History UsefulNotes / Tennis

1st Feb '16 10:26:02 PM Lemia
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* '''Novak Djokovic (Serbia)''' 2003-present: Current World No. 1. Has held No. 1 for 174 weeks (and counting). Has won 10 Grand Slams and an Olympic bronze medal in singles. Was constantly overshadowed by Federer and Nadal early on in his career [[OvershadowedByAwesome despite being World No. 3]], until he went on a spectacular 43-0 game winning streak in 2011 and became the only tennis player on the planet capable of reliably defeating the above two. ''Some'' of the time. Is also known as "[[FanNickname Djoker]]" for his sense of humor and impersonations of other players.
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* '''Novak Djokovic (Serbia)''' 2003-present: Current World No. 1. Has held No. 1 for 174 weeks (and counting). Has won 10 11 Grand Slams and an Olympic bronze medal in singles. Was constantly overshadowed by Federer and Nadal early on in his career [[OvershadowedByAwesome despite being World No. 3]], until he went on a spectacular 43-0 game winning streak in 2011 and became the only tennis player on the planet capable of reliably defeating the above two. ''Some'' of the time. Is also known as "[[FanNickname Djoker]]" for his sense of humor and impersonations of other players.

* '''Novak Djokovic (Serbia)''' 2003-present: Current World No. 1. Has held ** Another example involving Serena: at the 2016 Australian Open, everybody expected either her or Victoria Azarenka (a former No. 1 for 174 weeks (and counting). Has won 10 Grand Slams who seemed to be rounding back into form) to win it. No one saw Angelique Kerber, who had never made a major final before and an Olympic bronze medal in singles. Was constantly overshadowed by Federer and Nadal early on in his career [[OvershadowedByAwesome despite being World No. 3]], until he went on a spectacular 43-0 game couldn't make it past the third round at any of her majors the previous year, winning streak in 2011 and became the only tennis player on the planet capable of reliably defeating the above two. ''Some'' of the time. Is it instead with an inspired performance. It was also known as "[[FanNickname Djoker]]" for his sense of humor and impersonations of other players.the first time Serena had lost a major final since ''2011''.

** Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic: Unlike the above rivalries, the main appeal of their rivalry lies not in [[RedOniBlueOni how different they are]] in their playing styles but in [[BirdsOfAFeather how similar they are]] in [[TheDeterminator competitive fierceness]] and [[StoneWall baseline rallying and defense]]. So far, they have met an ATP Open Era record of 46 times with their head-to-head being even-steven at 23-23 after a long period of Nadal constantly being one step ahead of Djokovic in their rivalry. ** Also from the Big Four era, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. Their rivalry is the least friendly of the Big Four's rivalries ([[SitcomArchNemesis although that's not saying much]]) and their most memorable matches have come in Slam semifinals with Federer breaking Djokovic's 41-match winning streak in the 2011 French Open semis and Djokovic coming back from double match point down against Federer in both the 2010 and 2011 US Open semis. As of this time of typing, they've actually met more times than Federer and Nadal have (44 times) and are tied at 22-22.
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** Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic: Unlike the above rivalries, the main appeal of their rivalry lies not in [[RedOniBlueOni how different they are]] in their playing styles but in [[BirdsOfAFeather how similar they are]] in [[TheDeterminator competitive fierceness]] and [[StoneWall baseline rallying and defense]]. So far, they have met an ATP Open Era record of 46 times with their head-to-head being even-steven at 23-23 Djokovic leading him 24-23 after a long period of Nadal constantly being one step ahead of Djokovic in their rivalry. ** Also from the Big Four era, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. Their rivalry is the least friendly of the Big Four's rivalries ([[SitcomArchNemesis although that's not saying much]]) and their most memorable matches have come in Slam semifinals with Federer breaking Djokovic's 41-match winning streak in the 2011 French Open semis and Djokovic coming back from double match point down against Federer in both the 2010 and 2011 US Open semis. As of this time of typing, they've actually met more times than Federer and Nadal have (44 (45 times) and are tied at 22-22.with Djokovic leading Federer 23-22.
9th Jan '16 7:32:15 AM oknazevad
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* The first scoring level is the '''game'''. Unlike other sports a score of zero is called "love" in tennis. From "love," you go to 15, 30, 40,[[note]]actually shortened from 45[[/note]] then Game... unless both players are at 40, in which case one player must win by 2, necessitating 40:40[[note]]Also known as "Deuce"[[/note]] > 40:Advantage > Game. This can lead to very extended games when neither player can string enough points together leading to 40:40 > 40:Ad > 40:40 > Ad:40 and on and on.[[note]]The odd scoring systems makes sense when you consider that the original scoreboards were actually unwound clocks. The score keeper would push the minute hand around the face a quarter of the way for each point (hence 15-30-45-game) while the hour hand would automatically track the number of games in the set (which would end when the hour hand went halfway around). The "win by 2" rule is what required the odd "advantage/deuce" set up, as advancing the minute hand would screw up the scorekeeping"[[/note]]
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* The first scoring level is the '''game'''. Unlike other sports a score of zero is called "love" in tennis. From "love," you go to 15, 30, 40,[[note]]actually shortened from 45[[/note]] then Game... unless both players are at 40, in which case one player must win by 2, necessitating 40:40[[note]]Also known as "Deuce"[[/note]] > 40:Advantage > Game. This can lead to very extended games when neither player can string enough points together leading to 40:40 > 40:Ad > 40:40 > Ad:40 and on and on.[[note]]The odd scoring systems makes sense when you consider that the original scoreboards were actually unwound clocks. The score keeper would push the minute hand around the face a quarter of the way for each point (hence 15-30-45-game) while the hour hand would automatically track the number of games in the set (which would end when the hour hand went halfway around). The "win by 2" rule is what required the odd "advantage/deuce" set up, as advancing the minute hand would screw up the scorekeeping"[[/note]]scorekeeping.[[/note]]
9th Jan '16 7:31:31 AM oknazevad
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* The first scoring level is the '''game'''. Unlike other sports a score of zero is called "love" in tennis. From "love," you go to 15, 30, 40,[[note]]actually shortened from 45[[/note]] then Game... unless both players are at 40, in which case one player must win by 2, necessitating 40:40[[note]]Also known as "Deuce"[[/note]] > 40:Advantage > Game. This can lead to very extended games when neither player can string enough points together leading to 40:40 > 40:Ad > 40:40 > Ad:40 and on and on.[[note]]The odd scoring systems makes sense when you consider that the original scoreboards were actually unwound clocks. The score keeper would push the minute hand around the face aquarist of the way for each point (hence 15-30-45-game) while the hour hand would automatically track the number of games in the set (which would end when the hour hand went halfway around). The "win by 2" rule is what required the odd "advantage/deuce" set up, as advancing the minute hand would screw up the scorekeeping"[[/note]]
to:
* The first scoring level is the '''game'''. Unlike other sports a score of zero is called "love" in tennis. From "love," you go to 15, 30, 40,[[note]]actually shortened from 45[[/note]] then Game... unless both players are at 40, in which case one player must win by 2, necessitating 40:40[[note]]Also known as "Deuce"[[/note]] > 40:Advantage > Game. This can lead to very extended games when neither player can string enough points together leading to 40:40 > 40:Ad > 40:40 > Ad:40 and on and on.[[note]]The odd scoring systems makes sense when you consider that the original scoreboards were actually unwound clocks. The score keeper would push the minute hand around the face aquarist a quarter of the way for each point (hence 15-30-45-game) while the hour hand would automatically track the number of games in the set (which would end when the hour hand went halfway around). The "win by 2" rule is what required the odd "advantage/deuce" set up, as advancing the minute hand would screw up the scorekeeping"[[/note]]
13th Dec '15 8:41:08 PM KYCubbie
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Murray led GB to a Davis Cup title this year.
* '''Andy Murray (UK)''' 2005-present: Has won 2 Grand Slams. Was constantly known as "the best tennis player to never win a Grand Slam" until he broke a 76-year national hoodoo in 2012 by becoming the first male Brit to win a major -- the US Open -- since Fred Perry in 1936 and then broke a similar national drought the very next year by becoming the first male Brit to win {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} since -- you guessed it -- Fred Perry in 1936. Also has an Olympic gold medal in singles and a silver in mixed doubles.
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* '''Andy Murray (UK)''' 2005-present: Has won 2 Grand Slams. Was constantly known as "the best tennis player to never win a Grand Slam" until he broke a 76-year national hoodoo in 2012 by becoming the first male Brit to win a major -- the US Open -- since Fred Perry in 1936 and then broke a similar national drought the very next year by becoming the first male Brit to win {{UsefulNotes/Wimbledon}} since -- you guessed it -- Fred Perry in 1936. Also has an Olympic gold medal in singles and a silver in mixed doubles.doubles, and led Great Britain to a Davis Cup title in 2015, breaking a 79-year drought in that event. [[RunningGag Guess who was Britain's leading player back then...]]
22nd Nov '15 5:07:52 PM Lemia
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* '''Novak Djokovic (Serbia)''' 2003-present: Current World No. 1. Has held No. 1 for 164 weeks (and counting). Has won 10 Grand Slams and an Olympic bronze medal in singles. Was constantly overshadowed by Federer and Nadal early on in his career [[OvershadowedByAwesome despite being World No. 3]], until he went on a spectacular 43-0 game winning streak in 2011 and became the only tennis player on the planet capable of reliably defeating the above two. ''Some'' of the time. Is also known as "[[FanNickname Djoker]]" for his sense of humor and impersonations of other players.
to:
* '''Novak Djokovic (Serbia)''' 2003-present: Current World No. 1. Has held No. 1 for 164 174 weeks (and counting). Has won 10 Grand Slams and an Olympic bronze medal in singles. Was constantly overshadowed by Federer and Nadal early on in his career [[OvershadowedByAwesome despite being World No. 3]], until he went on a spectacular 43-0 game winning streak in 2011 and became the only tennis player on the planet capable of reliably defeating the above two. ''Some'' of the time. Is also known as "[[FanNickname Djoker]]" for his sense of humor and impersonations of other players.

** Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova: the cool-headed hard-court baseliner vs the emotional grass-court serve-and-volleyer. They met in a whopping 80 matches, 22 of them in Grand Slams, and have the longest-lasting tennis rivalry in history with their encounters occurring over a span of 15 years from 1973 to 1988. Evert had more of a headstart on Navratilova with her winning 27 of their first 40 matches, but Navratilova dominated their rivalry in later years with the final tally being 43-37 in Navratilova's favor. Perhaps fittingly, they ended up with the exact same number of Slams at 18 each.
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** Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova: the cool-headed hard-court baseliner vs the emotional grass-court serve-and-volleyer. They met in a whopping 80 matches, 22 of them in Grand Slams, and have the longest-lasting tennis rivalry in history with their encounters occurring over a span of 15 years from 1973 to 1988. Evert had more of a headstart on Navratilova with her winning 27 of their first 40 matches, but Navratilova dominated their rivalry in later years with the final tally being 43-37 in Navratilova's favor. Perhaps fittingly, they Fittingly, the two ended up their careers with the exact same number of Slams at 18 each.

** Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal: the [[CombatAestheticist graceful, traditional]], right-handed [[FragileSpeedster grass-courter]] vs the [[LightningBruiser raw power]] of the [[TheSouthpaw lefty]] [[StoneWall clay-courter]]. So far they have played 33 times with Nadal winning 23, he is the only player ever to have a winning record over Federer with a difference of more than 3. Enjoying a close friendship off the court, their 2008 Wimbledon final (which broke Federer's almost record streak of 40 straight match wins there and ensured that he lost the no.1 ranking for the first time) is widely cited as the greatest match of the Open Era. ** Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic: Unlike the above rivalries, the main appeal of their rivalry lies not in [[RedOniBlueOni how different they are]] in their playing styles but in [[BirdsOfAFeather how similar they are]] in [[TheDeterminator competitive fierceness]] and [[StoneWall baseline rallying and defense]]. So far, they have met an ATP Open Era record of 44 times with Nadal having a 23-21 edge but Djokovic keeping the gap closer than Federer's and being the only player who can legitimately challenge Nadal on clay. ** Also from the Big Four era, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. Their rivalry is the least friendly of the Big Four's rivalries ([[SitcomArchNemesis although that's not saying much]]) and their most memorable matches have come in Slam semifinals with Federer breaking Djokovic's 41-match winning streak in the 2011 French Open semis and Djokovic coming back from double match point down against Federer in both the 2010 and 2011 US Open semis. As of this time of typing, they've actually met more times than Federer and Nadal have (42 times) and are tied at 21-21.
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** Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal: the [[CombatAestheticist graceful, traditional]], right-handed [[FragileSpeedster grass-courter]] vs the [[LightningBruiser raw power]] of the [[TheSouthpaw lefty]] [[StoneWall clay-courter]]. So far they have played 33 34 times with Nadal winning 23, he is the only player ever to have a winning record over Federer with a difference of more than 3. Enjoying a close friendship off the court, their 2008 Wimbledon final (which broke Federer's almost record streak of 40 straight match wins there and ensured that he lost the no.1 ranking for the first time) is widely cited as the greatest match of the Open Era. ** Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic: Unlike the above rivalries, the main appeal of their rivalry lies not in [[RedOniBlueOni how different they are]] in their playing styles but in [[BirdsOfAFeather how similar they are]] in [[TheDeterminator competitive fierceness]] and [[StoneWall baseline rallying and defense]]. So far, they have met an ATP Open Era record of 44 46 times with their head-to-head being even-steven at 23-23 after a long period of Nadal having a 23-21 edge but constantly being one step ahead of Djokovic keeping the gap closer than Federer's and being the only player who can legitimately challenge Nadal on clay. in their rivalry. ** Also from the Big Four era, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. Their rivalry is the least friendly of the Big Four's rivalries ([[SitcomArchNemesis although that's not saying much]]) and their most memorable matches have come in Slam semifinals with Federer breaking Djokovic's 41-match winning streak in the 2011 French Open semis and Djokovic coming back from double match point down against Federer in both the 2010 and 2011 US Open semis. As of this time of typing, they've actually met more times than Federer and Nadal have (42 (44 times) and are tied at 21-21.22-22.
9th Nov '15 10:35:26 AM KYCubbie
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Bryan update
* '''Bob and Mike Bryan (USA)''' 1995-present: Twin brothers who have spent just about all of the last 11 years at No. 1 in men's doubles, and hold virtually every record in the book for men's doubles teams. Their most notable team records are Grand Slam titles (16), tournaments won (106), most weeks at No. 1 (over 400), and most year-end No. 1 rankings (9). Named by ATP fans as their favorite team in each year since that award was created in 2006. They have a career Golden Slam in doubles after winning Olympic gold in London in 2012, and their win at Wimbledon in 2013 made them the first men's doubles team in the Open era to hold all four Grand Slam titles at once. Finally, they are the only men's doubles team in history to win every major title in the sport—all four Grand Slam events, Olympic gold, every Masters 1000 event,[[note]]There have been 10 Masters 1000 events, but only nine in any given season. The former Hamburg event moved to Shanghai in 2009; the Bryans won in Hamburg in 2007 and Shanghai in 2014.[[/note]] the YEC, and Davis Cup.
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* '''Bob and Mike Bryan (USA)''' 1995-present: Twin brothers who have spent just about all of the last 11 years at No. 1 in men's doubles, and hold virtually every record in the book for men's doubles teams. Their most notable team records are Grand Slam titles (16), tournaments won (106), (109), most weeks at No. 1 (over 400), (nearing 440), and most year-end No. 1 rankings (9).(10). Named by ATP fans as their favorite team in each year since that award was created in 2006. They have a career Golden Slam in doubles after winning Olympic gold in London in 2012, and their win at Wimbledon in 2013 made them the first men's doubles team in the Open era to hold all four Grand Slam titles at once. Finally, they are the only men's doubles team in history to win every major title in the sport—all four Grand Slam events, Olympic gold, every Masters 1000 event,[[note]]There have been 10 Masters 1000 events, but only nine in any given season. The former Hamburg event moved to Shanghai in 2009; the Bryans won in Hamburg in 2007 and Shanghai in 2014.[[/note]] the YEC, and Davis Cup.
26th Oct '15 8:32:15 PM oknazevad
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* RecursiveAdaptation: Modern tennis was invented in the 1870s in England as lawn tennis, an outdoor game meant to be played on (really short) grass, based on an indoor game played on wooden floors that developed beginning in late medieval France. It spread very quickly, and lead many players to want to keep playing in the winter. So they would up playing on wooden gymnasium floors. This even lead to the short-lived [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Covered_Court_Championships World Covered Court Championships]], intended as a third major to go with the World Grass Court Championships (i.e., Wimbledon) and the World Clay Court Championships (which merged with the French national championships). To this day, many pro tournaments, including both the men's and women's year end championships, are played indoors. Bare wood isn't used anymore (it was deemed too fast); carpet coverings, which evolved into textured rubber mats, were used for many years, before they were replaced by portable floors surfaced with the same type of acrylics used for hard courts that, ironically, are usually wood panels underneath.
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* RecursiveAdaptation: Modern tennis was invented in the 1870s in England as lawn tennis, an outdoor summer game meant to be played on (really short) grass, based on an indoor game played on wooden floors that developed beginning in late medieval France. It spread very quickly, quickly and gained great popularity, which lead many players to want to keep playing in the winter. So they would up playing indoors on wooden gymnasium floors. This even lead to the short-lived [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Covered_Court_Championships World Covered Court Championships]], intended as a third major to go with the World Grass Court Championships (i.e., Wimbledon) and the World Clay Court Championships (which merged with the French national championships). To this day, many pro tournaments, including both the men's and women's year end championships, are played indoors. Bare wood isn't used anymore (it was deemed too fast); carpet coverings, which evolved into textured rubber mats, were used for many years, before they were replaced by portable floors surfaced with the same type of acrylics used for hard courts that, ironically, are usually wood panels underneath.
23rd Oct '15 2:33:52 PM oknazevad
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* The first scoring level is the '''game'''. Unlike other sports a score of zero is called "love" in tennis. From "love," you go to 15, 30, 40,[[note]]actually shortened from 45[[/note]] then Game... unless both players are at 40, in which case one player must win by 2, necessitating 40:40[[note]]Also known as "Deuce"[[/note]] > 40:Advantage > Game. This can lead to very extended games when neither player can string enough points together leading to 40:40 > 40:Ad > 40:40 > Ad:40 and on and on.
to:
* The first scoring level is the '''game'''. Unlike other sports a score of zero is called "love" in tennis. From "love," you go to 15, 30, 40,[[note]]actually shortened from 45[[/note]] then Game... unless both players are at 40, in which case one player must win by 2, necessitating 40:40[[note]]Also known as "Deuce"[[/note]] > 40:Advantage > Game. This can lead to very extended games when neither player can string enough points together leading to 40:40 > 40:Ad > 40:40 > Ad:40 and on and on. [[note]]The odd scoring systems makes sense when you consider that the original scoreboards were actually unwound clocks. The score keeper would push the minute hand around the face aquarist of the way for each point (hence 15-30-45-game) while the hour hand would automatically track the number of games in the set (which would end when the hour hand went halfway around). The "win by 2" rule is what required the odd "advantage/deuce" set up, as advancing the minute hand would screw up the scorekeeping"[[/note]]
22nd Oct '15 9:51:51 PM oknazevad
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*RecursiveAdaptation: Modern tennis was invented in the 1870s in England as lawn tennis, an outdoor game meant to be played on (really short) grass, based on an indoor game played on wooden floors that developed beginning in late medieval France. It spread very quickly, and lead many players to want to keep playing in the winter. So they would up playing on wooden gymnasium floors. This even lead to the short-lived [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Covered_Court_Championships World Covered Court Championships]], intended as a third major to go with the World Grass Court Championships (i.e., Wimbledon) and the World Clay Court Championships (which merged with the French national championships). To this day, many pro tournaments, including both the men's and women's year end championships, are played indoors. Bare wood isn't used anymore (it was deemed too fast); carpet coverings, which evolved into textured rubber mats, were used for many years, before they were replaced by portable floors surfaced with the same type of acrylics used for hard courts that, ironically, are usually wood panels underneath.

* SiblingTeam: Sisters Serena and Venus Williams have achieved the Career Golden Slam in doubles, winning 13 Grand Slam tournaments and 3 Olympic golds. Brothers John and Patrick [=McEnroe=] avert this slightly, they played doubles together, but their success came with other partners.
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* SiblingTeam: Sisters Serena and Venus Williams have achieved the Career Golden Slam in doubles, winning 13 Grand Slam tournaments and 3 Olympic golds. Brothers John and Patrick [=McEnroe=] avert this slightly, they played doubles together, but their success came with other partners. And then there's the Bryan brothers, twins who have annihilated every record possible in men's doubles.
2nd Oct '15 9:52:36 AM KYCubbie
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* '''WTA Finals and ATP World Tour Finals''' (late October for the women, mid-November for the men): The event that marks the true end of the tennis season. Ideally, it's supposed to determine the No. 1 player (or doubles team) with only the top eight players/teams in the world being pitted against each other in separate tournaments for the men and women. More often, what happens instead is that there's already a runaway No. 1 who doesn't even need to win the event to be the clear Player of the Year, and the fun of the year-end championships lie more in their unique round-robin format that lets people see their favorites play for at least three guaranteed matches in the opening rounds[[note]]the 8 players are split into 2 groups of 4 and each player dukes it out with the 3 other members in their group, with the best-performing 2 players from each group advancing to the semifinals; the semis and finals use the more typical knock-out format[[/note]]. Also worth watching for the [[BigEntrance dramatically-lit player entrances]] and the ConfettiDrop during the trophy ceremony.
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* '''WTA Finals and ATP World Tour Finals''' (late October Oct for the women, mid-November mid-Nov for the men): The event that marks the true end of the tennis season. Ideally, it's supposed to determine the No. 1 player (or doubles team) with only the top eight players/teams in the world being pitted against each other in separate tournaments for the men and women. More often, what happens instead is that there's already a runaway No. 1 who doesn't even need to win the event to be the clear Player of the Year, and the fun of the year-end championships lie more in their unique round-robin format that lets people see their favorites play for at least three guaranteed matches in the opening rounds[[note]]the 8 players are split into 2 groups of 4 and each player dukes it out with the 3 other members in their group, with the best-performing 2 players from each group advancing to the semifinals; the semis and finals use the more typical knock-out format[[/note]]. Also worth watching for the [[BigEntrance dramatically-lit player entrances]] and the ConfettiDrop during the trophy ceremony.
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