History UsefulNotes / OldBritishMoney

2nd Nov '17 11:36:20 PM snichols1973
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Between 1701 and 1825, when the currencies were unified, there was also an Irish shilling worth 13d, also known as a black hog.

to:

** Between 1701 and 1825, when the currencies were unified, there was also an Irish shilling worth 13d, 13d (13/-), also known as a black hog.
2nd Nov '17 11:27:02 PM snichols1973
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Three and six" means three shillings and sixpence. The 'stroke' or 'slash' symbol / (also called a solidus, which originated as ''ſ'', the long-s character) was often used to indicate shillings when writing amounts of money in figures; three shillings sixpence would be written "3/6". Three shillings exactly would be "3/-".

to:

* "Three and six" means three shillings and sixpence. The 'stroke' or 'slash' symbol / (also called a solidus, or virgule, which originated as ''ſ'', the long-s character) was often used to indicate shillings when writing amounts of money in figures; three shillings sixpence would be written "3/6". Three shillings exactly would be "3/-".



The pound's full name is the 'pound sterling', denoting that a pound was originally a gold coin (called a 'sovereign'[[note]](a now rare slang term for a pound is a "sov")[[/note]]) equal in value to one troy pound in weight of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_silver sterling silver]]. The "shilling" was originally a unit of account referring to the value of a sheep or a cow in Kent or some such. (No, really.)

to:

The pound's full name is the 'pound sterling', [[note]] Also known as a quid[[/note]] denoting that a pound was originally a gold coin (called a 'sovereign'[[note]](a now rare slang term for a pound is a "sov")[[/note]]) equal in value to one troy pound in weight of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sterling_silver sterling silver]]. The "shilling" was originally a unit of account referring to the value of a sheep or a cow in Kent or some such. (No, really.)



* Florin – 2/- (two shillings, or 24d; one tenth of a pound). Also known as 'two bob', as a shilling was often known as a 'bob'.

to:

* Testoon - 1/- (1 shilling, or 12d, one-twentieth of a pound), also known as a bob, white hog, or 'og.
** Between 1701 and 1825, when the currencies were unified, there was also an Irish shilling worth 13d, also known as a black hog.
* Florin – 2/- (two shillings, or 24d; one tenth of a pound). Also known as 'two bob', as a shilling was often known as a 'bob'.
8th Sep '17 2:21:32 AM LondonKdS
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** £10 – Orange ink with a portrait of: Florence Nightingale, pioneer of modern nursing (1975-1994); Creator/CharlesDickens (1992-2003); Charles Darwin, Discoverer of evolution (2000- ); Creator/JaneAusten[[note]](chosen specifically to ensure that a bank note will still feature a prominent British woman – aside from the Queen – after the retirement of Elizabeth Fry from the £5 note.)[[/note]] (projected from 2017). As with the Churchill £5, the latter will mark the introduction of plastic £10 notes.

to:

** £10 – Orange ink with a portrait of: Florence Nightingale, pioneer of modern nursing (1975-1994); Creator/CharlesDickens (1992-2003); Charles Darwin, Discoverer of evolution (2000- ); (2000-2018); Creator/JaneAusten[[note]](chosen specifically to ensure that a bank note will still feature a prominent British woman – aside from the Queen – after the retirement of Elizabeth Fry from the £5 note.)[[/note]] (projected from 2017).(2017- ). As with the Churchill £5, the latter will mark the introduction of plastic £10 notes.



** £50 – Red ink with a portrait of: Sir Christopher Wren, architect (1981-1996); Sir John Houblon, first governor of the Bank of England (1994-2014), Matthew Boulton and James Watt, steam engine engineers (2011- ). Usually only issued from banks by request (typically to put in birthday cards). This is the largest denomination issued by the Bank of England – some Scottish and Northern Irish banks issue £100 notes, which are even rarer than £50s. Can be difficult to pass in some stores due to lacking in change (some expressly do not accept them because of this), and will often be subjected to additional scrutiny due to the commonness of forgeries.

to:

** £50 – Red ink with a portrait of: Sir Christopher Wren, architect (1981-1996); Sir John Houblon, first governor of the Bank of England (1994-2014), Matthew Boulton and James Watt, steam engine engineers (2011- ). Usually only issued from banks by request (typically to put in birthday cards). This is the largest denomination issued by the Bank of England – some Scottish and Northern Irish banks issue £100 notes, which are even rarer than £50s. Can be difficult to pass in some stores due to lacking in change (some expressly do not accept them because of this), and will often be subjected to additional scrutiny due to the commonness of forgeries. The Bank of England has not confirmed whether a polymer £50 note will be issued, and it is possible that the note may be withdrawn due to its perceived main modern purposes being purchasing illegal goods or services, money-laundering, cash smuggling, and tax evasion.
20th Aug '17 9:13:24 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The Southern hemisphere used old money too! When originally settled, the colonies just used British pounds, but gradually introduced their own local currencies imaginatively named the Pound which were essentially equal to the Pound Sterling. Since they weren't tied so closely with the notion of the pound, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa decided to decimalize in a different way to the UK and Ireland by making 10 shillings equal to the new currency: ten South African shillings became one rand in 14 February 1961; ten Australian shillings became one Australian dollar on 14 February 1966; and ten New Zealand shillings became one New Zealand dollar on 10 July 1967. Their values have fluctuated since, and they all have lost their 1c and 2c coins due to inflation making them nearly worthless. New Zealand also lost its 5c coin in 2006, and South Africa is phasing them out as of 2012.

to:

The Southern hemisphere used old money too! When originally settled, the colonies just used British pounds, but gradually introduced their own local currencies imaginatively named the Pound which were essentially equal to the Pound Sterling. Since they weren't tied so closely with the notion of the pound, and because their currencies were not significant world reserve currencies that would cause major headaches if they changed the value of the basic unit of account, Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa decided to decimalize in a different way to the UK and Ireland by making 10 shillings equal to the new currency: ten South African shillings became one rand in 14 February 1961; ten Australian shillings became one Australian dollar on 14 February 1966; and ten New Zealand shillings became one New Zealand dollar on 10 July 1967. Their values have fluctuated since, and they all have lost their 1c and 2c coins due to inflation making them nearly worthless. New Zealand also lost its 5c coin in 2006, and South Africa is phasing them out as of 2012.
2nd Aug '17 3:07:39 AM KnightofLsama
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Originally using paper notes in 1988 a special commemorative ten dollar note for the bicentennial of the landing of the First Fleet was issued made from a form of flexible plastic and while there were some initial problems it was eventually decided to change all notes to this form. In addition to the plastic being much harder to copy they were also able to include new security features such as a transparent window. To the general public one of the more popular results of the change was that your money would no longer be reduced to a pulpy mess if it accidentally went through the wash. The colour coding from the old paper series was kept but while the old notes had gotten both taller and wider with increasing value to aid in identification by the blind the new notes were of a uniform height and only the width changed.

to:

Originally using paper notes in 1988 a special commemorative ten dollar note for the bicentennial of the landing of the First Fleet was issued made from a form of flexible plastic and while there were some initial problems it was eventually decided to change all notes to this form. In addition to the plastic being much harder to copy they were also able to include new security features such as a transparent window. To the general public one of the more popular results of the change was that your money would no longer be reduced to a pulpy mess if it accidentally went through the wash. The colour coding from the old paper series was kept but while the old notes had gotten both taller and wider with increasing value to aid in identification by the blind the new notes were of a uniform height and only the width changed.
changed. Starting in 2016 a new series with additional security features such as a top to bottom transparent bar have started being issued but they share the same design scheme as the previous series described below.


Added DiffLines:

In terms of slang, Australia shares the term "grand" meaning a thousand dollars and "shrapnel" to mean general loose coinage with the UK.
21st May '17 11:07:23 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


A rather odd, half-hearted attempt at decimalisation was introduced in [[VictorianBritain Victorian]] times when a large number of florins (two-bob bits) were minted, officially as tenths of a pound. The design was hugely controversial, as, on the front, the queen's portrait was accompanied by the words ''Victoria Regina'' ('[[UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria Queen Victoria]]') rather than the conventional ''Victoria Dei Gratia Regina'' ('Victoria, Queen by the Grace of God'). The "Godless Florins" were denounced by clergymen in much the same way that US dollars without 'In God We Trust' would be today, even though that motto is NewerThanTheyThink. Modern coins carry the inscription ''Elizabeth II Dei Gratia Regina Fidei Defensor'' (usually abbreviated to ELIZABETH II D G REG F D on most coins, thought the £2 has more space, so there it's ELIZABETH II DEI GRA REG FID DEF), meaning '[[HMTheQueen Elizabeth II]], by the grace of God, Queen and Defender of the Faith'.

to:

A rather odd, half-hearted attempt at decimalisation was introduced in [[VictorianBritain [[UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain Victorian]] times when a large number of florins (two-bob bits) were minted, officially as tenths of a pound. The design was hugely controversial, as, on the front, the queen's portrait was accompanied by the words ''Victoria Regina'' ('[[UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria Queen Victoria]]') rather than the conventional ''Victoria Dei Gratia Regina'' ('Victoria, Queen by the Grace of God'). The "Godless Florins" were denounced by clergymen in much the same way that US dollars without 'In God We Trust' would be today, even though that motto is NewerThanTheyThink. Modern coins carry the inscription ''Elizabeth II Dei Gratia Regina Fidei Defensor'' (usually abbreviated to ELIZABETH II D G REG F D on most coins, thought the £2 has more space, so there it's ELIZABETH II DEI GRA REG FID DEF), meaning '[[HMTheQueen Elizabeth II]], by the grace of God, Queen and Defender of the Faith'.
20th May '17 5:47:43 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Ha'penny/Halfpenny – yes, half a penny. Pronounced "haypnee" even when written in full.[[note]](The full version is the surname of a former ''Series/EastEnders''/''WaterlooRoad'' star, and of a current Welsh international rugby player.)[[/note]] The pre-decimal ha'penny was one inch in diameter. Still existed after 1971's decimalisation, but was discontinued in 1984.

to:

* Ha'penny/Halfpenny – yes, half a penny. Pronounced "haypnee" even when written in full.[[note]](The full version is the surname of a former ''Series/EastEnders''/''WaterlooRoad'' ''Series/EastEnders''/''Series/WaterlooRoad'' star, and of a current Welsh international rugby player.)[[/note]] The pre-decimal ha'penny was one inch in diameter. Still existed after 1971's decimalisation, but was discontinued in 1984.
29th Mar '17 7:09:11 AM Bisected8
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** £1 – Round, golden coloured and slightly fatter than other coins. Has milled indentations and the Latin phrase DECUS ET TUTAMEN ('An ornament and a safeguard') around the edge. The phrase refers to this 'milling', those little grooves on the edges of coins. Milling coins was introduced by then-Royal Mint director Sir UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton as both a decoration and as a defence against the then-common practice of 'clipping'[[note]](carefully shaving off bits of precious metal from the edges of coins, keeping the shavings, and passing off the clipped coin as full value. Milling a coin makes it easy to spot if it has been clipped. Clipping was not only bad because it was dishonest, but because it debased the currency, which eventually led to unwanted inflation)[[/note]]. Welsh-design coins use a different phrase, the Welsh PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWLAD ('True am I to my country'); Scottish-design coins the Latin NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT ('No-one provokes me with impunity')[[note]](the motto of the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever Order of the Thistle]], as well as three extant and several defunct Scottish regiments, as well as Canadian and South African regiments of Scottish descent. The use of the motto caused some fuss as some Scots were angry it [[SeriousBusiness used Latin rather that the Gaelic "Cha togar m' fhearg gun dìoladh"]]. That’s right; not only does Scottish coinage carry a BadassBoast, but some people were sufficiently badass to [[ViolentGlaswegian scrap over what language it carried this boast in]])[[/note]]. The reverse design varies from year to year, with some designs being reused. Commonly-used designs are the coats of arms of the UK nations and their national plants. In 2017, the pound coin is to be replaced by a dodecagonal design "inspired" by the pre-decimal thrupenny bit, to be bimetallic like the £2 coin with a "silver" centre and "gold" ring. It is claimed that this will be more difficult to forge, with as many as 3% of pound coins in circulation allegedly being forgeries.

to:

** £1 – As of March 2017, the pound coin has been replaced by a dodecagonal design "inspired" by the pre-decimal thrupenny bit, to be bimetallic like the £2 coin with a "silver" centre and "gold" ring. It is claimed that this will be more difficult to forge, with as many as 3% of old style pound coins in circulation allegedly being forgeries.
** Old £1 -
Round, golden coloured and slightly fatter than other coins. Has milled indentations and the Latin phrase DECUS ET TUTAMEN ('An ornament and a safeguard') around the edge. The phrase refers to this 'milling', those little grooves on the edges of coins. Milling coins was introduced by then-Royal Mint director Sir UsefulNotes/IsaacNewton as both a decoration and as a defence against the then-common practice of 'clipping'[[note]](carefully shaving off bits of precious metal from the edges of coins, keeping the shavings, and passing off the clipped coin as full value. Milling a coin makes it easy to spot if it has been clipped. Clipping was not only bad because it was dishonest, but because it debased the currency, which eventually led to unwanted inflation)[[/note]]. Welsh-design coins use a different phrase, the Welsh PLEIDIOL WYF I'M GWLAD ('True am I to my country'); Scottish-design coins the Latin NEMO ME IMPUNE LACESSIT ('No-one provokes me with impunity')[[note]](the motto of the [[UsefulNotes/KnightFever Order of the Thistle]], as well as three extant and several defunct Scottish regiments, as well as Canadian and South African regiments of Scottish descent. The use of the motto caused some fuss as some Scots were angry it [[SeriousBusiness used Latin rather that the Gaelic "Cha togar m' fhearg gun dìoladh"]]. That’s right; not only does Scottish coinage carry a BadassBoast, but some people were sufficiently badass to [[ViolentGlaswegian scrap over what language it carried this boast in]])[[/note]]. The reverse design varies from year to year, with some designs being reused. Commonly-used designs are the coats of arms of the UK nations and their national plants. In 2017, the pound coin is to be replaced by a dodecagonal design "inspired" by the pre-decimal thrupenny bit, to be bimetallic like the £2 coin with a "silver" centre and "gold" ring. It is claimed that this They will be more difficult to forge, with as many as 3% of pound coins phases out in circulation allegedly being forgeries.October 2017.
28th Mar '17 6:44:33 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "Pony" – £25 (As in [[OnlyFoolsAndHorses "stick a pony in your pocket"]])

to:

* "Pony" – £25 (As in [[OnlyFoolsAndHorses [[Series/OnlyFoolsAndHorses "stick a pony in your pocket"]])
7th Jan '17 3:01:39 PM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Also sometimes called a dollar, see above.



* Mark – 13/4 (thirteen shillings and four pence, or 160d; two thirds of a pound. Only ever used as a unit of account in some areas, and quite archaic even before decimalisation; it shared a root with and was similar in value to the German currency of the same name).

to:

* Half sovereign - 10/- (ten shillings, or 120d; one half of a pound). Replaced in TheTwenties by the ten-bob note.
* Mark – 13/4 (thirteen shillings and four pence, or 160d; two thirds of a pound. pound). Only ever used as a unit of account in some areas, and quite archaic even before decimalisation; it shared a root with and was similar in value to the German currency of the same name).name.
This list shows the last 10 events of 114. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.OldBritishMoney