History VideoGame / DragonQuestIII

11th Jan '18 8:20:51 PM Starlight36
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* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler: The hero defeats Zoma, saving the world, but the portal to his / her reality is sealed off in the process and Zoma declares a prophesy that long after the hero is dead, another evil will appear. The king bestows upon the hero the title of Loto, the highest honor of the land. The hero spends the rest of his / her days in this new world, giving his / her gear to various families for protection, and eventually having a child (or children), thus starting the bloodline of descendants who become the heroes of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' and ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII''.]]

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* BittersweetEnding: [[spoiler: The hero defeats Zoma, saving the world, but the portal to his / her their reality is sealed off in the process and Zoma declares a prophesy that long after the hero is dead, another evil will appear. The king bestows upon the hero the title of Loto, the highest honor of the land. The hero spends the rest of his / her their days in this new world, giving his / her their gear to various families for protection, and eventually having a child (or children), thus starting the bloodline of descendants who become the heroes of ''VideoGame/DragonQuestI'' and ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII''.]]
11th Jan '18 8:18:21 PM Starlight36
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* ArtifactOfDoom: The Golden Claw. Far worse in the original game, where it causes an enemy fight ''every step of the game.'' In the UpdatedRerelease, this only happens while you are in the pyramid; exiting the pyramid breaks the curse. Also in the original, this was the only additional claw the martial artist could use other than the standard.

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* ArtifactOfDoom: The Golden Claw. Far worse in the original game, where it causes an enemy fight ''every step of the game.'' In [[UpdatedRerelease subsequent versions of the UpdatedRerelease, game]], this only happens while you are in the pyramid; exiting the pyramid breaks the curse. Also in the original, this was the only additional claw the martial artist could use other than the standard.
11th Jan '18 8:15:37 PM Starlight36
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And thus, at this juncture, it needs to be emphasized, especially for our younger readers: ''Dragon Quest III'' is quite possibly the single most influential and important Japanese video game—not just RPG, but video game—''ever made''. Its vast popularity meant it was endlessly imitated or served as inspiration for other games and their mechanics, either to improve on or challenge parts of the design tenets it laid out; the influence of the game on the RPG, and even overall video game, industry in Japan is nearly impossible to '''over'''state. And because of this and the game's general popularity, it has an outsized place in the Japanese cultural zeitgeist as a whole—when a piece of Japanese non-video-game media references RPGs, 99% of the time, it'll reference ''Dragon Quest III'', even as of TheNewTens, and of course other video games directly reference it all the time. The only other games that can really be argued to command ''remotely'' similar mindshare, both in game industry influence and cultural presence, are [[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1 the original Super Mario Bros.]], [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original Pokemon games]], and more recently, ''VideoGame/PuzzleAndDragons''—and even then, the latter two ''themselves'' owe more than a little to ''Dragon Quest''.

to:

And thus, at this juncture, it needs to be emphasized, especially for our younger readers: ''Dragon Quest III'' is quite possibly the single most influential and important Japanese video game—not just RPG, but video game—''ever made''. Its vast popularity meant it was endlessly imitated or served as inspiration for other games and their mechanics, either to improve on or challenge parts of the design tenets it laid out; the influence of the game on the RPG, and even overall video game, industry in Japan is nearly impossible to '''over'''state. And because of this and the game's general popularity, it has an outsized place in the Japanese cultural zeitgeist as a whole—when a piece of Japanese non-video-game media references RPGs, [=RPGs=], 99% of the time, it'll reference ''Dragon Quest III'', even as of TheNewTens, and of course other video games directly reference it all the time. The only other games that can really be argued to command ''remotely'' similar mindshare, both in game industry influence and cultural presence, are [[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1 the original Super Mario Bros.]], [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original Pokemon games]], and more recently, ''VideoGame/PuzzleAndDragons''—and even then, the latter two ''themselves'' owe more than a little to ''Dragon Quest''.
11th Jan '18 8:11:47 PM Starlight36
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Dragon Quest III was an outstanding success in Japan—so much so that people were actually being ''mugged on the street for their copy'', something that just did not happen with video games back then. The insane amount of hype that led to these events wasn't totally unfounded though; while Dragon Quest II had introduced the concept of multiple-character parties to most players at the time, it was restrictive to the point that some people complained directly to Enix itself. In response to these outcries, Dragon Quest III introduced the job system that would appear in various ''Dragon Quest'' games, allowing you to customize your party to some degree. You could also pick everyone's gender, meaning that if you wanted a team of {{Action Girl}}s, nothing was stopping you… And female characters got to enjoy a few benefits barred to their male counterparts.

to:

Dragon Quest III was an outstanding success in Japan—so much so that people were actually being ''mugged on the street for their copy'', something that just did not happen with video games back then. The insane amount of hype that led to these events wasn't totally unfounded though; while Dragon Quest II had introduced the concept of multiple-character parties to most players at the time, it was restrictive to the point that some people complained directly to Enix itself. In response to these outcries, Dragon Quest III introduced the job system JobSystem that would appear in various ''Dragon Quest'' games, allowing you to customize your party to some degree. You could also pick everyone's gender, meaning that if you wanted a team of {{Action Girl}}s, nothing was stopping you… And female characters got to enjoy a few benefits barred to their male counterparts.
11th Jan '18 8:10:06 PM Starlight36
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And thus, at this juncture, it needs to be emphasized, especially for our younger readers: ''Dragon Quest III'' is quite possibly the single most influential and important Japanese video game—not just RPG, but video game—''ever made''. Its vast popularity meant it was endlessly imitated or served as inspiration for other games and their mechanics, either to improve on or challenge parts of the design tenets it laid out; the influence of the game on the RPG, and even overall video game, industry in Japan is nearly impossible to '''over'''state. And because of this and the game's general popularity, it has an outsized place in the Japanese cultural zeitgeist as a whole—when a piece of Japanese non-video-game media references RPG's, 99% of the time, it'll reference ''Dragon Quest III'', even as of TheNewTens, and of course other video games directly reference it all the time. The only other games that can really be argued to command ''remotely'' similar mindshare, both in game industry influence and cultural presence, are [[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1 the original Super Mario Bros.]], [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original Pokemon games]], and more recently, ''VideoGame/PuzzleAndDragons''—and even then, the latter two ''themselves'' owe more than a little to ''Dragon Quest''.

to:

And thus, at this juncture, it needs to be emphasized, especially for our younger readers: ''Dragon Quest III'' is quite possibly the single most influential and important Japanese video game—not just RPG, but video game—''ever made''. Its vast popularity meant it was endlessly imitated or served as inspiration for other games and their mechanics, either to improve on or challenge parts of the design tenets it laid out; the influence of the game on the RPG, and even overall video game, industry in Japan is nearly impossible to '''over'''state. And because of this and the game's general popularity, it has an outsized place in the Japanese cultural zeitgeist as a whole—when a piece of Japanese non-video-game media references RPG's, RPGs, 99% of the time, it'll reference ''Dragon Quest III'', even as of TheNewTens, and of course other video games directly reference it all the time. The only other games that can really be argued to command ''remotely'' similar mindshare, both in game industry influence and cultural presence, are [[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1 the original Super Mario Bros.]], [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original Pokemon games]], and more recently, ''VideoGame/PuzzleAndDragons''—and even then, the latter two ''themselves'' owe more than a little to ''Dragon Quest''.
11th Jan '18 8:09:45 PM Starlight36
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Dragon Quest III was an outstanding success in Japan—so much so that people were actually being ''mugged on the street for their copy'', something that just did not happen with video games back then. The insane amount of hype that led to these events wasn't totally unfounded though; while Dragon Quest II had introduced the concept of multiple-PC parties to most players at the time, it was restrictive to the point that some people complained directly to Enix itself. In response to these outcries, Dragon Quest III introduced the job system that would appear in various ''Dragon Quest'' games, allowing you to customize your party to some degree. You could also pick everyone's gender, meaning that if you wanted a team of {{Action Girl}}s, nothing was stopping you… And female characters got to enjoy a few benefits barred to their male counterparts.

to:

Dragon Quest III was an outstanding success in Japan—so much so that people were actually being ''mugged on the street for their copy'', something that just did not happen with video games back then. The insane amount of hype that led to these events wasn't totally unfounded though; while Dragon Quest II had introduced the concept of multiple-PC multiple-character parties to most players at the time, it was restrictive to the point that some people complained directly to Enix itself. In response to these outcries, Dragon Quest III introduced the job system that would appear in various ''Dragon Quest'' games, allowing you to customize your party to some degree. You could also pick everyone's gender, meaning that if you wanted a team of {{Action Girl}}s, nothing was stopping you… And female characters got to enjoy a few benefits barred to their male counterparts.
11th Jan '18 8:08:58 PM Starlight36
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''Dragon Quest III'' rounds out the original ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' trilogy by casting the player as the son / daughter of the hero Ortega, who... Didn't quite finish his grand journey to slay the evil Baramos. So, now that you're [[DangerousSixteenthBirthday sixteen]], everyone expects you to [[TakeUpMySword pick up where he left off]] and get to villain slaying already! Thankfully, you're not expected to do this ''alone''; the local tavern serves as an excellent adventurer's hub, where you can [[PlayerMooks recruit]] a number of [[ClassAndLevelSystem loyal party members]], ranging from warriors and wizards to jesters.

DQIII was an outstanding success in Japan -- so much so that people were actually being ''mugged on the street for their copy'', something that just did not happen with video games back then. The insane amount of hype that led to these events wasn't totally unfounded though; while DQII had introduced the concept of multiple-PC parties to most players at the time, it was restrictive to the point that some people complained directly to Enix itself. In response to these outcries, DQIII introduced the job system that would appear in various ''Dragon Quest'' games, allowing you to customize your party to some degree. You could also pick everyone's gender, meaning that if you wanted a team of {{Action Girl}}s, nothing was stopping you... And female characters got to enjoy a few benefits barred to their male counterparts.

And thus, at this juncture, it needs to be emphasized, especially for our younger readers: ''Dragon Quest III'' is quite possibly the single most influential and important Japanese video game -- not just RPG, but video game -- ''ever made''. Its vast popularity meant it was endlessly imitated or served as inspiration for other games and their mechanics, either to improve on or challenge parts of the design tenets it laid out; the influence of the game on the RPG, and even overall video game, industry in Japan is nearly impossible to '''over'''state. And because of this and the game's general popularity, it has an outsized place in the Japanese cultural zeitgeist as a whole -- when a piece of Japanese non-video-game media references RPG's, 99% of the time, it'll reference ''DQIII'', even as of TheNewTens, and of course other video games directly reference it all the time. The only other games that can really be argued to command ''remotely'' similar mindshare, both in game industry influence and cultural presence, are [[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1 the original Super Mario Bros.]], [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original Pokemon games]], and more recently, ''VideoGame/PuzzleAndDragons'' -- and even then, the latter two ''themselves'' owe more than a little to ''DQ''.

to:

''Dragon Quest III'' rounds out the original ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' trilogy by casting the player as the son / daughter child of the hero Ortega, who... Didn't who…didn't quite finish his grand journey to slay the evil Baramos. So, now that you're [[DangerousSixteenthBirthday sixteen]], everyone expects you to [[TakeUpMySword pick up where he left off]] and get to villain slaying already! Thankfully, you're not expected to do this ''alone''; the local tavern serves as an excellent adventurer's hub, where you can [[PlayerMooks recruit]] a number of [[ClassAndLevelSystem loyal party members]], ranging from warriors and wizards to jesters.

DQIII Dragon Quest III was an outstanding success in Japan -- so Japan—so much so that people were actually being ''mugged on the street for their copy'', something that just did not happen with video games back then. The insane amount of hype that led to these events wasn't totally unfounded though; while DQII Dragon Quest II had introduced the concept of multiple-PC parties to most players at the time, it was restrictive to the point that some people complained directly to Enix itself. In response to these outcries, DQIII Dragon Quest III introduced the job system that would appear in various ''Dragon Quest'' games, allowing you to customize your party to some degree. You could also pick everyone's gender, meaning that if you wanted a team of {{Action Girl}}s, nothing was stopping you... you… And female characters got to enjoy a few benefits barred to their male counterparts.

And thus, at this juncture, it needs to be emphasized, especially for our younger readers: ''Dragon Quest III'' is quite possibly the single most influential and important Japanese video game -- not game—not just RPG, but video game -- ''ever game—''ever made''. Its vast popularity meant it was endlessly imitated or served as inspiration for other games and their mechanics, either to improve on or challenge parts of the design tenets it laid out; the influence of the game on the RPG, and even overall video game, industry in Japan is nearly impossible to '''over'''state. And because of this and the game's general popularity, it has an outsized place in the Japanese cultural zeitgeist as a whole -- when whole—when a piece of Japanese non-video-game media references RPG's, 99% of the time, it'll reference ''DQIII'', ''Dragon Quest III'', even as of TheNewTens, and of course other video games directly reference it all the time. The only other games that can really be argued to command ''remotely'' similar mindshare, both in game industry influence and cultural presence, are [[VideoGame/SuperMarioBros1 the original Super Mario Bros.]], [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue the original Pokemon games]], and more recently, ''VideoGame/PuzzleAndDragons'' -- and ''VideoGame/PuzzleAndDragons''—and even then, the latter two ''themselves'' owe more than a little to ''DQ''.
''Dragon Quest''.



* AwesomeMomentOfCrowning: Provides a sort of temporary NonstandardGameOver at one point. The King / Queen can't exactly go out adventuring, after all...

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* AwesomeMomentOfCrowning: Provides a sort of temporary NonstandardGameOver at one point. The King / Queen can't exactly go out adventuring, after all...all…



* CatScare: In Zipangu, [[spoiler: checking the pots in one basement causes you to discover ''a human head''. ...Which turns out to be attached to the still very much alive body of a young girl hiding out in there to avoid being sacrificed]].

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* CatScare: In Zipangu, [[spoiler: checking the pots in one basement causes you to discover ''a human head''. ...Which …Which turns out to be attached to the still very much alive body of a young girl hiding out in there to avoid being sacrificed]].



* CrutchCharacter: In a way, Merchants. While they don't get much passive power at character ''creation'', their equipment selection is excellent early on, including several exclusive items that are more powerful than comparable items available for everyone else at the time. And, most importantly... Their EXP track is the fastest in the game. By ''far''. Even faster than Soldiers. It's very common for Merchants to be two full levels ahead of ''everyone'', very quickly, and for a while the extra stats from this keep them competitive. They begin to run into high-end equipment issues beginning in Isis, though, and by then an extra few levels isn't quite so much of a swing. Once you get to Baramos, even in the later versions, a Merchant will be struggling to keep up.

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* CrutchCharacter: In a way, Merchants. While they don't get much passive power at character ''creation'', their equipment selection is excellent early on, including several exclusive items that are more powerful than comparable items available for everyone else at the time. And, most importantly... importantly… Their EXP track is the fastest in the game. By ''far''. Even faster than Soldiers. It's very common for Merchants to be two full levels ahead of ''everyone'', very quickly, and for a while the extra stats from this keep them competitive. They begin to run into high-end equipment issues beginning in Isis, though, and by then an extra few levels isn't quite so much of a swing. Once you get to Baramos, even in the later versions, a Merchant will be struggling to keep up.



* DiscOneNuke: It was possible in the original NES version to get a modest pile of money at the beginning of the game by registering Soldier class characters, taking their expensive weapons / armor, selling it, then returning the character to the eatery and deleting their registration. This would let you easily amass enough gold to buy the best equipment at the first two towns for all your characters, which made the beginning of the game a bit easier. Re-releases fixed this by having every registered character join the party with no equipment, but the King 'gives' you four full sets of equipment...

to:

* DiscOneNuke: It was possible in the original NES version to get a modest pile of money at the beginning of the game by registering Soldier class characters, taking their expensive weapons / armor, selling it, then returning the character to the eatery and deleting their registration. This would let you easily amass enough gold to buy the best equipment at the first two towns for all your characters, which made the beginning of the game a bit easier. Re-releases fixed this by having every registered character join the party with no equipment, but the King 'gives' you four full sets of equipment...equipment…



* DistaffCounterpart: The only differences between men / women of each class are... Physical appearance, female-exclusive armor, and a few personalities in the remakes. (Only male recruits get access to an amusing EasterEgg involving the series' {{Fanservice}} RunningGag, though.)

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* DistaffCounterpart: The only differences between men / women of each class are... are… Physical appearance, female-exclusive armor, and a few personalities in the remakes. (Only male recruits get access to an amusing EasterEgg involving the series' {{Fanservice}} RunningGag, though.)



* GlassCannon: Fighters are impressively strong even without a big weapon set, ''and'' boast a naturally high Critical rate. However, while they have decent HP, their ''defense'' tends to be pretty low, and their armor choices are... Lacking.

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* GlassCannon: Fighters are impressively strong even without a big weapon set, ''and'' boast a naturally high Critical rate. However, while they have decent HP, their ''defense'' tends to be pretty low, and their armor choices are... are… Lacking.



** The latter had an explanation, although it took a significant amount of work to discover it. They had intended to do a similar ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV'' remake with the same Monster Coin system. These coins are even hidden in ''Dragon Quest III''[='=]s data files. You would have, in theory, been able to transfer your coins to the other game in order to complete the full set -- which they replaced at the last second with Grandragon [[spoiler: falling asleep]], when they decided to port 4 to the PSX instead.

to:

** The latter had an explanation, although it took a significant amount of work to discover it. They had intended to do a similar ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIV'' remake with the same Monster Coin system. These coins are even hidden in ''Dragon Quest III''[='=]s data files. You would have, in theory, been able to transfer your coins to the other game in order to complete the full set -- which set—which they replaced at the last second with Grandragon [[spoiler: falling asleep]], when they decided to port 4 to the PSX instead.



* HoldingOutForAHero: After Ortega's death, it feels like the whole world basically just waited for his heir to come of age. Certainly everyone in your hometown did. But hey -- no pressure, right?
* HonestAxe: There's a pond you can visit that your character will drop their weapon into. A water spirit then appears and offers you a really powerful weapon, which if you accept, you don't get, because it isn't yours. However if you say it isn't yours and then say that the original weapon you dropped is yours... You get your original weapon back, and that's it.

to:

* HoldingOutForAHero: After Ortega's death, it feels like the whole world basically just waited for his heir to come of age. Certainly everyone in your hometown did. But hey -- no hey—no pressure, right?
* HonestAxe: There's a pond you can visit that your character will drop their weapon into. A water spirit then appears and offers you a really powerful weapon, which if you accept, you don't get, because it isn't yours. However if you say it isn't yours and then say that the original weapon you dropped is yours... yours… You get your original weapon back, and that's it.



* JackOfAllStats: TheHero -- and, surprisingly, Merchants qualify for this early on, with well-balanced stats that can out-Jack the hero during the early game.

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* JackOfAllStats: TheHero -- and, TheHero—and, surprisingly, Merchants qualify for this early on, with well-balanced stats that can out-Jack the hero during the early game.



** Plus, in the later versions, they learn Whistle, which summons monsters -- potentially shaving hours off your LevelGrinding.

to:

** Plus, in the later versions, they learn Whistle, which summons monsters -- potentially monsters—potentially shaving hours off your LevelGrinding.



* MarketBasedTitle: Was called ''Dragon Warrior III'' in America until Square-Enix changed the series's name in the west back to ''Dragon Quest''. The Japanese version also has the subtitle "''Thus, Into Legend...''", while the western mobile version has its own subtitle: "''The Seeds of Salvation''".

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* MarketBasedTitle: Was called ''Dragon Warrior III'' in America until Square-Enix changed the series's name in the west back to ''Dragon Quest''. The Japanese version also has the subtitle "''Thus, Into Legend...''", Legend…''", while the western mobile version has its own subtitle: "''The Seeds of Salvation''".



* PersonalityPowers: The remakes add one-word descriptions of all of your party members: '[[WideEyedIdealist Naive]]', '[[DumbMuscle Bully]]', 'Weepy', '[[TheSmartGuy Sharp]]', '{{Tomboy}}', '[[AllMenArePerverts Lewd]] / [[RuleOfSexy Sexy]]', and so on. This actually has an effect on how their stats grow when they level up...

to:

* PersonalityPowers: The remakes add one-word descriptions of all of your party members: '[[WideEyedIdealist Naive]]', '[[DumbMuscle Bully]]', 'Weepy', '[[TheSmartGuy Sharp]]', '{{Tomboy}}', '[[AllMenArePerverts Lewd]] / [[RuleOfSexy Sexy]]', and so on. This actually has an effect on how their stats grow when they level up...up…



** In the original NES translation, the script repeatedly referred to the hero as Ortega's son, male or female. This was [[MythologyGag referenced]] in the GBC version at the start, when the king ''starts'' to call your heroine son, corrects himself and adds, "But that dauntless look -- no man could hope to match you!"

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** In the original NES translation, the script repeatedly referred to the hero as Ortega's son, male or female. This was [[MythologyGag referenced]] in the GBC version at the start, when the king ''starts'' to call your heroine son, corrects himself and adds, "But that dauntless look -- no look—no man could hope to match you!"



* RandomlyDrops: ''Monster Medals'' in the GBC remake. There are random items as well, approaching the ludicrous -- for example, Shoes of Happiness, which have an impossibly low chance to drop off a MetalSlime.

to:

* RandomlyDrops: ''Monster Medals'' in the GBC remake. There are random items as well, approaching the ludicrous -- for ludicrous—for example, Shoes of Happiness, which have an impossibly low chance to drop off a MetalSlime.



* RealMenWearPink: All soldiers wear pink armor, male and female alike. It's made a bit darker in the remakes... But only a little.

to:

* RealMenWearPink: All soldiers wear pink armor, male and female alike. It's made a bit darker in the remakes... remakes… But only a little.



* TropeCodifier: Not so much in America, but in Japan? '''''Good. God.''''' We mean it when we say that ''DQIII'' is the game that codified ''every'' major trope and element of JRPG's, and that every single JRPG that followed, in every single series or franchise, owes ''something'' to it, either through direct imitation, indirect inspiration or attempting to "answer" a "fault" of the game. For a few examples of the ''big'' ones:

to:

* TropeCodifier: Not so much in America, but in Japan? '''''Good. God.''''' We mean it when we say that ''DQIII'' ''Dragon Quest III'' is the game that codified ''every'' major trope and element of JRPG's, JRPGs, and that every single JRPG that followed, in every single series or franchise, owes ''something'' to it, either through direct imitation, indirect inspiration or attempting to "answer" a "fault" of the game. For a few examples of the ''big'' ones:



** Your choice of party members and party customization? Obviously there's been a ''lot'' of variance from ''DQIII'' on this one, but everyone really is trying be as good or better than what was on offer here.
** [[spoiler: A late-plot reveal of a whole second world to explore and the game being bigger than originally supposed or advertised? Oh yup. This is one of the biggest -- ''everyone'' who does this in their games is trying to capture the same lightning in a-bottle that resulted from ''DQIII'''s Alefgard reveal.]]
** Similarly, (non-DQ spoilers) [[spoiler: a big reveal [[ManBehindTheMan of a bigger boss to what you were previously fighting]]? Yup, another one with a lot of variants, but everyone from [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Zemus]] (and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyV Exdeath]], and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Ultimecia]]) to [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Blue as Champion]] to [[VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia Mithos Yggdrasil]] to even [[VideoGame/HyperdimensionNeptuniaVictory Rei Ryghts]] all call back to the reveal of Zoma.]]

to:

** Your choice of party members and party customization? Obviously there's been a ''lot'' of variance from ''DQIII'' ''Dragon Quest III'' on this one, but everyone really is trying be as good or better than what was on offer here.
** [[spoiler: A late-plot reveal of a whole second world to explore and the game being bigger than originally supposed or advertised? Oh yup. This is one of the biggest -- ''everyone'' biggest—''everyone'' who does this in their games is trying to capture the same lightning in a-bottle that resulted from ''DQIII'''s ''Dragon Quest III'''s Alefgard reveal.]]
** Similarly, (non-DQ (non-Dragon Quest spoilers) [[spoiler: a big reveal [[ManBehindTheMan of a bigger boss to what you were previously fighting]]? Yup, another one with a lot of variants, but everyone from [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyIV Zemus]] (and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyV Exdeath]], and [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII Ultimecia]]) to [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Blue as Champion]] to [[VideoGame/TalesOfSymphonia Mithos Yggdrasil]] to even [[VideoGame/HyperdimensionNeptuniaVictory Rei Ryghts]] all call back to the reveal of Zoma.]]



* VoluntaryShapeshifting: The Change Staff lets you randomly change to different forms. Including monsters. [[EasterEgg NPC's react accordingly to this]]. [[spoiler: Except for elves, who can see right through most disguises... Yet will still sell to you if you transform into a dwarf or other creature they're friendly with.]]

to:

* VoluntaryShapeshifting: The Change Staff lets you randomly change to different forms. Including monsters. [[EasterEgg NPC's react accordingly to this]]. [[spoiler: Except for elves, who can see right through most disguises... disguises… Yet will still sell to you if you transform into a dwarf or other creature they're friendly with.]]



* WhipItGood: One of the best weapons, actually... Though they tend to have lower attack power compared to regular weapons, whips allow your regular attacks (at least in the GBC and SNES versions) to target whole groups of enemies.

to:

* WhipItGood: One of the best weapons, actually... actually… Though they tend to have lower attack power compared to regular weapons, whips allow your regular attacks (at least in the GBC and SNES versions) to target whole groups of enemies.



** The Game Boy Color version doesn't even give you ''that'' much! The king sends you off with a ''club'', a simple ''traveling tunic'', and 50G, which is just enough to buy a ''pot lid for a shield''. Thanks a lot, kingy. Not like the whole future of the world depends on me or anything...

to:

** The Game Boy Color version doesn't even give you ''that'' much! The king sends you off with a ''club'', a simple ''traveling tunic'', and 50G, which is just enough to buy a ''pot lid for a shield''. Thanks a lot, kingy. Not like the whole future of the world depends on me or anything...anything…



* YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle: [[spoiler: Baramos has a boss. You find this out during a Fake Ending after exploring literally the entire world, spending 40+ hours to do so. It comes out of complete left field and cemented DQIII's status as a legendary RPG in Japan -- 40+ hours was already incredibly long for a NES era RPG, and then it opens up an ''entire second world map.'' A very familiar one at that, which led to an even bigger, more awesome revelation of just who the player character was.]]

to:

* YourPrincessIsInAnotherCastle: [[spoiler: Baramos has a boss. You find this out during a Fake Ending after exploring literally the entire world, spending 40+ hours to do so. It comes out of complete left field and cemented DQIII's Dragon Quest III's status as a legendary RPG in Japan -- 40+ Japan—40+ hours was already incredibly long for a NES era RPG, and then it opens up an ''entire second world map.'' A very familiar one at that, which led to an even bigger, more awesome revelation of just who the player character was.]]
4th Nov '17 11:08:48 AM Nargrakhan
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Added DiffLines:

* SuicideMission: The reason why the King of Aliahan hesitates to ask the hero to defeat Zoma, is because he believes it would be a death sentence and too much to ask someone who defeated what turned out to be TheDragon.
4th Nov '17 6:55:59 AM Nargrakhan
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* DevelopersForesight: In the event Ortega defeats King Hydra due to cheating, he still dies from wounds suffered before the battle, and the hero still fights a Zoma resurrected King Hydra.

to:

* DevelopersForesight: In the event Ortega defeats King Hydra due to cheating, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07WvC1vjWFM he still dies dies]] from wounds suffered before the battle, and the hero still fights a Zoma resurrected King Hydra.
4th Nov '17 6:55:21 AM Nargrakhan
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* DevelopersForesight: In the event Ortega defeats King Hydra due to cheating, he still dies from wounds suffered before the battle, and the hero still fights a Zoma resurrected King Hydra.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=VideoGame.DragonQuestIII