History UsefulNotes / TheNetherlands

13th Jan '17 1:31:59 AM LB7979
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* ''Film/OceansTwelve'' includes the caper crew visiting Amsterdam

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* ''Film/OceansTwelve'' includes the caper crew visiting AmsterdamAmsterdam. The city-setting was [[SubvertedTrope subverted]] though by the fact that prominent scenes of the movie that take place in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amsterdam_Centraal_station Amsterdam Central Train Station]], in reality were shot in [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haarlem_railway_station Haarlem Train Station]] instead - because while Amsterdam Central Train Station looks [[https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=674&q=amsterdam+centraal pretty on the outside]], the inside looks completely generic (at least at the time the movie was shot - it's been thoroughly renovated since) while [[https://www.google.com/search?site=&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=674&q=haarlem+trein+station Haarlem Train Station]]'s interior and tracks look/(ed) majestic.
11th Jan '17 3:10:22 AM LB7979
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11th Jan '17 3:04:47 AM LB7979
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* ''Film/OceansTwelve'' includes the caper crew visiting Amsterdam.

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* ''Film/OceansTwelve'' includes the caper crew visiting Amsterdam.Amsterdam



* ''Film/TheVanishing''.

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* ''Film/TheVanishing''. ''Film/TheVanishing''


Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/VetHard''
14th Dec '16 3:43:44 PM LB7979
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* Alcohol is legal for persons of 18 years and over.
* The age of consent is 16. Sex education usually starts in elementary school (it depends on the school), and is formally taught around age 13 in high school biology class.

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* Alcohol is legal for persons of 18 years and over.
over. Supermarkets can sell (as opposed to e.g. Australia where they can't sell any alcohol at all) beer, wine and port, but not strong liquor like vodka or whiskey. The official policy is that any person "looking to be under 30 years of age" has to show ID at supermarket check-out lanes, and this is being more strongly enforced lately since government uses undercover underage(-looking) people as "bait" to check if supermarkets and bars adhere to this rule.
* The age of consent is 16. Sex education usually starts in elementary school (it depends on the school), and is formally taught around age 13 in high school biology class.
class. It is generally pretty what would be in the U.S. called "comprehensive" sex education as opposed to "abstinence-based" - except in the small minority of schools that have an explicit conservative-Protestant identity (yes, the Netherlands ''does'' have a Bible Belt).



The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ have similar grammatical and word structure]] (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English, and English is a mandatory subject until high school graduation[[note]]which is at 17, 18 or 16, depending on the track / level you follow[[/note]]. Two other foreign languages, usually German and French though in some schools Spanish, Chinese or Arabic are options too, are required to be taken for at least 2 years in high school and optionally for up to 6 years - which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. At Universities / Colleges, Dutch is the standard for "Bachelor" level but English is ''required by law'' at "Master" level University for the lectures to given in, and assignments to be written in (probably Justified because University Master programmes typically have a lot of foreign students). English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for small kids (preschoolers)' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.

to:

The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ have similar grammatical and word structure]] (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English, and English is a mandatory subject until high school graduation[[note]]which is at 17, 18 or 16, depending on the track / level you follow[[/note]]. Two other foreign languages, usually German and French though in some schools Spanish, Chinese or Arabic are options too, are required to be taken for at least 2 years in high school and optionally for up to 6 years - which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. At Universities / Colleges, Dutch is the standard for "Bachelor" level but English is ''required by law'' at "Master" level University for the lectures to given in, and assignments to be written in (probably Justified because University Master programmes typically have a lot of foreign students). English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences.sentences[[note]]Funnily enough, the Dutch have completely incorporated the English-language swear words "Fuck" and "Shit", to the point that they use them more casually than native-English-speakers themself [[/note]]. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for small kids (preschoolers)' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.
27th Nov '16 6:07:14 AM LB7979
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* Growing or selling large quantities of marijuana. Please don't ask how the coffeeshops get their supply.

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* Growing or selling large quantities (> 5 plants) of marijuana.marijuana[[note]]Legally you can't possess ''any'' marijuana plant, but because of the "gedogen" (see below for explanation / translation), police and D.A. ignores possession of up to 5 marijuana plants and only arrest and prosecute for more than 5 marijuana plants.[[/note]]. Please don't ask how the coffeeshops get their supply.
27th Nov '16 5:18:06 AM LB7979
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The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ have similar grammatical and word structure]] (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English, and English is a mandatory subject for high school graduation. Two other foreign languages, usually German and French though in some schools Spanish, Chinese or Arabic are options too, are required to be taken for at least 2 years in high school and optionally for up to 6 years - which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. At Universities / Colleges, Dutch is the standard for "Bachelor" level but English is ''required by law'' at "Master" level University for the lectures to given in, and assignments to be written in (probably Justified because University Master programmes typically have a lot of foreign students). English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for small kids (preschoolers)' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.

to:

The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ have similar grammatical and word structure]] (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English, and English is a mandatory subject for until high school graduation.graduation[[note]]which is at 17, 18 or 16, depending on the track / level you follow[[/note]]. Two other foreign languages, usually German and French though in some schools Spanish, Chinese or Arabic are options too, are required to be taken for at least 2 years in high school and optionally for up to 6 years - which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. At Universities / Colleges, Dutch is the standard for "Bachelor" level but English is ''required by law'' at "Master" level University for the lectures to given in, and assignments to be written in (probably Justified because University Master programmes typically have a lot of foreign students). English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for small kids (preschoolers)' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.
27th Nov '16 5:04:20 AM LB7979
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The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ have similar grammatical and word structure]] (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English. Two other languages, traditionally German and French, but sometimes Spanish or Chinese (Or something else entirely) can be chosen too, are also compulsory, which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for kids' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.

to:

The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ have similar grammatical and word structure]] (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English. English, and English is a mandatory subject for high school graduation. Two other foreign languages, traditionally usually German and French, but sometimes Spanish or French though in some schools Spanish, Chinese (Or something else entirely) can be chosen or Arabic are options too, are also compulsory, required to be taken for at least 2 years in high school and optionally for up to 6 years - which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. At Universities / Colleges, Dutch is the standard for "Bachelor" level but English is ''required by law'' at "Master" level University for the lectures to given in, and assignments to be written in (probably Justified because University Master programmes typically have a lot of foreign students). English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for kids' small kids (preschoolers)' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.
27th Nov '16 4:48:13 AM LB7979
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The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages have similar grammatical and word structure (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English. Two other languages, traditionally German and French, but sometimes Spanish or Chinese (Or something else entirely) can be chosen too, are also compulsory, which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for kids' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.

to:

The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ have similar grammatical and word structure structure]] (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English. Two other languages, traditionally German and French, but sometimes Spanish or Chinese (Or something else entirely) can be chosen too, are also compulsory, which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for kids' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.



The Netherlands also has a "homegrown" linguistic minority in the Province of Frisia (also called West Frisia by foreigners[[note]]To make things more complicated, there is actually an area called West Frisia, that's not in Frisia. Try to explain that to the international community.[[/note]] because East and North Frisia are in Germany). Frisian, which is spoken there and on the North Sea coast and islands of Schleswig-Holstein, is the West Germanic language most closely related to Old English.

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The Netherlands also has a "homegrown" linguistic minority in the Province of Frisia (also called West Frisia by foreigners[[note]]To make things more complicated, there is actually an area called West Frisia, that's not in Frisia. Try to explain that to the international community.[[/note]] because East and North Frisia are in Germany). Frisian, which is spoken there and on the North Sea coast and islands of Schleswig-Holstein, is [[https://elms.wordpress.com/2008/03/04/lexical-distance-among-languages-of-europe/ the West Germanic language most closely related to Old English.
(Old) English]].
27th Nov '16 4:13:02 AM LB7979
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* Showing nudity on television, swearing in all media and mentioning sex in children's programming.

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* Showing nudity on television, Media is rated for sex, violence, swearing in all media etc. and mentioning 16+ can't be shown on television before 10 PM [[note]] And movie theaters check ID's for admittance to 16+ movies, where sub-16s aren't admitted to ''even if their legal guardian is present and consenting''[[/note]], but [[http://www.kijkwijzer.nl/about-kijkwijzer Kijkwijzer]] tends to rate milder in general against sex and nudity, compared to the MPAA in children's programming.the U.S.A.
14th Oct '16 12:59:55 PM superstrijder15
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The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages have similar grammatical and word structure (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English. German and French (and, depending on the school, several other languages) are also compulsory, which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for kids' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.

to:

The claim that "[[BilingualBonus Everybody in the Netherlands speaks English]]" is very accurate. This is mainly because the Dutch and English languages have similar grammatical and word structure (as both English and Dutch are from the Germanic language family) and the fact that early education requires children to learn English. Two other languages, traditionally German and French (and, depending on the school, several other languages) French, but sometimes Spanish or Chinese (Or something else entirely) can be chosen too, are also compulsory, which makes the Netherlands one of the most [[{{Omniglot}} polyglot]] countries in Europe. Latin and classical Greek are included for students that are at the top tier of the Dutch school system. English serves as a ''de facto'' secondary language in the Netherlands, with Dutch people regularly using English words in otherwise Dutch sentences. Fluency is probably helped by the fact that on TV and in movies subtitling is generally preferred over dubbing, regardless of a work's original language. Dubbing a work into Dutch is usually reserved for kids' media, though as of late more VideoGames are using dubbing as well.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheNetherlands