History ValuesDissonance / Film

25th May '17 9:20:25 AM fearlessnikki
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* Meta-example: Cheering in the cinema is generally more accepted in America than in the UK and Europe (hence the "mfw Americans clap" meme), though there are exceptions.
** Japan and other Asian countries are even worse about this. Clapping during a performance is considered quite ''rude'' as you are distracting from the show. Live performers such as Cirque Du Soleil were actually coached about this as they were used to boisterous applause after every major trick.
* Another meta-example: Voiceover singing in Hollywood vs. Bollywood. American audiences frown on the practice, viewing it as inauthentic and cheating (one of the reasons Creator/AudreyHepburn was not nominated for the Best Actress Oscar for ''Film/MyFairLady'' was because she didn't do her own singing). In Bollywood it's openly acknowledged and accepted; actors are dubbed over to the point where one woman, Lata Mangeshkar, provided the singing voice ''for every female actress in every major Bollywood movie for several decades'' and was a celebrity in her own right. [[note]]When Lata is unavailable, producers use her sister, Asha Bhosle, who sounds just like her.[[/note]]

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\n!!General:
* Meta-example: Cheering in the cinema is generally more accepted in America than in the UK and Europe (hence the "mfw Americans clap" meme), though there are exceptions.
**
exceptions. Japan and other Asian countries are even worse about this. Clapping during a performance is considered quite ''rude'' as you are distracting from the show. Live performers such as Cirque Du Soleil were actually coached about this as they were used to boisterous applause after every major trick.
* Another meta-example: Voiceover singing in Hollywood vs. Bollywood. American audiences frown on the practice, viewing it as inauthentic and cheating (one of the reasons Creator/AudreyHepburn was not nominated for the Best Actress Oscar for ''Film/MyFairLady'' was because she didn't do her own singing). In Bollywood it's openly acknowledged and accepted; actors are dubbed over to the point where one woman, Lata Mangeshkar, provided the singing voice ''for every female actress in every major Bollywood movie for several decades'' and was a celebrity in her own right. [[note]]When Lata is unavailable, producers use her sister, Asha Bhosle, who sounds just like her.[[/note]]



* France doesn't usually dish out age restrictions on mainstream movies, likely owing to the [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution rough history with censorship]]. Many movies rated R in the US or the UK are given "all ages" ratings unless they are very violent or patently adult.
* In general, Western European countries (including the United Kingdom) and some of their former colonies (like Australia) tend to be much more lenient about sexual content and profanity in films than the United States. For example, ''Film/SilverLiningsPlaybook'', rated R in the US mostly for [[ClusterFBomb the Cluster F-Bombs]], received the equivalent of a G rating in Sweden and France and an unrestricted M rating in Australia and New Zealand [[note]] meaning the film is recommended for mature audiences, but anyone can watch it.[[/note]]. ''Film/MagicMike'' was also rated G in France and Sweden, despite being a film about ''strippers''. However, ''Film/PrideAndPrejudiceAndZombies'' received the equivalent of an R rating in most countries (but only a PG-13 in the US.)
* In the United States, the NC-17 rating is seen as a death sentence for a film's commercial viability, basically limiting it to arthouse/independent cinemas. Major retailers like Walmart and Best Buy refuse to stock NC-17 films or DVDs, and theater chains like AMC are reluctant to book them. Although the MPAA specifically states it does not denote pornography, in practice it has been used for films with strong sexual content. Producers fight for an R rating and are often dismayed to get an NC-17. On the other side of the pond, however, the 18 certificate (roughly equivalent to the NC-17) not only has little effect on commercial viability[[note]]Although nobody under 18 may watch it in cinemas, plenty of mainstream films like Fargo, Silence of the Lambs, Halloween and Saw received an 18 and did very well at the UK box office.[[/note]] , it is seen as a badge of honor. In fact, [[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1169772/My-film-horrific-15-director-tells-censors-pushed-18.html one horror director]] was disappointed that his film ''didn't'' get an 18 certificate. Films cut for an NC-17 in the US for commercial reasons usually receive an 18 certificate uncut in the UK, with none of the stigma attached.
* In the Golden Age of Hollywood, Chinese-American star Creator/AnnaMayWong was heavily exoticised in the fan magazines - “Anna May Wong symbolizes the eternal paradox of her ancient race,” wrote one fan magazine. “She reminds us of cruel and intricate intrigues, and, at the same time, of crooned Chinese lullabies. She brings to the screen the rare comprehension and the mysterious colors of her ivory-skinned race.” - and could never play a romantic lead because UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode would not allow her to kiss a white man on screen. In another example of this trope, she took her career to the UK and took advantage of their lenient censorship laws to play less stereotypical roles.
* {{Yellowface}} was far more accepted back in the Golden Age of Hollywood. Most Asian characters in films like ''Film/TheGoodEarth'', ''Theatre/TheKingAndI'' and ''The Son-Daughter'' were played by white actresses in make-up - and the magazines would talk freely about the "exciting" make-up process.

!!Specific:



* Agnes' fate at the end of ''Literature/AuntieMame'' definitely qualifies for this trope. She finds herself impregnated and [[AccidentalMarriage accidentally married to]] a sexual predator who got her drunk and led her to the altar because he thought she was a rich noblewoman. This is supposed to be a ''happy'' ending, because it means that she's not, as she gravely feared, an ''unwed mother''. It is worth noting that in a later, musical version of the play, this part was changed. Instead of being married to the guy who knocked her up, Agnes is sent to live in a home for unwed mothers... that was founded and set up by Aunt Mame herself, specifically to help Agnes. (And to tick off the snooty rich family whose property was next door to the future site of said home.)
** In the original book, she falls in love with one of Patrick's college professors, a genuinely good man who reciprocates her love and proposes to her as she's being rushed to the hospital in labor. It's implied that they wind up happily married.
* A lot of the Creator/SeanConnery [[Film/JamesBond Bond]] movies suffer from this, including SexFaceTurn, ''really'' [[DisposableWoman Disposable Women]], and SlapSlapKiss. This dissonance was increased in ''Film/{{The Man with the Golden Gun}}'', when Roger Moore tries to slap around women. They are still toned down from what exists in the books. You only have to read a few other British thrillers of the early 20th Century (something by Dennis Wheatley, say) to realize that Ian Fleming was quite liberal for his time.
** TruthInTelevision due to Sean Connery's unapologetic defence of hitting women and accusations made by his ex wife.

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* Agnes' fate at the end of ''Literature/AuntieMame'' definitely qualifies for this trope. She finds herself impregnated and [[AccidentalMarriage accidentally married to]] a sexual predator who got her drunk and led her to the altar because he thought she was a rich noblewoman. This is supposed to be a ''happy'' ending, because it means that she's not, as she gravely feared, an ''unwed mother''. It is worth noting that in a later, musical version of the play, this part was changed. Instead of being married to the guy who knocked her up, Agnes is sent to live in a home for unwed mothers... that was founded and set up by Aunt Mame herself, specifically to help Agnes. (And Agnes (and to tick off the snooty rich family whose property was next door to the future site of said home.)
**
home). In the original book, she falls in love with one of Patrick's college professors, a genuinely good man who reciprocates her love and proposes to her as she's being rushed to the hospital in labor. It's implied that they wind up happily married.
* ''Film/JamesBond'':
**
A lot of the Creator/SeanConnery [[Film/JamesBond Bond]] movies suffer from this, including SexFaceTurn, ''really'' [[DisposableWoman Disposable Women]], and SlapSlapKiss. This dissonance was increased in ''Film/{{The Man with the Golden Gun}}'', when Roger Moore tries to slap around women. They are still toned down from what exists in the books. You only have to read a few other British thrillers of the early 20th Century (something by Dennis Wheatley, say) to realize that Ian Fleming was quite liberal for his time.
** TruthInTelevision due to Sean Connery's unapologetic defence of hitting women and accusations made by his ex wife.
time.



* In the 1968 film ''YoursMineAndOurs'', with Creator/LucilleBall and Henry Fonda, generally considered a G-rated, family values classic, there are several "Wait... what?" moments. Early in the film, three boys, aged about 14 to 18 get their father's potential next wife drunk by spiking her drink. In yet another scene, Ball gets angry at one of her sons, and grabs him up for an immediate and prolonged spanking.
** Fonda's character calls his children on the carpet for their little prank. He is NOT amused. (If I remember, the kids were trying to sabotage the budding relationship.)
* The original ''[[Franchise/ThePinkPanther Pink Panther]]'' films run into this with how Inspector Clouseau speaks of his Chinese manservant, e.g., "Cato, my little yellow friend, I'm home!" (On the other hand, Clouseau ''is'' portrayed as an arrogant idiot with (among others) MightyWhitey delusions, so this ignorance may well stem from that.)
** This is what probably inspired a scene from 2009's ''Film/ThePinkPanther2'' where Clouseau gets in trouble for calling a Japanese man "my little yellow friend".

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* In the 1968 film ''YoursMineAndOurs'', ''Film/YoursMineAndOurs'', with Creator/LucilleBall and Henry Fonda, generally considered a G-rated, family values classic, there are several "Wait... what?" moments. Early in Part of the film, three boys, aged about 14 to 18 get their father's potential next wife drunk by spiking her drink. In yet another scene, Ball gets angry at one of her sons, and grabs him up for an immediate and prolonged spanking.
** Fonda's character calls his children on the carpet for their little prank. He is NOT amused. (If I remember, the kids were trying
children's attempts to sabotage the budding relationship.)
relationship include trying to get their potential stepmother drunk by spiking her drink - although they're called out for this, it's still uncomfortable. One of the boys is later punished with a prolonged spanking from the lady, something that wouldn't fly today.
* The original ''[[Franchise/ThePinkPanther Pink Panther]]'' films run into this with how Inspector Clouseau speaks of his Chinese manservant, e.g., "Cato, my little yellow friend, I'm home!" (On the other hand, Clouseau ''is'' portrayed as an arrogant idiot with (among others) MightyWhitey delusions, so this ignorance may well stem from that.)
**
) This is what probably inspired a scene from 2009's ''Film/ThePinkPanther2'' where Clouseau gets in trouble for calling a Japanese man "my little yellow friend".



* ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys'' features Mickey Rooney as wacky Japanese neighbor Mr. Yunioshi, complete with yellowface, buck teeth and thick glasses that look like they were lifted directly from a WWII propaganda poster. At the time, this was acceptable comic relief.
** Another case where it was changed: in the story the film is based on, Peppard's character lets Holly go. This was considered too depressing an ending for a film.
** Truman Capote, who wrote the same-named novel the film was based on, vocally expressed his disgust at Mickey Rooney's being cast as the Japanese character, so at least the original author also found that offensive.

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* ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys'' ''Film/BreakfastAtTiffanys'':
** The film
features Mickey Rooney as wacky Japanese neighbor Mr. Yunioshi, complete with yellowface, buck teeth and thick glasses that look like they were lifted directly from a WWII propaganda poster. At the time, this was acceptable comic relief.
** Another case where it was changed: in the story the film is based on, Peppard's character lets Holly go. This was considered too depressing an ending for a film.
** Truman Capote, who wrote the same-named novel the film was based on, vocally expressed his disgust at Mickey Rooney's being cast as the Japanese character, so at least the
relief. The original author Truman Copote however slammed this, finding it offensive at the time too. Mickey Rooney apparently didn't see what the problem was.
** Paul's counterpart in the original book was gay - something that wouldn't fly in the 1950s - so he was changed to a straight man and PromotedToLoveInterest for Holly. Holly's bisexuality was
also found that offensive.eliminated from book to film.
** Lula Mae's marriage to a middle-aged man when she was only fourteen. While it's implied to have been a chaste one and annulled pretty quickly, there's no way he would have been played sympathetically today.



* The Depression-era film ''Film/GabrielOverTheWhiteHouse'' shows the President of the United States essentially setting himself up as a fascist dictator, suspending the Constitution and dissolving Congress when they try to oppose him, creating a paramilitary police force with extra-judicial powers accountable only to him and forcing all other nations to unilaterally disarm and submit to American rule using the threat of superweapons. This is depicted as a ''good'' and possibly even divinely inspired thing, and his totalitarian policies are shown to end crime, introduce huge economic booms and create world peace. To be fair, the film was controversial even at the time, but its unabashed praise for what would be TheEmpire in any other story is shocking to modern audiences. It's a sign of the desperate time it was made in more than anything else, when there were some calling for a dictatorial president to seize power and resolve the crippling economic issues and organized crime ravaging the country.
** [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything Which is a disturbingly similar situation]] [[ThoseWackyNazis to the state of Germany after World War One.]]

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* The Depression-era film ''Film/GabrielOverTheWhiteHouse'' shows the President of the United States essentially setting himself up as a fascist dictator, suspending the Constitution and dissolving Congress when they try to oppose him, creating a paramilitary police force with extra-judicial powers accountable only to him and forcing all other nations to unilaterally disarm and submit to American rule using the threat of superweapons. This is depicted as a ''good'' and possibly even divinely inspired thing, and his totalitarian policies are shown to end crime, introduce huge economic booms and create world peace. To be fair, the film was controversial even at the time, but its unabashed praise for what would be TheEmpire in any other story is shocking to modern audiences. It's a sign of the desperate time it was made in more than anything else, when there were some calling for a dictatorial president to seize power and resolve the crippling economic issues and organized crime ravaging the country.
**
country. [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything Which is a disturbingly similar situation]] [[ThoseWackyNazis to the state of Germany after World War One.]]



** Which, in itself, smacks of UnfortunateImplications when rude comments are responded to with physical violence.
* In ''{{Film/Casablanca}}'', Ilsa refers to Sam, the middle-aged black pianist in Rick's club, as a "boy", a common mild racial slur at the time.

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** Which, in itself, smacks of UnfortunateImplications when rude comments are responded to with physical violence.
* In ''{{Film/Casablanca}}'', Ilsa refers to Sam, the middle-aged black pianist in Rick's club, as a "boy", a common mild racial slur at the time. The film is also infamous for Ilsa not ending up with Rick, despite him being her true love. This is simply because Victor was her husband and in the 1940s, that trumped anything else.



* ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'' is full of this, of course, starting with the film's title and central premise, that the passing of an oligarchic slave-based society was something to be mourned. Then there's the racist caricature of lazy, shrieking, incompetent Prissy. Another example is the scene where [[MaritalRapeLicense Rhett forces his now-wife Scarlett into bed with him]]... [[NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization and she likes it]]. The book is even worse -- the Klan are good guys who avenge Scarlett after she's attacked by blacks. And, of course, the [[SarcasmMode utterly shocking words, never before spoken on film]]: [[spoiler:"Frankly, my dear, I don't give a [[PrecisionFStrike damn]]!"]]
** Of course, the character of Mammy represents a case of FairForItsDay wrapped up in the values dissonance. Mammy is a stock character, but well done and treated with respect, and black actors and actresses were rarely seen ''at all'' on film during that period:
-->'''Hattie [=McDaniel=]''' (after receiving an Oscar for the role): "I'd rather play a maid than be a maid!"
** The ValuesDissonance is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in an episode of ''Series/ChappellesShow''. Paul Mooney plays the lone black panelist on a film review show, and is utterly appalled when the white female critics ignore the blatant racism and praise the film for presenting a strong, "feminist" heroine.

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* ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'' is full of this, of course, starting with ''Film/GoneWithTheWind'':
** The book and film present
the film's title and central premise, that end of the passing of an oligarchic slave-based society was pre-Civil War era as something to be mourned. Then there's mourned, giving a very RoseTintedNarrative of slavery.
** Scarlett suffers marital rape at
the hands of Rhett late in the film, and it's presented as a good thing for their marriage. Scarlett also gives a NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization.
** The character Prissy is a shockingly
racist caricature of lazy, shrieking, incompetent Prissy. Another example is the scene where [[MaritalRapeLicense Rhett forces his now-wife Scarlett into bed - with him]]... [[NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization her high pitched voice, laziness and she likes it]]. The book is even worse -- the Klan are good guys general incompetence. Narrowly averted with {{Mammy}} - who avenge Scarlett after she's attacked by blacks. And, is highly intelligent in spite of course, the [[SarcasmMode utterly shocking words, never before spoken on film]]: [[spoiler:"Frankly, my dear, I don't give a [[PrecisionFStrike damn]]!"]]
** Of course, the character of Mammy represents
her position, representing a case of FairForItsDay wrapped up in the values dissonance. Mammy is a stock character, but well done and treated with respect, and black actors and actresses were rarely seen ''at all'' on film during that period:
-->'''Hattie [=McDaniel=]''' (after receiving an Oscar for the role): "I'd rather play a maid than be a maid!"
** The ValuesDissonance is [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in an episode of ''Series/ChappellesShow''. Paul Mooney plays the lone black panelist on a film review show, and is utterly appalled when the white female critics ignore the blatant racism and praise the film for presenting a strong, "feminist" heroine.
FairForItsDay.



* Similarly the ''Film/CarryOn'' films sometimes showed men groping women without their permission but the women sometimes show a positive reaction from it.

to:

* Similarly ''Film/CarryOn'':
** Many of
the ''Film/CarryOn'' films sometimes showed men groping women without their permission but consent, and the women sometimes show a often getting positive reaction reactions from it.



** ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]'' ran headlong into another example with the short "Catching Trouble", a 1936 documentary about a hunter who catches animals for zoos. The narration makes it clear that he's a man among men who bends nature to his will; Joel and the Bots, however, just see a cruel bully harassing innocent animals, and cheer for the animals to escape. And that's not even getting into his "loyal Seminole" sidekick...
** Generally ''[=MST3K=]'' frequently riffs on the mores and attitudes portrayed in its subject films.

to:

** * ''[[Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000 MST3K]]'' ran headlong into another example with the short "Catching Trouble", a 1936 documentary about a hunter who catches animals for zoos. The narration makes it clear that he's a man among men who bends nature to his will; Joel and the Bots, however, just see a cruel bully harassing innocent animals, and cheer for the animals to escape. And that's not even getting into his "loyal Seminole" sidekick...
** Generally ''[=MST3K=]'' frequently riffs on the mores and attitudes portrayed in its subject films.
sidekick...



* In a fairly obscure 1950 film, luridly titled ''Film/SoYoungSoBad'', a sixteen-year-old girl is consigned to a reform school because she's pregnant out of wedlock. There's no suggestion that terminating the pregnancy is an option: in fact, the girl is portrayed as heartless, selfish, and unloving for ''wanting to give her baby up for adoption''. This is a holdover from the prewar years when unwed mothers in maternity homes were required to stay and nurse their newborns for three months, and were propagandized with heartrending stories supposedly from the point of view of "abandoned" (read: relinquished for adoption) babies.

to:

* In a fairly obscure 1950 film, luridly titled an independent film from the 50s ''Film/SoYoungSoBad'', the character Loretta has had a sixteen-year-old girl is consigned to a reform school because she's pregnant baby out of wedlock. There's no suggestion It's presented as a character flaw that terminating the pregnancy is an option: in fact, the girl is portrayed as heartless, selfish, and unloving for ''wanting she wants to give her the baby up for adoption''. adoption - despite the fact that she's an unmarried teenager who has no family to support her. Her happy ending is choosing to keep her baby, albeit after graduating from school. This is a holdover from the prewar years when unwed pre-war years, where mothers in maternity homes were required to stay and nurse discouraged from giving up their newborns children for three months, and were propagandized with heartrending stories supposedly from the point of view of "abandoned" (read: relinquished for adoption) babies. adoption.



*** Website/CollegeHumor created a [[http://www.collegehumor.com/video/6368260/grease-dilemma video]] that caused the characters to react as if they were in modern day to that line. The video itself [[RapeAsComedy has some]] UnfortunateImplications.
*** Though to be fair, the line could also be interpreted as "did she play hard to get?"



* ''Film/IronMan3'' sought to avoid this with their depiction of [[BigBad the Mandarin]]. In the comics, the Mandarin was a YellowPeril villain, which wouldn't really work these days. The film avoids this by casting the British-Indian actor Creator/BenKingsley then having the Mandarin be an combination of many cultures. [[spoiler:Furthermore, the Mandarin turns out to be a smokescreen/scapegoat for the real villain's organization, played by an actor and designed to obfuscate the real villain's identity. THEN turned on its head when the ''actual'' Mandarin has his double rescued from prison to bring him into the fold.]]
** And of course, many fans still claimed changing the villain's race was a case of UnfortunateImplications. Sometimes you just can't win...

to:

* ''Film/IronMan3'' sought to avoid this with their depiction of [[BigBad the Mandarin]]. In the comics, the Mandarin was a YellowPeril villain, which wouldn't really work these days. The film avoids this by casting the British-Indian actor Creator/BenKingsley then having the Mandarin be an combination of many cultures. [[spoiler:Furthermore, the Mandarin turns out to be a smokescreen/scapegoat for the real villain's organization, played by an actor and designed to obfuscate the real villain's identity. THEN turned on its head when the ''actual'' Mandarin has his double rescued from prison to bring him into the fold.]]
**
]] And of course, many fans still claimed changing the villain's race was a case of UnfortunateImplications. Sometimes you just can't win...



* ''{{Film/Carrie}}'': Even by 1976 standards, someone would surely request Social Services to check the home environment to see if the title character is in a safe place.
** Considering the character was being bullied, the Gym teacher was in the right mind to intervene and report it to the principal. Nowadays, she would've been viewed as a hero because bullying has gotten deadly, forcing many US States to pass laws regarding it. The bullies would’ve faced suspension or expulsion these days rather than have Carrie take matters in her own hands… or rather, her mind.[[note]]In the film and book, the teacher does threaten the girls with suspension - but says that the school board was stocked by men who didn't understand how horrible the shower incident was[[/note]].

to:

* ''{{Film/Carrie}}'': ''{{Film/Carrie}}'':
**
Even by 1976 standards, someone would surely request Social Services to check the home environment to see if the title character is in a safe place.
place. The 2013 remake acknowledges this somewhat, where the state stepped in to stop Margaret from homeschooling Carrie.
** Considering the character was being bullied, the Gym teacher was in the right mind to intervene and report it to the principal. Nowadays, she would've been viewed as a hero because bullying has gotten deadly, forcing many US States to pass laws regarding it. The bullies would’ve faced suspension or expulsion these days rather than have Carrie take matters in her own hands… or rather, her mind.[[note]]In the film and book, the teacher does threaten the girls with suspension - but says that the school board was stocked by men who didn't understand how horrible the shower incident was[[/note]].was. Chris does get suspended for refusing to do the punishment detentions.[[/note]].



* ''Film/TeenWolf'' (the film version with Michael J. Fox, not the later TV series) has a scene where one of the characters is MistakenForGay. The word "fag" is used no less than three times throughout this bit of dialogue.

to:

* ''Film/TeenWolf'' (the film version with Michael J. Fox, not the later TV series) has a scene where one of the characters is MistakenForGay. The word "fag" is used no less than three times throughout this bit of dialogue.



* France doesn't usually dish out age restrictions on mainstream movies, likely owing to the [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution rough history with censorship]]. Many movies rated R in the US or the UK are given "all ages" ratings unless they are very violent or patently adult.
** In general, Western European countries (including the United Kingdom) and some of their former colonies (like Australia) tend to be much more lenient about sexual content and profanity in films than the United States. For example, ''Film/SilverLiningsPlaybook'', rated R in the US mostly for [[ClusterFBomb the Cluster F-Bombs]], received the equivalent of a G rating in Sweden and France and an unrestricted M rating in Australia and New Zealand [[note]] meaning the film is recommended for mature audiences, but anyone can watch it.[[/note]]. ''Film/MagicMike'' was also rated G in France and Sweden, despite being a film about ''strippers''. However, ''Film/PrideAndPrejudiceAndZombies'' received the equivalent of an R rating in most countries (but only a PG-13 in the US.)
* In the United States, the NC-17 rating is seen as a death sentence for a film's commercial viability, basically limiting it to arthouse/independent cinemas. Major retailers like Walmart and Best Buy refuse to stock NC-17 films or DVDs, and theater chains like AMC are reluctant to book them. Although the MPAA specifically states it does not denote pornography, in practice it has been used for films with strong sexual content. Producers fight for an R rating and are often dismayed to get an NC-17. On the other side of the pond, however, the 18 certificate (roughly equivalent to the NC-17) not only has little effect on commercial viability[[note]]Although nobody under 18 may watch it in cinemas, plenty of mainstream films like Fargo, Silence of the Lambs, Halloween and Saw received an 18 and did very well at the UK box office.[[/note]] , it is seen as a badge of honor. In fact, [[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1169772/My-film-horrific-15-director-tells-censors-pushed-18.html one horror director]] was disappointed that his film ''didn't'' get an 18 certificate. Films cut for an NC-17 in the US for commercial reasons usually receive an 18 certificate uncut in the UK, with none of the stigma attached.
* ''Film/IAmAFugitiveFromAChainGang'': Helen's line "I'm free, white, and twenty-one." was a common expression during the 1920s, 1930s, and much later when racism was not only socially acceptable but the law in many parts of the country. The use of this line lasted into the sixties and even seventies.
** Inger Stevens use of the idiom is lampshaded by Creator/HarryBelafonte in ''Film/TheWorldTheFleshAndTheDevil''.

to:

* France doesn't usually dish out age restrictions on mainstream movies, likely owing to the [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution rough history with censorship]]. Many movies rated R in the US or the UK are given "all ages" ratings unless they are very violent or patently adult.
** In general, Western European countries (including the United Kingdom) and some of their former colonies (like Australia) tend to be much more lenient about sexual content and profanity in films than the United States. For example, ''Film/SilverLiningsPlaybook'', rated R in the US mostly for [[ClusterFBomb the Cluster F-Bombs]], received the equivalent of a G rating in Sweden and France and an unrestricted M rating in Australia and New Zealand [[note]] meaning the film is recommended for mature audiences, but anyone can watch it.[[/note]]. ''Film/MagicMike'' was also rated G in France and Sweden, despite being a film about ''strippers''. However, ''Film/PrideAndPrejudiceAndZombies'' received the equivalent of an R rating in most countries (but only a PG-13 in the US.)
* In the United States, the NC-17 rating is seen as a death sentence for a film's commercial viability, basically limiting it to arthouse/independent cinemas. Major retailers like Walmart and Best Buy refuse to stock NC-17 films or DVDs, and theater chains like AMC are reluctant to book them. Although the MPAA specifically states it does not denote pornography, in practice it has been used for films with strong sexual content. Producers fight for an R rating and are often dismayed to get an NC-17. On the other side of the pond, however, the 18 certificate (roughly equivalent to the NC-17) not only has little effect on commercial viability[[note]]Although nobody under 18 may watch it in cinemas, plenty of mainstream films like Fargo, Silence of the Lambs, Halloween and Saw received an 18 and did very well at the UK box office.[[/note]] , it is seen as a badge of honor. In fact, [[http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1169772/My-film-horrific-15-director-tells-censors-pushed-18.html one horror director]] was disappointed that his film ''didn't'' get an 18 certificate. Films cut for an NC-17 in the US for commercial reasons usually receive an 18 certificate uncut in the UK, with none of the stigma attached.
* ''Film/IAmAFugitiveFromAChainGang'': Helen's line "I'm free, white, and twenty-one." was a common expression during the 1920s, 1930s, and much later when racism was not only socially acceptable but the law in many parts of the country. The use of this line lasted into the sixties and even seventies.
**
seventies. Inger Stevens use of the idiom is lampshaded by Creator/HarryBelafonte in ''Film/TheWorldTheFleshAndTheDevil''.


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* ''Film/TheMaskOfFuManchu'' is a YellowPeril pulp movie from the 1930s and is full of Asian stereotypes and villains, complete with Boris Karloff and Myrna Loy in {{Yellowface}}. And of course the fact that the plot involves Fu Manchu trying to lead all of Asia against the west.
24th May '17 3:23:33 PM DesertDragon
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/AceVenturaPetDetective'', the BigBad is Ray Finkle, former football player whose botched field goal kick cost him a Superbowl win and ultimately his sanity. It is later revealed that the beautiful female police lieutenant Lois Einhorn, who dislikes Ace but has some sexual tension with him, actually ''is'' Einhorn, having assumed the identity of a dead woman and even having partial [[{{Transsexual}} gender-reassignment surgery]] to pass as female. The movie is vague as to whether or not Finkle is actually transgender or if he's ''so'' insane, he changed genders and became a cop just as part of a long-term plan to get back at the Miami Dolphins. Furthermore, when Ace realizes the two are one and the same, he's horrified that he got to second base with a "man" and we see a montage of him washing his mouth out, burning his clothes, and taking a ShowerOfAngst. With transgender visibility having come a long way since the mid-90's, what was considered funny back then would be ''skewered'' for its transphobia today.
20th May '17 6:33:12 PM CrowTR0bot
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* In the Soviet Union {{Blackface}} and {{Yellowface}} were not considered racist, and because of that there were more than a few movies with anti-racist messages that had oppressed Black or Asian people played by white Soviet actors. For example, Soviet adaptations of AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn stressed the racism and evils of slavery, yet nearly all of them had Jim played by a man in blackface.

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* In the Soviet Union {{Blackface}} and {{Yellowface}} were not considered racist, and because of that there were more than a few movies with anti-racist messages that had oppressed Black or Asian people played by white Soviet actors. For example, Soviet adaptations of AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn stressed the racism and evils of slavery, yet nearly all of them had Jim played by a man in blackface. Of course [[JustifiedTrope actual black people were hard to come by in the Soviet Union]], so this at least would have been basic pragmatism.
18th May '17 9:10:59 PM hello86
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* Another meta-example: Voiceover singing in Hollywood vs. Bollywood. American audiences frown on the practice, viewing it as inauthentic and cheating (one of the reasons Creator/AudreyHepburn lost the Best Actress Oscar for ''Film/MyFairLady'' was because she didn't do her own singing). In Bollywood it's openly acknowledged and accepted; actors are dubbed over to the point where one woman, Lata Mangeshkar, provided the singing voice ''for every female actress in every major Bollywood movie for several decades'' and was a celebrity in her own right. [[note]]When Lata is unavailable, producers use her sister, Asha Bhosle, who sounds just like her.[[/note]]

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* Another meta-example: Voiceover singing in Hollywood vs. Bollywood. American audiences frown on the practice, viewing it as inauthentic and cheating (one of the reasons Creator/AudreyHepburn lost was not nominated for the Best Actress Oscar for ''Film/MyFairLady'' was because she didn't do her own singing). In Bollywood it's openly acknowledged and accepted; actors are dubbed over to the point where one woman, Lata Mangeshkar, provided the singing voice ''for every female actress in every major Bollywood movie for several decades'' and was a celebrity in her own right. [[note]]When Lata is unavailable, producers use her sister, Asha Bhosle, who sounds just like her.[[/note]]
12th May '17 7:34:38 AM CraigoMc
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** Depends on the country. In many areas, it is perfectly legal to hit someone over "fighting words." See the other wiki for details.
30th Apr '17 4:40:43 PM comicwriter
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** Both Bender and Andy use the word "fag/faggot" without being punished or reprimanded for it. Today, the word is seen as an insult almost on par with the N-word, but in TheEighties, the term would essentially be seen as just another swear, and doesn't imply that either of them were gay-bashers.

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** Both Bender and Andy use the word "fag/faggot" without being punished or reprimanded for it. Today, the word is seen as an insult a slur almost on par with the N-word, but in TheEighties, the term would essentially be seen as just another swear, and doesn't imply that either of them were gay-bashers.
22nd Apr '17 3:39:42 PM Golondrina
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* In the immediate lead-up to one of the most famous scenes in ''Film/CitizenKane'', when Jed Leland is promoting Charles Foster Kane for governor of New York, it's a bit odd for modern audiences to hear him unabashedly describing his boss as a "liberal," since that word is hardly ever used in a positive context anymore, what with being associated (unfairly) with the 1960s counterculture and the supposed persecution of white working-class Americans. But it's even more shocking to hear Leland use the term "fighting liberal" - even though that was a completely un-ironic and flattering term in the early twentieth century - because that phrase inherently clashes with many modern conceptions of political liberalism, such as the BourgeoisBohemian (of which, ironically enough, many consider OrsonWelles himself to be the TropeMaker, at least for Hollywood).

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* In the immediate lead-up to one of the most famous scenes in ''Film/CitizenKane'', when Jed Leland is promoting Charles Foster Kane for governor of New York, it's a bit odd for modern audiences to hear him unabashedly describing his boss as a "liberal," since that word is hardly ever used in a positive context anymore, what with being associated (unfairly) with the 1960s counterculture and the supposed persecution of white working-class Americans. But it's even more shocking to hear Leland use the term "fighting liberal" - even though that was a completely un-ironic and flattering term in the early twentieth century - because that phrase inherently clashes with many modern conceptions of political liberalism, such as the BourgeoisBohemian (of which, ironically enough, many consider OrsonWelles Creator/OrsonWelles himself to be the TropeMaker, at least for Hollywood).
31st Mar '17 2:17:21 PM comicwriter
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* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 1990's and 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence were seen as not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. The Clinton administration's softer stance on crime (including the Assault Weapons Ban) and lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 80's and early 90's.

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* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 1990's and 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence were seen as seem not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. The Clinton administration's softer stance on crime (including the Assault Weapons Ban) and lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 80's and early 90's.
18th Mar '17 3:23:40 PM 64SuperNintendo
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* ''Film/KidsInAmerica'': [[spoiler: through they were successful on preventing their bully of a principal from becoming superintendent by informing parents about her]], a teenager from present day would wanna ask why didn’t any of the students used to the internet to get the message out since the film was released in 2005, even with the capabilities of the technology at the time. Weller's methods in suppressing the students' freedom of expression in the school wouldn't work in cyberspace where there's nothing she could do since it's open to the public.

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* ''Film/KidsInAmerica'': [[spoiler: through Though they were successful on preventing their bully of a principal from becoming superintendent by informing parents about her]], a teenager from present day would wanna ask why didn’t any of the students used to the internet to get the message out since the film was released in 2005, even with the capabilities of the technology at the time. Weller's methods in suppressing the students' freedom of expression in the school wouldn't work in cyberspace where there's nothing she could do since it's open to the public.
18th Mar '17 3:22:02 PM 64SuperNintendo
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* Watch any western from the 20's through the 70's, and see if you can notice how many times Native Americans, women or Mexicans are stereotyped or condescended towards. [[Film/TheTreasureoftheSierraMadre "I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges"]] would not have made it to the final cut nowadays, that's for sure.

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* Watch any western from the 20's through the 70's, and see if you can notice how many times Native Americans, women or Mexicans are stereotyped or condescended towards. [[Film/TheTreasureoftheSierraMadre [[Film/TheTreasureOfTheSierraMadre "I don't have to show you any stinkin' badges"]] would not have made it to the final cut nowadays, that's for sure.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ValuesDissonance.Film