History UsefulNotes / TheMoonsOfJupiter

5th May '17 9:34:17 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


As shown in the page quote, Europa played a prominent role in ''[[Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact 2010: The Year We Make Contact]]''. The moviemakers making it ''2001''[='=]s target instead of [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn Saturn's Iapetus]] was VindicatedByHistory; its subsurface ocean is today considered the most likely candidate to host extraterrestrial life in this Solar System, even moreso than UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}. [[note]]To put it in perspective, it's taken as read that if Mars had life, it's going to be microbial, and already ''[[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} Curiosity]]'''s analysis of the Martian soil makes it extremely unlikely that even that is there. On the other hand, the Europan sea might very well bear more complex life (sure, it'd probably be anoxic, but there's nothing suggesting that anoxic biochemistries couldn't make complex forms)--and we have nothing that suggests it might be otherwise.[[/note]]

to:

As shown in the page quote, Europa played a prominent role in ''[[Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact 2010: The Year We Make Contact]]''. The moviemakers making it ''2001''[='=]s target instead of [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn Saturn's Iapetus]] was VindicatedByHistory; its subsurface ocean is today considered the most likely candidate to host extraterrestrial life in this Solar System, even moreso more so than UsefulNotes/{{Mars}}. [[note]]To UsefulNotes/{{Mars}},[[note]]To put it in perspective, it's taken as read that if Mars had life, it's going to be microbial, and already ''[[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} Curiosity]]'''s analysis of the Martian soil makes it extremely unlikely that even that is there. On the other hand, the Europan sea might very well bear more complex life (sure, it'd probably be anoxic, but there's nothing suggesting that anoxic biochemistries couldn't make complex forms)--and we have nothing that suggests it might be otherwise.[[/note]]
[[/note]] although since about 2015 [[UsefulNotes/TheMoonsOfSaturn Enceladus]] has given Europa a run for its money in that department.
5th May '17 9:30:20 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The discovery of the four Galilean moons was a major blow to the geocentric model of the universe, Until Isaac Newton defined the Law of Gravity, it was widely held that Earth could not revolve around the Sun because the Moon would be left behind. Once it was observed that Jupiter was clearly dragging four objects along its orbit, it raised the question of why Earth couldn't do the same with the Moon.

to:

The discovery of the four Galilean moons was a major blow to the geocentric model of the universe, Until Isaac Newton defined the Law of Gravity, it was widely held that Earth could not revolve around the Sun because the Moon would be left behind. Once it was observed that Jupiter was clearly dragging four objects along its orbit, it raised the question of why Earth couldn't do the same with the Moon.
Moon. (That being said, it wasn't definitive proof; there was also strong evidence that while the planets revolved around the Sun, the Sun and Moon might revolve around the Earth. Solid proof of the Sun-centered Solar System would not come until the 19th century, when astronomers measured parallax in a star that showed the stars to be super-far away. By that point, most astronomers had accepted heliocentrism, but they were basing it on a sense that that solution, which was more elegant, was more likely true, rather than solid evidence.)
14th Apr '17 12:18:18 PM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->--''[[Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact 2010: Odyssey Two]]'' (The addition comes from the film version of the novel.)

to:

-->--''[[Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact -->-- ''[[Film/TwoThousandTenTheYearWeMakeContact 2010: Odyssey Two]]'' (The addition comes from the film version of the novel.)
3rd Jun '16 9:25:32 PM anza_sb
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The discovery of the four Galilean moons was a major blow to the geocentric model of the universe, Until Isaac Newton defined the Law of Gravity, it was widely held that Earth could not revolve around the sun because the moon would be left behind. Once It was observed that Jupiter was clearly dragging four objects along its orbit, it raised the question of why Earth couldn't do the same with the moon.

to:

The discovery of the four Galilean moons was a major blow to the geocentric model of the universe, Until Isaac Newton defined the Law of Gravity, it was widely held that Earth could not revolve around the sun Sun because the moon Moon would be left behind. Once It it was observed that Jupiter was clearly dragging four objects along its orbit, it raised the question of why Earth couldn't do the same with the moon.
Moon.



About 3640km in diameter, Io is one of the Galilean moons.

to:

About 3640km 3640 km in diameter, Io is one of the Galilean moons.
12th May '16 10:51:16 AM dieseldragons
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Almost as big as {{UsefulNotes/Mercury}} and the third biggest moon in the Solar System, this dead world is outside the main radiation belts of {{UsefulNotes/Jupiter}} and is the outermost Galilean moon. At larger scales it's covered by craters on top of other craters. At smaller scales, the surface shows more variety, with plains and knobs, probably formed by the erosion of yet more craters. The general calmness of the place (0.01 rem/day average) makes it a good location to colonize, but most writers tend to ignore it. Callisto is the only Galilean moon not part of an orbital resonance with the others. Due to the resulting lack of tidal forces from the other three Galilean moons, Callisto's surface has remained largely unchanged since it was bombarded in the early days of the solar system, making it a valuable source of information about the conditions of that time. This lack of tidal heating also makes Callisto the largest non-differentiated body in the Solar System.

to:

Almost as big as {{UsefulNotes/Mercury}} and the third biggest moon in the Solar System, this dead world is outside the main radiation belts of {{UsefulNotes/Jupiter}} and is the outermost Galilean moon. At larger scales it's covered by craters on top of other craters. At smaller scales, the surface shows more variety, with plains and knobs, probably formed by the erosion of yet more craters. The general calmness of the place (0.01 rem/day average) makes it a good location to colonize, but most writers tend to ignore it. In fact, it has ''seven times less'' radiation than even our own Earth. Callisto is the only Galilean moon not part of an orbital resonance with the others. Due to the resulting lack of tidal forces from the other three Galilean moons, Callisto's surface has remained largely unchanged since it was bombarded in the early days of the solar system, making it a valuable source of information about the conditions of that time. This lack of tidal heating also makes Callisto the largest non-differentiated body in the Solar System.
27th Apr '16 5:29:53 PM RainbowPhoenix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Its surface features are named after gods of fire, thunder and lightning, the sun, or blacksmithing (Ra Patera, the volcanoes Pele and Surt, etc.) Given its extreme geological activity, it's questionable how long any of these surface features will last.

to:

Its surface features are named after gods of fire, thunder and lightning, the sun, or blacksmithing (Ra Patera, the volcanoes Pele and Surt, etc.) Given its extreme geological activity, it's questionable how long any of these surface features will last.
last. Based on observations via the Voyager and Galileo probes, Io only needs a mere ''sixteen years'' to replace all of its surface features.
10th Apr '16 11:57:42 PM RainbowPhoenix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Almost as big as {{UsefulNotes/Mercury}} and the third biggest moon in the Solar System, this dead world is outside the main radiation belts of {{UsefulNotes/Jupiter}} and is the outermost Galilean moon. At larger scales it's covered by craters on top of other craters. At smaller scales, the surface shows more variety, with plains and knobs, probably formed by the erosion of yet more craters. The general calmness of the place (0.01 rem/day average) makes it a good location to colonize, but most writers tend to ignore it. Callisto is the only Galilean moon not part of an orbital resonance with the others. Due to the resulting lack of tidal forces from the other three Galilean moons, Callisto's surface has remained largely unchanged since it was bombarded in the early days of the solar system, making it a valuable source of information about the conditions of that time.

to:

Almost as big as {{UsefulNotes/Mercury}} and the third biggest moon in the Solar System, this dead world is outside the main radiation belts of {{UsefulNotes/Jupiter}} and is the outermost Galilean moon. At larger scales it's covered by craters on top of other craters. At smaller scales, the surface shows more variety, with plains and knobs, probably formed by the erosion of yet more craters. The general calmness of the place (0.01 rem/day average) makes it a good location to colonize, but most writers tend to ignore it. Callisto is the only Galilean moon not part of an orbital resonance with the others. Due to the resulting lack of tidal forces from the other three Galilean moons, Callisto's surface has remained largely unchanged since it was bombarded in the early days of the solar system, making it a valuable source of information about the conditions of that time. \n This lack of tidal heating also makes Callisto the largest non-differentiated body in the Solar System.
19th Mar '16 11:09:52 AM RainbowPhoenix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Almost as big as {{UsefulNotes/Mercury}} and the third biggest moon in the Solar System, this dead world is outside the main radiation belts of {{UsefulNotes/Jupiter}} and is the outermost Galilean moon. At larger scales it's covered by craters on top of other craters. At smaller scales, the surface shows more variety, with plains and knobs, probably formed by the erosion of yet more craters. The general calmness of the place (0.01 rem/day average) makes it a good location to colonize, but most writers tend to ignore it. Due to the lack of tidal forces from the other three Galilean moons, Callisto's surface has remained largely unchanged since it was bombarded in the early days of the solar system, making it a valuable source of information about the conditions of that time.

to:

Almost as big as {{UsefulNotes/Mercury}} and the third biggest moon in the Solar System, this dead world is outside the main radiation belts of {{UsefulNotes/Jupiter}} and is the outermost Galilean moon. At larger scales it's covered by craters on top of other craters. At smaller scales, the surface shows more variety, with plains and knobs, probably formed by the erosion of yet more craters. The general calmness of the place (0.01 rem/day average) makes it a good location to colonize, but most writers tend to ignore it. Callisto is the only Galilean moon not part of an orbital resonance with the others. Due to the resulting lack of tidal forces from the other three Galilean moons, Callisto's surface has remained largely unchanged since it was bombarded in the early days of the solar system, making it a valuable source of information about the conditions of that time.
time.
12th Feb '16 1:13:07 PM RainbowPhoenix
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

The discovery of the four Galilean moons was a major blow to the geocentric model of the universe, Until Isaac Newton defined the Law of Gravity, it was widely held that Earth could not revolve around the sun because the moon would be left behind. Once It was observed that Jupiter was clearly dragging four objects along its orbit, it raised the question of why Earth couldn't do the same with the moon.
2nd Jan '16 10:56:06 PM TheGreatSkrond
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Amalthea didn't get its name until the mid-20th century; before then it was simply known as "Jupiter V" (as in the Roman numeral 5). Creator/ArthurCClarke wrote a short story by this name, which posited an alien civilization there. (How a civilization could form under such high radiation levels, in surface gravity only 0.2% of Earth's, is another matter.)

to:

Amalthea didn't get its name until the mid-20th century; before then it was simply known as "Jupiter V" (as in the Roman numeral 5). Creator/ArthurCClarke wrote a short story by this name, which posited it was an alien civilization there. (How a civilization could form under such high radiation levels, in surface gravity only 0.2% of Earth's, is another matter.)
starship (yes, the entire moon).
This list shows the last 10 events of 26. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.TheMoonsOfJupiter