History UsefulNotes / TheNetherlands

8th Aug '16 4:11:17 AM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/OceansTwelve'' includes the caper crew visiting Amsterdam.
8th Aug '16 4:08:46 AM Morgenthaler
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* Euthanasia, kind of.

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* Euthanasia, kind of. It's only legal in cases of terminal illness and when the patient is conscious and sound of mind to give consent.
10th Jun '16 11:52:54 PM nombretomado
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'''[[StatlerAndWaldorf Waldorf]]''': Het is koud, nat en druk. De mensen mopperen, zijn onbeschoft en stinken naar kaas. [[note]] It's cold, wet and crowded. And the people there are grumpy, rude, and stink of cheese.[[/note]]\\
'''[[StatlerAndWaldorf Statler]]''': Ja! Ik voel me er helemaal thuis! [[note]]Yeah! We'd be right at home, there![[/note]]\\

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'''[[StatlerAndWaldorf '''[[JustForFun/StatlerAndWaldorf Waldorf]]''': Het is koud, nat en druk. De mensen mopperen, zijn onbeschoft en stinken naar kaas. [[note]] It's cold, wet and crowded. And the people there are grumpy, rude, and stink of cheese.[[/note]]\\
'''[[StatlerAndWaldorf '''[[JustForFun/StatlerAndWaldorf Statler]]''': Ja! Ik voel me er helemaal thuis! [[note]]Yeah! We'd be right at home, there![[/note]]\\
18th May '16 3:29:12 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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The country has engaged in a considerable amount of sea reclamation during the last few centuries (spawning the joke that "God made the world, but the Dutch made the Netherlands"), to the point that when ''{{QI}}'' asked "what is the largest man-made structure on Earth" serious consideration was given to accepting "the Netherlands" as the correct answer.

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The country has engaged in a considerable amount of sea reclamation during the last few centuries (spawning the joke that "God made the world, but the Dutch made the Netherlands"), to the point that when ''{{QI}}'' ''Series/{{QI}}'' asked "what is the largest man-made structure on Earth" serious consideration was given to accepting "the Netherlands" as the correct answer.
19th Apr '16 10:46:38 AM penguinist
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The Dutch Republic was an interesting beast. Nominally a loose confederation of quasi-independent states, it was in practice dominated by Holland. To further complicate matters, although each province was in theory free to appoint anyone "stadtholder" (commander of its armed forces), in practice every province gave the position to the head of the House of Orange-Nassau. As a result, the Princes of Orange (from French lineage) were generally accorded quasi-royal status by the monarchies of Europe, which is why William III of Orange was judged to be an acceptable husband (and co-ruler) for [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart Mary II of England]]. The structure of the United Provinces also had an impact on later federalist political theory: the founders of UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates looked to the Dutch Republic as a model, basing the Articles of Confederation on it: the Confederation Congress (one state, one vote) was modeled on the Dutch States-General, as was the practice of having some lands administered directly by the federal legislature (in the Netherlands these were called Generality Lands; in the US, Territories). As it happened, the first part only really worked in the Netherlands because of Holland's domination over the other provinces, and was quickly dropped (albeit modified in the form of the Senate), but the territorial system worked out rather well and was retained. Both of these innovations, with modifications, later spread to other federal regimes (e.g. Canada, Australia, Mexico, and India).

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The Dutch Republic was an interesting beast. Nominally a loose confederation of quasi-independent states, it was in practice dominated by Holland. To further complicate matters, although each province was in theory free to appoint anyone "stadtholder" (commander of its armed forces), in practice every province gave the position to the head of the House of Orange-Nassau. As a result, the Princes of Orange (from French lineage) were generally accorded quasi-royal status by the monarchies of Europe, which is why William III of Orange was judged to be an acceptable husband (and co-ruler) for [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart Mary II of England]].England]] (and, not incidentally, that his ''father'' was considered an acceptable husband for an English princess; yeah, William and Mary were [[KissingCousins first cousins]]). The structure of the United Provinces also had an impact on later federalist political theory: the founders of UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates looked to the Dutch Republic as a model, basing the Articles of Confederation on it: the Confederation Congress (one state, one vote) was modeled on the Dutch States-General, as was the practice of having some lands administered directly by the federal legislature (in the Netherlands these were called Generality Lands; in the US, Territories). As it happened, the first part only really worked in the Netherlands because of Holland's domination over the other provinces, and was quickly dropped (albeit modified in the form of the Senate), but the territorial system worked out rather well and was retained. Both of these innovations, with modifications, later spread to other federal regimes (e.g. Canada, Australia, Mexico, and India).
21st Jan '16 2:10:20 PM Morgenthaler
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/nl-map.gif]]

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:330:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/nl-map.gif]]
24th Nov '15 4:06:03 PM StFan
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* The Flemish ComicStrip/DeKiekeboes' albums ''"Kiekeboe in Carré"'' and ''"De Zes Sterren"'' take place in Amsterdal.

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* The Flemish ComicStrip/DeKiekeboes' ''ComicBook/DeKiekeboes''' albums ''"Kiekeboe in Carré"'' and ''"De Zes Sterren"'' take place in Amsterdal.
13th Nov '15 2:05:54 PM StFan
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* The Flemish ComicStrip/{{Urbanus}} album ''"De Laatste Hollander"''

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* The Flemish ComicStrip/{{Urbanus}} ''ComicBook/{{Urbanus}}'' album ''"De ''De Laatste Hollander"''Hollander''
8th Oct '15 5:50:25 PM MarkLungo
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...which didn't exactly work out. The old stereotype of the inhumanly greedy Dutchman came from somewhere, and the particularly notorious ten percent income tax known as the "tiende penning" was every bit as much of a reason to rebel against the king as the persecution of Protestants. This all led to the "Eighty Years' War" (1568-1648; unlike most wars with names along this line it actually lasted the specified number of years), a complex series of conflicts, complete with a twelve year armistice, that's also known as the Dutch Revolt and Dutch War of Independence. The Dutch nobles and burghers ended up proclaiming their independence in 1581, resulting in the Republic of the United Provinces, a.k.a. the Dutch Republic. And in spite of the fact that over half of the provinces either remained loyal to the Spanish Crown (the members of the Union of Atrecht) or were reconquered by the Spanish (like the county of Flanders, and particularly the city of Antwerp), the Republic still managed to remain an economic powerhouse and develop into a naval power capable of threatening Spanish and [[UsefulNotes/TheDutchPortugueseWar Portuguese]] fleets and colonies as far away as South America and Indonesia. They were also heavily involved in the Slave Trade, and indeed at one point was the global leader until being surpassed by the English in the 1700s. Much like England and France, slavery was banned within the Netherlands but enforced in the colonies and it existed there until 1863, long after its cessation by England and France, and around the time of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar.

to:

...which didn't exactly work out. The old stereotype of the inhumanly greedy Dutchman came from somewhere, and the particularly notorious ten percent income tax known as the "tiende penning" was every bit as much of a reason to rebel against the king as the persecution of Protestants. This all led to the "Eighty Years' War" "UsefulNotes/TheEightyYearsWar" (1568-1648; unlike most wars with names along this line it actually lasted the specified number of years), a complex series of conflicts, complete with a twelve year armistice, that's also known as the Dutch Revolt and Dutch War of Independence. The Dutch nobles and burghers ended up proclaiming their independence in 1581, resulting in the Republic of the United Provinces, a.k.a. the Dutch Republic. And in spite of the fact that over half of the provinces either remained loyal to the Spanish Crown (the members of the Union of Atrecht) or were reconquered by the Spanish (like the county of Flanders, and particularly the city of Antwerp), the Republic still managed to remain an economic powerhouse and develop into a naval power capable of threatening Spanish and [[UsefulNotes/TheDutchPortugueseWar Portuguese]] fleets and colonies as far away as South America and Indonesia. They were also heavily involved in the Slave Trade, and indeed at one point was the global leader until being surpassed by the English in the 1700s. Much like England and France, slavery was banned within the Netherlands but enforced in the colonies and it existed there until 1863, long after its cessation by England and France, and around the time of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar.



->The flag's red, white and blue colors have been used since the 16th century and was formalized in 1937. Originally the red stripe was to be orange, in honor of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_the_Silent Prince William I "the Silent" of Orange]], leader of the anti-Spanish LaResistance that triggered the EightyYearsWar. At the time, however, the orange dye often turned red, thus subsequent versions of the flag adopted red, though a recent tradition adds a small orange pennant above the flag, symbolizing the Dutch people's allegiance to the House of Orange, still the ruling family of the Netherlands.[[note]]The orange, white and blue version of the Dutch flag appeared on the South African flag, which featured both the British and Dutch flags to symbolise the origins of the white South African people. [[/note]]\\

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->The flag's red, white and blue colors have been used since the 16th century and was formalized in 1937. Originally the red stripe was to be orange, in honor of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_the_Silent Prince William I "the Silent" of Orange]], leader of the anti-Spanish LaResistance that triggered the EightyYearsWar.UsefulNotes/TheEightyYearsWar. At the time, however, the orange dye often turned red, thus subsequent versions of the flag adopted red, though a recent tradition adds a small orange pennant above the flag, symbolizing the Dutch people's allegiance to the House of Orange, still the ruling family of the Netherlands.[[note]]The orange, white and blue version of the Dutch flag appeared on the South African flag, which featured both the British and Dutch flags to symbolise the origins of the white South African people. [[/note]]\\
21st Sep '15 10:38:47 PM JulianLapostat
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The Netherlands ('''Dutch:''' ''Nederland'') is a country in Western Europe. It's famous for not only being flat, but in large part below sea level. It's also the country of cheese (Gouda, Edam), Delftware, windmills, tulips, clogs, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick blow-up dolls and cannabis.]]

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The Netherlands ('''Dutch:''' ''Nederland'') is a country in Western Europe. It's famous for not only being flat, but in large part below sea level. It's also the country of cheese (Gouda, Edam), Delftware, windmills, tulips, clogs, some of the greatest painters the world has ever known, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick blow-up dolls and cannabis.]]



...which didn't exactly work out. The old stereotype of the inhumanly greedy Dutchman came from somewhere, and the particularly notorious ten percent income tax known as the "tiende penning" was every bit as much of a reason to rebel against the king as the persecution of Protestants. This all led to the "Eighty Years' War" (1568-1648; unlike most wars with names along this line it actually lasted the specified number of years), a complex series of conflicts, complete with a twelve year armistice, that's also known as the Dutch Revolt and Dutch War of Independence. The Dutch nobles and burghers ended up proclaiming their independence in 1581, resulting in the Republic of the United Provinces, a.k.a. the Dutch Republic. And in spite of the fact that over half of the provinces either remained loyal to the Spanish Crown (the members of the Union of Atrecht) or were reconquered by the Spanish (like the county of Flanders, and particularly the city of Antwerp), the Republic still managed to remain an economic powerhouse and develop into a naval power capable of threatening Spanish and [[UsefulNotes/TheDutchPortugueseWar Portuguese]] fleets and colonies as far away as South America and Indonesia.

to:

...which didn't exactly work out. The old stereotype of the inhumanly greedy Dutchman came from somewhere, and the particularly notorious ten percent income tax known as the "tiende penning" was every bit as much of a reason to rebel against the king as the persecution of Protestants. This all led to the "Eighty Years' War" (1568-1648; unlike most wars with names along this line it actually lasted the specified number of years), a complex series of conflicts, complete with a twelve year armistice, that's also known as the Dutch Revolt and Dutch War of Independence. The Dutch nobles and burghers ended up proclaiming their independence in 1581, resulting in the Republic of the United Provinces, a.k.a. the Dutch Republic. And in spite of the fact that over half of the provinces either remained loyal to the Spanish Crown (the members of the Union of Atrecht) or were reconquered by the Spanish (like the county of Flanders, and particularly the city of Antwerp), the Republic still managed to remain an economic powerhouse and develop into a naval power capable of threatening Spanish and [[UsefulNotes/TheDutchPortugueseWar Portuguese]] fleets and colonies as far away as South America and Indonesia.
Indonesia. They were also heavily involved in the Slave Trade, and indeed at one point was the global leader until being surpassed by the English in the 1700s. Much like England and France, slavery was banned within the Netherlands but enforced in the colonies and it existed there until 1863, long after its cessation by England and France, and around the time of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar.
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