History VideoGame / FinalFantasyII

13th May '16 3:50:40 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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This game is where many FF staples began: Chocobos, Dragoons, the recurring character named Cid and his ubiquitous airship[[labelnote:*]]Although this was {{Retcon}}ned in the re-release of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'', where he is mentioned as the creator of that game's airship and is involved in the game's lore.[[/labelnote]], and the NonlinearSequel concept. It also got remade on the UsefulNotes/WonderSwan, Playstation, Game Boy Advance, PSP, and iPhone..

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This game is where many FF staples began: Chocobos, Dragoons, the recurring character named Cid and his ubiquitous airship[[labelnote:*]]Although this was {{Retcon}}ned in the re-release of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'', where he is mentioned as the creator of that game's airship and is involved in the game's lore.[[/labelnote]], and the NonlinearSequel concept. It also got remade on the UsefulNotes/WonderSwan, Playstation, Game Boy Advance, UsefulNotes/Playstation, UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance, PSP, and iPhone..



* EvilLaugh: Minor villain Borghen has one, though for some reason in the GameBoyAdvance and {{PlayStation Portable}} [[VideoGameRemake remakes]] it sounds like the gobbling of a male turkey (odd, considering what was pulled off with Kefka in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' on older hardware).

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* EvilLaugh: Minor villain Borghen has one, though for some reason in the GameBoyAdvance UsefulNotes/GameBoyAdvance and {{PlayStation Portable}} UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable [[VideoGameRemake remakes]] it sounds like the gobbling of a male turkey (odd, considering what was pulled off with Kefka in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVI'' on older hardware).
10th May '16 7:48:06 AM MissesJinx
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10th May '16 7:44:30 AM MissesJinx
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What makes [=FFII=] stand out from the rest of the series is its "learn by doing" experience system more commonly associated with the ''VideoGame/{{SaGa}}'' series (also developed by Akitoshi Kawazu, the brains behind Square's more open-ended [=JRPGs=]) and ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' , also known as StatGrinding: a character that cast magic a lot increased their magical abilities, a character that got hit a lot increased their hit points and defense, et cetera. In theory, this gave players total control over the party's makeup; In actual practice, the most efficient way to grind was to ignore the monsters and ''club your own characters on the head.''[[hottip:*:(At least until the remakes balanced the way you earned certain stats).]] This, combined with recycled sprites and textures from the previous title, have lent [=FFII=] a reputation similar to ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'' and other {{mission pack sequel}}s.

Despite the frustrating nature of the above -- especially in the original releases -- this game is where many FF staples began: Chocobos, Dragoons, the recurring character named Cid and his ubiquitous airship[[labelnote:*]]Although this was {{Retcon}}ned in the re-release of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'', where he is mentioned as the creator of that game's airship and is involved in the game's lore.[[/labelnote]], and the NonlinearSequel concept. It also got remade on the UsefulNotes/WonderSwan, Playstation, Game Boy Advance, PSP, and iPhone, later versions also tweaking the stat system to make it more manageable.

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What makes [=FFII=] stand out from the rest of the series is its "learn by doing" experience system more commonly associated with the ''VideoGame/{{SaGa}}'' series (also developed by Akitoshi Kawazu, the brains behind Square's more open-ended [=JRPGs=]) and ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' , also known as StatGrinding: a character that cast magic a lot increased their magical abilities, a character that got hit a lot increased their hit points and defense, et cetera. In theory, this gave This allowed players total control over the party's makeup; In actual practice, the most efficient way to grind was to ignore the monsters and ''club your own develop characters on however they desired, and the head.''[[hottip:*:(At least until the remakes balanced the way you earned certain stats).]] This, combined mechanics (along with recycled sprites and textures from the previous title, have lent [=FFII=] a reputation similar to ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'' and other {{mission pack sequel}}s.

Despite the frustrating nature of the above -- especially
several [[GoodBadBugs exploits]], though some still exist) were refined in the original releases -- this remakes.

This
game is where many FF staples began: Chocobos, Dragoons, the recurring character named Cid and his ubiquitous airship[[labelnote:*]]Although this was {{Retcon}}ned in the re-release of ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyI'', where he is mentioned as the creator of that game's airship and is involved in the game's lore.[[/labelnote]], and the NonlinearSequel concept. It also got remade on the UsefulNotes/WonderSwan, Playstation, Game Boy Advance, PSP, and iPhone, later versions also tweaking the stat system to make it more manageable.
iPhone..



* AbsurdlyHighLevelCap: Weapon and Spell proficiencies max at Level 16. Unless you do a lot of level grinding for the PSP {{Bonus Dungeon}}s, odds are by the end of the game most of your skills will be no higher than level 10, ''if'' you spam them relentlessly the entire game. Of course, the only spells you ''need'' to buff to 16 are Aura (a buff spell with stacking abilities for every level) and Ultima (which uses the levels of all equipped spells-including itself-for attack power), as most spells are quite formidable by level 10.
** The ''Dawn of Souls'' remake has made leveling spells even more of a chore by fixing the [[GoodBadBug bug that allowed players to level up spells by just giving the okay command then canceling it repeatedly]] and making it so that offensive magic will only level up according to the strength of the monsters they are used on relative to the spell's current level. It sounds reasonable, but in practice it means that leveling up attack spells past level 10 is extremely time-consuming even against monsters in the penultimate dungeon.

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* AbsurdlyHighLevelCap: Weapon and Spell proficiencies max at Level 16. Unless you do a lot of level grinding for the PSP {{Bonus Dungeon}}s, odds Odds are by the end of the game game, most of your skills will be no higher than level 10, ''if'' you spam them relentlessly the entire game. Of course, the only spells you ''need'' to buff to 16 are Aura (a buff spell with stacking abilities for every level) and Ultima (which uses the levels of all equipped spells-including itself-for attack power), as most spells are quite formidable by level 10.
** The ''Dawn of Souls'' remake has made leveling spells even more of a chore by fixing the [[GoodBadBug bug that allowed players to level up spells by just giving the okay command then canceling it repeatedly]] and making it so that offensive magic will only level up according to the strength
they're commonly-used skills. Because of the monsters they are used on relative AntiGrinding rank system, actually getting a skill to the spell's current level. It sounds reasonable, but Level 16 practically requires either hunting down random-encounter [[BossInMookClothing Bosses in practice it means that leveling up attack spells past level 10 is extremely time-consuming even against monsters in the penultimate dungeon. Mook Clothing]] or prolonging fights to absurd degrees.



* AttackBackfire: In this game, attacking enemies with the wrong spell (eg; Ice monsters with Ice magic, Undead with Drain/Osmose, or BlobMonster with Poison) will actually heal the monster. With Drain or Blood Swords, results will be ugly.
** In fact, all ''Final Fantasy'' games after the first one have a system of elemental absorb.

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* AttackBackfire: In this game, attacking enemies with the wrong spell (eg; Ice monsters with Ice magic, Undead with Drain/Osmose, or BlobMonster with Poison) will actually heal the monster. With Drain or Blood Swords, results will be ugly.
** In fact, all ''Final Fantasy'' games after
This is the first one have a system of game in the series with elemental absorb.absorption—attacking an ice monster with Blizzard spells will heal it, for example. Notably, this applies to status-inflicting spells, as they have their own elements.
** Using Drain spells or the Blood Sword against undead enemies will heal ''them'' and damage the user.



* BeefGate: The world map is wide open, designed in a way so as to not even so much as ''suggest'' a way you should go, with featureless plains and forests in every direction being the norm. Some advice for if you don't know where to go is to pick a direction. If you died to a random encounter, you went the wrong way.
** The situation is slightly better in the remakes, where the world map becomes available fairly early on and always marks the next destination to advance the main plot with a blinking yellow light.

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* BeefGate: The world map is wide open, designed in a way so as mostly one giant continent, and it is possible to wander too far if you're not even so much as ''suggest'' a way you should go, with featureless plains careful and forests in every direction being the norm. Some advice for if you don't know where to go is to pick a direction. If you died to a end up curb-stomped by high-level random encounter, you went the wrong way.
** The situation is slightly better in the remakes, where the world map becomes available fairly early on and always marks the next destination to advance the main plot with a blinking yellow light.
encounters.



* BlackMagicianGirl: Odd example; while any of the party members can be made into Black Mages, Maria's starting stats are best suited for the role.

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* BlackMagicianGirl: Odd example; while While any of the party members can be made into Black Mages, Maria's starting stats are best suited for the role.



* ChainmailBikini: Guy's artwork and his PSP sprite has him wearing a breastplate that [[BareYourMidriff bares his midriff]], some shoulder pads, a cape, and a [[UnderwearOfPower pair of briefs]]. He pretty much pioneered the standard outfits for SNES-era Final Fantasy heroines. He has a more forgivable outfit in the Origins and Dawn of Souls versions.

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* ChainmailBikini: ChainmailBikini:
**
Guy's artwork and his PSP sprite has him wearing a breastplate that [[BareYourMidriff bares his midriff]], some shoulder pads, a cape, and a [[UnderwearOfPower pair of briefs]]. He pretty much pioneered the standard outfits for SNES-era Final Fantasy heroines. He has a more forgivable much more...normal outfit in the Origins and Dawn of Souls versions.versions.
** Maria sports ''half'' of one, with her leotard-like outfit covering her other breast.



* ContractualBossImmunity: Averted, because ''every single boss'' in the game is vulnerable to instant-death spells. The only ones it doesn't really work on are the [[spoiler:Dark and Light Emperors, and Zombie Borghen]], the last of which is technically vulnerable to the spells but has high enough magic defense stats to ensure that the spells have pretty much zero chance of hitting him, and the other two of which are flat-out immune.

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* ContractualBossImmunity: Averted, because ''every single boss'' in Played with. Different bosses have different resistances, but many don't resist the game is vulnerable to Matter element, which includes several instant-death spells. The only ones it doesn't really work on are the [[spoiler:Dark and Light Emperors, and Zombie Borghen]], the last of which is technically vulnerable to the spells but has high enough magic defense stats to ensure that the spells have pretty much zero chance of hitting him, and the other two of which are flat-out immune.



* DiscOneNuke: Thanks to the same combination of StatGrinding and BeefGate that produce the game's infamous FakeDifficulty, there are all sorts of ways to go about getting one of these before the first dungeon. A few of the simplest approaches:

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* DiscOneNuke: Thanks to the same combination of StatGrinding and BeefGate that produce the game's infamous FakeDifficulty, there There are all sorts of ways to go about getting one of these before the first dungeon. A few of the simplest approaches:approaches:
** Unarmed attacks. Their attack power rises with each level, and unarmed power scales faster than weapon upgrades early on. Their effectiveness falters later on, when shields become much more useful and vital to survival.



** Reach Mysidia. This is major SequenceBreaking, because the RandomEncounters in the area are a BeefGate unto themselves, about as hard as the Captains in Fynn but in larger groups. Still, with a properly leveled Toad or Teleport they'll die just as easily as anything else, and the shops in Mysidia have the best gear for sale in the whole game. With that on top of what it takes to handle the local monsters, nothing short of the final dungeons will pose a challenge.

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** Reach Mysidia. This The land route is major SequenceBreaking, because inhabited by some of the RandomEncounters most dangerous monsters in the area are a BeefGate unto themselves, about overworld, or you can reach it as hard soon as the Captains in Fynn but in larger groups. Still, with you get a properly leveled Toad or Teleport they'll die just as easily as anything else, and the ship. The shops in Mysidia have the best purchasable gear for sale in the whole game. With that on top of what it takes to handle the local monsters, nothing short of the final dungeons will pose game, giving you a challenge.large step up.



** In the original Famicom release all of this is even easier thanks to a major glitch in the mechanics of stat gains in combat that renders the initial grinding risk-free and slightly faster than in the remakes.



* DualWielding: Everyone can do this with any weapon except bows, if you're willing to forgo shields.
** One uncommon strategy for turning Firion immortal from the beginning involves doing a small amount of grinding, just to get some money and then as soon as possible, buying six shields and having everyone Dual-Wield shields for about an hour. Since nobody has a weapon nor are unarmed, they will just stand in battle and block all attacks, causing evasion and shield level to increase tremendously.

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* DualWielding: Everyone can do this with any weapon except bows, if you're willing to forgo shields.
** One uncommon strategy
save for turning Firion immortal from bows. It can even be done with shields, sacrificing the beginning involves doing a small amount of grinding, just ability to get some money and then as soon as possible, buying six shields and having everyone Dual-Wield shields attack for about an hour. Since nobody has a weapon nor are unarmed, they will just stand in battle and block all attacks, causing evasion and shield level to increase tremendously.increased Evasion.



* EvolvingAttack: Spell animations become longer and cooler-looking as they grow in level.

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* EvolvingAttack: Spell animations become longer Weapon and cooler-looking as they grow in level.spell skill levels. Weapons get more hits (with unarmed attacks doing more damage), and spells get stronger and have flashier animations.



* HeelFaceTurn: [[spoiler:Leon.]]

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* HeelFaceTurn: [[spoiler:Leon.HeelFaceTurn:
** Leila accepts the party's offer to join the Rebellion after they [[ZeroEffortBoss deal with her pirates.]]
** [[spoiler:Leon, after the Emperor returns from Hell.
]]



* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:Most of your fourth party members.]]

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* HeroicSacrifice: [[spoiler:Most of your fourth party members.Enough for [[spoiler:an entire second party]]:
** [[spoiler:Scott holds off the Imperial forces attacking Fynn, and is mortally wounded as a result.]]
** [[spoiler:Josef holds back a boulder loosed by Borghen to allow Firion, Maria, and Guy to escape.]]
** [[spoiler:Minwu gives his life to break the seal on the Ultima magic.]]
** [[spoiler:Ricard pulls a YouShallNotPass on the risen-from-Hell Emperor to allow the others to escape.
]]



* MagicKnight[=/=]SquishyWizard: While in the original, leveling up weapon abilities drained your magic abilities and vice versa, the remakes do away with this, making everyone able to be a MagicKnight.
* MagikarpPower: Instant-death spells, especially Toad. At low levels, they're exactly as useless as you'd expect, but with Toad 4 a good black mage can wipe out most bosses, and Toad 10 can end almost every random encounter for 10 Mp.

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* MagicKnight[=/=]SquishyWizard: While in the original, leveling up weapon abilities drained MagicKnight: A possible way to build your magic abilities characters. In the older versions, physical and vice versa, magical stats would sometimes lower when using the other, though there is a net gain. The remakes do away with this, remove lowering stats, making everyone able to be a MagicKnight.
this much easier.
* MagikarpPower: Instant-death spells, especially Toad. MagikarpPower:
** Status-affecting spells.
At low levels, they're exactly as useless as you'd expect, but likely to miss entirely. Once you level them up a bit, they can greatly improve your stats or devastate enemies.
** Gordon. He starts
with Toad 4 a good black mage can wipe out most bosses, the lowest HP of any GuestStarPartyMember, but his high base stats allow him to catch up quickly and Toad 10 can end almost every random encounter for 10 Mp.fit any role the player wishes to build him in.



* TheMedic: As above, the lead Firion starts out with the best stats for White Magic.
** Minwu is a better example. He joins your party with excellent magic attributes and has nearly every White Magic spell learned and at high levels.

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* TheMedic: As above, the lead Firion starts out with the best stats for White Magic.
** Minwu is a better example.
Minwu. He joins your party with excellent magic attributes and has nearly every White Magic spell learned and at high levels.



* NintendoHard: Website/HardcoreGaming101 states as such. Much hay is made over the game encouraging you to club yourself in the head.

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* NintendoHard: Website/HardcoreGaming101 states as such. Much hay The original Famicom version is made over quite brutal. The remakes have eased up the game encouraging you to club yourself in difficulty of the head.main game.



* ScratchDamage: Averted, at least in the remake. After a few casts of the Protect spell (which Minwu has at level 5 by default), enemy attacks will regularly hit some characters for 0 damage, even without level grinding or armor upgrades.

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* ScratchDamage: Averted, at least in the remake. After a few casts of the Protect spell (which Minwu has at level 5 by default), enemy Averted. It is entirely possible for attacks will regularly hit some characters for 0 damage, even without level grinding or armor upgrades.to do zero damage if the target's Defense is high enough.



* SenselessSacrifice: [[spoiler:Minwu]] could be seen as one, since the Ultima spell is never used in-story (see AbortedArc above).
** In the original Famicon/NES version, gameplay and the plot intersect to make it even more so, with a bug making Ultima practically useless. Luckily this was fixed in the remakes.
* SequelDifficultySpike: To the point that Website/HardcoreGaming101 [[http://www.hardcoregaming101.net/finalfantasy/ff2/ff2-1.htm compared it to]] ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels'' "in its evident eagerness to pound the player into timorous submission".



* SpiritualSequel: As noted in the intro text, this game begat the ''VideoGame/{{SaGa}}'' series. The gameplay is the same (albeit with improvements,) they share the same "go anywhere" philosophy usually utilized in [=WRPGs=], and EverybodysDeadDave tends to be a driving force in both games' themes, especially in the ''Romancing'' sequels.

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* SpiritualSequel: As noted in the intro text, this game begat the ''VideoGame/{{SaGa}}'' series. The gameplay is the same (albeit with improvements,) same, they share the same "go anywhere" philosophy usually utilized in [=WRPGs=], and EverybodysDeadDave tends to be a driving force in both games' themes, especially in the ''Romancing'' sequels.



* UselessUsefulSpell: All over the place, given the weird way spells work. Notably, Raise and Esuna have a chance to fail based on their level, but always succeed outside of battle, so using them in combat is often not worth it. It does level them faster though.
** Oddly enough, Ultima. When you get it, three quarters of the way through the game, you will enthusiastically go around using it... only to realize that, thanks to a glitch that makes it so that it never gains any power, it's actually a pretty weak spell. Even in versions of the game where this glitch is fixed, the spell's extremely unusual way of powering up (its power increases depending on ''all the other spells and weapons'' that you've leveled up) means it takes ''exponentially'' more grinding to be powerful, compared to usual spells. On the other hand, though, if you do trick Ultima out fully, you've got pretty much guaranteed 9000+ damage for 16MP a pop, elemental resistances and magic defense/evasion be damned.
** Arguably EVERY spell in the game (except Cure, Life, and Esuna) can be seen as this; level 1 spells are insanely weak, even by the standards at the start of the game. Attack spells do pathetic damage, status and buff spells miss constantly, the only way for them to become actually useful is to level them up with constant use. But the amount of time needed to level up all these spells is INSANE and physical attack power increases MUCH quicker, especially with all the loot you can get in dungeons, so many players may find themselves simply relying on Cure, Life, Esuna, and nothing else.
* ValuesResonance: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a soap-opera-esque plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a SNES era RPG. Unfortunately, it's bizarre stat grinding system and spiteful level design meant that it never was as influential as it could have been, and it's [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII immediate successor]] took a step backward with cypher protagonists and no word system.

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* UselessUsefulSpell: All over UselessUsefulSpell:
** The Ultima spell. In
the place, given original game, it was glitched and didn't work as intended. In the weird way spells work. Notably, Raise and Esuna have a chance to fail based on their level, but always succeed outside of battle, so using them in combat is often not worth it. It does level them faster though.
** Oddly enough, Ultima. When you get it, three quarters
remakes, its power rises with the skill levels of the way through the game, you will enthusiastically go around using it... only to realize that, thanks to a glitch that makes it so that it never gains any power, it's actually a pretty weak spell. Even in versions of the game where this glitch is fixed, the spell's extremely unusual way of powering up (its power increases depending on ''all the user's other spells and weapons'' that you've leveled up) means skills, but it takes ''exponentially'' more grinding still requires a lot of high-level spells to be powerful, compared to usual spells. On the other hand, though, if you do trick Ultima out fully, you've got pretty much guaranteed 9000+ make it inflict better damage for 16MP a pop, than Flare or an elemental resistances and magic defense/evasion be damned.
** Arguably EVERY
spell in the game (except Cure, Life, and Esuna) can be seen as this; level 1 spells are insanely weak, even by the standards at the start of the game. Attack spells do pathetic damage, status and buff spells miss constantly, the only way for them to become actually useful is to level them up with constant use. But the amount of time needed to level up all these spells is INSANE and physical attack power increases MUCH quicker, especially with all the loot you can get in dungeons, so many players may find themselves simply relying on Cure, Life, Esuna, and nothing else.
hitting a weakness.
* ValuesResonance: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a soap-opera-esque plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a SNES era RPG. Unfortunately, it's bizarre stat grinding system and spiteful level design meant that it never was as influential as it could have been, and it's [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII immediate successor]] took a step backward with cypher protagonists and no word system.



* WeaponOfChoice: Every playable character has a moderate level of experience in one specific weapon type, with the exception of BlackMagic. The remake rectifies this by giving Scott several leveled Black Magic spells.

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* WeaponOfChoice: Every playable character Each GuestStarPartyMember has a moderate level of experience in one specific their own starting proficiencies. Subverted with Gordon, who [[MagikarpPower starts with fairly low weapon type, with the exception of BlackMagic. The remake rectifies this by giving Scott several leveled Black Magic spells.skills and no magic, but high base stats.]]
5th Apr '16 11:49:26 PM MaskedAndDangerous
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Added DiffLines:

* ValuesResonance: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a soap-opera-esque plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a SNES era RPG. Unfortunately, it's bizarre stat grinding system and spiteful level design meant that it never was as influential as it could have been, and it's [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII immediate successor]] took a step backward with cypher protagonists and no word system.
19th Dec '15 11:06:52 AM Josef5678
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* FailureIsTheOnlyOption: Even if the party somehow wins the first battle the game continues as though they lost. [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything In the remakes]], it [[NoFairCheating returns to the title screen]] instead.

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* FailureIsTheOnlyOption: Even if the party somehow wins the first battle the game continues as though they lost. [[TheDevTeamThinksOfEverything In the remakes]], remakes, it [[NoFairCheating returns to the title screen]] instead.
17th Dec '15 10:49:11 AM Morgenthaler
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* LikeABadassOutOfHell: [[spoiler:The Emperor.]] Guess what he did after death?
27th Nov '15 7:33:36 AM KarjamP
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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: This entry in the series was ''enormously'' experimental - character advancement worked differently, conversations worked differently, plot progression worked differently, you get the idea. Very little of it carried into future titles, though some of the ideas later branched off into the ''VideoGame/RomancingSaga'' series.

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: EarlyInstallmentWeirdness:
**
This entry in the series was ''enormously'' experimental - character advancement worked differently, conversations worked differently, plot progression worked differently, you get the idea. Very little of it carried into future titles, though some of the ideas later branched off into the ''VideoGame/RomancingSaga'' series.series.
** Chocobo's Theme is shorter in this game, the full version of the song only appearing from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIII'' onwards.
9th Aug '15 8:45:02 PM kensu
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** Also a nice aversion. There is a cape east of Mysidia that is about a quarter of the length of the world map, but is completely empty. Guess where the Jade Passage opens up at the end of the game?
9th Jun '15 7:23:52 PM totoofze47
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* HopelessBossFight: The Black Knights at the beginning.
* {{Hulkspeak}}: Guy; justified because he was raised by animals and later on adopted by humans.

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* HopelessBossFight: The Black Knights at the beginning.
beginning. It is possible to win if you use cheat devices, though. While the NES version allows you to continue as if you had lost (Albeit with whatever items and money you got from the battle), the remakes send you straight back to the title screen.
* {{Hulkspeak}}: HulkSpeak: Guy; justified because he was raised by animals and later on adopted by humans.



* NonstandardGameOver: What reportedly happens in remakes if you beat the EliteMook HopelessBossFight in the opening sequence.

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* NonstandardGameOver: What reportedly happens in remakes if you beat the EliteMook HopelessBossFight in the opening sequence. It's not a GameOver per se, but it does take you back to the title screen as a Game Over would, instead of continuing the game.
25th May '15 9:01:56 AM Sarisa
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* FragileSpeedster: Equipping light armor and a shield turns a character into one of these. With high Agility and 99% evasion, most enemies can't hit the character even if they get a turn, but any physical attack that bypasses evasion may be a one-hit kill.
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