History UsefulNotes / WarsOfTheRoses

8th Oct '17 5:28:06 PM DarkPhoenix94
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons: Invoked by Henry Tudor, who used a red dragon as his personal banner while rallying his troops. Partly served as a marker of his Welsh heritage (the red dragon being a popular national emblem of Wales), and partly as a sign of his claim that he would bring the English monarchy back to its glory days of medieval chivalry. It's the sort of unabashed romanticism that you would expect of an English monarch who named his eldest son "[[Myth/KingArthur Arthur]]".
* ItsPersonal: In a war that was essentially a long succession of family feuds, a few moments like this were inevitable. For Richard of York, it was probably his rival Edmund of Somerset replacing him as a Commander in France, and later being named the godfather of the infant Prince Edward. For Somerset, it was probably being imprisoned in the Tower of London by York. For Edward of York, his father's death at the Battle of Wakefield strengthened his resolve to crush the Lancastrians at all costs. Similarly, Somerset's death at the Battle of Saint Albans left his son Henry determined to crush the Yorkists, while Henry Tudor was galvanized into becoming a major player in the Wars after his father Edmund and his grandfather Owen were both captured and executed by Yorkist forces.

to:

* InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons: Invoked by Henry Tudor, who used a red dragon as his personal banner while rallying his troops. Partly served as a marker of his Welsh heritage (the red dragon being a popular national emblem of Wales), and partly as a sign of his claim that he would bring the English monarchy back to its glory days of medieval chivalry. It's the sort of unabashed romanticism (or, considering the Machiavellian character of Henry, cynical manipulation of unabashed romanticism) that you would expect of an English monarch who named his eldest son "[[Myth/KingArthur Arthur]]".
* ItsPersonal: In a war that was essentially a long succession of family feuds, a few moments like this were inevitable. For Richard of York, it was probably his rival Edmund of Somerset replacing him as a Commander in France, and later being named the godfather of the infant Prince Edward. For Somerset, it was probably being imprisoned in the Tower of London by York. For Edward of York, his father's death at the Battle of Wakefield strengthened his resolve to crush the Lancastrians at all costs. Similarly, Somerset's death at the Battle of Saint Albans left his son Henry determined to crush the Yorkists, while Henry Tudor was galvanized galvanised into becoming a major player in the Wars after his father Edmund and his grandfather Owen were both captured and executed by Yorkist forces.



* NonIndicativeName: The House of Lancaster wasn't based in the Duchy of Lancaster, and it wasn't a "House" (a clan bearing the common family name "Lancaster") in the traditional sense. The name refers to the fact that the House was established as the reigning branch of the royal family by Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster; the rebel faction was centered around Richard Duke of York and his hereditary claim to the throne. Both Houses' actual surname was Plantagenet.

to:

* NonIndicativeName: The House of Lancaster wasn't based in the Duchy of Lancaster, and it wasn't a "House" (a clan bearing the common family name "Lancaster") in the traditional sense. The name refers to the fact that the House was established as the reigning branch of the royal family by Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster; the rebel faction was centered centred around Richard Duke of York and his hereditary claim to the throne. Both Houses' actual surname was Plantagenet.



* TheManBehindTheMan: Henry VI was an infamously weak leader, but he was surrounded by a long succession of ambitious advisors who ''all'' wanted to play this role. The resulting power struggle was a key cause of the Wars, as everyone realized the potential of being able to use a king as a pawn. As the Wars progressed, Henry's wife Queen Margaret eventually came to dominate the throne, taking a much more active role in fighting the Yorkists than her husband. Even the Yorkist ruler Edward IV was largely at the mercy of his fabulously wealthy lieutenant Richard Neville, the Earl of Warwick--at least until Warwick betrayed him. They didn't call Warwick "The Kingmaker" for nothing.
* RagsToRiches: If it hadn't been for Owain ap Maredudd ap Tudur traveling to London to seek his fortune, and having a chance love affair with Henry V's widow Catherine, there likely never would have been a House of Tudor. In fact, it was a stroke of monumental good luck that the English crown chose to recognize Owain and Catherine's two children as royalty, considering their marriage was technically ''illegal''. [[note]] The English court had passed laws decreeing that widowed queens could not remarry without the court's permission, since they feared the possibility of a queen trying to rule in her husband's name and produce a new heir. After the debacle of Edward II being deposed by his rebellious wife Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, the concern was somewhat understandable.[[/note]] But against all odds, their children were christened as Edmund and Jasper [[MeaningfulRename Tudor]], the Earl of Richmond and the Duke of Bedford. Henry VI eventually came to publicly recognize them as his half-siblings, and accepted them as allies for the Lancastrian cause. Then Edmund's son Henry eventually took the throne for the House of Lancaster, and the rest is history.
That said, it's often wrongly said that Owen Tudor was a "low-born squire". He was the scion of an ''extremely'' highly placed and powerful family and was a descendant of not just the great Llywelyn Fawr but of virtually every native Welsh prince, often through female lines. His direct male ancestors were the seneschals of Gwynedd.

to:

* TheManBehindTheMan: Henry VI became King as a child and was an infamously weak leader, but he was surrounded by a long succession of ambitious advisors advisers who ''all'' wanted to play this role. The resulting power struggle was a key cause of the Wars, as everyone realized the potential of being able to use a king as a pawn. As the Wars progressed, Henry's wife Queen Margaret eventually came to dominate the throne, taking a much more active role in fighting the Yorkists than her husband. Even the Yorkist ruler Edward IV was largely at the mercy of his fabulously wealthy lieutenant Richard Neville, the Earl of Warwick--at least until Warwick betrayed him.him (though, to be fair, Warwick had been patiently negotiating for a marriage to a French princess when Edward went behind his back and married beautiful commoner Elizabeth Woodville, putting Warwick in the mother of all awkward positions, so you can see why he might have been upset). They didn't call Warwick "The Kingmaker" for nothing.
* RagsToRiches: If it hadn't been for Owain ap Maredudd ap Tudur traveling to London to seek his fortune, and having a chance love affair with Henry V's widow Catherine, there likely never would have been a House of Tudor. In fact, it was a stroke of monumental good luck that the English crown chose to recognize Owain and Catherine's two children as royalty, considering their marriage was technically ''illegal''. [[note]] The English court had passed laws decreeing that widowed queens could not remarry without the court's permission, since they feared the possibility of a queen trying to rule in her husband's name and produce a new heir. After the debacle of Edward II being deposed by his rebellious wife Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, the concern was somewhat understandable.[[/note]] But against all odds, their children were christened as Edmund and Jasper [[MeaningfulRename Tudor]], the Earl of Richmond and the Duke of Bedford. Henry VI eventually came to publicly recognize recognise them as his half-siblings, and accepted them as allies for the Lancastrian cause. Then Edmund's son Henry eventually took the throne for the House of Lancaster, and the rest is history.
** That said, it's often wrongly said that Owen Tudor was a "low-born squire". He was the scion of an ''extremely'' highly placed and powerful family and was a descendant of not just the great Llywelyn Fawr (and thus possibly from John I of England, father of Llywelyn's wife, Joan, meaning a line of descent right back to William the Conqueror... though it is probable that if this was the case, Henry VII would have made more of it) but of virtually every native Welsh prince, often through female lines. His direct male ancestors were the seneschals of Gwynedd.



* SiblingYinYang: While Richard III probably wasn't [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade a cackling hunchbacked supervillain]], it's hard to deny that he and his older brother Edward IV were as different as night and day. Edward was very much the traditional English knight, he won much of his support through his prowess on the battlefield, and he was remembered by most of his contemporaries as handsome and charismatic, though he was said to have a fiery temper, and his penchant for feasting and womanizing left a dent in his reputation in his later life. By contrast, Richard was a calculating political strategist who was generally agreed to be far more competent at statecraft than warfare, though his austere personality--coupled with his persistent struggles with scoliosis--made it far harder for him to match his brother in charisma. He was also far more willing to resort to use political intrigue to guard the welfare of the realm, most infamously when he had Prince Edward and his younger brother Richard imprisoned in the Tower of London and seized the throne for himself.

to:

* SiblingYinYang: While Richard III probably wasn't [[HistoricalVillainUpgrade a cackling hunchbacked supervillain]], it's hard to deny that he and his older brother Edward IV were as different as night and day. Edward was very much the traditional English knight, he won much of his support through his prowess on the battlefield, and he was remembered by most of his contemporaries as handsome and charismatic, though and he married a commoner, almost certainly for love (though it might have been a case of TakeAThirdOption). However, he was said to have a fiery temper, and his penchant for feasting and womanizing womanising left a dent in his reputation in his later life. By contrast, Richard was a calculating political strategist who was generally agreed to be far more competent at statecraft than warfare, though his austere personality--coupled with his persistent struggles with scoliosis--made it far harder for him to match his brother in charisma. He was also far more willing to resort to use political intrigue to guard the welfare of the realm, most infamously when he had Prince Edward and his younger brother Richard imprisoned in the Tower of London and seized the throne for himself.himself, possibly even ordering their deaths (even leaving aside Tudor propaganda, he is the most obvious candidate, simply because he was the one with the most to gain and the Princes were under guard in [[TheAlcatraz the Tower, the most secure fortress in the country,]] surrounded by his trusted men, under his protection. At the very least, he was guilty of negligence).



* WellIntentionedExtremist: Yes, Richard III broke the law by seizing the throne from his 12 year-old nephew Prince Edward, who was Edward IV's legal heir. He also lived in a time when the disastrous reign of Henry VI--who inherited the throne as an infant, and had to learn how to rule a kingdom when he was just a child--was still fresh in England's collective memory. Considering the context, it's not hard to imagine that he wanted to prevent history from repeating itself.
* WhosYourDaddy: There were persistent rumors that the young Lancastrian heir Edward, Prince of Wales was actually fathered by his godfather Edmund Beaufort, the Duke of Somerset. This may have fueled the Duke of York's resentment of Somerset, as he likely saw it as one more instance of Somerset trying to seize power illegitimately.

to:

* WellIntentionedExtremist: Yes, Richard III broke the law by seizing the throne from his 12 year-old nephew Prince Edward, who was Edward IV's legal heir. He also lived in a time when the disastrous reign of Henry VI--who inherited the throne as an infant, and had to learn how to rule a kingdom when he was just a child--was child, and for all his good nature, was extremely bad at it--was still fresh in England's collective memory. Considering the context, it's not hard to imagine that he wanted to prevent history from repeating itself.
* WhosYourDaddy: There were persistent rumors rumours that the young Lancastrian heir Edward, Prince of Wales was actually fathered by his godfather Edmund Beaufort, the Duke of Somerset. This may have fueled fuelled the Duke of York's resentment of Somerset, as he likely saw it as one more instance of Somerset trying to seize power illegitimately.



* FemmeFatale: How Queen Margaret of Anjou is often portrayed, thanks to the influence of her victorious enemies. To give you a good idea: she's the most likely inspiration for Cersei Lannister in ''Series/GameOfThrones''.

to:

* FemmeFatale: How Queen Margaret of Anjou is often portrayed, thanks to the influence of her victorious enemies. To give you a good idea: she (or how she's depicted) the most likely inspiration for Cersei Lannister in ''Series/GameOfThrones''.



* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Henry VII. Considering the first dramatic portrayals of the Wars were patronized by his granddaughter, this one's a no-brainer.
* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Richard III. Though not so much anymore. Modern portrayals of the House of York tend to cast him as the mildest of the York brothers, an interpretation certainly more accurate than Shakespeare's.

to:

* HistoricalHeroUpgrade: Henry VII. Considering the first and by far the most famous dramatic portrayals of the Wars were patronized patronised by his granddaughter, this one's a no-brainer.
* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: Richard III. Though III, though not so much anymore. Modern portrayals of the House of York tend to cast him as the mildest of the York brothers, an interpretation certainly more accurate than Shakespeare's.



* ''[[Series/{{Blackadder}} The Black Adder]]'''s premise is that Richard III actually won the battle of Bosworth Field, but was accidently beheaded by his incompetent nephew Edmund while trying to take his horse. Subsequently, Edmunds father Richard, one of the Princes In the Tower who were never imprisoned or killed, is crowned king and becomes Richard IV. After a 13-year reign, the entire family line, including Edmund, is wiped out in a botched attempt by Edmund (now calling himself the Black Adder) to seize the throne for himself, with Edmund technically being king for about 30 seconds before succumbing to poisoning. The entire period is [[WrittenByTheWinners erased from history by the House of Tudor]], with Henry Tudor claiming the throne and changing the historical records to show that he won the battle, as well as portraying Richard III as a tyrant and kin-slayer.

to:

* ''[[Series/{{Blackadder}} The Black Adder]]'''s premise is that Richard III actually won the battle of Bosworth Field, but was accidently accidentally beheaded by his incompetent nephew Edmund while trying to take his horse. Subsequently, Edmunds Edmund's father Richard, one of the Princes In the Tower who were never imprisoned or killed, is crowned king and becomes Richard IV. After a 13-year reign, the entire family line, including Edmund, is wiped out in a botched attempt by Edmund (now calling himself the Black Adder) to seize the throne for himself, with Edmund technically being king for about 30 seconds before succumbing to poisoning. The entire period is [[WrittenByTheWinners erased from history by the House of Tudor]], with Henry Tudor claiming the throne and changing the historical records to show that he won the battle, as well as portraying Richard III as a tyrant and kin-slayer.



* ...and yet another in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', with Stark and Lannister FeudingFamilies being less than subtle clues.

to:

* ... and yet another in ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', with Stark and Lannister FeudingFamilies being less than subtle clues.
20th Aug '17 2:39:28 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/{{Gemfire}}'' is best described as "''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' in a StandardFantasySetting [[XMeetsY version of the Wars of the Roses]]," down to the king being from House ''[[MeaningfulName Lankshire]]''. And Ishmeria being shaped like England and Wales (including the Isle of Man) and the king's bastard heading up House Tudoria.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Gemfire}}'' is best described as "''Literature/RomanceOfTheThreeKingdoms'' in a StandardFantasySetting [[XMeetsY [[JustForFun/XMeetsY version of the Wars of the Roses]]," down to the king being from House ''[[MeaningfulName Lankshire]]''. And Ishmeria being shaped like England and Wales (including the Isle of Man) and the king's bastard heading up House Tudoria.
15th May '17 1:26:00 AM frozen
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* MeaningfulRename: "Tudor" was not originally an English family name; it was a Welsh given name, originally spelled "Tudur", "Tydir", or "Tewdwr". Henry VII's grandfather was a Welsh squire who--because of his common ancestry--didn't have a family name at all. His name, Owain ap Maredudd ap Tudur, simply meant "Owain, son of Maredudd, son of Tudur" (his grandfather's name, in turn, was "Tudur ap Goronwy"). It wasn't until after his secret marriage to Catherine de Valois that he took the anglicized name "Owen Tudor", making Tudor his surname. His much more famous grandson carried on the tradition when he took the throne and called his new royal line "The House of Tudor".

to:

* MeaningfulRename: "Tudor" was not originally an English family name; it was a The Welsh given name, originally spelled "Tudur", "Tydir", or "Tewdwr". Henry VII's grandfather was a Welsh squire who--because of his common ancestry--didn't have a family name at all. His name, the time did not use surnames no matter how highborn they were, and Owain ap Maredudd Meredudd ap Tudur, simply meant "Owain, Tudur (or, as anglicized, "Owen, son of Maredudd, Meredith, son of Tudur" (his grandfather's name, in turn, Theodore") was "Tudur ap Goronwy"). It wasn't until after his secret marriage no exception. When he first came to Catherine de Valois that court he took the anglicized his father's name as a surname and was referred to as "Owen Tudor", making Tudor his surname.Meredith", but by the time he entered into a relationship with Katherine of Valois he had renamed himself "Owen Tudor". His much more famous grandson carried on the tradition when he took the throne and called his new royal line "The House of Tudor".



* RagsToRiches: Would you believe that Henry Tudor was the grandson of a low-born Welsh squire? It's hard to believe, but he was. If it hadn't been for Owain ap Maredudd ap Tudur traveling to London to seek his fortune, and having a chance love affair with Henry V's widow Catherine, there likely never would have been a House of Tudor. In fact, it was a stroke of monumental good luck that the English crown chose to recognize Owain and Catherine's two children as royalty, considering their marriage was technically ''illegal''. [[note]] The English court had passed laws decreeing that widowed queens could not remarry without the court's permission, since they feared the possibility of a queen trying to rule in her husband's name and produce a new heir. After the debacle of Edward II being deposed by his rebellious wife Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, the concern was somewhat understandable.[[/note]] But against all odds, their children were christened as Edmund and Jasper [[MeaningfulRename Tudor]], the Earl of Richmond and the Duke of Bedford. Henry VI eventually came to publicly recognize them as his half-siblings, and accepted them as allies for the Lancastrian cause. Then Edmund's son Henry eventually took the throne for the House of Lancaster, and the rest is history.

to:

* RagsToRiches: Would you believe that Henry Tudor was the grandson of a low-born Welsh squire? It's hard to believe, but he was. If it hadn't been for Owain ap Maredudd ap Tudur traveling to London to seek his fortune, and having a chance love affair with Henry V's widow Catherine, there likely never would have been a House of Tudor. In fact, it was a stroke of monumental good luck that the English crown chose to recognize Owain and Catherine's two children as royalty, considering their marriage was technically ''illegal''. [[note]] The English court had passed laws decreeing that widowed queens could not remarry without the court's permission, since they feared the possibility of a queen trying to rule in her husband's name and produce a new heir. After the debacle of Edward II being deposed by his rebellious wife Isabella and her lover Roger Mortimer, the concern was somewhat understandable.[[/note]] But against all odds, their children were christened as Edmund and Jasper [[MeaningfulRename Tudor]], the Earl of Richmond and the Duke of Bedford. Henry VI eventually came to publicly recognize them as his half-siblings, and accepted them as allies for the Lancastrian cause. Then Edmund's son Henry eventually took the throne for the House of Lancaster, and the rest is history.history.
That said, it's often wrongly said that Owen Tudor was a "low-born squire". He was the scion of an ''extremely'' highly placed and powerful family and was a descendant of not just the great Llywelyn Fawr but of virtually every native Welsh prince, often through female lines. His direct male ancestors were the seneschals of Gwynedd.
15th May '17 1:06:50 AM frozen
Is there an issue? Send a Message


On a side note, the "Wars of the Roses" were [[BeamMeUpScotty never called that by contemporaries]]. While the name does come from the [[FlowerMotifs White and Red Rose]] badges of the Yorkists and Lancastrians, respectively, it wasn't until Creator/{{Shakespeare}} and Creator/WalterScott that the conflict became known by its now common name. Earlier commentators might have called it the English Civil War (a name later taken by a [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar rather more ideological conflict]]) or perhaps as the War of the English Succession (which later became a now-disused name for the [[UsefulNotes/HanoverStuartWars Nine Years' War]]). Until UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the Battle of Towton was the bloodiest single day for British soldiery; around 28,000 men perished on those snowy fields, a record that would not be surpassed until the opening day of the Battle of the Somme 450 years later.

to:

On a side note, the "Wars of the Roses" were [[BeamMeUpScotty never called that by contemporaries]]. While the name does come from the [[FlowerMotifs White and Red Rose]] badges of the Yorkists and Lancastrians, respectively, it wasn't until Creator/{{Shakespeare}} and Creator/WalterScott that the conflict became known by its now common name. Earlier commentators might have called it the Cousins' War, the English Civil War (a name later taken by a [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar rather more ideological conflict]]) or perhaps as the War of the English Succession (which later became a now-disused name for the [[UsefulNotes/HanoverStuartWars Nine Years' War]]). Until UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the Battle of Towton was the bloodiest single day for British soldiery; around 28,000 men perished on those snowy fields, a record that would not be surpassed until the opening day of the Battle of the Somme 450 years later.



* CoolUncle: Henry Tudor certainly saw his uncle Jasper Tudor as this, considering he served as his primary political and military advisor for much of the last phase of the wars. Since Henry's father Edmund died in captivity when we was an infant, Jasper was also [[ParentalSubstitute the closest thing he had to a father]].

to:

* CoolUncle: Henry Tudor certainly saw his uncle Jasper Tudor as this, considering he served as his primary political and military advisor for much of the last phase of the wars. Since Henry's father Edmund died in captivity when we was an infant, before his birth, Jasper was also [[ParentalSubstitute the closest thing he had to a father]].
16th Apr '17 3:48:50 PM capretty
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Wars of the Roses were a series of [[SuccessionCrisis dynastic civil wars]] set in [[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} England]] between [[TheLateMiddleAges 1455 and 1485]]. They originated in a struggle between descendants of two of King Edward III [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfPlantagenet Plantagenet]]'s eight sons. [[Usefulnotes/HenryTheFourth Henry]] "Bolingbroke" of the [[TheClan House of Lancaster]] [[TheUsurper stole the throne]] from his cousin, Edward's first grandson Richard II. Although his house had a couple of strong monarchs (see Theatre/HenryV), Henry VI turned out to be a strange boy with mental issues. He was challenged for the throne by TheRival [[FeudingFamilies House of York]] (a cousin line descended from Edward III). After thirty years of conflict, in which almost all of the Lancastrians died, [[TakeAThirdOption Henry VII]] from UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor was crowned. He was a cousin of the Lancastrian side, and married a daughter of the Yorkist faction, uniting the two sides. However some historians claim this wasn't the end of the Wars, as there were still threats to Henry from Yorkist Pretenders, which a lot of the nobility didn't seem ready to help him against.

to:

The Wars of the Roses were a series of [[SuccessionCrisis dynastic civil wars]] set in [[UsefulNotes/{{Britain}} England]] between [[TheLateMiddleAges 1455 and 1485]]. They originated in a struggle between descendants of two of King Edward III [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfPlantagenet Plantagenet]]'s eight sons. [[Usefulnotes/HenryTheFourth Henry]] "Bolingbroke" of the [[TheClan House of Lancaster]] [[TheUsurper stole the throne]] from his cousin, Edward's first grandson Richard II. Although his house had a couple of strong monarchs (see Theatre/HenryV), Henry VI turned out to be a strange boy with mental issues. He was challenged for the throne by TheRival [[FeudingFamilies House of York]] (a cousin line descended from Edward III). After thirty years of conflict, in which almost all of the Lancastrians died, [[TakeAThirdOption Henry VII]] from UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfTudor was crowned. He was a cousin of the Lancastrian side, and married Elizabeth of York, a daughter of the Yorkist faction, uniting the two sides. However some historians claim this wasn't the end of the Wars, as there were still threats to Henry from Yorkist Pretenders, which a lot of the nobility didn't seem ready to help him against.
14th Apr '17 3:34:35 AM Ruddigore
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* RichesToRags: The Wars played a key role in the eventual decline and downfall of the once all-powerful Medici Bank. As their power and wealth grew, the Medici eventually opened a branch of their business in London. This branch made the fatal mistake of loaning colossal sums of money to different claimants and their supporters despite the historical tendency of English monarchs to default on loans. When the dust settled, the Medici found to their horror that a great many of their debtors were now dead or ruined and thus unable to repay a penny. On top of that, they'd spent a great deal of money backing ''Lancastrian'' nobles, only for the ''Yorkist'' Edward IV to end up on the throne. Worse still, Edward was in no position to pay off any of the money he owed either, and was only able to offer the Medici exemption from tariffs on wool exports (English wool being a huge part of the European textile industry). The Medici were forced to close their London branch in 1478, with final losses of 51,533 florins, an astronomical sum for the time.
3rd Jan '17 9:54:33 PM Chytus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


On a side note, the "Wars of the Roses" were [[BeamMeUpScotty never called that by contemporaries]]. While the name does come from the [[FlowerMotifs White and Red Rose]] badges of the Yorkists and Lancastrians, respectively, it wasn't until Creator/{{Shakespeare}} and Creator/WalterScott that the conflict became known by its now common name. Earlier commentators might have called it the English Civil War (a name later taken by a [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar rather more ideological conflict]]) or perhaps as the War of the English Succession (which later became a now-disused name for the [[UsefulNotes/HanoverStuartWars Nine Years' War]]). Until WorldWarOne, the Battle of Towton was the bloodiest single day for British soldiery; around 28,000 men perished on those snowy fields, a record that would not be surpassed until the opening day of the Battle of the Somme 450 years later.

to:

On a side note, the "Wars of the Roses" were [[BeamMeUpScotty never called that by contemporaries]]. While the name does come from the [[FlowerMotifs White and Red Rose]] badges of the Yorkists and Lancastrians, respectively, it wasn't until Creator/{{Shakespeare}} and Creator/WalterScott that the conflict became known by its now common name. Earlier commentators might have called it the English Civil War (a name later taken by a [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar rather more ideological conflict]]) or perhaps as the War of the English Succession (which later became a now-disused name for the [[UsefulNotes/HanoverStuartWars Nine Years' War]]). Until WorldWarOne, UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, the Battle of Towton was the bloodiest single day for British soldiery; around 28,000 men perished on those snowy fields, a record that would not be surpassed until the opening day of the Battle of the Somme 450 years later.



* InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons: Invoked by Henry Tudor, who used a red dragon as his personal banner while rallying his troops. Partly served as a marker of his Welsh heritage (the red dragon being a popular national emblem of Wales), and partly as a sign of his claim that he would bring the English monarchy back to its glory days of medieval chivalry. It's the sort of unabashed romanticism that you would expect of an English monarch who named his eldest son "[[KingArthur Arthur]]".
* ItsPersonal: See CycleOfRevenge. In a war that was essentially a long succession of family feuds, a few moments like this were inevitable. For Richard of York, it was probably his rival Edmund of Somerset replacing him as a Commander in France, and later being named the godfather of the infant Prince Edward. For Somerset, it was probably being imprisoned in the Tower of London by York. For Edward of York, his father's death at the Battle of Wakefield strengthened his resolve to crush the Lancastrians at all costs. Similarly, Somerset's death at the Battle of Saint Albans left his son Henry determined to crush the Yorkists, while Henry Tudor was galvanized into becoming a major player in the Wars after his father Edmund and his grandfather Owen were both captured and executed by Yorkist forces.
* LaserGuidedKarma: See HistoryRepeats. Not only were the Wars of the Roses preceded by a strikingly similar civil conflict in France, the mentally unstable French monarch who made that war possible (Charles VI) was actually the father of Catherine de Valois, the French princess who Henry V married to solidify his claim to the French throne--thus making him Henry VI's grandfather. Considering Henry VI's later bouts of instability (which may have been caused by some form of schizophrenia), it's quite possible that he inherited his grandfather's mental illness, and that Henry V inadvertently brought about the fall of the House of Plantagenet by trying to exploit the civil war in France.

to:

* InstantAwesomeJustAddDragons: Invoked by Henry Tudor, who used a red dragon as his personal banner while rallying his troops. Partly served as a marker of his Welsh heritage (the red dragon being a popular national emblem of Wales), and partly as a sign of his claim that he would bring the English monarchy back to its glory days of medieval chivalry. It's the sort of unabashed romanticism that you would expect of an English monarch who named his eldest son "[[KingArthur "[[Myth/KingArthur Arthur]]".
* ItsPersonal: See CycleOfRevenge. In a war that was essentially a long succession of family feuds, a few moments like this were inevitable. For Richard of York, it was probably his rival Edmund of Somerset replacing him as a Commander in France, and later being named the godfather of the infant Prince Edward. For Somerset, it was probably being imprisoned in the Tower of London by York. For Edward of York, his father's death at the Battle of Wakefield strengthened his resolve to crush the Lancastrians at all costs. Similarly, Somerset's death at the Battle of Saint Albans left his son Henry determined to crush the Yorkists, while Henry Tudor was galvanized into becoming a major player in the Wars after his father Edmund and his grandfather Owen were both captured and executed by Yorkist forces.
* LaserGuidedKarma: See HistoryRepeats. Not only were the Wars of the Roses preceded by a strikingly similar civil conflict in France, the mentally unstable French monarch who made that war possible (Charles VI) was actually the father of Catherine de Valois, the French princess who Henry V married to solidify his claim to the French throne--thus making him Henry VI's grandfather. Considering Henry VI's later bouts of instability (which may have been caused by some form of schizophrenia), it's quite possible that he inherited his grandfather's mental illness, and that Henry V inadvertently brought about the fall of the House of Plantagenet by trying to exploit the civil war in France.



* TakeAThirdOption: Who won the Wars of the Roses: the House of York or the House of Lancaster? It's a trick question; ''neither'' side technically won in the end, as the throne was ultimately inherited by the newly christened House of Tudor. Though Henry VII fought on the Lancastrian side, and he was descended from the same royal line as Henry VI, he set up a new royal house that bore the name of his own father, Edmund Tudor. The sigil of the House of Tudor (see page image) was made both red and white to emphasize the fact that it was neither York nor Lancaster.

to:

* TakeAThirdOption: Who won the Wars of the Roses: the House of York or the House of Lancaster? It's a trick question; ''neither'' side technically won in the end, as the throne was ultimately inherited by the newly christened House of Tudor. Though Henry VII fought on the Lancastrian side, and he was descended from the same royal line as Henry VI, he set up a new royal house that bore the name of his own father, Edmund Tudor. The sigil of the House of Tudor (see page image) was made both red and white to emphasize the fact that it was neither York nor Lancaster.



* TyrantTakesTheHelm: See HistoricalVillainUpgrade. Richard III's ascension to the throne is often portrayed this way, since he technically seized the throne from the lawful heir Prince Edward V (who was just 12 years old at the time). Whether he could justifiably be called a "tyrant", however, is a matter of much debate.

to:

* TyrantTakesTheHelm: See HistoricalVillainUpgrade. Richard III's ascension to the throne is often portrayed this way, since he technically seized the throne from the lawful heir Prince Edward V (who was just 12 years old at the time). Whether he could justifiably be called a "tyrant", however, is a matter of much debate.
12th Dec '16 4:30:35 PM Solicitr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NotSoDifferent: From a certain perspective, there were ''no'' "rightful" monarchs in the House of York or the House of Lancaster. Chances were, if you didn't seize the throne of England by force, you inherited it from somebody who did. As you might expect, this made questions of proper rulership considerably more contentious.

to:

* NotSoDifferent: From a certain perspective, there were ''no'' "rightful" monarchs in the House of York or the House of Lancaster. The Lancastrian possession of the crown stemmed from Henry Bolingbroke's forcible usurpation[[note]] and almost certainly the subsequent murder[[/note]] of the rightful king, Richard II, while the Yorkist claim was inferior even to the Lancastrians.' The eventual winner, Henry Tudor, had essentially no claim to the throne whatsoever, since his only (English) royal blood came in the female line from a bastard branch of the family which had been formally excluded from the succession by Act of Parliament. Chances were, if you didn't seize the throne of England by force, you inherited it from somebody who did. As you might expect, this made questions of proper rulership considerably more contentious.
12th Dec '16 4:20:29 PM Solicitr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NonIndicativeName: The House of Lancaster wasn't based in the Duchy of Lancaster, and it wasn't a "House" (a clan bearing the common family name "Lancaster") in the traditional sense. The name refers to the fact that the House, as the Reigning one, was founded by Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster; and the rebel faction was centered around Richard Duke of York and his claim to the throne. Both sides' actual surname was Plantagenet.

to:

* NonIndicativeName: The House of Lancaster wasn't based in the Duchy of Lancaster, and it wasn't a "House" (a clan bearing the common family name "Lancaster") in the traditional sense. The name refers to the fact that the House, House was established as the Reigning one, was founded reigning branch of the royal family by Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster; and the rebel faction was centered around Richard Duke of York and his hereditary claim to the throne. Both sides' Houses' actual surname was Plantagenet.
12th Dec '16 4:15:46 PM Solicitr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NonIndicativeName: The House of Lancaster wasn't based in the Duchy of Lancaster, and it wasn't a "House" (a clan bearing the common family name "Lancaster") in the traditional sense. The name refers to the fact that the Duchy of Lancaster was historically a private holding ruled directly by the reigning royal family, rather than by one of their subservient lords. [[note]] That tradition actually still survives today. One of Queen Elizabeth II's many royal titles is "Duke of Lancaster".[[/note]] Lancastrians were loyal to the reigning royal family of England, while Yorkists wanted to see them overthrown.

to:

* NonIndicativeName: The House of Lancaster wasn't based in the Duchy of Lancaster, and it wasn't a "House" (a clan bearing the common family name "Lancaster") in the traditional sense. The name refers to the fact that the Duchy of Lancaster House, as the Reigning one, was historically a private holding ruled directly founded by Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Lancaster; and the reigning royal family, rather than by one rebel faction was centered around Richard Duke of their subservient lords. [[note]] That tradition actually still survives today. One of Queen Elizabeth II's many royal titles is "Duke of Lancaster".[[/note]] Lancastrians were loyal York and his claim to the reigning royal family of England, while Yorkists wanted to see them overthrown.throne. Both sides' actual surname was Plantagenet.
This list shows the last 10 events of 202. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.WarsOfTheRoses