically hold no interest to international games.
gamers.
18th Jan '17 2:55:30 PM OldBen
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* ''Fire Emblem Heroes'': A smartphone title releasing in early 2017.

to:

* ''Fire Emblem Heroes'': A smartphone title releasing in early on February 2nd, 2017.
18th Jan '17 2:24:38 PM OldBen
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* ''Fire Emblem Heroes'' A smartphone title releasing in early 2017.
* ''Fire Emblem Warriors'': An upcoming {{crossover}} of the series with Creator/{{Koei}}'s ''[[VideoGame/DynastyWarriors Warriors]]'' franchise, scheduled for release in Fall 2017 on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS.

to:

* ''Fire Emblem Heroes'' Heroes'': A smartphone title releasing in early 2017.
* ''Fire Emblem Warriors'': An upcoming {{crossover}} of the series with Creator/{{Koei}}'s ''[[VideoGame/DynastyWarriors Warriors]]'' franchise, scheduled for release in Fall 2017 on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS.[[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS New Nintendo 3DS]].
18th Jan '17 2:23:21 PM OldBen
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* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''[[note]]The name of the country was translated as "Akaneia" in Europe, but "Archanea" in North America.[[/note]]: The original series of games, starring Marth in the first and third games[[note]]which originally contained a remake of the first as a prologue[[/note]], and is by far the most prolific of the timelines, encompassing the first three games in the series along with the eleventh and twelfth (since they were remakes of the first and third). The second game, ''Gaiden'' [[note]]The only one of the original 3 games to not feature Marth's story[[/note]] is notable for the many gameplay mechanics differences it has had from the original game and most of the series installments aside from a few notable SpiritualSuccessor games. ''Awakening'' also takes place in this timeline, but thousands of years in the future.

to:

* ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''[[note]]The name of the country was translated as "Akaneia" in Europe, but "Archanea" in North America.[[/note]]: The original series of games, starring Marth in the first and third games[[note]]which originally contained a remake of the first as a prologue[[/note]], and is by far the most prolific of the timelines, encompassing the first three games in the series along with the eleventh and eleventh, twelfth (since they were remakes of and upcoming fifteenth (remakes of, respectively, the first first, third and third).second). The second game, ''Gaiden'' [[note]]The only one of the original 3 games to not feature Marth's story[[/note]] is notable for the many gameplay mechanics differences it has had from the original game and most of the series installments aside from a few notable SpiritualSuccessor games. ''Awakening'' also takes place in this timeline, but thousands of years in the future.



* ''Fire Emblem'' (working title): A smartphone title releasing in early 2017.
* ''Fire Emblem Warriors'': An upcoming {{crossover}} of the series with Creator/{{Koei}}'s ''[[VideoGame/DynastyWarriors Warriors]]'' franchise, scheduled for release in late 2017 on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch.

to:

* ''Fire Emblem'' (working title): Emblem Heroes'' A smartphone title releasing in early 2017.
* ''Fire Emblem Warriors'': An upcoming {{crossover}} of the series with Creator/{{Koei}}'s ''[[VideoGame/DynastyWarriors Warriors]]'' franchise, scheduled for release in late Fall 2017 on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch.UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch and UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS.
* A currently unnamed title releasing on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch in 2018.
17th Jan '17 10:52:59 AM eroock
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->''Together we fight, together we live.''

to:

->''Together ->''"Together we fight, together we live.''
"''
12th Jan '17 8:52:05 PM OldBen
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* ''Fire Emblem Warriors'': An upcoming {{crossover}} of the series with Creator/{{Koei}}'s ''[[VideoGame/DynastyWarriors Warriors]]'' franchise, scheduled for release in late 2017 on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch,

to:

* ''Fire Emblem Warriors'': An upcoming {{crossover}} of the series with Creator/{{Koei}}'s ''[[VideoGame/DynastyWarriors Warriors]]'' franchise, scheduled for release in late 2017 on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch, UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch.
12th Jan '17 8:51:43 PM OldBen
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* ''Fire Emblem'' (working title): A smartphone title releasing in fall 2016.

to:

* ''Fire Emblem'' (working title): A smartphone title releasing in fall 2016.early 2017.
* ''Fire Emblem Warriors'': An upcoming {{crossover}} of the series with Creator/{{Koei}}'s ''[[VideoGame/DynastyWarriors Warriors]]'' franchise, scheduled for release in late 2017 on UsefulNotes/NintendoSwitch,
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