History UsefulNotes / Taiwan

13th May '18 7:08:26 PM AnimalExtender
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But in 1683, the new dynasty claimed the island, and ruled it until they lost the First Sino-Japanese War. The Japanese held Taiwan from 1895 until the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, after which it fell into the hands of China's Nationalist government. When they lost the Chinese Civil War to [[UsefulNotes/RedChina the communists]], the dictator UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek and the other Nationalists fled to the island. Mao had plans to follow Chiang and capture Taiwan in 1949, but the United States sent their Seventh Fleet to dissuade that, and an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Guningtou attempted PLA invasion]] of Taiwan failed. Since then Taiwan maintained a quasi-sovereign status thanks to the protection of the United States. It was placed under martial law from 1949 to the 1980s, when Chiang's son and successor, Chiang Ching-kuo, followed by the first actually 'Taiwanese' president, [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese Army veteran]] Lee Teung-Hui, began to democratize the nation's political system, turning it from a one-party state to a multi-party democracy. Also around this time, the incredibly wealthy government-in-exile (the ruling nationalist party, Kuomintang, ''personally'' had holdings worth around $10 billion US, a consequence of capitalist police state rule) started to lose control: while Taiwan would become one of the Four Great Asian Tigers, Taipei itself lost most international recognition as the government of all of China (only apartheid [[UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica South Africa]] remained an ally).

to:

But in 1683, the new dynasty claimed the island, and ruled it until they lost the First Sino-Japanese War. The Japanese held Taiwan from 1895 until the end of UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, after which it fell into the hands of China's Nationalist government. When they lost the Chinese Civil War to [[UsefulNotes/RedChina the communists]], the dictator UsefulNotes/ChiangKaiShek and the other Nationalists fled to the island. Mao had plans to follow Chiang and capture Taiwan in 1949, but the United States sent their Seventh Fleet to dissuade that, and an [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Guningtou attempted PLA invasion]] of Taiwan failed. Since then Taiwan maintained a quasi-sovereign status thanks to the protection of the United States. It was placed under martial law from 1949 to the 1980s, when Chiang's son and successor, Chiang Ching-kuo, followed by the first actually 'Taiwanese' president, [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese Army veteran]] Lee Teung-Hui, began to democratize the nation's political system, turning it from a one-party state to a multi-party democracy. Also around this time, the incredibly wealthy government-in-exile (the ruling nationalist party, Kuomintang, ''personally'' had holdings worth around $10 billion US, a consequence of capitalist police state rule) started to lose control: while Taiwan would become one of the Four Great Asian Tigers, Taipei itself lost most international recognition as the government of all of China (only apartheid [[UsefulNotes/SouthAfrica South Africa]] remained an ally).(today the only remaining allies are a few countries in Africa and Latin America, as well as the Vatican).



Starting in the late Eighties/early Nineties, the opposition parties gained more voice in the public arena, especially given the Nationalist party's rampant corruption issues and endless infighting. (The Nationalists were never particularly popular in Taiwan outside of the party and the military, since they were seen to be ignoring "native" Taiwanese interests... never mind that indigenous Taiwanese had been confined to reservations long before the Nationalists arrived.) As pressure mounted, the Nationalist party began removing restrictions on free speech and free press, and Congress began the long, arduous process of amending the constitution to correct the most obvious inequities.

to:

Starting in the late Eighties/early Nineties, the opposition parties gained more voice in the public arena, especially given the Nationalist party's rampant corruption issues and endless infighting. (The Nationalists were never particularly popular in Taiwan outside of the party and the military, since they were seen to be ignoring "native" Taiwanese interests... never mind that indigenous Taiwanese had been confined to reservations had been forcibly assimilated or forced into the mountainous areas long before the Nationalists arrived.) As pressure mounted, the Nationalist party began removing restrictions on free speech and free press, and Congress began the long, arduous process of amending the constitution to correct the most obvious inequities.


Added DiffLines:

The KMT-led ruling coalition, led by President Ma Ying-jeou, pursued policies during their eight years in power that tried to link Taiwan’s economy more closely with China’s. By the middle of Ma’s second term, his government’s approval ratings had plummeted due to unease with closer ties with China, as well as a perception that the KMT had failed to improve Taiwan’s economy (their signature issue in 2008 and 2012). In 2014, an attempt to pass a trade pact with China with very minimal review or debate led to weeks of (mostly) peaceful protests, most notably a three-week student-led occupation of the national legislature.

The 2014 protests and their aftermath became known as the Sunflower Movement, and came to symbolize the emergence of a new generation of politically active Taiwanese youth who were wary of China’s overwhelming political influence. The KMT suffered heavy losses in the 2016 elections, and a new DPP-led government came to power, including the largest DPP legislative majority in the country’s history. President Tsai Ing-wen appears to be dealing with China very cautiously, although Taiwan’s continued sluggish economy has put Tsai under fire from both political left and right.
9th May '18 8:14:58 PM karstovich2
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About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. Unlike the mainland, Taiwan has retained traditional characters for writing Chinese; however, since 2009, Taiwan officially uses the mainland's Hanyu Pinyin system for transcription of Mandarin, though the [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]] is still used for place names and personal names basically out of inertia.

to:

About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. Unlike the mainland, Taiwan has retained traditional characters for writing Chinese; however, since 2009, Taiwan officially uses the mainland's Hanyu Pinyin system for transcription of Mandarin, though the [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]] is still used for place names and most personal names basically out of inertia.
9th May '18 8:12:25 PM karstovich2
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About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. Unlike the mainland, Taiwan has retained traditional characters for writing Chinese; however, since 2009, Taiwan officially uses the mainland's Hanyu Pinyin system for transcription of Mandarin, though the [[Useful Notes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]] is still used for place names and personal names basically out of inertia.

The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different subfamilies of the family, with the tenth family being the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable.


to:

About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. Unlike the mainland, Taiwan has retained traditional characters for writing Chinese; however, since 2009, Taiwan officially uses the mainland's Hanyu Pinyin system for transcription of Mandarin, though the [[Useful Notes/WhyMaoChangedHisName [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]] is still used for place names and personal names basically out of inertia.

The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's family. Taiwan is widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different of the ten generally-recognize subfamilies of the family, with the Austronesian. The tenth family being is the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Māori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable.Hawai'ian).

English is widely taught in Taiwan, but proficiency is highly variable.

9th May '18 8:10:28 PM karstovich2
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Mandarin is the standard spoken language today. About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different subfamilies of the family, with the tenth family being the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable. Evidently from the image above some places still uses the [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]]. Taiwan has also keep to traditional Chinese characters writing.

to:

Mandarin is the standard spoken language today. Basically all Taiwanese speak Mandarin, and the vast majority speak it as a first language.
About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. Unlike the mainland, Taiwan has retained traditional characters for writing Chinese; however, since 2009, Taiwan officially uses the mainland's Hanyu Pinyin system for transcription of Mandarin, though the [[Useful Notes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]] is still used for place names and personal names basically out of inertia.

The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different subfamilies of the family, with the tenth family being the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable. Evidently from the image above some places still uses the [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]]. Taiwan has also keep to traditional Chinese characters writing.\n

8th May '18 8:49:49 PM karstovich2
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The period of Japanese rule has since left a few cultural marks. Among these are the integration of certain [[GratuitousJapanese Japanese phrases]] into the local vernacular, including ObaSan (strictly in the sense of "older woman"), and some Japanese foods. Japanese pop culture also has a strong presence, especially in the forms of music and manga, and a few Japanese television channels (including NHK) are available. The older generation will sometimes speak Japanese among themselves instead of [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Mandarin]] or [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Taiwanese]].

Mandarin is the standard spoken language these days. About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different subfamilies of the family, with the tenth family being the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable. Evidently from the image above some places still uses the [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]]. Taiwan has also keep to traditional Chinese characters writing.

to:

The period of Japanese rule has since left a few cultural marks. Among these are the integration of certain [[GratuitousJapanese Japanese phrases]] into the local vernacular, including ObaSan (strictly in the sense of "older woman"), and some Japanese foods. The widespread use of the Asian Plum blossom as a [[FlowerMotifs floral symbol of Taiwan]] also seems to be inspired by the use of ''sakura'' blossoms as a floral symbol of Japaneseness (the flowers look very similar, as both are species of the plum/peach/cherry/apricot genus ''Prunus''). Japanese pop culture also has a strong presence, especially in the forms of music and manga, and a few Japanese television channels (including NHK) are available. The older generation will sometimes speak Japanese among themselves instead of [[UsefulNotes/ChineseLanguage Mandarin]] or [[UsefulNotes/ChineseDialectsAndAccents Taiwanese]].

Mandarin is the standard spoken language these days.today. About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different subfamilies of the family, with the tenth family being the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable. Evidently from the image above some places still uses the [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]]. Taiwan has also keep to traditional Chinese characters writing.
8th May '18 8:46:06 PM karstovich2
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Unique among most of Japan's neighbors, the relationship between Japan and Taiwan has been generally positive and easygoing, with relatively few bitter grudges stemming from the Japanese occupation, especially considering that Taiwan was spared most of the horrors of the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar. It saw no significant land battles (though hundreds of thousands of Taiwanese fought in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese Army]], and the island was devastated by American bombing which destroyed more than 90% of its industrial and electric output). The Japanese occupation ended after [=WW2=] when the Allies handed over Taiwan to the Republic of China, but decades of SecretPolice arrests and executions--called the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Terror_(Taiwan) White Terror]]"--under the Chinese ended up creating a popular nostalgia for the time when Taiwan was a colony of the Japanese Empire.
During the authoritarian rule of Chiang Kai-shek's military dictatorship, hundreds of thousands of Taiwanese were first involved in a violent uprising (following the infamous [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_28_Incident 228 Incident]] in Taipei), or targeted in subsequent terror period, with tens of thousands being arrested, executed or otherwise "disappeared", usually for being accused of communist sympathies, in one of the longest periods of martial law in modern history. Many were completely innocent, and the purges nearly destroyed the Taiwanese intellectual elite. Since then, many Taiwanese resent the KMT and Chiang for killing or imprisoning friends and family, compared to Imperial Japan's fairly gentle treatment of the Taiwanese Hoklo. However, indigenous Taiwanese tend to support the KMT-although the KMT tried to assimilate aborigines into Han Chinese culture, they also introduced patronage programs that allow indigenous Taiwanese to get jobs. Additionally, the Japanese racially persecuted the indigenous Taiwanese, frequently sending the army to commit violent pogroms against them.

to:

Unique among most of Japan's neighbors, the relationship between Japan and Taiwan has been generally positive and easygoing, with relatively few bitter grudges stemming from the Japanese occupation, especially considering that Taiwan was spared most of the horrors of the UsefulNotes/SecondSinoJapaneseWar. It saw no significant land battles (though battles, though the island was devastated by American bombing (which destroyed more than 90% of its industrial and electric output). The Taiwanese people were also not untouched; hundreds of thousands of Taiwanese fought in the [[UsefulNotes/KatanasOfTheRisingSun Imperial Japanese Army]], and Army]] (indeed, the island last [[IWillFightSomeMoreForever "Japanese" holdout]] to surrender to Allied forces, Pvt. Teruo Nakamura, was devastated by American bombing which destroyed more than 90% of its industrial and electric output). actually an ethnic Amis Aboriginal Taiwanese with the birth name Attun Palalin). The Japanese occupation ended after [=WW2=] when the Allies handed over Taiwan to the Republic of China, but China.

As a result,
decades of SecretPolice arrests and executions--called the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_Terror_(Taiwan) White Terror]]"--under the Chinese ended up creating a popular nostalgia for the time when Taiwan was a colony of the Japanese Empire.
Empire, since the Japanese never did treat Taiwan itself quite so badly as the Chinese Nationalist regime that followed them. During the authoritarian rule of Chiang Kai-shek's military dictatorship, hundreds of thousands of Taiwanese were first involved in a violent uprising (following the infamous [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_28_Incident 228 Incident]] in Taipei), or targeted in subsequent terror period, with tens of thousands being arrested, executed or otherwise "disappeared", usually for being accused of communist sympathies, in one of the longest periods of martial law in modern history. Many were completely innocent, and the purges nearly destroyed the Taiwanese intellectual elite. Since then, many Taiwanese resent the KMT and Chiang for killing or imprisoning friends and family, compared to Imperial Japan's fairly gentle treatment of the Taiwanese Hoklo. However, indigenous Taiwanese tend to support the KMT-although the KMT tried to assimilate aborigines into Han Chinese culture, they also introduced patronage programs that allow indigenous Taiwanese to get jobs. Additionally, the Japanese racially persecuted the indigenous Taiwanese, frequently sending the army to commit violent pogroms against them.
8th May '18 8:37:04 PM karstovich2
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Taiwan is an island off the coast of mainland China in the Pacific Ocean. Also known as Formosa and Peng Lai, it was first known to the Europeans through a Portuguese ship spotting it and giving it the name of ''Ilha Formosa'' (Beautiful Island). It is believed that the indigenous Taiwanese population first arrived there during the late Ice Ages. The indigenous Taiwanese speak Austronesian languages related to the Malayo-Polynesian languages of Southeast Asia and Oceania; genetic studies show that they are most closely related to the peoples of the Philippines (which truth be told aren't that far away). The Chinese, who after all were not that far away, were aware of the island, but they mostly left the place undisturbed because of the fearsomeness of the tribespeople and the lack of valuable goods for trade. Some of the islands off the coast had attracted a fishing colony by the 13th century, but it wasn't until the 16th century that the Chinese started settling in Taiwan in any significant numbers.

to:

Taiwan is an island off the coast of mainland China in the Pacific Ocean. Also known as Formosa and Peng Lai, it was first known to the Europeans through a Portuguese ship spotting it and giving it the name of ''Ilha Formosa'' (Beautiful Island). It is believed that the indigenous Taiwanese population first arrived there during the late Ice Ages. The indigenous Taiwanese speak Austronesian languages related to the Malayo-Polynesian languages of Southeast Asia and Oceania; genetic studies show that they are most closely related to the peoples of the Philippines (which truth be told aren't that far away).away, and whose peoples all historically speak Malayo-Polynesian languages). The Chinese, who after all were not that far away, were aware of the island, but they mostly left the place undisturbed because of the fearsomeness of the tribespeople and the lack of valuable goods for trade. Some of the islands off the coast had attracted a fishing colony by the 13th century, but it wasn't until the 16th century that the Chinese started settling in Taiwan in any significant numbers.
21st Mar '18 2:54:23 AM ddyingle
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A quirk that Taiwan is infamous for is the [[BloodOnTheDebateFloor fist fights between its parliamentarians]]. The Taiwanese even had a word for it, called Legislative Brawling (立委群毆). Needless to say, this earned the Taiwanese parliament a notorious reputation, at some point, according to detractors, the parliamentarians even stage fights merely to maintain the reputation and garner attention. On a lighter side of note, Taiwan is bustling with night markets and temple festivals and is famous for inventing [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea bubble tea]] and NBA star Jeremy Lin.

to:

A quirk that Taiwan is infamous for is the [[BloodOnTheDebateFloor fist fights between its parliamentarians]]. The Taiwanese even had a word for it, called Legislative Brawling (立委群毆). Needless to say, this earned the Taiwanese parliament a notorious reputation, at some point, according to detractors, the parliamentarians even stage fights merely to maintain the reputation and garner attention. On a lighter side of note, Taiwan is bustling with night markets and temple festivals and is famous for inventing [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea bubble tea]] and NBA star Jeremy Lin.
attention.



Mandarin is the standard spoken language these days. About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different subfamilies of the family, with the tenth family being the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable.

For Taiwanese LiveActionTV series, please click [[TaiwaneseSeries here]]. Like UsefulNotes/HongKong Cantonese songs, Taiwan Chinese pop songs are widely enjoyed by Chinese.

to:

Mandarin is the standard spoken language these days. About 70% of residents also speak Taiwanese Hokkien, commonly known as Taiwanese, which is a Hokkien dialect of Min Nan, where most of the Taiwanese came from. Hakka or ''Ke Jia Hua'' is also spoken by a substantial minority. The aboriginals' languages belong to the entirely different Austronesian language family; it's widely considered to be the ancestral homeland or near-homeland of the family, as it harbors about nine different subfamilies of the family, with the tenth family being the Malayo-Polynesian family (which includes Malay, Indonesian, and a large number of Polynesian languages including Maori, Tongan, Samoan, and Hawaiian). English is widely taught but proficiency is highly variable.

variable. Evidently from the image above some places still uses the [[UsefulNotes/WhyMaoChangedHisName Wade-Giles system]]. Taiwan has also keep to traditional Chinese characters writing.

For Taiwanese LiveActionTV series, please click [[TaiwaneseSeries here]]. Like UsefulNotes/HongKong Cantonese songs, Taiwan Chinese pop songs are widely enjoyed by Chinese.
Chinese. Taiwan is rather popular with night markets and temple festivals, and renowned for inventing [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea bubble tea]].
22nd Dec '17 10:44:09 PM ddyingle
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A quirk that Taiwan is infamous for is the [[BloodOnTheDebateFloor fist fights between its parliamentarians]]. The Taiwanese even had a word for it, called Legislative Brawling (立委群毆). Needless to say, this earned the Taiwanese parliament a notorious reputation, at some point, according to detractors, the parliamentarians even stage fights merely to maintain the reputation and garner attention. On a lighter side of note, Taiwan is bustling with night markets and temple festivals and is famous for inventing [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea bubble tea]].

to:

A quirk that Taiwan is infamous for is the [[BloodOnTheDebateFloor fist fights between its parliamentarians]]. The Taiwanese even had a word for it, called Legislative Brawling (立委群毆). Needless to say, this earned the Taiwanese parliament a notorious reputation, at some point, according to detractors, the parliamentarians even stage fights merely to maintain the reputation and garner attention. On a lighter side of note, Taiwan is bustling with night markets and temple festivals and is famous for inventing [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea bubble tea]].
tea]] and NBA star Jeremy Lin.
29th Nov '17 5:41:14 AM ddyingle
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A quirk that Taiwan is infamous for is the [[BloodOnTheDebateFloor fist fights between its parliamentarians]]. The Taiwanese even had a word for it, called Legislative Brawling (立委群毆). Needless to say, this earned the Taiwanese parliament a notorious reputation, at some point, according to detractors, the parliamentarians even stage fights merely to maintain the reputation and garner attention. On a lighter side of note, Taiwan is bustling with night markets and temple festivals.

to:

A quirk that Taiwan is infamous for is the [[BloodOnTheDebateFloor fist fights between its parliamentarians]]. The Taiwanese even had a word for it, called Legislative Brawling (立委群毆). Needless to say, this earned the Taiwanese parliament a notorious reputation, at some point, according to detractors, the parliamentarians even stage fights merely to maintain the reputation and garner attention. On a lighter side of note, Taiwan is bustling with night markets and temple festivals.
festivals and is famous for inventing [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_tea bubble tea]].
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