History ValuesDissonance / Film

14th Aug '17 7:09:32 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/{{Shivers}}'': As a result of the sex parasites, men start making out with other men and women start making out with other women. Given that it's set in the more conservative 1970s[[note]]Remember, the "sexual revolution" of the 1960s didn't exactly filter through to most layers of society immediately[[/note]], this was ''probably'' intended to be seen as people losing all rational inhibitions. Nowadays, putting homosexuality on the same level as incest or pedophilia would be incredibly insulting.
20th Jul '17 3:49:43 PM LaptopGuy
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* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence seem not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. Lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 70's to early 90's.

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* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence seem not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, beating and several notable instances of the mid-2010s, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities minorities, especially African-Americans, disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. Lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 70's to early 90's.



* The Western ''Film/RideWithTheDevil,'' starring Creator/TobeyMaguire, was destroyed at the box office thanks to Values Dissonance. The movie portrays an African American fighting on the side of southern guerrillas in the Kansas border skirmishes of the Civil War. Although the character had a historically factual precedent, the idea of a black soldier fighting for the Confederacy was so repugnant that the film was delayed, promotional materials were destroyed, and the release was severely limited (in the actual Confederacy most of the black soldiers were slaves forced into service by their masters though, so it's not as if they were all willing anyway).

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* The Western ''Film/RideWithTheDevil,'' starring Creator/TobeyMaguire, was destroyed at the box office thanks to Values Dissonance. The movie portrays an African American fighting on the side of southern guerrillas in the Kansas border skirmishes of the Civil War. Although the character had a historically factual precedent, the idea of a black soldier fighting for the Confederacy Confederacy, an institution widely associated with white supremacy, was so repugnant that the film was delayed, promotional materials were destroyed, and the release was severely limited (in the actual Confederacy most of the black soldiers were slaves forced into service by their masters though, so it's not as if they were all willing anyway).



* The Depression-era film ''Film/GabrielOverTheWhiteHouse'' shows the President of the United States essentially setting himself up as a fascist dictator, suspending the Constitution and dissolving Congress when they try to oppose him, creating a paramilitary police force with extra-judicial powers accountable only to him and forcing all other nations to unilaterally disarm and submit to American rule using the threat of superweapons. This is depicted as a ''good'' and possibly even divinely inspired thing, and his totalitarian policies are shown to end crime, introduce huge economic booms and create world peace. To be fair, the film was controversial even at the time, but its unabashed praise for what would be TheEmpire in any other story is shocking to modern audiences. It's a sign of the desperate time it was made in more than anything else, when there were some calling for a dictatorial president to seize power and resolve the crippling economic issues and organized crime ravaging the country. [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything Which is a disturbingly similar situation]] [[ThoseWackyNazis to the state of Germany after World War One.]]

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* The Depression-era film ''Film/GabrielOverTheWhiteHouse'' shows the President of the United States essentially setting himself up as a fascist dictator, suspending the Constitution and dissolving Congress when they try to oppose him, creating a paramilitary police force with extra-judicial powers accountable only to him and forcing all other nations to unilaterally disarm and submit to American rule using the threat of superweapons. This is depicted as a ''good'' and possibly even divinely inspired thing, and his totalitarian policies are shown to end crime, introduce huge economic booms and create world peace. To be fair, the film was controversial even at the time, but its unabashed praise for what would be TheEmpire in any other story is shocking to modern audiences. It's a sign of the desperate time it was made in more than anything else, when there were some calling for a dictatorial president to seize power and resolve the crippling economic issues and organized crime ravaging the country. [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything Which is a disturbingly similar situation]] [[ThoseWackyNazis to the state of Germany after World War One.]]]] The election of UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump in 2016 has only worsened this situation, given the fact that he is criticized for being a fascist by many of his opponents.



** The book and film present the end of the pre-Civil War era as something to be mourned, giving a very RoseTintedNarrative of slavery.
** Scarlett suffers marital rape at the hands of Rhett late in the film, and it's presented as a good thing for their marriage. Scarlett also gives a NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization.

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** The book and film present the end of the pre-Civil War era as something to be mourned, giving a very RoseTintedNarrative of slavery.
slavery, attitudes that widely became taboo post-Civil Rights movement.
** Scarlett suffers marital rape at the hands of Rhett late in the film, and it's presented as a good thing for their marriage. Scarlett also gives a NotIfTheyEnjoyedItRationalization. The rise of feminism later in the century led to increasingly negative attitudes towards rape.



* ''Film/TheSandlot'' has a very classic scene of where one of the boys gets CPR, and, upon recovery, plays at still being unconscious so that next time she goes to mouth-to-mouth, he can ''grab her head and kiss her''. The gang, of course, responded by [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop tipping their hats to him for the next few weeks]], and she responded by becoming interested in and eventually marrying him.

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* ''Film/TheSandlot'' has a very classic scene of where one of the boys gets CPR, and, upon recovery, plays at still being unconscious so that next time she goes to mouth-to-mouth, he can ''grab her head and kiss her''. The gang, of course, responded by [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop tipping their hats to him for the next few weeks]], and she responded by becoming interested in and eventually marrying him. Now imagine if the boy were a grown-up man...



** Also, as sex education is now mandatory in Maine public schools, Carrie would have learned about menstruation well beforehand and likely wouldn't have freaked out so terribly when it happened.

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** Also, as sex education is now mandatory in Maine many public schools, schools in the country (including in Maine, where the film takes place), Carrie would have learned about menstruation well beforehand and likely wouldn't have freaked out so terribly when it happened.



* In ''Film/AnimalHouse'', the GoodAngelBadAngel scene where Pinto wonders whether he should have sex with the unconscious teenager Clorette has become ''extremely'' cringeworthy since rape, both on college campuses and among teenagers, has become a bigger concern. Then again, the more serious attitude toward campus rape can mean that for some viewers the joke now CrossesTheLineTwice, and as a result has become even ''funnier.''

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* In ''Film/AnimalHouse'', the GoodAngelBadAngel scene where Pinto wonders whether he should have sex with the unconscious teenager Clorette has become ''extremely'' cringeworthy since rape, both on college campuses and among teenagers, has become a bigger concern. While both parties would be equally mocked back in the '70s, nowadays virtually everyone will sympathize with Clorette and Pinto would be ostracized from society. Then again, the more serious attitude toward campus rape can mean that for some viewers the joke now CrossesTheLineTwice, and as a result has become even ''funnier.''



** Mike Teevee playing with a realistic toy gun would certainly not fly with mass shootings all too real in today's world. He brings it with him to the factory and even pretends to shoot Willy Wonka with it, yelling "WHAM! You're dead!". If that happened these days, he'd be tried as a juvenile delinquent.

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** Mike Teevee playing with a realistic toy gun would certainly not fly with mass shootings all too real in today's world. He brings it with him to the factory and even pretends to shoot Willy Wonka with it, yelling "WHAM! You're dead!". If that happened these days, he'd be tried as a juvenile delinquent. It doesn't help that the 2005 version of Mike is a sociopathic video game addict from ''Denver, Colorado'', the same metropolitan area behind the [[UsefulNotes/{{Columbine}} tragedy that first brought mass shooting into the forefront of American consciousness]].



* In ''Film/AceVenturaPetDetective'', the BigBad is Ray Finkle, former football player whose botched field goal kick cost him a Superbowl win and ultimately his sanity. It is later revealed that the beautiful female police lieutenant Lois Einhorn, who dislikes Ace but has some sexual tension with him, actually ''is'' Finkle, having assumed the identity of a dead woman and even having partial [[{{Transsexual}} gender-reassignment surgery]] to pass as female. The movie is vague as to whether or not Finkle is actually transgender or if he's ''so'' insane, he changed genders and became a cop just as part of a long-term plan to get back at the Miami Dolphins. Furthermore, when Ace realizes the two are one and the same, he's horrified that he got to second base with a "man" and we see a montage of him washing his mouth out, burning his clothes, and taking a ShowerOfAngst. With transgender visibility having come a long way since the mid-90's, what was considered funny back then would be ''skewered'' for its transphobia today.

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* In ''Film/AceVenturaPetDetective'', the BigBad is Ray Finkle, former football player whose botched field goal kick cost him a Superbowl win and ultimately his sanity. It is later revealed that the beautiful female police lieutenant Lois Einhorn, who dislikes Ace but has some sexual tension with him, actually ''is'' Finkle, having assumed the identity of a dead woman and even having partial [[{{Transsexual}} gender-reassignment surgery]] to pass as female. The movie is vague as to whether or not Finkle is actually transgender or if he's ''so'' insane, he changed genders and became a cop just as part of a long-term plan to get back at the Miami Dolphins. Furthermore, when Ace realizes the two are one and the same, he's horrified that he got to second base with a "man" and we see a montage of him washing his mouth out, burning his clothes, and taking a ShowerOfAngst. With transgender visibility and acceptance of trans people in society having come a long way since the mid-90's, what was considered funny back then would be ''skewered'' for its transphobia today.
17th Jul '17 8:35:44 PM SickBoy
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* In ''Film/AceVenturaPetDetective'', the BigBad is Ray Finkle, former football player whose botched field goal kick cost him a Superbowl win and ultimately his sanity. It is later revealed that the beautiful female police lieutenant Lois Einhorn, who dislikes Ace but has some sexual tension with him, actually ''is'' Einhorn, having assumed the identity of a dead woman and even having partial [[{{Transsexual}} gender-reassignment surgery]] to pass as female. The movie is vague as to whether or not Finkle is actually transgender or if he's ''so'' insane, he changed genders and became a cop just as part of a long-term plan to get back at the Miami Dolphins. Furthermore, when Ace realizes the two are one and the same, he's horrified that he got to second base with a "man" and we see a montage of him washing his mouth out, burning his clothes, and taking a ShowerOfAngst. With transgender visibility having come a long way since the mid-90's, what was considered funny back then would be ''skewered'' for its transphobia today.

to:

* In ''Film/AceVenturaPetDetective'', the BigBad is Ray Finkle, former football player whose botched field goal kick cost him a Superbowl win and ultimately his sanity. It is later revealed that the beautiful female police lieutenant Lois Einhorn, who dislikes Ace but has some sexual tension with him, actually ''is'' Einhorn, Finkle, having assumed the identity of a dead woman and even having partial [[{{Transsexual}} gender-reassignment surgery]] to pass as female. The movie is vague as to whether or not Finkle is actually transgender or if he's ''so'' insane, he changed genders and became a cop just as part of a long-term plan to get back at the Miami Dolphins. Furthermore, when Ace realizes the two are one and the same, he's horrified that he got to second base with a "man" and we see a montage of him washing his mouth out, burning his clothes, and taking a ShowerOfAngst. With transgender visibility having come a long way since the mid-90's, what was considered funny back then would be ''skewered'' for its transphobia today.
12th Jul '17 6:04:43 PM AdamC
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* In ''Film/AnimalHouse'', the GoodAngelBadAngel scene where Pinto wonders whether he should have sex with the unconscious teenager Clorette has become ''extremely'' cringeworthy since rape, both on college campuses and among teenagers, has become a bigger concern.

to:

* In ''Film/AnimalHouse'', the GoodAngelBadAngel scene where Pinto wonders whether he should have sex with the unconscious teenager Clorette has become ''extremely'' cringeworthy since rape, both on college campuses and among teenagers, has become a bigger concern. Then again, the more serious attitude toward campus rape can mean that for some viewers the joke now CrossesTheLineTwice, and as a result has become even ''funnier.''
4th Jul '17 2:09:58 AM AdamC
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* The movie ''Film/OfficeSpace'' is essentially about a man going into clinical depression over his job, which ''is'' shown to be frustrating and demeaning. But in the wake of the Great Recession and mass unemployment it comes off as rather unsympathetic to complain about having a steady job just because you're unhappy with it.
-->'''Peter:''' What if we're still doing this when we're fifty?\\
'''Samir:''' It'd be nice to have that kind of job security.
29th Jun '17 6:28:42 PM Green_lantern40
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* ''Film/{{The Jazz Singer}}'' features a hero who must escape the confines of his conservative Jewish father to realize his own dream of self-expression... by performing in blackface.

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* ''Film/{{The Jazz Singer}}'' features a hero who must escape the confines of his conservative Jewish father to realize his own dream of self-expression... by performing in blackface. The film was remade in 1980 with Music/NeilDiamond in the lead role... and the '''blackface element still intact''', which led to [[DudeNotFunny predictable]] [[BoxOfficeBomb results]] at the box office.
6th Jun '17 6:16:55 PM jm9101983
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* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 1990's and 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence seem not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. Lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 80's and early 90's.

to:

* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 1990's and 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence seem not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. Lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 80's and 70's to early 90's.
1st Jun '17 9:21:33 AM BiffJr
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* In ''Film/SpringSummerFallWinterAndSpring'', the older monk catches the younger having sex with a girl who has come for medicine, and kicks her out, warning him that lust and desire will inevitably lead him to murder. The younger monk ignores him and follows her... "inevitably", he ''kills her'' a few years later.
1st Jun '17 9:20:15 AM nightkiller
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* Cheering in the cinema is generally more accepted in America than in the UK and Europe (hence the "mfw Americans clap" meme), though there are exceptions. Japan and other Asian countries are even worse about this. Clapping during a performance is considered quite ''rude'' as you are distracting from the show. Live performers such as Cirque Du Soleil were actually coached about this as they were used to boisterous applause after every major trick.

to:

* Cheering in the cinema is generally more accepted in North America than in the UK and Europe (hence the "mfw Americans clap" meme), though there are exceptions. Japan and other Asian countries are even worse about this. Clapping during a performance is considered quite ''rude'' as you are distracting from the show. Live performers such as Cirque Du Soleil were actually coached about this as they were used to boisterous applause after every major trick.
1st Jun '17 9:18:52 AM BiffJr
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* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 1990's and 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence seem not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. The Clinton administration's softer stance on crime (including the Assault Weapons Ban) and lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 80's and early 90's.

to:

* The whole idea of the {{Cowboy Cop}}, omnipresent in cop movies of the 1970's and 1980's has come under fire since the 1990's and 2000's. Back in the 70's, rising crime rates and then the "rough on crime" rhetoric of the Reagan era in the 80's made actions like beating up suspects for information, executing helpless criminals if they were evil enough, disregard for warrant, and all around tons of violence seem not just acceptable for police officers and displays of their badassitude, but necessary for combating crime. This ended after a string of high-profile incidents of PoliceBrutality and shootings of unarmed suspects, most infamously the Rodney King beating, which also revealed these actions targeted racial minorities disproportionately. As a result, characters like Film/DirtyHarry and Film/{{Cobra}} come across as a lot less sympathetic nowadays. The Clinton administration's softer stance on crime (including the Assault Weapons Ban) and lower Lower crime rates beginning in the mid-90's also led to the demise of the "vigilante hero" and "future big city in ruins" subgenres extremely popular in the late 80's and early 90's.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=ValuesDissonance.Film