History UsefulNotes / TheNetherlands

11th Jul '17 11:31:25 PM shadowmanwkp
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* The most divisive and notorious taste of all: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice Dutch liquorice]]''. In Dutch called "''drop''", it's a much more salty, much more "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami umami]]", much more flavoury, and not-sweet-at-all form of what's outside of the Netherlands known as "liquorice". It is ''notorious'' for evoking ''either'' a major ''{{Squick}}! / "that's disguisting!"'' response if one hasn't been exposed to it from about early childhood on, ''or'' a {{Squee}} response if one ''has'' been. Though only a minority of Dutch people might be really addicted to it, ''many'' revert to it as a means to alleviate a flu or a cold. [[note]]There's also a ''sweet / sugary'' form of liquorice in the Netherlands, that is much more likely to agree with non-Dutch people's palates; strangely enough this is called in the Netherlands "''Engelse'' drop" / "''English'' liquorice" - even though this is not a candy actually known in the U.K. / Britain / England.[[/note]]

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* The most divisive and notorious taste of all: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice Dutch liquorice]]''. In Dutch called "''drop''", it's a much more salty, much more "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami umami]]", much more flavoury, and not-sweet-at-all form of what's outside of the Netherlands known as "liquorice". It is ''notorious'' for evoking ''either'' a major ''{{Squick}}! / "that's disguisting!"'' response if one hasn't been exposed to it from about early childhood on, ''or'' a {{Squee}} response if one ''has'' been. Though only a minority of Dutch people might be really addicted to it, ''many'' revert revere to it as a means to alleviate a flu or a cold. [[note]]There's also a ''sweet / sugary'' form of liquorice in the Netherlands, that is much more likely to agree with non-Dutch people's palates; strangely enough this is called in the Netherlands "''Engelse'' drop" / "''English'' liquorice" - even though this is not a candy actually known in the U.K. / Britain / England.[[/note]]cold.
22nd Jun '17 10:57:29 PM LB7979
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Then UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte tried to set up a puppet state called the "Kingdom of Holland" (which was technically the first Dutch kingdom), but that didn't really work out the way he wanted (for one thing, his appointed stooge, brother Louis, took Dutch interests to heart over Napoleon's, also helped with his own money ''and hands'' at the gunpowder disaster in Leyden), so he eventually just put an end to the kingdom and made the Netherlands part of the French Empire.

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Then UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte tried to set up a puppet state called the "Kingdom of Holland" (which was technically the first Dutch kingdom), but that didn't really work out the way he wanted (for one thing, his appointed stooge, brother Louis, took Dutch interests to heart over Napoleon's, also helped with his own money ''and hands'' at [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leiden#19th_and_20th_centuries the gunpowder disaster in Leyden), Leiden]]), so he eventually just put an end to the kingdom and made the Netherlands part of the French Empire.



The Netherlands today is a democratic constitutional monarchy. It used to be famous for a political system called "consociationalism", where the [[UsefulNotes/{{Pillarisation}} different religious and social groups]] of the country each had a veto over national policy, but this worked so well, the nation no longer needs it; this didn't keep the Dutch political scientist Arend Lijphart from advocating the implementation of similar systems in other conflict-torn countries (with varying degrees of success). Its former prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende resembled Franchise/HarryPotter, except for completely lacking the ability to get out of scrapes (besides his bout with necrotizing fasciits, which he thankfully survived).

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The Netherlands today is a democratic constitutional monarchy. It used to be famous for a political system called "consociationalism", where the [[UsefulNotes/{{Pillarisation}} different religious and social groups]] of the country each had a veto over national policy, but this worked so well, the nation no longer needs it; this didn't keep the Dutch political scientist Arend Lijphart from advocating the implementation of similar systems in other conflict-torn countries (with varying degrees of success). Its former prime minister [[https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1040&bih=646&q=jan+peter+balkenende&gws_rd=cr&ei=7KFMWcvWCdHHwAKhqYoI Jan Peter Balkenende Balkenende]] resembled Franchise/HarryPotter, except for completely lacking the ability to get out of scrapes (besides his bout with necrotizing fasciits, which he thankfully survived).


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* ''Film/AllesIsLiefde''
13th Jun '17 9:40:39 PM nombretomado
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It stayed out of WorldWarOne, but was invaded by Germany in WorldWarTwo (and its Indonesian colonies were invaded by the Japanese). Over 100,000 Jews were sent to the camps, [[Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl Anne Frank]] among them.

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It stayed out of WorldWarOne, UsefulNotes/WorldWarI, but was invaded by Germany in WorldWarTwo UsefulNotes/WorldWarII (and its Indonesian colonies were invaded by the Japanese). Over 100,000 Jews were sent to the camps, [[Literature/TheDiaryOfAYoungGirl Anne Frank]] among them.
13th Jun '17 7:59:01 AM majoraoftime
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* The last third of ''Literature/TheGoldfinch'' takes place in Amsterdam
14th May '17 3:04:36 PM LB7979
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* ''Erwtensoep'' or, colloquially, ''snert'' is (green-)split-pea soup. It's very thick, made from green split peas, celeriac, potatoes and small pieces of the aforementioned ''rookworst'' again. It's a staple of winter cuisine and especially goes together with cold weather and skating.
* ''Beschuit'' is [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rusk#Netherlands_and_Belgium_.28Flanders.29 rusk]] - a dry biscuit, round of ca. 3 inch diameter, that can be eaten as an alternative to bread. It stems from the origin of the Netherlands as a sea-faring country, as they used to be taken on ships centuries ago, since they can be conserved virtually eternally.
* ''Muisjes'' (litt.: "little mice", because their shape resembles those) are aniseeds covered in a sugar coating. Eaten as a sweet topping on buttered bread or on the aforementioned ''beschuit'' / rusk. ''Beschuit met muisjes'', rusk with muisjes, is traditionally eaten when a baby is born by the new parents with visitors for the baby (pink-and-white ''muisjes'' for a baby girl, blue-and-white ''muisjes'' for a baby boy).
* Regarding alcoholic drinks: beer is popular; the most popular brands are Heineken and Grolsch - both successful export products, of course. Though in the 2010's, the Dutch tend to consume more and more Belgian beers. The ''de facto'' Dutch strong liquor is ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jenever jenever]]'' - a gin made of juniper. By now old-fashioned, but still loved by old people, is ''advocaat'' - a drink of eggs and brandy that's yellow and thick and has a custard-like taste (an alcoholic version of eggnog).
14th May '17 4:16:15 AM StarTropes
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* One episode of ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' focuses on [[DaChief Director Vance's]] first mission as an agent, which took place in Amsterdam. It's where he and [[BadassIsraeli Eli David]] first met and became friends.
5th Mar '17 11:15:41 AM Morgenthaler
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The war ended in 1648, when Spain officially recognized the Republic's independence and renounced its claims on the northern provinces. At the same time, they also officially left the HolyRomanEmpire. But by that time, the British had already become accustomed to call their inhabitants "Dutch". This word, from "diet" ("people"), originally applied to the inhabitants of the entire HolyRomanEmpire north of the Alps. In modern Dutch, however, it's never used by the Dutch to describe themselves; the word "Duits" can only mean "German" (compare the German word for "German": "Deutsch".)

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The war ended in 1648, when Spain officially recognized the Republic's independence and renounced its claims on the northern provinces. At the same time, they also officially left the HolyRomanEmpire.UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire. But by that time, the British had already become accustomed to call their inhabitants "Dutch". This word, from "diet" ("people"), originally applied to the inhabitants of the entire HolyRomanEmpire UsefulNotes/HolyRomanEmpire north of the Alps. In modern Dutch, however, it's never used by the Dutch to describe themselves; the word "Duits" can only mean "German" (compare the German word for "German": "Deutsch".)
27th Feb '17 9:58:33 AM LB7979
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* A ''snackbar'' is a fast-food take-out joint serving, mostly, fries [[note]]As famously noted by Creator/JohnTravolta's character in Film/PulpFiction, the Dutch (and Belgians) normally eat these with mayonnaise; though ketchup (imported from American culture) or satay sauce (imported from Indonesian culture) are options too[[/note]] with either [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croquette croquettes]] or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frikandel frikandel]]. Almost ironically, ''croquettes'' are actually French in origin, contrary to what many Dutch people themselves are aware of.

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* A ''snackbar'' is a fast-food take-out joint serving, mostly, fries [[note]]As famously noted by Creator/JohnTravolta's character in Film/PulpFiction, the Dutch (and Belgians) normally eat these with mayonnaise; though ketchup (imported from American culture) or satay sauce (imported from Indonesian culture) are options too[[/note]] too.[[/note]] with either [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croquette croquettes]] or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frikandel frikandel]]. Almost ironically, ''croquettes'' are actually French in origin, contrary to what many Dutch people themselves are aware of.



* The most divisive and notorious taste of all: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice Dutch liquorice]]''. In Dutch called "''drop''", it's a much more salty, much more "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami umami]]", much more flavoury, and not-sweet-at-all form of what's outside of the Netherlands known as "liquorice". It is ''notorious'' for evoking ''either'' a major ''{{Squick}}! / "that's disguisting!"'' response if one hasn't been exposed to it from about early childhood on, ''or'' a {{Squee}} response if one ''has'' been. Though only a minority of Dutch people might be really addicted to it, ''many'' revert to it as a means to alleviate a flu or a cold.

to:

* The most divisive and notorious taste of all: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice Dutch liquorice]]''. In Dutch called "''drop''", it's a much more salty, much more "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami umami]]", much more flavoury, and not-sweet-at-all form of what's outside of the Netherlands known as "liquorice". It is ''notorious'' for evoking ''either'' a major ''{{Squick}}! / "that's disguisting!"'' response if one hasn't been exposed to it from about early childhood on, ''or'' a {{Squee}} response if one ''has'' been. Though only a minority of Dutch people might be really addicted to it, ''many'' revert to it as a means to alleviate a flu or a cold. [[note]]There's also a ''sweet / sugary'' form of liquorice in the Netherlands, that is much more likely to agree with non-Dutch people's palates; strangely enough this is called in the Netherlands "''Engelse'' drop" / "''English'' liquorice" - even though this is not a candy actually known in the U.K. / Britain / England.[[/note]]
27th Feb '17 3:55:36 AM LB7979
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* The most divisive and notorious taste of all: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice Dutch liquorice]]''. In Dutch called "''drop''", it's a much more salty, much more "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami umami]]", much more flavoury, and not-sweet-at-all form of what's outside of the Netherlands known as "liquorice". It is ''notorious'' for evoking ''either'' a major ''{{Squick}}! / "that's disguisting!" response if one hasn't been exposed to it from about early childhood on, ''or'' a {{Squee}} response if one ''has'' been. Though only a minority of Dutch people might be really addicted to it, ''many'' revert to it as a means to alleviate a flu or a cold".

to:

* The most divisive and notorious taste of all: ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salty_liquorice Dutch liquorice]]''. In Dutch called "''drop''", it's a much more salty, much more "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Umami umami]]", much more flavoury, and not-sweet-at-all form of what's outside of the Netherlands known as "liquorice". It is ''notorious'' for evoking ''either'' a major ''{{Squick}}! / "that's disguisting!" disguisting!"'' response if one hasn't been exposed to it from about early childhood on, ''or'' a {{Squee}} response if one ''has'' been. Though only a minority of Dutch people might be really addicted to it, ''many'' revert to it as a means to alleviate a flu or a cold".
cold.
27th Feb '17 3:18:18 AM LB7979
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* ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stroopwafel Stroopwafels]]'', literally ''syrup waffles'', [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin two layers of waffle with syrup in between]]. Not to be confused with ''Belgian'' waffles (or what in the U.S. is simply called "waffle"), that have a different structure and lack inside syrup. ''Stroopwafels'' have become kind of a well-known export product, being sold in other countries. In the Netherlands, they're also sold warm and freshly-baked on the street.
* Pancakes, entirely different than the American ones (much thinner, much larger (to the point they ususally are larger than a pizza is), and less sweet-tasting). They're served in joints called ''Pannekoekenhuis'' (litt. "Pancake House"), which often offer at least 100 different varieties of them - the plain way to be served is only with either powdered sugar or with syrup, but they can be ordered with virtually anything, from apple slices to ham and / or cheese or any vegetable you'd like.

to:

* ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stroopwafel Stroopwafels]]'', literally ''syrup waffles'', [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin two layers of waffle with syrup in between]]. Not to be confused with ''Belgian'' waffles (or what in the U.S. is simply called "waffle"), that have a entirely different structure and ingredients, and lack inside syrup. ''Stroopwafels'' have become kind of a well-known export product, being sold in other countries. In the Netherlands, they're also sold warm and freshly-baked on the street.
* Pancakes, entirely different than the American ones (much thinner, much larger (to the point they ususally are larger than a pizza is), and less sweet-tasting). They're served in joints called ''Pannekoekenhuis'' (litt. "Pancake House"), which often offer at least 100 different varieties of them - the plain way for them to be served is only with either powdered sugar or with syrup, but they can be ordered with virtually anything, from apple slices to ham and / or cheese or any meat and / or vegetable you'd like.
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