History UsefulNotes / TheKoreanWar

3rd Sep '17 8:16:35 PM Jhonny
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It's somewhat of a forgotten war in the United States despite seeing just over half as many American deaths as UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar (36,516 vs. 58,209 respectively, and over a far shorter period of time in much higher-intensity combat), 1,109 British deaths and a total body count that must be heading towards 3 million. In North Korea, however, the war has been used ever since as an excuse to villainize the United States and its "puppet government" in South Korea. Most of the population is led from birth to believe that the US is just waiting for the right moment to come in and "finish the job". Technically, the war is still ongoing as both sides have only ever agreed to a ceasefire, not any peace treaty. This is in large part because a peace treaty would require the two Koreas to officially recognize each other as existing[[note]]Only the legitimate governments of sovereign nations can be signatories of treaties. Each of the Koreas considers the other to be its own territory and the government thereof to be an illegal rebellion.[[/note]], which they refuse to do. "Restarting" the war is a fairly common plot[[note]] This is probably less likely to occur now than at any other time since the actual war. Know that big Chinese brother whose assistance to North Korea is all over this page? Word is that they've totally turned their back on North Korea and are at the point that they would welcome Korean unification...''under Seoul's auspices''. At any rate, [[EagleLand the other giant that was involved in the war?]] Is now their no. 1 economic partner, and they ''definitely'' won't risk that for the Kims. Seoul being it's largest import partner doesn't help, either. The entire reason China still provides economic and sometimes political support to North Korea at all is to avoid having to deal with the inevitable flood of North Korean refugees should the Kim regime collapse suddenly.. That said, North Korea's raison d'etre is to continue the war, and they may eventually feel the pressure to try again, plus the First Family of Pyongyang aren't known for being especially stable, so the scenario isn't impossible.[[/note]].

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It's somewhat of a forgotten war in the United States despite seeing just over half as many American deaths as UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar (36,516 vs. 58,209 respectively, and over a far shorter period of time in much higher-intensity combat), 1,109 British deaths and a total body count that must be heading towards 3 million. In North Korea, however, the war has been used ever since as an excuse to villainize the United States and its "puppet government" in South Korea. Most of the population is led from birth to believe that the US is just waiting for the right moment to come in and "finish the job". Technically, the war is still ongoing as both sides have only ever agreed to a ceasefire, not any peace treaty. This is in large part because a peace treaty would require the two Koreas to officially recognize each other as existing[[note]]Only the legitimate governments of sovereign nations can be signatories of treaties. Each of the Koreas considers the other to be its own territory and the government thereof to be an illegal rebellion.[[/note]], which they refuse to do. "Restarting" the war is a fairly common plot[[note]] This is probably less likely to occur now than at any other time since the actual war. Know that big Chinese brother whose assistance to North Korea is all over this page? Word is that they've totally turned their back on North Korea and are at the point that they would welcome Korean unification...''under Seoul's auspices''. At any rate, [[EagleLand the other giant that was involved in the war?]] Is now their no. 1 economic partner, and they ''definitely'' won't risk that for the Kims. Seoul being it's largest import partner doesn't help, either. The entire reason China still provides economic and sometimes political support to North Korea at all is to avoid having to deal with the inevitable flood of North Korean refugees should the Kim regime collapse suddenly..suddenly. Another reason is that China cannot want the US Army to stand directly at its border. They might want some sort of "demilitarized Korea" deal, but Russia tried to get that after the Cold War and now former Soviet Republic are in NATO. That said, North Korea's raison d'etre is to continue the war, and they may eventually feel the pressure to try again, plus the First Family of Pyongyang aren't known for being especially stable, so the scenario isn't impossible.[[/note]].
3rd Sep '17 7:40:40 PM SSJMagus
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It's somewhat of a forgotten war in the United States despite seeing just over half as many American deaths as UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar (36,516 vs. 58,209 respectively, and over a far shorter period of time in much higher-intensity combat), 1,109 British deaths and a total body count that must be heading towards 3 million. In North Korea, however, the war has been used ever since as an excuse to villainize the United States and its "puppet government" in South Korea. Most of the population is led from birth to believe that the US is just waiting for the right moment to come in and "finish the job". Technically, the war is still ongoing as both sides have only ever agreed to a ceasefire, not any peace treaty. "Restarting" the war is a fairly common plot[[note]] This is probably less likely to occur now than at any other time since the actual war. Know that big Chinese brother whose assistance to North Korea is all over this page? Word is that they've totally turned their back on North Korea and are at the point that they would welcome Korean unification...''under Seoul's auspices''. At any rate, [[EagleLand the other giant that was involved in the war?]] Is now their no. 1 economic partner, and they ''definitely'' won't risk that for the Kims. Seoul being it's largest import partner doesn't help, either. That said, North Korea's raison d'etre is to continue the war, and they may eventually feel the pressure to try again, plus the First Family of Pyongyang aren't known for being especially stable, so the scenario isn't impossible.[[/note]].

to:

It's somewhat of a forgotten war in the United States despite seeing just over half as many American deaths as UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar (36,516 vs. 58,209 respectively, and over a far shorter period of time in much higher-intensity combat), 1,109 British deaths and a total body count that must be heading towards 3 million. In North Korea, however, the war has been used ever since as an excuse to villainize the United States and its "puppet government" in South Korea. Most of the population is led from birth to believe that the US is just waiting for the right moment to come in and "finish the job". Technically, the war is still ongoing as both sides have only ever agreed to a ceasefire, not any peace treaty. This is in large part because a peace treaty would require the two Koreas to officially recognize each other as existing[[note]]Only the legitimate governments of sovereign nations can be signatories of treaties. Each of the Koreas considers the other to be its own territory and the government thereof to be an illegal rebellion.[[/note]], which they refuse to do. "Restarting" the war is a fairly common plot[[note]] This is probably less likely to occur now than at any other time since the actual war. Know that big Chinese brother whose assistance to North Korea is all over this page? Word is that they've totally turned their back on North Korea and are at the point that they would welcome Korean unification...''under Seoul's auspices''. At any rate, [[EagleLand the other giant that was involved in the war?]] Is now their no. 1 economic partner, and they ''definitely'' won't risk that for the Kims. Seoul being it's largest import partner doesn't help, either. The entire reason China still provides economic and sometimes political support to North Korea at all is to avoid having to deal with the inevitable flood of North Korean refugees should the Kim regime collapse suddenly.. That said, North Korea's raison d'etre is to continue the war, and they may eventually feel the pressure to try again, plus the First Family of Pyongyang aren't known for being especially stable, so the scenario isn't impossible.[[/note]].
19th Jun '17 4:50:28 PM StarSword
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/SabreAceConflictOverKorea'' is an air combat simulator set during the war, with the USAF player starting in an F-51 Mustang and working their way up to an F-86 Sabre jet fighter. The North Korean campaign has you ahistorically[[note]]The Soviet Union didn't send its pilots into combat until April 1951.[[/note]] playing a Soviet pilot, starting in a Yak-9 and changing over to a [=MiG-15=] jet later.
6th Jun '17 8:33:45 AM jamespolk
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And in a sane world, that's where the war would've ended, after only a single bloody year. But negotiations dragged on for two more years, and men continued to die by the thousands with no territorial gains for either side (much like WorldWarOne a generation earlier, only this time with jets). The Soviet Union snuck in some pilots, partly as a show of solidarity with the PRC but also to gain experience in modern air-air combat. The UN forces knew they were there, but weren't keen on starting a war with the [[Main/{{RedsWithRockets}} Reds With Rockets]].[[note]] American and British fighter pilots had standing orders to kill any enemy fighter pilot suspected of being a Russian. Not shoot him down, ''kill him''. This was to send a message to the Soviets, who insisted that [[BlatantLies every Mig-15 was being flown by a "brave Chinese volunteer."]] [[/note]]

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And in a sane world, that's where the war would've ended, after only a single bloody year. But negotiations dragged on for two more years, and men continued to die by the thousands with no territorial gains for either side (much like WorldWarOne UsefulNotes/WorldWarOne a generation earlier, only this time with jets). The Soviet Union snuck in some pilots, partly as a show of solidarity with the PRC but also to gain experience in modern air-air combat. The UN forces knew they were there, but weren't keen on starting a war with the [[Main/{{RedsWithRockets}} Reds With Rockets]].[[note]] American and British fighter pilots had standing orders to kill any enemy fighter pilot suspected of being a Russian. Not shoot him down, ''kill him''. This was to send a message to the Soviets, who insisted that [[BlatantLies every Mig-15 was being flown by a "brave Chinese volunteer."]] [[/note]]



* ''The Steel Helmet'' (1951)

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* ''The Steel Helmet'' ''Film/TheSteelHelmet'' (1951)



* ''Sayonara'' (1957)

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* ''Sayonara'' ''Film/{{Sayonara}}'' (1957)
27th May '17 2:10:33 PM nombretomado
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* Sheriff Will Teasle of the first ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' film is a Korean War veteran. It is implied on the movie (and explicit on the novel) that his IrrationalHatred for Rambo is because Korea (and his own sacrifices by proxy) has been all but swept under the rug by the American people while Rambo (a VietnamWar vet) is a walking symbol of the "new generation".

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* Sheriff Will Teasle of the first ''Franchise/{{Rambo}}'' film is a Korean War veteran. It is implied on the movie (and explicit on the novel) that his IrrationalHatred for Rambo is because Korea (and his own sacrifices by proxy) has been all but swept under the rug by the American people while Rambo (a VietnamWar UsefulNotes/VietnamWar vet) is a walking symbol of the "new generation".
9th May '17 10:06:18 PM Sylderon
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Although the US and her allies technically won the war -- their main goal, maintaining South Korean independence, was achieved -- the long bloody stalemate has ensured that the war is remembered as a draw. Another, much more paradoxical, but, ironically, ''official'' point of view was that the war didn't technically happen ''at all''. Y'see, both halves of Korea consider themselves the only legitimate government, with their jurisdiction covering the entire peninsula[[note]]North officially considered Seoul its capital till 1972, and South still appoints governors for the northern provinces[[/note]], and the other contender as rebels and bandits. Thus, in their books, the whole war only counted as a police operation to bring the rebel provinces back, and Southern representatives weren't even present at the signing of the armistice. Even stranger, in this perspective, is that no official "country" participated in this war. US and its allies participated as the UN force, not as armed forces of the respective countries. The Chinese were all technically and legally "volunteers." The Soviet pilots were officially never in Korea. And both Koreas denied that the other was a legitimate "country" at all.

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Although the US and her allies technically won the war -- their main goal, maintaining South Korean independence, was achieved -- the long bloody stalemate has ensured that the war is remembered as a draw. Another, much more paradoxical, but, ironically, ''official'' point of view was that the war didn't technically happen ''at all''. Y'see, both halves of Korea consider themselves the only legitimate government, with their jurisdiction covering the entire peninsula[[note]]North officially considered Seoul its capital till 1972, and South still appoints governors for the northern provinces[[/note]], and the other contender as rebels and bandits. Thus, in their books, the whole war only counted as a police operation to bring the rebel provinces back, and Southern representatives weren't even present at the signing of the armistice. [[note]]President Rhee's interference with the peace negotiations and his demand that the UN forces fight on, until the whole country was unified (under his leadership, natch) became so annoying that Eisenhower called Rhee's bluff (a demand that, if they didn't fight on, UN forces should leave the country) and threatened to leave him to get stomped by the Chinese if he didn't stop being such a {{Jerkass}}[[/note]] Even stranger, in this perspective, is that no official "country" participated in this war. US and its allies participated as the UN force, not as armed forces of the respective countries. The Chinese were all technically and legally "volunteers." The Soviet pilots [[IWasNeverHere were officially never in Korea.Korea]]. And both Koreas denied that the other was a legitimate "country" at all.
28th Apr '17 5:38:27 AM Kadorhal
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* The aptly named 2003 title ''Korea : Forgotten Conflict''. Its style of gameplay is very similar to that of the ''VideoGame/{{Commandos}}'' series.

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* The aptly named 2003 title ''Korea : ''Korea: Forgotten Conflict''. Its style of gameplay is very similar to that of the ''VideoGame/{{Commandos}}'' series.



* The top tiers of ''VideoGame/WorldOfTanks'' and ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarplanes'' involve vehicles from this era.



* The Cold War campaign in the ''Thrones and Patriots'' expansion of ''VideoGame/RiseOfNations'' allows the player (as the US or Soviet Union) to get involved in the war. The US has the option to decide whether to simply hold on to South Korea's original cities or push into the North - the latter action spurs China into action against you and pushes the worldwide DEFCON level down. The Soviets, in addition to taking on a more active role, can also decide whether to accept Chinese help in exchange for a non-agression pact lasting several campaign turns (that you can break early, also for a DEFCON level fall).

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* The Cold War campaign in the ''Thrones and Patriots'' expansion of ''VideoGame/RiseOfNations'' allows the player (as the US or Soviet Union) to get involved in the war. The US has the option to decide whether to simply hold on to South Korea's original cities or push into the North - the latter action spurs China into action against you and pushes the worldwide DEFCON level down. The Soviets, in addition to taking on a more active role, can also decide whether to accept Chinese help in exchange for a non-agression non-aggression pact lasting several campaign turns (that you can break early, also for a DEFCON level fall).



* ''VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory'' plays with this. One level has [[TheHero Sam]] sneaking his way through a war-torn Seoul.
** This caused it to be [[BannedInChina Banned In South Korea]] for a while.

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* ''VideoGame/SplinterCellChaosTheory'' plays with this. ''VideoGame/SplinterCell: Chaos Theory'' has the war restart halfway through the game as a result of the bad guys using weaponized computer algorithms to autonomously launch a North Korean missile at a US carrier, sinking it and pinning the blame on them. One level has [[TheHero Sam]] sneaking his way through a war-torn Seoul.
** This
Seoul (which caused it to be [[BannedInChina Banned In South Korea]] for a while.while).
* ''VideoGame/GhostRecon 2'' is an interesting case, as the "First Contact" version for [=PS2=] and [=GameCube=] depicts the same conflict as in ''Chaos Theory'', showing more of the actual battles of it (whereas ''Chaos Theory'' focuses more on the truth behind the war)... and then the "Final Assault" version for Xbox concerns the war restarting '''again''' a couple years later.



* The top tiers of ''VideoGame/WorldOfTanks'' and ''WorldOfWarplanes'' involve vehicles from this era.
30th Mar '17 5:04:36 PM MAI742
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At least 100,000 Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK, 'North' Korea) served in at least the final three years (1948-50) of the Chinese Civil War on the side of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). After most of the Chinese-majority provinces of the Mainland had been conquered, on the 1st of October 1949 Chairman Mao of the CCP declared the foundation of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Roughly 1.5 million troops whose warlords were allied with or who answered directly to the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMG) continued to hold out along the Chinese-Burman border, Chinese Central Asia, and on Hainan Island (ant Taiwan) but the war was effectively over by then. The PRC's People's Liberation Army (PLA) was simply unable to deploy most of its troops in these remote and inaccessible areas, so it demobilised most of its forces and allowed most DPRK units to return to North Korea with their equipment and weapons - and experience in battle. The final 30,000 were repatriated within three months of the outbreak of the Korean War.

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At least 100,000 Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK, 'North' Korea) served in at least the final three years (1948-50) of the Chinese Civil War on the side of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). After most of the Chinese-majority provinces of the Mainland had been conquered, on the 1st of October 1949 Chairman Mao of the CCP declared the foundation of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Roughly 1.5 million troops whose warlords were allied with or who answered directly to the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMG) continued to hold out along the Chinese-Burman border, Chinese Central Asia, and on Hainan Island (ant (and Taiwan) but the war was effectively over by then. The PRC's People's Liberation Army (PLA) was simply unable to deploy most of its troops in these remote and inaccessible areas, so it demobilised most of its forces and allowed most DPRK units to return to North Korea with their equipment and weapons - and experience in battle. The final 30,000 were repatriated within three months of the outbreak of the Korean War.
30th Mar '17 5:03:49 PM MAI742
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->''"There is not a single unit in the United Democratic Forces now driving the Kuomintang from Manchuria that does not have my troops in it [...] at the end of the Manchurian campaign these roops will be seasoned, trained veterans. When the Americans and the Russians withdraw, we will be able to liberate [southern] Korea immediately."''
-->--'''Ch'oe Yonggon''', DPRK Defence Minister (translated by Bruce Cummings) [[note]] printed in Bruce Cummings' ''The Origins of the Korean War: The Roaring of the Cataract 1947-1950 (Princeton, 1990), p.359 [[/note]]
30th Mar '17 5:03:15 PM MAI742
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->''"If you should get kicked in the teeth, I shall not lift a finger. You have to ask [[UsefulNotes/MaoZedong Mao]] for all the help."''
-->--'''UsefulNotes/JosephStalin''', in conversation to Kim Il-Sung, April 1950 [[note]] printed in Kim Chullbaum's ''The Truth about the Korean War'' p.106 [[/note]]

The closest the USA ever came to using several hundred nuclear weapons upon the People's Republic of China, the Korean War of 1950-53 is known as "the 6.25 War" (the war began on the 25th of June) or just "6.25" in UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}}, the "Fatherland Liberation War" in UsefulNotes/{{North Korea}}, and 'the ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' war' in the English-speaking world. The two Koreas are still ''de jure'' at war, as they only ever agreed to a ceasefire, but ''de facto'' at peace as no serious fighting has ensued in the decades since the ceasefire was concluded. In fact their relationship has been more or less amicable, especially after 1998.



The closest the USA ever came to using several hundred nuclear weapons upon the People's Republic of China, the Korean War of 1950-53 is known as "the 6.25 War" (the war began on the 25th of June) or just "6.25" in UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}}, the "Fatherland Liberation War" in UsefulNotes/{{North Korea}}, and 'the ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' war' in the English-speaking world. The two Koreas are still ''de jure'' at war, as they only ever agreed to a ceasefire, but ''de facto'' at peace as no serious fighting has ensued in the decades since the ceasefire was concluded. In fact their relationship has been more or less amicable, especially after 1998.

At least 50,000 Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK, 'North' Korea) served in at least the final three years (1948-50) of the Chinese Civil War on the side of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). After most of the Chinese-majority provinces of the Mainland had been conquered, on the 1st of October 1949 Chairman Mao of the CCP declared the foundation of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Chinese Nationalist Party (KMG) forces continued to hold out along the Chinese-Burman border, Chinese Central Asia, and Hainan Island but the war was effectively over by then. The PRC's People's Liberation Army (PLA) was simply unable to deploy most of its troops in these remote and inaccessible areas, so it demobilised most of its forces and allowed the DPRK units to return to North Korea with their equipment and weapons - and experience in battle.

to:

The closest ->''"There is not a single unit in the USA ever came to using several hundred nuclear weapons upon United Democratic Forces now driving the People's Republic Kuomintang from Manchuria that does not have my troops in it [...] at the end of China, the Manchurian campaign these roops will be seasoned, trained veterans. When the Americans and the Russians withdraw, we will be able to liberate [southern] Korea immediately."''
-->--'''Ch'oe Yonggon''', DPRK Defence Minister (translated by Bruce Cummings) [[note]] printed in Bruce Cummings' ''The Origins of
the Korean War War: The Roaring of 1950-53 is known as "the 6.25 War" (the war began on the 25th of June) or just "6.25" in UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}}, the "Fatherland Liberation War" in UsefulNotes/{{North Korea}}, and 'the ''[[Series/{{Mash}} M*A*S*H]]'' war' in the English-speaking world. The two Koreas are still ''de jure'' at war, as they only ever agreed to a ceasefire, but ''de facto'' at peace as no serious fighting has ensued in the decades since the ceasefire was concluded. In fact their relationship has been more or less amicable, especially after 1998.

Cataract 1947-1950 (Princeton, 1990), p.359 [[/note]]

At least 50,000 100,000 Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK, 'North' Korea) served in at least the final three years (1948-50) of the Chinese Civil War on the side of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). After most of the Chinese-majority provinces of the Mainland had been conquered, on the 1st of October 1949 Chairman Mao of the CCP declared the foundation of the People's Republic of China (PRC). Roughly 1.5 million troops whose warlords were allied with or who answered directly to the Chinese Nationalist Party (KMG) forces continued to hold out along the Chinese-Burman border, Chinese Central Asia, and on Hainan Island (ant Taiwan) but the war was effectively over by then. The PRC's People's Liberation Army (PLA) was simply unable to deploy most of its troops in these remote and inaccessible areas, so it demobilised most of its forces and allowed the most DPRK units to return to North Korea with their equipment and weapons - and experience in battle.
battle. The final 30,000 were repatriated within three months of the outbreak of the Korean War.
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