History UsefulNotes / Wales

6th Oct '17 3:04:37 PM TrustBen
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* Music/Duffy - a UK famous singer, who hasn't had any pants or knickers thrown at her yet.

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* Music/Duffy Music/{{Duffy}} - a UK famous singer, who hasn't had any pants or knickers thrown at her yet.
12th Aug '17 10:28:53 PM moloch
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There are two regiments of the British Army that require their officer candidates to be fluent, and ideally bilingual, in a language other than English. One is the Gurkha Rifles and the other is the Royal Welch Fusiliers. (founded in 1690, who use an archaic spelling of the word currently grammaticised as "Welsh".)

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There are two regiments of the British Army that require their officer candidates to be fluent, and ideally bilingual, in a language other than English. One is the Gurkha Rifles and the other is the Royal Welch Fusiliers. (founded Fusiliers (they were founded in 1690, who use an [[InsistentTerminology and still insist on the archaic spelling spelling]] of the word currently grammaticised rendered as "Welsh".)
"Welsh").
24th Jul '17 10:01:29 AM RaphaelL
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In [[AncientRome Roman times]], the whole of Great Britain inhabited by a Celtic population. During the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], the Germanic UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons invaded and took over most of the island, but one of the parts they didn't take over was the little corner we now call Wales.[[note]]The others were Scotland, Cornwall and Cumbria.[[/note]] Wales was conquered by the English in The Middle Ages, and became legally a part of the Kingdom of England -- which is why there's no "Welsh Bit" of the Union Jack, which was formed from the flags of the Kingdoms of England, Scotland and, later, Ireland. Being conquered and repressed has given Wales both a strong sense of identity and the mother of all chips on shoulders. [[BerserkButton Do not call a Welshman English]]. It will cause immediate and lasting discomfort (The Scottish are often portrayed as having similar tendencies).

to:

In [[AncientRome Roman times]], the whole of Great Britain was inhabited by a Celtic population. During the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], the Germanic UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons invaded and took over most of the island, but one of the parts they didn't take over was the little corner we now call Wales.[[note]]The others were Scotland, Cornwall and Cumbria.[[/note]] Wales was conquered by the English in The Middle Ages, and became legally a part of the Kingdom of England -- which is why there's no "Welsh Bit" of the Union Jack, which was formed from the flags of the Kingdoms of England, Scotland and, later, Ireland. Being conquered and repressed has given Wales both a strong sense of identity and the mother of all chips on shoulders. [[BerserkButton Do not call a Welshman English]]. It will cause immediate and lasting discomfort (The Scottish are often portrayed as having similar tendencies).
30th May '17 2:52:12 PM Arashi110
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Added DiffLines:

* Bryn Terfel, world famous operatic bass-baritone.
13th May '17 1:25:16 PM nombretomado
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The heavily industrial economy ensured that Welsh politics have always favoured the left. This has continued after the industry declined, as MargaretThatcher is often blamed for the post-industrial misfortunes of regions like "The Valleys" (to the north of Cardiff). In 1997 and 2001, the Conservatives failed to win a single Welsh seat, although they have since made some inroads. Wales also has its own secessionist party ''Plaid Cymru'' ("Party of Wales"), who tend to have the most support in the rural areas.

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The heavily industrial economy ensured that Welsh politics have always favoured the left. This has continued after the industry declined, as MargaretThatcher UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher is often blamed for the post-industrial misfortunes of regions like "The Valleys" (to the north of Cardiff). In 1997 and 2001, the Conservatives failed to win a single Welsh seat, although they have since made some inroads. Wales also has its own secessionist party ''Plaid Cymru'' ("Party of Wales"), who tend to have the most support in the rural areas.
4th Dec '16 11:02:37 AM JohnPrestwick
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Although long treated as a separate nation to England for cultural purposes, Wales was still part of England for legal purposes until 1967. It was not until 1972 that its borders were clarified. [[AliensInCardiff Cardiff]] (''Caerdydd'') had been proclaimed the capital of Wales in 1955. This was mostly because it was Wales' largest city; there was no government based there at the time, and pre-conquest Wales never really a fixed capital. Since 1999 Wales now has a devolved assembly based there, albeit one with less power than the [[UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} Scottish]] Parliament. This reflects the overall state of Welsh affairs at the moment. Although Welsh is by far the healthiest modern Celtic language and Welsh identity is widespread and firm, the vast majority of Welsh are, all things considered, quite comfortable being British (not English, of course--''British''), and are certainly nowhere nearly as interested in independence as the Scots. Some have even noted a reluctance on the part of the Welsh Assembly itself to ask for more power from Westminster (in contrast to the Scottish Parliament, which even under the Scottish-Unionist Labour/Lib Dem coalition clearly wanted a bit more authority for itself).

to:

Although long treated as a separate nation to England for cultural purposes, Wales was still part of England for legal purposes until 1967. It was not until 1972 that its borders were clarified. [[AliensInCardiff Cardiff]] (''Caerdydd'') had been proclaimed the capital of Wales in 1955. This was mostly because it was Wales' largest city; there was no government based there at the time, and pre-conquest Wales never really had a fixed capital. Since 1999 Wales now has a devolved assembly based there, albeit one with less power than the [[UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} Scottish]] Parliament. This reflects the overall state of Welsh affairs at the moment. Although Welsh is by far the healthiest modern Celtic language and Welsh identity is widespread and firm, the vast majority of Welsh are, all things considered, quite comfortable being British (not English, of course--''British''), and are certainly nowhere nearly as interested in independence as the Scots. Some have even noted a reluctance on the part of the Welsh Assembly itself to ask for more power from Westminster (in contrast to the Scottish Parliament, which even under the Scottish-Unionist Labour/Lib Dem coalition clearly wanted a bit more authority for itself).



* Aimee Ann '''Duffy''' - a UK famous singer, who hasn't had any pants or knickers thrown at her yet.

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* Aimee Ann '''Duffy''' Music/Duffy - a UK famous singer, who hasn't had any pants or knickers thrown at her yet.



* Bonnie Tyler.
* Singer-songwriter Marina Diamandis of Marina & the Diamonds.

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* Bonnie Tyler.
Music/BonnieTyler.
* Singer-songwriter Marina Diamandis of Marina & the Diamonds.Music/MarinaAndTheDiamonds.




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** UsefulNotes/JamesCallaghan, though he didn't come from Wales, held a seat in Cardiff.



* Badfinger

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* Badfinger{{Badfinger}}



* Bullet For My Valentine
* Catatonia
* Feeder

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* Bullet For My Valentine
BulletForMyValentine
* Catatonia
{{Catatonia}}
* Feeder{{Feeder}}



* Stereophonics

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* Stereophonics{{Stereophonics}}
4th Dec '16 5:02:57 AM JohnPrestwick
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In [[AncientRome Roman times]], the whole of Great Britain inhabited by a Celtic population. During the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], the Germanic UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons invaded and took over most of the island, but never managed to get into the little corner of the island we now call Wales.[[note]]Another Celtic-speaking kingdom related to modern Wales existed in the Northern half of England. Caught between Scotland and the northward drift of Saxons, the Kingdom of Strathclyde's last remnants were extinguished by the Norman Conquest. Echoes of a Celtic/Welsh civilization live on in Cumbria, in placenames and the old counting system used by shepherds: this counts in multiples of twenty in the Welsh fashion and the number-names are plainly Celtic, related to Welsh.[[/note]] Wales was conquered by the English in The Middle Ages, and became legally a part of the Kingdom of England -- which is why there's no "Welsh Bit" of the Union Jack, which was formed from the flags of the Kingdoms of England, Scotland and, later, Ireland. Being conquered and repressed has given Wales both a strong sense of identity and the mother of all chips on shoulders. [[BerserkButton Do not call a Welshman English]]. It will cause immediate and lasting discomfort (The Scottish are often portrayed as having similar tendencies).

to:

In [[AncientRome Roman times]], the whole of Great Britain inhabited by a Celtic population. During the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], the Germanic UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons invaded and took over most of the island, but never managed to get into one of the parts they didn't take over was the little corner of the island we now call Wales.[[note]]Another Celtic-speaking kingdom related to modern Wales existed in the Northern half of England. Caught between Scotland and the northward drift of Saxons, the Kingdom of Strathclyde's last remnants [[note]]The others were extinguished by the Norman Conquest. Echoes of a Celtic/Welsh civilization live on in Cumbria, in placenames Scotland, Cornwall and the old counting system used by shepherds: this counts in multiples of twenty in the Welsh fashion and the number-names are plainly Celtic, related to Welsh.Cumbria.[[/note]] Wales was conquered by the English in The Middle Ages, and became legally a part of the Kingdom of England -- which is why there's no "Welsh Bit" of the Union Jack, which was formed from the flags of the Kingdoms of England, Scotland and, later, Ireland. Being conquered and repressed has given Wales both a strong sense of identity and the mother of all chips on shoulders. [[BerserkButton Do not call a Welshman English]]. It will cause immediate and lasting discomfort (The Scottish are often portrayed as having similar tendencies).
3rd Dec '16 11:11:32 AM JohnPrestwick
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Wales, the land of the Welsh Dragon, Music/TomJones, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and the rest of Creator/TheBBC Sci-fi/fantasy TV programs.

In [[AncientRome Roman times]], the parts of Great Britain now called England (the words "England" and "English" refer specifically to the Germanic invaders you're about to meet), Wales, and Scotland were inhabited by a Celtic population. During the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], the Germanic UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons invaded and pushed them into the little corner of the island we now call Wales.[[note]]Another Celtic-speaking kingdom related to modern Wales existed in the Northern half of England. Caught between Scotland and the northward drift of Saxons, the Kingdom of Strathclyde's last remnants were extinguished by the Norman Conquest. Echoes of a Celtic/Welsh civilization live on in Cumbria, in placenames and the old counting system used by shepherds: this counts in multiples of twenty in the Welsh fashion and the number-names are plainly Celtic, related to Welsh.[[/note]] Wales was conquered by the English in The Middle Ages, and became legally a part of the Kingdom of England -- which is why there's no "Welsh Bit" of the Union Jack, which was formed from the flags of the Kingdoms of England, Scotland and, later, Ireland. Being conquered and repressed has given Wales both a strong sense of identity and the mother of all chips on shoulders. [[BerserkButton Do not call a Welshman English]]. It will cause immediate and lasting discomfort (The Scottish are often portrayed as having similar tendencies).

It now has a devolved assembly, albeit one with less power than the [[UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} Scottish]] Parliament, based in the capital, [[AliensInCardiff Cardiff]] (Caerdydd in Welsh). This reflects the overall state of Welsh affairs at the moment. Although Welsh is by far the healthiest modern Celtic language and Welsh identity is widespread and firm, the vast majority of Welsh are, all things considered, quite comfortable being British (not English, of course--''British''), and are certainly nowhere nearly as interested in independence as the Scots. Some have even noted a reluctance on the part of the Welsh Assembly itself to ask for more power from Westminster (in contrast to the Scottish Parliament, which even under the Scottish-Unionist Labour/Lib Dem coalition clearly wanted a bit more authority for itself).

to:

Wales, ''Cymru'', the land of the Welsh Dragon, Music/TomJones, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' and the rest of Creator/TheBBC Sci-fi/fantasy TV programs.

In [[AncientRome Roman times]], the parts whole of Great Britain now called England (the words "England" and "English" refer specifically to the Germanic invaders you're about to meet), Wales, and Scotland were inhabited by a Celtic population. During the [[DarkAgeEurope Dark Ages]], the Germanic UsefulNotes/AngloSaxons invaded and pushed them took over most of the island, but never managed to get into the little corner of the island we now call Wales.[[note]]Another Celtic-speaking kingdom related to modern Wales existed in the Northern half of England. Caught between Scotland and the northward drift of Saxons, the Kingdom of Strathclyde's last remnants were extinguished by the Norman Conquest. Echoes of a Celtic/Welsh civilization live on in Cumbria, in placenames and the old counting system used by shepherds: this counts in multiples of twenty in the Welsh fashion and the number-names are plainly Celtic, related to Welsh.[[/note]] Wales was conquered by the English in The Middle Ages, and became legally a part of the Kingdom of England -- which is why there's no "Welsh Bit" of the Union Jack, which was formed from the flags of the Kingdoms of England, Scotland and, later, Ireland. Being conquered and repressed has given Wales both a strong sense of identity and the mother of all chips on shoulders. [[BerserkButton Do not call a Welshman English]]. It will cause immediate and lasting discomfort (The Scottish are often portrayed as having similar tendencies).

Although long treated as a separate nation to England for cultural purposes, Wales was still part of England for legal purposes until 1967. It was not until 1972 that its borders were clarified. [[AliensInCardiff Cardiff]] (''Caerdydd'') had been proclaimed the capital of Wales in 1955. This was mostly because it was Wales' largest city; there was no government based there at the time, and pre-conquest Wales never really a fixed capital. Since 1999 Wales now has a devolved assembly, assembly based there, albeit one with less power than the [[UsefulNotes/{{Scotland}} Scottish]] Parliament, based in the capital, [[AliensInCardiff Cardiff]] (Caerdydd in Welsh).Parliament. This reflects the overall state of Welsh affairs at the moment. Although Welsh is by far the healthiest modern Celtic language and Welsh identity is widespread and firm, the vast majority of Welsh are, all things considered, quite comfortable being British (not English, of course--''British''), and are certainly nowhere nearly as interested in independence as the Scots. Some have even noted a reluctance on the part of the Welsh Assembly itself to ask for more power from Westminster (in contrast to the Scottish Parliament, which even under the Scottish-Unionist Labour/Lib Dem coalition clearly wanted a bit more authority for itself).



The Welsh language was suppressed with varying degrees of viciousness by the English from the middle ages right up until the 1960s, but since then it has become one of the best-subsidized minority languages in the world, and nowadays around 20% of Welsh people can speak some Welsh, with 14% claiming to use it on a daily basis. Northern and Southern versions differ in details, and 'gogs' (as North Walians are referred to in the South[[note]]Southerners are referred to as 'hwntws', that being everyone born on the 'wrong' (south) side of Cader Idris is a 'hwntw'[[/note]]) are sometimes said to sound like Russian porn stars. Welsh is accorded equal status with English within Wales, so all roadsigns and official notices have to be in both. (East of Conwy, English is given precedence. West of Conwy, Welsh comes first. Welsh language roadsignage generally begins at the border: visitors are often consternated that Welsh signage begins even before you have left Chester. (Big supermarkets in Oswestry, nominally inside England, have bilingual signage.)) The language is the butt of many jokes in England, usually along the lines of "Welsh is very difficult to speak unless you have either a lifetime's study, or a serious throat infection".[[note]]To be fair, the Dutch say the same thing about their own language.[[/note]] Welsh spellings are also the subject of English humor, sometimes being attributed either to anagrams of breakfast cereal names or escapees from Creator/HPLovecraft's less well-known works.

to:

The Welsh language was suppressed with varying degrees of viciousness by the English from the middle ages Middle Ages right up until the 1960s, but since then it has become one of the best-subsidized minority languages in the world, and nowadays around 20% of Welsh people can speak some Welsh, with 14% claiming to use it on a daily basis. Northern and Southern versions differ in details, and 'gogs' (as North Walians are referred to in the South[[note]]Southerners are referred to as 'hwntws', that being everyone born on the 'wrong' (south) side of Cader Idris is a 'hwntw'[[/note]]) are sometimes said to sound like Russian porn stars. Welsh is accorded equal status with English within Wales, so all roadsigns and official notices have to be in both. (East of Conwy, English is given precedence. West of Conwy, Welsh comes first. Welsh language roadsignage generally begins at the border: visitors are often consternated that Welsh signage begins even before you have left Chester. (Big supermarkets in Oswestry, nominally inside England, have bilingual signage.)) The language is the butt of many jokes in England, usually along the lines of "Welsh is very difficult to speak unless you have either a lifetime's study, or a serious throat infection".[[note]]To be fair, the Dutch say the same thing about their own language.[[/note]] Welsh spellings are also the subject of English humor, sometimes being attributed either to anagrams of breakfast cereal names or escapees from Creator/HPLovecraft's less well-known works.



Wales is notable for its sheep population -- c. 10.9 million of them against a human population of about three million. So, the [[BestialityIsDepraved usual jokes]] apply. Wales is also notable for its level of rainfall -- even more so than [[UsefulNotes/BritishWeather the UK as a whole]]. Second city Swansea (Abertawe) officially holds the distinction of "wettest city in Britain".

South Wales was more industrialized than the rest, due to immense coal deposits, though Wrexham in the North East was as industrialized also due to coal. A lot of Welsh cultural identity stems from the 19th-century mining industry, when "the Valleys" as the area was known, saw religious revivals, the enthusiastic adoption of the game of Rugby, and a great tradition of choral singing. The industry largely (and in the main needlessly) came to an end in the late eighties, thanks in chief to MargaretThatcher, leaving the population and economy a little shell-shocked. This is why it's not cool to be a Tory between Llanelli and Newport. Very few Tories survived the 1997 cull in any part of Wales. After ten years of New "Labour", the Welsh are also beginning to perceive Labour as just another English political party. After Blair and Brown signally failed to repair the damage done to Wales by Thatcher's Tories, the hitherto unthinkable started to happen - the super-safe constituencies of Rhondda and Islwyn fell to the Welsh Nationalists, although Labour won them back a few years later.

to:

Wales is notable for its sheep population -- c. 10.9 million of them against a human population of about three million. So, the [[BestialityIsDepraved usual jokes]] apply. Wales is also notable for its level of rainfall -- even more so than [[UsefulNotes/BritishWeather the UK as a whole]]. Second city Swansea (Abertawe) (''Abertawe'') officially holds the distinction of "wettest city in Britain".

The majority of the population live in the southeastern corner, in the corridor between Swansea and Newport. The mountainous middle of Wales is quite sparsely populated. This, as well as the lack of north-to-south transport links (trains from Cardiff to North Wales go through England), mean there is a degree of cultural separation between the North and South of Wales. Historically, Wales' population was more dispersed, but South Wales was more industrialized than (and to a lesser extent, Wrexham and the rest, North East) boomed in the 19th century due to immense coal deposits, though Wrexham in the North East was as industrialized also due to coal. deposits. A lot of Welsh cultural identity stems from the 19th-century mining industry, when "the Valleys" as the area was known, saw religious revivals, the enthusiastic adoption of the game of Rugby, and a great tradition of choral singing. singing.

The heavily industrial economy ensured that Welsh politics have always favoured the left. This has continued after the industry largely (and in declined, as MargaretThatcher is often blamed for the main needlessly) came to an end in post-industrial misfortunes of regions like "The Valleys" (to the late eighties, thanks in chief to MargaretThatcher, leaving the population and economy a little shell-shocked. This is why it's not cool to be a Tory between Llanelli and Newport. Very few Tories survived the north of Cardiff). In 1997 cull in any part of Wales. After ten years of New "Labour", and 2001, the Welsh are also beginning to perceive Labour as just another English political party. After Blair and Brown signally Conservatives failed to repair the damage done to Wales by Thatcher's Tories, the hitherto unthinkable started to happen - the super-safe constituencies of Rhondda and Islwyn fell to the win a single Welsh Nationalists, seat, although Labour won them back a few years later.
they have since made some inroads. Wales also has its own secessionist party ''Plaid Cymru'' ("Party of Wales"), who tend to have the most support in the rural areas.
10th Sep '16 6:30:06 PM TheGreatSkrond
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The Welsh language was suppressed with varying degrees of viciousness by the English from the middle ages right up until the 1960s, but since then it has become one of the best-subsidized minority languages in the world, and nowadays around 20% of Welsh people can speak some Welsh, with 14% claiming to use it on a daily basis. Northern and Southern versions differ in details, and 'gogs' (as North Walians are referred to in the South[[note]]Southerners are referred to as 'hwntws', that being everyone born on the 'wrong' (south) side of Cader Idris is a 'hwntw'[[/note]]) are sometimes said to sound like Russian porn stars. Welsh is accorded equal status with English within Wales, so all roadsigns and official notices have to be in both. (East of Conwy, English is given precedence. West of Conwy, Welsh comes first. Welsh language roadsignage generally begins at the border: visitors are often consternated that Welsh signage begins even before you have left Chester. (Big supermarkets in Oswestry, nominally inside England, have bilingual signage.) The language is the butt of many jokes in England, usually along the lines of "Welsh is very difficult to speak unless you have either a lifetime's study, or a serious throat infection".[[note]]To be fair, the Dutch say the same thing about their own language.[[/note]] Welsh spellings are also the subject of English humor, sometimes being attributed either to anagrams of breakfast cereal names or escapees from Creator/HPLovecraft's less well-known works.

to:

The Welsh language was suppressed with varying degrees of viciousness by the English from the middle ages right up until the 1960s, but since then it has become one of the best-subsidized minority languages in the world, and nowadays around 20% of Welsh people can speak some Welsh, with 14% claiming to use it on a daily basis. Northern and Southern versions differ in details, and 'gogs' (as North Walians are referred to in the South[[note]]Southerners are referred to as 'hwntws', that being everyone born on the 'wrong' (south) side of Cader Idris is a 'hwntw'[[/note]]) are sometimes said to sound like Russian porn stars. Welsh is accorded equal status with English within Wales, so all roadsigns and official notices have to be in both. (East of Conwy, English is given precedence. West of Conwy, Welsh comes first. Welsh language roadsignage generally begins at the border: visitors are often consternated that Welsh signage begins even before you have left Chester. (Big supermarkets in Oswestry, nominally inside England, have bilingual signage.) )) The language is the butt of many jokes in England, usually along the lines of "Welsh is very difficult to speak unless you have either a lifetime's study, or a serious throat infection".[[note]]To be fair, the Dutch say the same thing about their own language.[[/note]] Welsh spellings are also the subject of English humor, sometimes being attributed either to anagrams of breakfast cereal names or escapees from Creator/HPLovecraft's less well-known works.
30th Jun '16 7:16:03 AM LondonKdS
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* Creator/IwanRheon, singer and actor (Best known as Simon in ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' and [[spoiler:Ramsay Bolton]] from ''Series/GameOfThrones''), from Cardiff.

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* Creator/IwanRheon, singer and actor (Best known as Simon in ''Series/{{Misfits}}'' and [[spoiler:Ramsay Bolton]] Ramsay Bolton from ''Series/GameOfThrones''), from Cardiff.



* ''[[Series/YGwyll Y Gwyll/Hinterland]]'': a bilingual Mid-Wales detective drama in the vein of Scandinavian noirs like ''Series/{{Wallander}}'', ''Series/BronBroen'', or ''Series/{{Forbrydelsen}}''.

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* ''[[Series/YGwyll Y Gwyll/Hinterland]]'': a bilingual Mid-Wales detective drama in the vein of Scandinavian noirs NordicNoir like ''Series/{{Wallander}}'', ''Series/BronBroen'', or ''Series/{{Forbrydelsen}}''.
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