History UsefulNotes / TheFrenchRevolution

21st Jun '18 6:44:48 PM costanton11
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** The notorious Creator/MarquisDeSade was writing the ''120 Days of Sodom'' in the Bastille before being released two weeks before 14 July, 1789. During the revolution, he worked in the popular theaters and became a spokesman in the Radical Paris Section (City Ward) Piques (it was Robespierre's ward!). He was highly popular and well-liked by the sectionnaires and sans-culottes and became a committed radical, even writing a eulogy for Marat which compared him to Jesus. He faced problems when his son, fighting in the French Army, defected to the enemy and he also argued against the Terror which led to his imprisonment. After Thermidor, he was virtually penniless, being forced to sell his remaining estate and barely subsisting [[JerkAss until Napoleon whimsically ordered his imprisonment to Charenton after reading ''Juliette''.]]
** The legendary Thomas Alexandre Davy de la Palettiere was the son of a French nobleman and a Haitian African slave. In France, he was raised with full privileges and education. During the Revolution, he fell out with his father and he took his mother's family name and called himself Thomas-Alexandre Dumas. He fell into hard times towards the end of the Revolutionary Wars and the Rise of Napoleon (they hated each other) and Dumas was unfairly stranded in an Italian prison for two years which badly affected his health. After his release, Napoleon refused to give him and his wife a pension and when he died, his wife had to raise her young son Creator/AlexandreDumas in poor circumstances for which they blamed [[JerkAss Napoleon]].

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** The notorious Creator/MarquisDeSade was writing the ''120 Days of Sodom'' in the Bastille before being released two weeks before 14 July, 1789. During the revolution, he worked in the popular theaters and became a spokesman in the Radical Paris Section (City Ward) Piques (it was Robespierre's ward!). He was highly popular and well-liked by the sectionnaires and sans-culottes and became a committed radical, even writing a eulogy for Marat which compared him to Jesus. He faced problems when his son, fighting in the French Army, defected to the enemy and he also argued against the Terror which led to his imprisonment. After Thermidor, he was virtually penniless, being forced to sell his remaining estate and barely subsisting [[JerkAss until Napoleon whimsically ordered his imprisonment to Charenton after reading ''Juliette''.]]
''Juliette''.
** The legendary Thomas Alexandre Davy de la Palettiere was the son of a French nobleman and a Haitian African slave. In France, he was raised with full privileges and education. During the Revolution, he fell out with his father and he took his mother's family name and called himself Thomas-Alexandre Dumas. He fell into hard times towards the end of the Revolutionary Wars and the Rise of Napoleon (they hated each other) and Dumas was unfairly stranded in an Italian prison for two years which badly affected his health. After his release, Napoleon refused to give him and his wife a pension and when he died, his wife had to raise her young son Creator/AlexandreDumas in poor circumstances for which they blamed [[JerkAss Napoleon]].Napoleon.
12th Jun '18 6:10:38 AM jormis29
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* ''Andrea Chénier'', an opera by Umberto Giordano based on the life and death of the poet André Chénier.

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* ''Andrea Chénier'', ''Theatre/AndreaChenier'', an opera by Umberto Giordano based on the life and death of the poet André Chénier.
19th May '18 8:38:21 AM costanton11
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* [[Characters/TheFrenchRevolution The French Revolution Characters]]:
** UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolutionMajorFigures
** UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolutionClubsAndFactions
** UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolutionOrganizations

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* [[Characters/TheFrenchRevolution The French Revolution Characters]]:
**
UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolutionMajorFigures
** * UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolutionClubsAndFactions
** * UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolutionOrganizations
13th Mar '18 4:28:27 AM jormis29
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* ''Farewell, My Queen'' a 2012 French film starring Diane Kruger as Marie Antoinette. It explores Versailles in the first three days of the Revolution.

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* ''Farewell, My Queen'' ''Film/FarewellMyQueen'' a 2012 French film starring Diane Kruger as Marie Antoinette. It explores Versailles in the first three days of the Revolution.
20th Jan '18 10:10:59 AM HighCrate
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After this, the Revolution faced a series of problems, many of them revolving on debates that were OlderThanFeudalism but got stirred up during UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment. Obviously old-fashioned autocratic Kingdom, DivineRightOfKings, feudal class distinctions and religious control on social levers was getting [[DeaderThanDisco increasingly unacceptable]]. If the King and Church was removed, or at least, if their power was limited anyhow, what could take its place? The suggestion put forth was "the Nation" revolving around a conception of French identity that individuals of all classes, all beliefs in all regions could share and accept. Problem was that most of France, outside of the Paris Basin, didn't really feel this unified 'French' identity, and nobody was sure about how, if at all, this idea of the "French nation" was ever to really replace the local traditions of feudal monarchy, always backed by the Church that was more than a millennium old.

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After this, the Revolution faced a series of problems, many of them revolving on debates that were OlderThanFeudalism but got stirred up during UsefulNotes/TheEnlightenment. Obviously old-fashioned autocratic Kingdom, DivineRightOfKings, feudal class distinctions and religious control on social levers was getting [[DeaderThanDisco increasingly unacceptable]].unacceptable. If the King and Church was removed, or at least, if their power was limited anyhow, what could take its place? The suggestion put forth was "the Nation" revolving around a conception of French identity that individuals of all classes, all beliefs in all regions could share and accept. Problem was that most of France, outside of the Paris Basin, didn't really feel this unified 'French' identity, and nobody was sure about how, if at all, this idea of the "French nation" was ever to really replace the local traditions of feudal monarchy, always backed by the Church that was more than a millennium old.
7th Dec '17 8:28:37 PM karstovich2
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The result was the French Revolution's original sin: the [[WellIntentionedExtremist well-intentioned mess]] of the Civil Constitution of the Clergy. This legislation demanded that priests across France swear an oath to the Republic above the Pope, accept wages from the government and devolve to the status of civil servants and accept nationalization and confiscation of Church property. This was truly divisive and controversial to say the least, since it offended the beliefs of many devout Catholics, including the King. The plan was also implemented without full understanding of regional diversity. In relatively urbanized areas under close royal supervision, like the Paris Basin, people largely went along with the plan, even if there was some grumbling by the particularly devout (like, again, the King). By contrast, the Civil Constitution failed utterly in more rural regions, traditionally far away from royal influence. This was particularly true in the western region known as the Vendée, where the local nobles and priests were well liked and respected by the people and the confiscation of property led to the destruction of local Catholic charities that catered to the poor. The Church property was also supposed to have been distributed among peasants, but in the Vendée, it was bought up by local merchant-elites, and thanks to LoopholeAbuse in the "abolition of seigneural dues" and weak implementation of the same, these merchants continued to extort taxes among the people who had a limited security net.

This seriously undermined popular support for revolutionary aims. The aristocratic counterrevolutionaries opposed the Revolution's changes on general principle (as well as outrage for losing ancient privileges they felt entitled to), but their numbers were few and their political attitude could be best described as "utterly demoralized." By contrast, the Civil Constitution [[NiceJobBreakingItHero alienated poor but devout peasants]], who might have gone along with some of the Revolution's policies (after all, what kind of peasant doesn't want more land and lower taxes?), but turned permanently against the Revolution when it turned on their beloved Church--especially after the Civil Constitution was condemned by the Pope. This led to a long-running counterrevolutionary revolt/insurgency in the Vendée (occasionally spreading to surrounding regions like Brittany). The insurgency became a constant, festering ulcer for the Revolution, often distracting from other policy priorities and threats (including foreign wars) at critical moments.

to:

The result was the French Revolution's original sin: the [[WellIntentionedExtremist well-intentioned mess]] of the Civil Constitution of the Clergy. This legislation demanded that priests across France swear an oath to the Republic above the Pope, accept wages from the government and devolve to the status of civil servants and accept nationalization and confiscation of Church property. This was truly divisive and controversial to say the least, since it offended the beliefs of many devout Catholics, including the King. The plan was also implemented without full understanding of regional diversity. In relatively urbanized areas under close royal supervision, like the Paris Basin, people largely went along with the plan, even if there was some grumbling by the particularly devout (like, again, the King). By contrast, the Civil Constitution failed utterly in more rural regions, traditionally far away from royal influence. This was particularly true in the western region known as the Vendée, where the local nobles and priests were well liked and respected by the people and the confiscation of property led to the destruction of local Catholic charities that catered to the poor. The Church property was also supposed to have been distributed among peasants, but in the Vendée, it was bought up by local merchant-elites, and thanks to LoopholeAbuse in the "abolition of seigneural dues" and weak implementation of the same, these merchants continued to extort taxes among the people who had a limited security net.

Nowhere in France was the failure of the Civil Constitution more apparent in the very rural western region known as the Vendée. In the Vendée, most of the peasants liked the local nobles, who by and large kept to the old principle of ''noblesse oblige'', and the local clergy, whom they regarded as honorable defenders of their deeply-held Catholic faith. Together, the nobles and the clergy funded and ran Catholic charities that served as a fairly decent social support for the region (making the Vendée one of the few places where the idealized notions about the nobility and the Church came close to reality). The Civil Constitution, which stripped the Church of its property, combined with the emigration of the nobility and the division of the émigré lands, therefore not only seemed like an unjust attack to the people of the Vendée, it stripped them of their safety net. And they needed that net because of rampant LoopholeAbuse with the sale of the seized property, which was supposed to be available to peasants but was in practice all taken by well-off bourgeois merchants. Moreover, because of the weird way in which seignieurial dues were supposedly "abolished" (certain ones were deemed property rights that could not be taken away without compensation, and so still remained after "abolition"), these new bourgeois owners often enforced to the hilt various dues the less businesslike nobles and Church had let slide, squeezing the peasantry just as they were losing their main means of support in hard times.

This seriously undermined popular support for revolutionary aims.aims in the Vendée. The aristocratic counterrevolutionaries opposed the Revolution's changes on general principle (as well as outrage for losing ancient privileges they felt entitled to), but their numbers were few and their political attitude could be best described as "utterly demoralized." By contrast, the Civil Constitution [[NiceJobBreakingItHero alienated poor but devout peasants]], who might have gone along with some of the Revolution's policies (after all, what kind of peasant doesn't want more land and lower taxes?), but turned permanently against the Revolution when it turned on their beloved Church--especially after the Civil Constitution was condemned by the Pope. This led to a long-running counterrevolutionary revolt/insurgency in the Vendée (occasionally spreading to surrounding regions like Brittany). The insurgency became a constant, festering ulcer for the Revolution, often distracting from other policy priorities and threats (including foreign wars) at critical moments.
5th Dec '17 12:37:26 PM Jhonny
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This realization became was public when, the Third Estate, upon finding out one day that their meeting hall was locked for some reason, chose to meet on their own in a tennis court--joined by some of the First Estate members representing the poor parish priests (who largely had concerns closer to those of the Third Estate than that of higher-ranking prelates) and a few liberal nobles (led by the UsefulNotes/MarquisDeLaFayette and--later--the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi Duke of Orleans]]). They took an oath not to disband, and eventually declared themselves the "National Assembly," inviting the First and Second Estates to sit with them.

to:

This realization became was public when, the Third Estate, upon finding out one day that their meeting hall was locked for some reason, chose to meet on their own in a tennis court--joined by some of the First Estate members representing the poor parish priests (who largely had concerns closer to those of the Third Estate than that of higher-ranking prelates) and a few liberal nobles (led by the UsefulNotes/MarquisDeLaFayette and--later--the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi Duke of Orleans]]). They took an oath not to disband, and eventually declared themselves the "National Assembly," inviting the First and Second Estates to sit with them.
4th Dec '17 8:52:18 PM karstovich2
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This realization became was public when, the Third Estate, upon finding out one day that their meeting hall was locked for some reason, chose to meet on their own in a tennis court--joined by some of the First Estate members representing the poor parish priests (who largely had concerns closer to those of the Third Estate than that of higher-ranking prelates) and a few liberal nobles. They took an oath not to disband, and eventually declared themselves the "National Assembly," inviting the First and Second Estates to sit with them.

to:

This realization became was public when, the Third Estate, upon finding out one day that their meeting hall was locked for some reason, chose to meet on their own in a tennis court--joined by some of the First Estate members representing the poor parish priests (who largely had concerns closer to those of the Third Estate than that of higher-ranking prelates) and a few liberal nobles.nobles (led by the UsefulNotes/MarquisDeLaFayette and--later--the [[UsefulNotes/LEtatCestMoi Duke of Orleans]]). They took an oath not to disband, and eventually declared themselves the "National Assembly," inviting the First and Second Estates to sit with them.
4th Dec '17 8:47:32 PM karstovich2
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Despite being a little dim, Louis was well aware that this is more or less exactly what had happened to [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart Charles I of England]] about [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar 150 years previously]], and that calling the English Estates--that is, Parliament--had cost Charles his head and the English monarchy nearly all of its political power. There was a ''reason'' that none of the French monarchs had seen fit to call one since 1614--an Estates-General was a powerful tool because of the immense legitimacy it had to make big changes, but that same legitimacy made it extremely ''dangerous''. Better, Louis thought, to try to make do with what was possible without the Estates. But the Assembly of Notables was his last chance, and they told him in no uncertain terms that he had no options. So in May 1789, King Louis XVI called a meeting of the Estates-General at Versailles.

to:

Despite being a little dim, Louis was well aware that this is more or less exactly what had happened to [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart Charles I of England]] about [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar 150 years previously]], and that calling the English Estates--that is, Parliament--had cost Charles his head and the English monarchy nearly all of its political power. There was a ''reason'' that none of the French monarchs had seen fit to call one an Estates-General since 1614--an Estates-General was a powerful tool because of the immense legitimacy it had to make big changes, but that same legitimacy made it extremely ''dangerous''. Better, Louis thought, to try to make do with what was possible without the Estates. But the Assembly of Notables was his last chance, and they told him in no uncertain terms that he had no options. So in May 1789, King Louis XVI called a meeting of the Estates-General at Versailles.
4th Dec '17 8:46:29 PM karstovich2
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Louis knew that, and despite being a little dim, Louis was well aware that this is more or less exactly what had happened to [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart Charles I of England]] about [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar 150 years previously]], and that had cost Charles his head and the English monarchy nearly all of its political power. There was a ''reason'' that none of the French monarchs had seen fit to call one since 1614--an Estates-General was a powerful tool because of the immense legitimacy it had to make big changes, but that same legitimacy made it extremely ''dangerous''. Better, Louis thought, to try to make do with what was possible without the Estates. But the Assembly of Notables was his last chance, and they told him in no uncertain terms that he had no options. So in May 1789, King Louis XVI called a meeting of the Estates-General at Versailles.

to:

Louis knew that, and despite Despite being a little dim, Louis was well aware that this is more or less exactly what had happened to [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart Charles I of England]] about [[UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar 150 years previously]], and that had calling the English Estates--that is, Parliament--had cost Charles his head and the English monarchy nearly all of its political power. There was a ''reason'' that none of the French monarchs had seen fit to call one since 1614--an Estates-General was a powerful tool because of the immense legitimacy it had to make big changes, but that same legitimacy made it extremely ''dangerous''. Better, Louis thought, to try to make do with what was possible without the Estates. But the Assembly of Notables was his last chance, and they told him in no uncertain terms that he had no options. So in May 1789, King Louis XVI called a meeting of the Estates-General at Versailles.
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