History UsefulNotes / PrehistoricLifeCeratopsidPredecessors

24th Jan '15 8:15:10 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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This MixAndMatchCritter look surprised scientists, which used to think frontal horns were a very evolved trait of some advanced ceratopsids - while the nasal one was believed the most ancient horn in ceratopsid’s history. The ancestry of the frontal horns was confirmed in the 2000s, when some early centrosaurine true ceratopsids (the no-frontal-horns subfamily) showed long frontal horns like those of a chasmosaurine: ''Albertaceratops'' is one example. Now scientists think later centrosaurines (''Centrosaurus'', ''Styracosaurus'' and so on) reduced secondarily the length of these horns. There was also a chasmosaurine which eliminated its nasal horn, resembling a ''Zuniceratops''; this one is variably classified either as a odd-looking ''Triceratops'' species, or a separate genus, ''Nedoceratops'' (once called "Diceratops" or "Diceratus").

to:

This MixAndMatchCritter look surprised scientists, which used to think frontal horns were a very evolved trait of some advanced ceratopsids - while the nasal one was believed the most ancient horn in ceratopsid’s history. The ancestry of the frontal horns was confirmed in the 2000s, when some early centrosaurine true ceratopsids (the no-frontal-horns subfamily) showed long frontal horns like those of a chasmosaurine: ''Albertaceratops'' is one example. Now scientists think later centrosaurines (''Centrosaurus'', ''Styracosaurus'' and so on) reduced secondarily the length of these horns. There was also a chasmosaurine which eliminated its nasal horn, resembling a ''Zuniceratops''; this one is variably classified either as a odd-looking ''Triceratops'' species, or a separate genus, ''Nedoceratops'' (once ''Nedoceratops'', originally called "Diceratops" ("two-horned face") or "Diceratus")."Diceratus" (the name "Diceratops" was pre-occupied by an insect and had the same fate of "Microceratops").
17th Jan '14 12:45:26 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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'''The "sheeps" of the Cretaceous:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptoceratops Leptoceratops]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montanoceratops Montanoceratops]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagaceratops Bagaceratops]]''

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'''The "sheeps" "sheep" of the Cretaceous:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leptoceratops Leptoceratops]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montanoceratops Montanoceratops]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagaceratops Bagaceratops]]''
Leptoceratops]]''



Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is the quadrupedal ''Montanoceratops'' from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', has been recently put in its own family as well. ''Bagaceratops'' is notable because is one of the smallest quadrupedal dinosaurs that ever lived: only one meter long, only a bit more than the bipedal ''Microceratus'' (see below).

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Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is the quadrupedal ''Montanoceratops'' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montanoceratops Montanoceratops]]'', from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagaceratops Bagaceratops]]'', has been recently put in its own family as well. ''Bagaceratops'' is notable because is one of the smallest quadrupedal dinosaurs that ever lived: only one meter long, only a bit more than the bipedal ''Microceratus'' (see below).



'''The other missing links:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yinlong Yinlong]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeoceratops Archaeoceratops]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaoyangsaurus Chaoyangsaurus]]''

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'''The other missing links:''' link:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yinlong Yinlong]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeoceratops Archaeoceratops]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaoyangsaurus Chaoyangsaurus]]''
Yinlong]]''



Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America. Some were related with the examples listed above: for example, ''Udanoceratops'' (one of the largest ones) was close to ''Leptoceratops''; ''Graciliceratops'' was similar to ''Microceratus''; while ''Turanoceratops'' was perhaps close to ''Zuniceratops'' and maybe one of the ceratopsids' ancestors. But others have revealed to be more primitive, if not at the same degree of ''Yinlong''. Two of them have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ("ancient horned face") was a sort of middle-way between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Leptoceratops''; and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian) has been revealed being between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Yinlong''. Still mysterious is the identity of the poorly-known Early Cretaceous ''Stenopelix'', whose pelvis was found in Europe in the XIX century.

to:

Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America. Some were related with the examples listed above: for example, ''Udanoceratops'' (one of the largest ones) was close to ''Leptoceratops''; ''Graciliceratops'' was similar to ''Microceratus''; while ''Turanoceratops'' was perhaps close to ''Zuniceratops'' and maybe one of the ceratopsids' ancestors. But others have revealed to be more primitive, if not at the same degree of ''Yinlong''. Two of them have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeoceratops Archaeoceratops]]'' ("ancient horned face") was a sort of middle-way between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Leptoceratops''; and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaoyangsaurus Chaoyangsaurus]]'' (originally called "Chaoyoungosaurus" or "Chaoyangosaurus" and initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian) has been revealed being between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Yinlong''. Still mysterious is the identity of the poorly-known Early Cretaceous ''Stenopelix'', whose pelvis was found in Europe in the XIX century.
29th Dec '13 3:41:00 AM laplaneteetlesoleil
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Try to tell everyone if ''[[StockDinosaurs Protoceratops]]'' was really sheep-like. If you manage to do it, then try with this: ''Leptoceratops'', the same length of ''Protoceratops'' but ''partially bipedal''.

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Try to tell everyone if ''[[StockDinosaurs Protoceratops]]'' was really sheep-like. If you manage to do it, then try with this: ''Leptoceratops'', the same length of ''Protoceratops'' but ''partially bipedal''. ''Leptoceratops'' has probably been the most common basal ceratopsid in docu-media after ''Protoceratops'' & ''Psittacosaurus''; like the former, it too was compared with a sheep in the past.
23rd May '13 2:16:15 AM IlPianetaDeiDinosauri
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Added DiffLines:

Among the chosen examples you can tell the closest-to-ceratopsids apart from the most basal kinds by simply reading their names: the former have usually the suffix -ceratops (ex. ''Leptoceratops'', ''Zuniceratops''), the latter usually end in other ways (ex. ''Psittacosaurus'', ''Yinlong'').
6th May '13 2:13:41 PM IlPianetaDeiDinosauri
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Another, even more important missing-link was found as recently as the 2006: following the current trend about Chinese dinos’ naming, it was called ''Yinlong''. Living in Late Jurassic, it now detains “the most primitive ceratopsian” record.

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Another, even more important missing-link was found as recently as the 2006: following the current trend about Chinese dinos’ naming, it was called ''Yinlong''. Living in Late Jurassic, it now detains “the most primitive ceratopsian” record. Its external appearence was the least ''Triceratops''-like one can imagine. ''Yinlong'' had neither any parrot-bill, nor spiky cheeks: its only ceratopsian trait is a merely anatomical one, the “rostral bone” at the tip of its upper jaw, present in all ceratopsians and in no other dinosaur group. To compensate, ''Yinlong'' had small “canines”: this, together with its tiny size and shape, makes it quite similar to the basal ornithischian ''Heterodontosaurus''. Indeed, this resemblance was once cited as the definitive proof that heterodontosaurids were not ornithopods but ancient relatives of ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs, but now the latter is disputed.



Its external appearence was the least ''Triceratops''-like one can imagine. ''Yinlong'' had neither any parrot-bill, nor spiky cheeks: its only ceratopsian trait is a merely anatomical one, the “rostral bone” at the tip of its upper jaw, present in all ceratopsians and in no other dinosaur group. To compensate, ''Yinlong'' had small “canines”: this, together with its tiny size and shape, makes it quite similar to the basal ornithischian ''Heterodontosaurus''. Indeed, this resemblance was once cited as the definitive proof that heterodontosaurids were not ornithopods but ancient relatives of ceratopsians and pachycephalosaurs, but now the latter is disputed.
6th May '13 2:13:13 PM IlPianetaDeiDinosauri
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Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is the quadrupedal ''Montanoceratops'' from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', has been recently put in its own family as well. ''Bagaceratops'' is notable because is one of the smallest quadrupedal dinosaurs that ever lived: only one meter long, a bit more than the bipedal ''Microceratus'' (see below).

to:

Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is the quadrupedal ''Montanoceratops'' from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', has been recently put in its own family as well. ''Bagaceratops'' is notable because is one of the smallest quadrupedal dinosaurs that ever lived: only one meter long, only a bit more than the bipedal ''Microceratus'' (see below).



The most historically relevant was aptly called “Microceratops”. From Ancient China like the [[IncrediblyLamePun prototypical Protoceratops]], it’s one of the smallest dinosaurs ever, only the size of a rooster; and was a fast-running animal with slim body and agile legs, unlike the classic image of ceratopsians. Nonetheless, its head was unmistakeably ceratopsian, or rather, protoceratopsian. Very poorly-known, “Microceratops” has now fallen in disuse being preoccupied by an insect: [[ScienceMarchesOn we now need]] to call it ''Microceratus''. Still, "Microceratops" has appeared in some popular works, namely the first ''Jurassic Park'' novel and Disney's Dinosaur.

to:

The most historically relevant was aptly called “Microceratops”. From Ancient China like the [[IncrediblyLamePun prototypical Protoceratops]], it’s one of the smallest dinosaurs ever, only the size of a rooster; and was a fast-running animal with slim body and agile legs, unlike the classic image of ceratopsians. Nonetheless, its head was unmistakeably ceratopsian, or rather, protoceratopsian. Very poorly-known, “Microceratops” has now fallen in disuse being preoccupied by an insect: [[ScienceMarchesOn we now need]] to call it ''Microceratus''. Still, "Microceratops" the microceratops has appeared in some popular works, namely the first ''Jurassic Park'' novel and Disney's Dinosaur.
''Dinosaur''.



Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America. Some were related with the classical genera: for example, ''Udanoceratops'' (one of the largest ones) was close to ''Leptoceratops''; while ''Graciliceratops'' was similar to ''Microceratus''. But others have revealed to be more primitive, if not at the same degree of ''Yinlong''. Two of them have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ("ancient horned face") was a sort of middle-way between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Leptoceratops''; and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian) has been revealed being between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Yinlong''. Still mysterious is the identity of the poorly-known Early Cretaceous ''Stenopelix'', whose pelvis was found in Europe in the XIX century.

to:

Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America. Some were related with the classical genera: examples listed above: for example, ''Udanoceratops'' (one of the largest ones) was close to ''Leptoceratops''; while ''Graciliceratops'' was similar to ''Microceratus''.''Microceratus''; while ''Turanoceratops'' was perhaps close to ''Zuniceratops'' and maybe one of the ceratopsids' ancestors. But others have revealed to be more primitive, if not at the same degree of ''Yinlong''. Two of them have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ("ancient horned face") was a sort of middle-way between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Leptoceratops''; and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian) has been revealed being between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Yinlong''. Still mysterious is the identity of the poorly-known Early Cretaceous ''Stenopelix'', whose pelvis was found in Europe in the XIX century.
6th May '13 2:09:33 PM IlPianetaDeiDinosauri
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Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is ''Montanoceratops'' from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', has been recently put in its own family as well. ''Bagaceratops'' is notable because is one of the smallest quadrupedal dinosaurs that ever lived: only one meter long, a bit more than the bipedal ''Microceratus'' (see below).

to:

Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is the quadrupedal ''Montanoceratops'' from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', has been recently put in its own family as well. ''Bagaceratops'' is notable because is one of the smallest quadrupedal dinosaurs that ever lived: only one meter long, a bit more than the bipedal ''Microceratus'' (see below).



The most historically relevant was aptly called “Microceratops”. From Ancient China like the [[IncrediblyLamePun prototypical Protoceratops]], it’s one of the smallest dinosaurs ever, only the size of a rooster; and was a fast-running animal with slim body and agile legs, unlike the classic image of ceratopsians. Nonetheless, its head was unmistakeably ceratopsian, or rather, protoceratopsian. Very poorly-known, “Microceratops” has now fallen in disuse being preoccupied by an insect: [[ScienceMarchesOn we now need]] to call it ''Microceratus''.

to:

The most historically relevant was aptly called “Microceratops”. From Ancient China like the [[IncrediblyLamePun prototypical Protoceratops]], it’s one of the smallest dinosaurs ever, only the size of a rooster; and was a fast-running animal with slim body and agile legs, unlike the classic image of ceratopsians. Nonetheless, its head was unmistakeably ceratopsian, or rather, protoceratopsian. Very poorly-known, “Microceratops” has now fallen in disuse being preoccupied by an insect: [[ScienceMarchesOn we now need]] to call it ''Microceratus''.
''Microceratus''. Still, "Microceratops" has appeared in some popular works, namely the first ''Jurassic Park'' novel and Disney's Dinosaur.



Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America, and two genera have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ("ancient horned face") was a sort of middle-way between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Leptoceratops''; and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian) has been revealed being between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Yinlong''. Still mysterious is the identity of the poorly-known Early Cretaceous ''Stenopelix'', whose pelvis was found in Europe in the XIX century.

to:

Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America, and two genera America. Some were related with the classical genera: for example, ''Udanoceratops'' (one of the largest ones) was close to ''Leptoceratops''; while ''Graciliceratops'' was similar to ''Microceratus''. But others have revealed to be more primitive, if not at the same degree of ''Yinlong''. Two of them have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ("ancient horned face") was a sort of middle-way between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Leptoceratops''; and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian) has been revealed being between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Yinlong''. Still mysterious is the identity of the poorly-known Early Cretaceous ''Stenopelix'', whose pelvis was found in Europe in the XIX century.
6th May '13 1:58:07 PM IlPianetaDeiDinosauri
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Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is ''Montanoceratops'' from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', has been recently put in its own family as well.

to:

Another relative which lived along ''Leptoceratops'' is ''Montanoceratops'' from [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Montana]]; once thought to have had a small nasal horn [[ScienceMarchesOn we now know]] it hadn't such a thing. ''Protoceratops'', ''Leptoceratops'' and other animals made once one family, the Protoceratopsids; now ''Leptoceratops'' and ''Montanoceratops'' make their own family, Leptoceratopsids. Another former protoceratopsid, Asian ''Bagaceratops'', has been recently put in its own family as well. \n ''Bagaceratops'' is notable because is one of the smallest quadrupedal dinosaurs that ever lived: only one meter long, a bit more than the bipedal ''Microceratus'' (see below).
7th Apr '13 9:58:00 AM IlPianetaDeiDinosauri
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Added DiffLines:

7th Apr '13 9:57:32 AM IlPianetaDeiDinosauri
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'''The other missing link:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yinlong Yinlong]]''

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'''The other missing link:''' links:''' ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yinlong Yinlong]]''
Yinlong]]'', ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archaeoceratops Archaeoceratops]]'', and ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaoyangsaurus Chaoyangsaurus]]''



Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America, and two genera have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ("ancient horned face") and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian).

to:

Many new basal ceratopsians have been described since the 1990s both in Asia and in North America, and two genera have become the namesakes of their own family: the Early Cretaceous ''Archaeoceratops'' ("ancient horned face") was a sort of middle-way between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Leptoceratops''; and the Late Jurassic ''Chaoyangsaurus'' (initially believed the earliest pachycephalosaurian). pachycephalosaurian) has been revealed being between ''Psittacosaurus'' and ''Yinlong''. Still mysterious is the identity of the poorly-known Early Cretaceous ''Stenopelix'', whose pelvis was found in Europe in the XIX century.
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