History UsefulNotes / OldBritishMoney

17th Sep '16 4:43:15 PM Bisected8
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** £5 – Blue or green ink (depending on when they were printed and who you ask). Portrait: UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington (1971-1991); George Stephenson, pioneering railway engineer (1990-2003); Elizabeth Fry, campaigner responsible for reforming the prison system (2002- ); UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill (projected from 2016). The latter, featuring Churchill, will be the first British bank note to be produced in plastic.

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** £5 – Blue or green ink (depending on when they were printed and who you ask). Portrait: UsefulNotes/TheDukeOfWellington (1971-1991); George Stephenson, pioneering railway engineer (1990-2003); Elizabeth Fry, campaigner responsible for reforming the prison system (2002- ); (2002-2016); UsefulNotes/WinstonChurchill (projected from 2016). The latter, featuring Churchill, will be (2016-, also the first British fiver and bank note overall to be produced printed in plastic.polymer rather than paper).
16th Sep '16 11:09:27 AM Morgenthaler
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* Other older still denominations existed before the seventeenth century, of which the most impressive is the Triple Unite – £3 (three pounds, or sixty shillings), an exceedingly rare coin, nearly an ounce in weight, produced only in 1642-4 during the EnglishCivilWar.

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* Other older still denominations existed before the seventeenth century, of which the most impressive is the Triple Unite – £3 (three pounds, or sixty shillings), an exceedingly rare coin, nearly an ounce in weight, produced only in 1642-4 during the EnglishCivilWar.
UsefulNotes/EnglishCivilWar.
14th May '16 4:17:28 PM nombretomado
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** £1 – Round, golden coloured and slightly fatter than other coins. Has milled indentations and the Latin phrase DECUS ET TUTAMEN ('An ornament and a safeguard') around the edge. The phrase refers to this 'milling', those little grooves on the edges of coins. Milling coins was introduced by then-Royal Mint director Sir IsaacNewton as both a decoration and as a defence against the then-common practice of 'clipping'[[note]](carefully shaving off bits of precious metal from the edges of coins, keeping the shavings, and passing off the clipped coin as full value. Milling a coin makes it easy to spot if it has been clipped. Clipping was not only bad because it was dishonest, but because it debased the currency, which eventually led to unwanted inflation)[[/note]]. Welsh-design coins use a different phrase, the Welsh PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWLAD ('True am I to my country'); Scottish-design coins the Latin NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT ('No-one provokes me with impunity')[[note]](the motto of the [[KnightFever Order of the Thistle]], as well as three extant and several defunct Scottish regiments, as well as Canadian and South African regiments of Scottish descent. The use of the motto caused some fuss as some Scots were angry it [[SeriousBusiness used Latin rather that the Gaelic "Cha togar m' fhearg gun dìoladh"]]. That’s right; not only does Scottish coinage carry a BadassBoast, but some people were sufficiently badass to [[ViolentGlaswegian scrap over what language it carried this boast in]])[[/note]]. The reverse design varies from year to year, with some designs being reused. Commonly-used designs are the coats of arms of the UK nations and their national plants. In 2017, the pound coin is to be replaced by a dodecagonal design "inspired" by the pre-decimal thrupenny bit, to be bimetallic like the £2 coin with a "silver" centre and "gold" ring. It is claimed that this will be more difficult to forge, with as many as 3% of pound coins in circulation allegedly being forgeries.

to:

** £1 – Round, golden coloured and slightly fatter than other coins. Has milled indentations and the Latin phrase DECUS ET TUTAMEN ('An ornament and a safeguard') around the edge. The phrase refers to this 'milling', those little grooves on the edges of coins. Milling coins was introduced by then-Royal Mint director Sir IsaacNewton as both a decoration and as a defence against the then-common practice of 'clipping'[[note]](carefully shaving off bits of precious metal from the edges of coins, keeping the shavings, and passing off the clipped coin as full value. Milling a coin makes it easy to spot if it has been clipped. Clipping was not only bad because it was dishonest, but because it debased the currency, which eventually led to unwanted inflation)[[/note]]. Welsh-design coins use a different phrase, the Welsh PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWLAD ('True am I to my country'); Scottish-design coins the Latin NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT ('No-one provokes me with impunity')[[note]](the motto of the [[KnightFever [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever Order of the Thistle]], as well as three extant and several defunct Scottish regiments, as well as Canadian and South African regiments of Scottish descent. The use of the motto caused some fuss as some Scots were angry it [[SeriousBusiness used Latin rather that the Gaelic "Cha togar m' fhearg gun dìoladh"]]. That’s right; not only does Scottish coinage carry a BadassBoast, but some people were sufficiently badass to [[ViolentGlaswegian scrap over what language it carried this boast in]])[[/note]]. The reverse design varies from year to year, with some designs being reused. Commonly-used designs are the coats of arms of the UK nations and their national plants. In 2017, the pound coin is to be replaced by a dodecagonal design "inspired" by the pre-decimal thrupenny bit, to be bimetallic like the £2 coin with a "silver" centre and "gold" ring. It is claimed that this will be more difficult to forge, with as many as 3% of pound coins in circulation allegedly being forgeries.
22nd Apr '16 8:48:56 AM LondonKdS
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** £20 – Purple ink with a portrait of: Creator/WilliamShakespeare (1970-1993); Michael Faraday, scientist (1991-2001); Music/EdwardElgar (1999-2010); Adam Smith, father of modern economics and [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts hater of gamers' guts]] (2007- ). This tends to be the largest denomination anyone will bother with. It is also the largest you'll normally get from an ATM. Following from £5 and £10 notes, they will be plastic from 2020 onwards.

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** £20 – Purple ink with a portrait of: Creator/WilliamShakespeare (1970-1993); Michael Faraday, scientist (1991-2001); Music/EdwardElgar (1999-2010); Adam Smith, father of modern economics and [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts hater of gamers' guts]] (2007- ).); JMW Turner, painter (projected from 2020). This tends to be the largest denomination anyone will bother with. It is also the largest you'll normally get from an ATM. Following from £5 and £10 notes, they will be plastic from 2020 onwards.
2nd Apr '16 11:32:27 AM nombretomado
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* Ha'penny/Halfpenny – yes, half a penny. Pronounced "haypnee" even when written in full.[[note]](The full version is the surname of a former ''EastEnders''/''WaterlooRoad'' star, and of a current Welsh international rugby player.)[[/note]] The pre-decimal ha'penny was one inch in diameter. Still existed after 1971's decimalisation, but was discontinued in 1984.

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* Ha'penny/Halfpenny – yes, half a penny. Pronounced "haypnee" even when written in full.[[note]](The full version is the surname of a former ''EastEnders''/''WaterlooRoad'' ''Series/EastEnders''/''WaterlooRoad'' star, and of a current Welsh international rugby player.)[[/note]] The pre-decimal ha'penny was one inch in diameter. Still existed after 1971's decimalisation, but was discontinued in 1984.
15th Jan '16 2:15:08 PM Anddrix
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If you made it through all that, you have [[ViewersAreMorons probably]] already realized that this is [[IThoughtItMeant not to be confused with]] the ''other'' kind of [[BlueBlood Old Money]], the opposite of the NouveauRiche.

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If you made it through all that, you have [[ViewersAreMorons probably]] probably already realized that this is [[IThoughtItMeant not to be confused with]] the ''other'' kind of [[BlueBlood Old Money]], the opposite of the NouveauRiche.
14th Jan '16 5:12:22 PM karstovich2
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This put Canada in a bit of a bind. Since Canada was still British, the War Office (then in charge of managing Britain's colonies) wanted Canada to continue to use the pound sterling as the basis of its currency, but most Canadians, realizing the benefits of easy trade with their far more populous southern neighbour, wanted to assimilate to the American unit. For a while, a native Canadian pound was adopted, worth slightly less than the sterling for an easier-to-handle exchange rate with the dollar, namely $4 to the pound. As an interesting sidenote: the ha'penny was not issued in English-speaking Upper Canada, but it was issued in French-speaking Lower Canada, where it was known as the ''sou''[[note]]Which is still the Quebec French nickname for a Canadian cent. Also, because at an exchange rate of $4 to £1, $0.25 was ''exactly'' 15 pence (because when $4=£1, then $1=5s=60d, so $0.25=15d), French-speakers in Quebec came to call the ubiquitous American quarter dollars ''trente sous'' ("thirty sous"), and the nickname has stuck for subsequent Canadian and American 25-cent pieces, even though the word ''sou'' came to mean "cent" in other contexts.[[/note]] after a similarly low-valued French coin. However, this situation proved to be untenable, and in 1857 the Province of Canada adopted an American-based decimal currency unit, although the British gold sovereign remained legal tender at a value of $4.86 2/3 (which remained true until the mid 1990s – at which point if you took a gold sovereign at face value anyway, you were either desperate or an idiot). When Confederation occurred ten years later, it was this currency that became the Canadian dollar of today.

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This put Canada in a bit of a bind. Since Canada was still British, the War Office (then in charge of managing Britain's colonies) wanted Canada to continue to use the pound sterling as the basis of its currency, but most Canadians, realizing the benefits of easy trade with their far more populous southern neighbour, wanted to assimilate to the American unit. For a while, a native Canadian pound was adopted, worth slightly less than the sterling for an easier-to-handle exchange rate with the dollar, namely $4 to the pound. As an interesting sidenote: the ha'penny was not issued in English-speaking Upper Canada, but it was issued in French-speaking Lower Canada, where it was known as the ''sou''[[note]]Which is still the Quebec French nickname for a Canadian cent. Also, because at an exchange rate of $4 to £1, $0.25 was ''exactly'' 15 pence (because when $4=£1, then $1=5s=60d, so $0.25=15d), French-speakers in Quebec came to call the ubiquitous American quarter dollars ''trente sous'' ("thirty sous"), and the nickname has stuck for subsequent Canadian and American 25-cent pieces, even though the word ''sou'' came to mean "cent" in other contexts.[[/note]] after a similarly low-valued French coin. However, this situation proved to be untenable, and in 1857 the Province of Canada adopted an American-based decimal currency unit, although the British gold sovereign remained legal tender at a value of $4.86 2/3 (which remained true until the mid 1990s – at which point if you took used a gold sovereign at face value anyway, you were either desperate or an idiot). When Confederation occurred ten years later, it was this currency that became the Canadian dollar of today.
13th Dec '15 1:21:01 PM moloch
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* £20 – purple – DanielOConnell

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* £20 – purple – DanielOConnellDaniel O'Connell



On New Year's Day 2003, the Irish pound was replaced by the {{euro}} (issued as 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 cent, €1 and €2 coins, and notes of €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200 and €500 (the last three note denominations are rarely circulated).

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On New Year's Day 2003, the Irish pound was replaced by the {{euro}} [[UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion Euro]] (issued as 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50 cent, €1 and €2 coins, and notes of €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200 and €500 (the last three note denominations are rarely circulated).
2nd Sep '15 7:52:18 AM Bisected8
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** £1 – Round, golden coloured and slightly fatter than other coins. Has milled indentations and the Latin phrase DECUS ET TUTAMEN ('An ornament and a safeguard') around the edge. The phrase refers to this 'milling', those little grooves on the edges of coins. Milling coins was introduced by then-Royal Mint director Sir IsaacNewton as both a decoration and as a defence against the then-common practice of 'clipping'[[note]](carefully shaving off bits of precious metal from the edges of coins, keeping the shavings, and passing off the clipped coin as full value. Milling a coin makes it easy to spot if it has been clipped. Clipping was not only bad because it was dishonest, but because it debased the currency, which eventually led to unwanted inflation)[[/note]]. Welsh-design coins use a different phrase, the Welsh PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWLAD ('True am I to my country'); Scottish-design coins the Latin NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT ('No-one provokes me with impunity')[[note]](the motto of the [[KnightFever Order of the Thistle]], as well as three extant and several defunct Scottish regiments, as well as Canadian and South African regiments of Scottish descent. The use of the motto caused some fuss as some Scots were angry it [[SeriousBusiness used Latin rather that the Gaelic "Cha togar m' fhearg gun dìoladh"]]. That’s right; not only does Scottish coinage carry a BadassBoast, but some people were sufficiently badass to [[ViolentGlaswegian scrap over what language it carried this boast in]])[[/note]]. The reverse design varies from year to year, with some designs being reused. Commonly-used designs are the coats of arms of the UK nations and their national plants.
*** In 2017, the pound coin is to be replaced by a dodecagonal design "inspired" by the pre-decimal thrupenny bit, to be bimetallic like the £2 coin with a "silver" centre and "gold" ring. It is claimed that this will be more difficult to forge, with as many as 3% of pound coins in circulation allegedly being forgeries.

to:

** £1 – Round, golden coloured and slightly fatter than other coins. Has milled indentations and the Latin phrase DECUS ET TUTAMEN ('An ornament and a safeguard') around the edge. The phrase refers to this 'milling', those little grooves on the edges of coins. Milling coins was introduced by then-Royal Mint director Sir IsaacNewton as both a decoration and as a defence against the then-common practice of 'clipping'[[note]](carefully shaving off bits of precious metal from the edges of coins, keeping the shavings, and passing off the clipped coin as full value. Milling a coin makes it easy to spot if it has been clipped. Clipping was not only bad because it was dishonest, but because it debased the currency, which eventually led to unwanted inflation)[[/note]]. Welsh-design coins use a different phrase, the Welsh PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWLAD ('True am I to my country'); Scottish-design coins the Latin NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT ('No-one provokes me with impunity')[[note]](the motto of the [[KnightFever Order of the Thistle]], as well as three extant and several defunct Scottish regiments, as well as Canadian and South African regiments of Scottish descent. The use of the motto caused some fuss as some Scots were angry it [[SeriousBusiness used Latin rather that the Gaelic "Cha togar m' fhearg gun dìoladh"]]. That’s right; not only does Scottish coinage carry a BadassBoast, but some people were sufficiently badass to [[ViolentGlaswegian scrap over what language it carried this boast in]])[[/note]]. The reverse design varies from year to year, with some designs being reused. Commonly-used designs are the coats of arms of the UK nations and their national plants. \n*** In 2017, the pound coin is to be replaced by a dodecagonal design "inspired" by the pre-decimal thrupenny bit, to be bimetallic like the £2 coin with a "silver" centre and "gold" ring. It is claimed that this will be more difficult to forge, with as many as 3% of pound coins in circulation allegedly being forgeries.



** £5 – Usually commemorative issues, legal tender but not in general circulation. Occasionally the introduction of a regular £5 coin is proposed, but so far there isn't one.

to:

** £5 – Usually commemorative issues, issues. They're legal tender but not in general circulation.circulation and unlikely to be accepted as payment. Occasionally the introduction of a regular £5 coin is proposed, but so far there isn't one.



** £20 – Purple ink with a portrait of: Creator/WilliamShakespeare (1970-1993); Michael Faraday, scientist (1991-2001); Music/EdwardElgar (1999-2010); Adam Smith, father of modern economics and [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts hater of gamers' guts]] (2007- ). This tends to be the largest denomination anyone will bother with. It is also the largest you'll normally get from an ATM.

to:

** £20 – Purple ink with a portrait of: Creator/WilliamShakespeare (1970-1993); Michael Faraday, scientist (1991-2001); Music/EdwardElgar (1999-2010); Adam Smith, father of modern economics and [[AdamSmithHatesYourGuts hater of gamers' guts]] (2007- ). This tends to be the largest denomination anyone will bother with. It is also the largest you'll normally get from an ATM. Following from £5 and £10 notes, they will be plastic from 2020 onwards.
17th Jun '15 5:46:40 AM Prfnoff
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** It should also be noted that Scotland still has a few £1 notes in circulation, and has its own note designs, several for each denomination. (The three big Scottish banks – Bank of Scotland, Royal Bank of Scotland, and Clydesdale Bank – are all entitled to issue notes under Scots law. The Bank of Scotland notes have pictures of Sir WalterScott, who petitioned for Scotland to keep its banknotes in 1826.)

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** It should also be noted that Scotland still has a few £1 notes in circulation, and has its own note designs, several for each denomination. (The three big Scottish banks – Bank of Scotland, Royal Bank of Scotland, and Clydesdale Bank – are all entitled to issue notes under Scots law. The Bank of Scotland notes have pictures of Sir WalterScott, Creator/WalterScott, who petitioned for Scotland to keep its banknotes in 1826.)
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