History UsefulNotes / PoliticalSystemOfGermany

14th Aug '16 10:04:20 AM Jhonny
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There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, {=BVerfG=}, in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.

to:

There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, {=BVerfG=}, [=BVerfG=], in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.
seats. In the 2014 elections to the European parliament Germany did indeed send representatives of small parties, such as Martin Sonneborn of the PARTEI.
14th Aug '16 10:02:19 AM Jhonny
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** Sarah Wagenknecht: Daughter of an Iranian father and a (East-)German mother and associated with Kommunistische Plattform (communist platform) until 2010. Now the number two within the party and faction in the Bundestag and also married to Oscar Lafontaine (since 2014). One of the best known Linke politcians and also one of its leading intellectuals.


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** Sarah Wagenknecht: Daughter of an Iranian father and a (East-)German mother and associated with Kommunistische Plattform (communist platform) until 2010. Now the number two within the party and faction in the Bundestag and also married to Oscar Lafontaine (since 2014). One of the best known Linke politcians politicians and also one of its leading intellectuals.

intellectuals. Has a fondness to delve into rhetoric that would not sound off at an [=AfD=] rally every once in a while to the annoyance of many members of her party.

13th Aug '16 5:51:15 PM SmoCro
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** Sarah Wagenknecht: Daughter of an Iranian father and a (East-)German mother and associated with Kommunistische Plattform (communist platform) until 2010. Now the number two within the party and faction in the Bundestag and also married to Oscar Lafontaine (since 2014). One of the best known Linke politcians and also one of its leading intellectuals.

13th Aug '16 5:43:41 PM SmoCro
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* '''Die Linke''' (Red, or Purple since the SPD already took Red): The Left Party is a recent merger of the relatively new '''WASG''' (founded by disgruntled Social Democrats) and the '''PDS''' (Party of Democratic Socialism). The PDS in turn was once the Socialist Unity Party (''Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands'', SED)[[note]]Which was itself a forced merger of the SPD and the KPD (''Kommunistische Partei Deutschlands'', the Communist Party of Germany), mandated by the Soviet occupation authorities in 1946[[/note]] that ran EastGermany, but lost most of its old members when it lost power. With the merger, former SPD chairman Lafontaine joined in, resulting in the party becoming more popular. The Left Party is strongest in the Eastern states and Lafontaine's home state of Saarland.

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* '''Die Linke''' (Red, or Purple since the SPD already took Red): The Left Party is a recent merger of the relatively new '''WASG''' (founded by disgruntled Social Democrats) Democrats; Wahlalternative Soziale Gerechtigkeit translates as Election alternative for social justice) and the '''PDS''' (Party of Democratic Socialism). The PDS in turn was once the Socialist Unity Party (''Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands'', SED)[[note]]Which was itself a forced merger of the SPD and the KPD (''Kommunistische Partei Deutschlands'', the Communist Party of Germany), mandated by the Soviet occupation authorities in 1946[[/note]] that ran EastGermany, but lost most of its old members when it lost power. With the merger, former SPD chairman Lafontaine joined in, resulting in the party becoming more popular. The Left Party is strongest in the Eastern states and Lafontaine's home state of Saarland.
3rd May '16 7:00:45 AM NuclearSheep
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* '''Alternative für Deutschland''' (Blue and Red): A new center-right party, founded only in 2013, as a response to the ongoing Eurocrisis. They're generally considered a Eurosceptic party, though they'll remind you that they're not [[InsistentTerminology anti-EU, just anti-Euro]]. As can be guessed, they're pretty much a single-issue party: get rid of the Euro. In the 2013 election they received 4.7% of the vote, just under the 5% threshold required to get seats. They're supporters of the right-wing organisation PEGIDA (Patriotische Europäer gegen die Islamisierung des Abendlandes, "Patriotic Europeans against the Islamification of the Western World"). During the migrant crisis in 2015 they gained much support and entered three ''Landtage'' in 2016, even becoming the second-strongest party in Saxony-Anhalt. Their founder, Bernd Lucke, a professor of economics has been deposed and since left the party, resulting in it moving to the right and focusing more on immigration instead of economics.

to:

* '''Alternative für Deutschland''' (Blue and Red): A new center-right party, founded only in 2013, as a response to the ongoing Eurocrisis. They're generally considered a Eurosceptic party, though they'll remind you that they're not [[InsistentTerminology anti-EU, just anti-Euro]]. As can be guessed, they're pretty much a single-issue party: get rid of the Euro. In the 2013 election they received 4.7% of the vote, just under the 5% threshold required to get seats. They're supporters of the right-wing organisation PEGIDA (Patriotische Europäer gegen die Islamisierung des Abendlandes, "Patriotic Europeans against the Islamification of the Western World"). During the migrant crisis in 2015 they gained much support and entered three ''Landtage'' in 2016, even becoming the second-strongest party in Saxony-Anhalt. Their founder, Bernd Lucke, a professor of economics has been deposed and since left the party, resulting in it moving to the right and focusing more on immigration instead of economics.
economics. In 2016 they radically changed their course and became more of an anti-Islam party, even stating that "The Islam doesn't belong to Germany".
9th Apr '16 5:37:56 PM Jhonny
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There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, '''{{=BVerfG=}}''', in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.

to:

There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, '''{{=BVerfG=}}''', {=BVerfG=}, in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.
9th Apr '16 5:37:34 PM Jhonny
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There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, '''{=BVerfG=}''', in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.

to:

There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, '''{=BVerfG=}''', '''{{=BVerfG=}}''', in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.
9th Apr '16 5:37:10 PM Jhonny
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There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, {='''BVerfG'''=}, in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.

to:

There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, {='''BVerfG'''=}, '''{=BVerfG=}''', in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.
9th Apr '16 5:36:32 PM Jhonny
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There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, '''BVG''', in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.

to:

There is a notable exceptions to PR, the '''Five Percent Threshold'''. In order to reach full representation under PR, a party has to get 5% of the vote, or win a number of constituencies (1 on state level, 3 on federal). Otherwise they get only seats for won constituencies. This has recently come under increased scrutiny by the Federal Constitutional Court (Bundesverfassungsgericht, '''BVG''', {='''BVerfG'''=}, in German), which basically only tolerates the 5% threshold on state and federal levels, hoping it provides for stable governments, but struck it down for local and in 2011 for EU Parliament elections. If it had declared the 5% threshold void for the EP elections in 2009, small parties would have got 8 of Germany's 99 seats.
9th Apr '16 5:35:46 PM Jhonny
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* '''Alternative für Deutschland''' (Blue and Red): A new center-right party, founded only in 2013, as a response to the ongoing Eurocrisis. They're generally considered a Eurosceptic party, though they'll remind you that they're not [[InsistentTerminology anti-EU, just anti-Euro]]. As can be guessed, they're pretty much a single-issue party: get rid of the Euro. In the 2013 election they received 4.7% of the vote, just under the 5% threshold required to get seats. They're supporters of the right-wing organisation PEGIDA (Patriotische Europäer gegen die Islamisierung des Abendlandes, "Patriotic Europeans againt the Islamification of the Western World"). During the migrant crisis in 2015 they gained much support and entered three ''Landtage'' in 2016, even becoming the second-strongest party in Saxony-Anhalt.

to:

* '''Alternative für Deutschland''' (Blue and Red): A new center-right party, founded only in 2013, as a response to the ongoing Eurocrisis. They're generally considered a Eurosceptic party, though they'll remind you that they're not [[InsistentTerminology anti-EU, just anti-Euro]]. As can be guessed, they're pretty much a single-issue party: get rid of the Euro. In the 2013 election they received 4.7% of the vote, just under the 5% threshold required to get seats. They're supporters of the right-wing organisation PEGIDA (Patriotische Europäer gegen die Islamisierung des Abendlandes, "Patriotic Europeans againt against the Islamification of the Western World"). During the migrant crisis in 2015 they gained much support and entered three ''Landtage'' in 2016, even becoming the second-strongest party in Saxony-Anhalt.
Saxony-Anhalt. Their founder, Bernd Lucke, a professor of economics has been deposed and since left the party, resulting in it moving to the right and focusing more on immigration instead of economics.
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