History UsefulNotes / Stars

25th Aug '16 8:25:47 AM aurora369
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Even more massive stars, that are theorized to have existed in the earliest epochs of the Universe, would die not with a bang but with a whimper suffering a process known as photodesintegration that would case them to collapse into a black hole, some mass escaping into relativistic jets.

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Even more massive stars, that are theorized to have existed in the earliest epochs of the Universe, would die not with a bang but with a whimper suffering a process known as photodesintegration that would case them to collapse into a black hole, some mass escaping into relativistic jets. \n There's, however, a theory according to which these mammoth stars underwent the most fascinating transformation of all: they became quasars, or active galactic cores, and later ordinary galactic cores. In between, they spent some time as ''quasistars'', the transitional critters between star and quasar: enormous black holes completely covered by outer layers of stellar matter held aloft by the radiation of screaming matter pulled into the event horizon. When they ran out of these outer layers, they started to eat stuff around them, and fully transitioned to quasar status.
24th May '16 5:45:53 PM AnotherGuy
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In general, however, don't expect to find ''habitable'' planets around anything other than F, G, K or M main sequence stars or possibly subgiants. Unless your lifeforms are based on ArtificialIntelligence and can live anywhere, have otherwise come from elsewhere and {{Terraform}}ed an inhospitable planet or moon, or have evolved with some exotic form of biology, any exceptions to that rule would be ''extremely'' strange - and without a sufficiently good {{handwave}}, it will look like you don't understand the facts.

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In general, however, don't expect to find ''habitable'' planets around anything other than F, G, K or M main sequence stars or possibly subgiants. Unless your lifeforms are based on ArtificialIntelligence and can live anywhere, have otherwise come from elsewhere and {{Terraform}}ed an inhospitable planet or moon, or have evolved with some exotic form of biology, any exceptions to that rule would be ''extremely'' strange - and without a sufficiently good {{handwave}}, it will look like you don't understand the facts.[[note]]And even these couldn't function in planets that have formed from the gas of a supernova that created a pulsar. Yes, [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulsar_planet planets have been found around pulsars]], but they get hit by ''extremely'' high radiation.[[/note]]
24th May '16 5:43:01 PM AnotherGuy
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** Blue stragglers. The oddest stars ever discovered when scientists believe were created through stellar collisions. Blue stragglers have discovered the Fountain of Youth, since they age ''very'' slowly and avoid the main sequence of stars completely. Long after other stars have gone supernova or entered their red giant stage, they'll remain basically unchanged.

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** Blue stragglers. The oddest stars ever discovered when scientists believe were created through stellar collisions. Blue stragglers discovered, which have discovered the Fountain of Youth, since they Youth. They age ''very'' slowly and avoid the main sequence of stars completely. Long after other stars have gone supernova or entered their red giant stage, they'll remain basically unchanged.
unchanged. Scientists believe these were created through stellar collisions, especially since they're normally found in clusters of fellow stragglers.
24th May '16 5:41:28 PM AnotherGuy
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** Blue stragglers. The oddest stars ever discovered when scientists believe were created through stellar collisions. Blue stragglers have discovered the Fountain of Youth, since they age ''very'' slowly and avoid the main sequence of stars completely. Long after other stars have gone supernova or entered their red giant stage, they'll remain basically unchanged.
1st Apr '16 1:54:11 AM harharhar
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* Traditional or "proper" names: Most ancient cultures had names for the brighter stars, but generally the ones assigned by [[OlderThanFeudalism the ancient Greeks]] (Arcturus, Sirius, Procyon, etc.) and [[OlderThanPrint medieval Arabs]] (Betelgeuse, Altair, Deneb, Rigel, etc.) are the ones you'll find on star charts today. Many of these star names start with "Al", because "al" is the Arabic word for "the" and Arabic astronomical names tend toward "The Something" because of the way the UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage works. Others have received proper names more recently - Alpha Pavonis was named "Peacock" by the Royal Air Force because it didn't have a well known one yet, and it was needed on maps as a navigation star for pilots operating in the Southern Hemisphere.

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* Traditional or "proper" names: Most ancient cultures had names for the brighter stars, but generally the ones assigned by [[OlderThanFeudalism the ancient Greeks]] (Arcturus, Sirius, Procyon, etc.) and [[OlderThanPrint medieval Arabs]] (Betelgeuse, Altair, Deneb, Rigel, etc.) are the ones you'll find on star charts today. Many of these star names start with "Al", because "al" is the Arabic word for "the" and Arabic astronomical names tend toward "The Something" because [[note]]Speaking of the way the Arab names, due to how UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage works. Others works, Al- (which means "The") is extremely common in star names. Also, very often the Arab names of stars can be translated into "The Something" or "Something (of) The Something"; stars with the long names translatable to the latter version generally have their modern names shortened. And speaking of "Something (of) The Something"-kind of naming, aside from Al-, the words Ras- ("Head") and Deneb- ("Tail") are also very common among different stars, obviously especially for stars in constellations depicting animals. Cardinal directions such as -Schemali/Shamali ("North") and -Genubi ("South") are also common.[[/note]]Others have received proper names more recently - Alpha Pavonis was named "Peacock" by the Royal Air Force because it didn't have a well known one yet, and it was needed on maps as a navigation star for pilots operating in the Southern Hemisphere.
2nd Oct '15 9:23:39 PM karstovich2
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* The Flamsteed designation: A number followed by the genitive constellation name, such as "51 Pegasi" or "40 Eridani." As with the Bayer designations, this naming scheme pre-dates the widespread use of telescopes in astronomy, and thus only applies to stars visible with the naked eye. These were developed by John Flamsteed, the first Astronomer Royal of England/Great Britain ([[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart 1675]]-[[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover 1719]]), albeit with a complicated history that would probably make for an amusing play (involving Sirs UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton and Edmund Halley pilfering Flamsteed's catalogue and publishing it without permission, only for Flamsteed's wife to publish the list after his death without numbers, and then having a Frenchman restore the numbers in modern form sixty years later). Flamsteed designations [[strike:seem to be arbitrary]] were originally supposed to have the number increase from west to east, but precession and proper motion have changed the position of some stars relative to celestial longitude since the time the designations were made. Some of them weren't stars at all; for example, what Flamsteed included in chart as "34 Tauri" turned out to be the planet Uranus - as a sidenote, this error left that designation available [[{{Series/Firefly}} for the star at the heart of a certain 'Verse...]]

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* The Flamsteed designation: A number followed by the genitive constellation name, such as "51 Pegasi" or "40 Eridani." As with the Bayer designations, this naming scheme pre-dates the widespread use of telescopes in astronomy, and thus only applies to stars visible with the naked eye. These were developed by John Flamsteed, the first Astronomer Royal of England/Great Britain ([[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart 1675]]-[[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover 1719]]), albeit with a complicated history that would probably make for an amusing play (involving Sirs Edmond Halley and Sir UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton and Edmund Halley pilfering Flamsteed's catalogue and publishing it without permission, only for Flamsteed's wife to publish the list after his death without numbers, and then having a Frenchman restore the numbers in modern form sixty years later). Flamsteed designations [[strike:seem to be arbitrary]] were originally supposed to have the number increase from west to east, but precession and proper motion have changed the position of some stars relative to celestial longitude since the time the designations were made. Some of them weren't stars at all; for example, what Flamsteed included in chart as "34 Tauri" turned out to be the planet Uranus - as a sidenote, this error left that designation available [[{{Series/Firefly}} for the star at the heart of a certain 'Verse...]]
2nd Oct '15 9:21:49 PM karstovich2
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* The Flamsteed designation: A number followed by the genitive constellation name, such as "51 Pegasi" or "40 Eridani." As with the Bayer designations, this naming scheme pre-dates the use of telescopes in astronomy, and thus only applies to stars visible with the naked eye. Flamsteed designations [[strike:seem to be arbitrary]] were originally supposed to have the number increase from west to east, but precession and proper motion have changed the position of some stars relative to celestial longitude since the time the designations were made. Some of them weren't stars at all; for example, what Flamsteed included in chart as "34 Tauri" turned out to be the planet Uranus - as a sidenote, this error left that designation available [[{{Series/Firefly}} for the star at the heart of a certain 'Verse...]]

to:

* The Flamsteed designation: A number followed by the genitive constellation name, such as "51 Pegasi" or "40 Eridani." As with the Bayer designations, this naming scheme pre-dates the widespread use of telescopes in astronomy, and thus only applies to stars visible with the naked eye.eye. These were developed by John Flamsteed, the first Astronomer Royal of England/Great Britain ([[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfStuart 1675]]-[[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover 1719]]), albeit with a complicated history that would probably make for an amusing play (involving Sirs UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton and Edmund Halley pilfering Flamsteed's catalogue and publishing it without permission, only for Flamsteed's wife to publish the list after his death without numbers, and then having a Frenchman restore the numbers in modern form sixty years later). Flamsteed designations [[strike:seem to be arbitrary]] were originally supposed to have the number increase from west to east, but precession and proper motion have changed the position of some stars relative to celestial longitude since the time the designations were made. Some of them weren't stars at all; for example, what Flamsteed included in chart as "34 Tauri" turned out to be the planet Uranus - as a sidenote, this error left that designation available [[{{Series/Firefly}} for the star at the heart of a certain 'Verse...]]
2nd Oct '15 8:18:16 PM karstovich2
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* Traditional or "proper" names: Most ancient cultures had names for the brighter stars, but generally the ones assigned by [[OlderThanFeudalism the ancient Greeks]] (Arcturus, Sirius, Procyon, etc.) and [[OlderThanPrint medieval Arabs]] (Betelgeuse, Altair, Deneb, Rigel, etc.) are the ones you'll find on star charts today. Many of these star names start with "Al", because "al" is the Arabic word for "the." Others have received proper names more recently - Alpha Pavonis was named "Peacock" by the Royal Air Force because it didn't have a well known one yet, and it was needed on maps as a navigation star for pilots operating in the Southern Hemisphere.

to:

* Traditional or "proper" names: Most ancient cultures had names for the brighter stars, but generally the ones assigned by [[OlderThanFeudalism the ancient Greeks]] (Arcturus, Sirius, Procyon, etc.) and [[OlderThanPrint medieval Arabs]] (Betelgeuse, Altair, Deneb, Rigel, etc.) are the ones you'll find on star charts today. Many of these star names start with "Al", because "al" is the Arabic word for "the." "the" and Arabic astronomical names tend toward "The Something" because of the way the UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage works. Others have received proper names more recently - Alpha Pavonis was named "Peacock" by the Royal Air Force because it didn't have a well known one yet, and it was needed on maps as a navigation star for pilots operating in the Southern Hemisphere.
5th Sep '15 12:54:28 AM HeraldAlberich
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For specific examples, see the Useful Notes pages on:

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For specific examples, see the Useful Notes UsefulNotes pages on:
5th Sep '15 12:54:16 AM HeraldAlberich
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! Magnitude- Apparent and Absolute

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! Magnitude- Apparent Magnitude--Apparent and Absolute
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