History UsefulNotes / NewJersey

20th May '18 2:59:43 PM costanton11
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Just as [[OnlyInFlorida Florida is famous for "news of the weird" stories]], New Jersey has been host to some of the most outlandish, absurd, and downright [[MagnificentBastard magnificent]] acts of corruption and anti-corruption stings to ever grace US shores.

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Just as [[OnlyInFlorida Florida is famous for "news of the weird" stories]], New Jersey has been host to some of the most outlandish, absurd, and downright [[MagnificentBastard magnificent]] magnificent acts of corruption and anti-corruption stings to ever grace US shores.
6th May '18 1:08:58 PM TheMysteriousTroper
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* Creator/ZachBraff and John C. [=McGinley=]]], who grew up in adjacent towns (Braff in South Orange, McGinley in Millburn)

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* Creator/ZachBraff and John C. [=McGinley=]]], who grew up in adjacent towns (Braff in South Orange, McGinley [=McGinley=] in Millburn)
2nd May '18 7:19:38 AM Njein
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#New Jersey is home to TheMafia. If ''Series/TheSopranos'' and ''Series/BoardwalkEmpire'' aren't enough to convince you of the state's long and rich history of mob hits and "legitimate buss-a-ness," just ask New Jersey residents themselves. It's a well-known secret that the mob exists more plentifully in New Jersey than any other state these days; it's just an accepted fact of life. They've been there since TheRoaringTwenties and just never left, outlasting the mob in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} and UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. Ask any New Jersey resident, and they'll tell you Jimmy Hoffa is buried in the Pine Barrens, duh -- and if he's not there, then he was buried underneath the stands of the old Giants Stadium.

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#New Jersey is home to TheMafia. If ''Series/TheSopranos'' and ''Series/BoardwalkEmpire'' aren't enough to convince you of the state's long and rich history of mob hits and "legitimate buss-a-ness," just ask New Jersey residents themselves. It's a well-known secret that the mob exists more plentifully in New Jersey than any other state these days; it's just an accepted fact of life.life, given that the Five Families, the New Jersey Mafia and the Philly Mob have crews that divvied up the rackets in the state. In fact, much of northern Jersey is under the New York mob's control, while Philly controls Atlantic City and south Jersey, and the New Jersey mob has practically everything in between. They've been there since TheRoaringTwenties and just never left, outlasting the mob in UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} and UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. Ask any New Jersey resident, and they'll tell you Jimmy Hoffa is buried in the Pine Barrens, duh -- and if he's not there, then he was buried underneath the stands of the old Giants Stadium.
28th Apr '18 12:10:58 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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** '''Seaside Heights:''' Yes, ''that'' Seaside. Creator/{{MTV}}'s ''Series/JerseyShore'' took place here, and the town is typically regarded as one of the trashier locales on the Shore, occasionally nicknamed "Sleazeside". Not like they're complaining; they love the tourist money. Got hammered good by Sandy, which took out part of the pier and flung the rollercoaster into the ocean. Locals here call tourists "bennies".
** '''Long Beach Island:''' Often called "LBI", this is a land of vacation homes commonly seen as one of the more family-friendly places on the Shore. The value of beachfront property can run in the millions of dollars on the northern part of the island, though the southern part is more middle-class, commercialized, and diverse; a common saying, popularized in TheSeventies, is that "the haves turn right (south) and the have mores turn left (north)". At various points, most recently 1962, severe storms have cut the island into two or more pieces, making one think that building levees and sea walls would be an idea with unanimous support; however, opposition from homeowners fearful that the sea walls would devalue their property meant that LBI had an incomplete sea wall system when Sandy hit, leaving it one of the most devastated areas on the Shore. Locals here call tourists "bennies". and/or "shoobies".

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** '''Seaside Heights:''' Yes, ''that'' Seaside. Creator/{{MTV}}'s ''Series/JerseyShore'' took place here, and the town is typically regarded as one of the trashier locales on the Shore, occasionally nicknamed "Sleazeside". Not like they're complaining; they love the tourist money. Got hammered good by Sandy, which took out part of the pier and flung the rollercoaster into the ocean.ocean, leaving behind [[https://media.npr.org/assets/img/2013/07/31/roller-coaster-2-c-mark-wilson-getty_wide-ae1e70625e6147a2bd18347306d75fff4e281609-s900-c85.jpg one of the most iconic shots]] of the hurricane's aftermath. Locals here call tourists "bennies".
** '''Long Beach Island:''' Often called "LBI", this is a land of vacation homes commonly seen as one of the more family-friendly places on the Shore. The value of beachfront property can run in the millions of dollars on the northern part of the island, though the southern part is more middle-class, commercialized, and diverse; a common saying, popularized in TheSeventies, is that "the haves turn right (south) and the have mores turn left (north)". At various points, most recently 1962, severe storms have cut the island into two or more pieces, making one think that building levees and sea walls would be an idea with unanimous support; however, opposition from homeowners fearful that the sea walls would devalue their property meant that LBI had an incomplete sea wall system when Sandy hit, leaving it one of the most devastated areas on the Shore. Locals here call tourists "bennies". "bennies" and/or "shoobies".
20th Apr '18 8:30:49 PM karstovich2
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* [[BigEater Chris]] [[BigFun Christie]] (born in Newark, raised in Livingston, resided in Mendham. Current governor of NJ; ran an abortive campaign for President in 2016. Notable for giving a scathing speech about UsefulNotes/BarackObama at the 2012 Republican National Convention, but dropping all partisanship after Hurricane Sandy hit--and ''crying'' in the speech thanking the Administration for its help, causing many GOP commentators to turn on him; apparently they think he was supposed to screw over his own state in order to keep trashing the other party, but this move garnered him significant support in his own state. He then squandered this goodwill by trying to secure endorsements he really didn't need from Democratic politicians (which led to the aforementioned Bridgegate) and then spending so much time out of state for the presidential campaign that it became a statewide joke.

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* [[BigEater Chris]] [[BigFun Christie]] (born in Newark, raised in Livingston, resided in Mendham. Current governor Governor of NJ; NJ 2010-18; ran an abortive campaign for President in 2016. Notable for giving a scathing speech about UsefulNotes/BarackObama at the 2012 Republican National Convention, but dropping all partisanship after Hurricane Sandy hit--and ''crying'' in the speech thanking the Administration for its help, causing many GOP commentators to turn on him; apparently they think he was supposed to screw over his own state in order to keep trashing the other party, but this move garnered him significant support in his own state. He then squandered this goodwill by trying to secure endorsements he really didn't need from Democratic politicians (which led to the aforementioned Bridgegate) and then spending so much time out of state for the presidential campaign that it became a statewide joke.
20th Apr '18 8:11:18 PM karstovich2
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Each half of the state has their own funnily-named 7-Eleven equivalent. As a general rule, the north has [=QuickChek=] and the south has Wawa. The former is Jersey-born; the latter began in Philadelphia's southwestern suburbs in Delaware County, PA, but quickly crossed the river and became deeply entrenched in South Jersey. One popular definition of Central Jersey is that it's the part of the state where the two stores compete, with the southernmost [=QuickCheks=] being in Toms River and Trenton and Wawas commonly found as far north as Woodbridge and Bridgewater (though isolated Wawas can be spotted all the way in Lodi and Parsippany). And if you can't find either of them, you'll go to a Krauszer's (a Middlesex County-based chain, but with stores from Trenton up through to Paterson), a Heritage's (a Gloucester County chain, with some stores in Camden, Salem, and Cumberland), a 7-Eleven (although compared to other places, they're somewhat uncommon), a local store/deli/bodega (particularly common in the cities; Newark and Jersey City particularly have a lot of them), or a gas station mini-mart (and again, depending on where you are, it might be an Amoco-turned-BP, or a Texaco-turned-Shell). Also, the Maryland-based Royal Farms has begun invading South Jersey, encroaching on Wawa's turf (attracting the fascination of NJ.com).

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Each half of the state has their own funnily-named 7-Eleven equivalent. As a general rule, the north has [=QuickChek=] and the south has Wawa. The former is Jersey-born; Jersey-born (with its first store in Dunellen and current HQ in Whitehouse Station); the latter began in Philadelphia's southwestern suburbs in Delaware County, PA, but quickly crossed the river and became deeply entrenched in South Jersey. One popular definition of Central Jersey is that it's the part of the state where the two stores compete, with the southernmost [=QuickCheks=] being in Toms River and Trenton and Wawas commonly found as far north as Woodbridge and Bridgewater (though isolated Wawas can be spotted all the way in Lodi and Parsippany). And if you can't find either of them, you'll go to a Krauszer's (a Middlesex County-based chain, but with stores from Trenton up through to Paterson), a Heritage's (a Gloucester County chain, with some stores in Camden, Salem, and Cumberland), a 7-Eleven (although compared to other places, they're somewhat uncommon), a local store/deli/bodega (particularly common in the cities; Newark and Jersey City particularly have a lot of them), or a gas station mini-mart (and again, depending on where you are, it might be an Amoco-turned-BP, or a Texaco-turned-Shell). Also, the Maryland-based Royal Farms has begun invading South Jersey, encroaching on Wawa's turf (attracting the fascination of NJ.com).
20th Apr '18 8:08:14 PM karstovich2
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Each half of the state has their own funnily-named 7-Eleven equivalent. As a general rule, the north has [=QuickChek=] and the south has Wawa; the latter store began in the Philadelphia suburbs, but quickly crossed the river and became deeply entrenched in South Jersey. One popular definition of Central Jersey is that it's the part of the state where the two stores compete, with the southernmost [=QuickCheks=] being in Toms River and Trenton and Wawas commonly found as far north as Woodbridge and Bridgewater (though isolated Wawas can be spotted all the way in Lodi and Parsippany). And if you can't find either of them, you'll go to a Krauszer's (a Middlesex County-based chain, but with stores from Trenton up through to Paterson), a Heritage's (a Gloucester County chain, with some stores in Camden, Salem, and Cumberland), a 7-Eleven (although compared to other places, they're somewhat uncommon), a local store/deli/bodega (particularly common in the cities; Newark and Jersey City particularly have a lot of them), or a gas station mini-mart (and again, depending on where you are, it might be an Amoco-turned-BP, or a Texaco-turned-Shell). Also, the Maryland-based Royal Farms has begun invading South Jersey, encroaching on Wawa's turf (attracting the fascination of NJ.com).

to:

Each half of the state has their own funnily-named 7-Eleven equivalent. As a general rule, the north has [=QuickChek=] and the south has Wawa; Wawa. The former is Jersey-born; the latter store began in the Philadelphia suburbs, Philadelphia's southwestern suburbs in Delaware County, PA, but quickly crossed the river and became deeply entrenched in South Jersey. One popular definition of Central Jersey is that it's the part of the state where the two stores compete, with the southernmost [=QuickCheks=] being in Toms River and Trenton and Wawas commonly found as far north as Woodbridge and Bridgewater (though isolated Wawas can be spotted all the way in Lodi and Parsippany). And if you can't find either of them, you'll go to a Krauszer's (a Middlesex County-based chain, but with stores from Trenton up through to Paterson), a Heritage's (a Gloucester County chain, with some stores in Camden, Salem, and Cumberland), a 7-Eleven (although compared to other places, they're somewhat uncommon), a local store/deli/bodega (particularly common in the cities; Newark and Jersey City particularly have a lot of them), or a gas station mini-mart (and again, depending on where you are, it might be an Amoco-turned-BP, or a Texaco-turned-Shell). Also, the Maryland-based Royal Farms has begun invading South Jersey, encroaching on Wawa's turf (attracting the fascination of NJ.com).
20th Apr '18 8:02:16 PM karstovich2
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In other words, New Jersey is home to the second-largest and third-densest city on the East Coast, it's just that it's divided into five counties and 141 separate municipalities... because Jersey likes "towns" and "local rule". This tradition goes back to the TheGayNineties, when the arrival of commuter rail led to the development of northern New Jersey's first suburbs, and conflict between new suburbanites and the "old guard" of farmers in the region (short version: the suburbanites wanted schools and infrastructure in their bedroom communities and local control over them, and the farmers didn't want to spend the tax dollars for it) led to the passage of new laws in 1894 that made it much easier for small communities to break away from townships and form "boroughs". Bergen County alone (where this trend was most concentrated) has seventy separate municipalities as a result of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boroughitis "boroughitis"]] that swept the state in 1894 and '95, and throughout the state, there exist many towns formed under the borough system that are completely surrounded by the townships they seceded from. This in turn made it hard for New Jersey's major urban centers to do what most other cities in the U.S. did: annex territory into the cities. This created problems for N.J.'s cities down the road (as it left them particularly vulnerable to white flight and other problems that caused narrowing of the tax base). Add this to the fact that New Jersey municipalities are forbidden from raising revenue through any means other than property taxes and you have a recipe for urban decline.

to:

In other words, New Jersey is home to the second-largest and third-densest city on the East Coast, it's just that it's divided into five counties and 141 separate municipalities... because Jersey likes "towns" and "local rule". This tradition goes back to the TheGayNineties, when the arrival of commuter rail led to the development of northern New Jersey's first suburbs, and conflict between new suburbanites and the "old guard" of farmers in the region (short version: the suburbanites wanted schools and infrastructure in their bedroom communities and local control over them, and the farmers didn't want to spend the tax dollars for it) led to the passage of new laws in 1894 that made it much easier for small communities to break away from townships and form "boroughs". Bergen County alone (where this trend was most concentrated) has seventy separate municipalities as a result of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boroughitis "boroughitis"]] that swept the state in 1894 and '95, and throughout the state, there exist many towns formed under the borough system that are completely surrounded by the townships they seceded from. This in turn made it hard for New Jersey's major urban centers to do what most other cities in the U.S. did: annex territory into the cities. This created problems for N.J.'s cities down the road (as it left them particularly vulnerable to white flight and other problems that caused narrowing of the tax base). Add this to the fact that New Jersey municipalities are forbidden from raising revenue through any means other than property taxes taxes[[note]]With one very narrow exception that allows Newark and ''maybe'' Jersey City to levy a payroll tax, but that's it[[/note]] and you have a recipe for urban decline.
20th Apr '18 7:59:35 PM karstovich2
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** '''Camden''', directly across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. From the late 1960s, it has been, as noted, a bit of a WretchedHive, with rampant crime, corruption, and general abject poverty. It wasn't always so, of course; Camden was once a prosperous working-to-middle-class industrial city, home to [[Creator/RCARecords RCA Victor]] (whose factories once consumed the Camden waterfront and have now been either demolished and turned into parking for Downtown Camden's few attractions, or refurbished into lofts and office space) and Campbell's Soup Company (which retains its HQ in town in a heavily-secured complex off 11th St., but closed down its factory decades ago). The city made the news in 2012 for breaking its own absurdly-high murder rate record; however, on the other hand, it made news in 2014 when the implementation of new policing methods (including--and [[SarcasmMode this is shocking]]--getting out of squad cars, walking beats, and getting to know the good citizens as people) apparently caused a sharp drop in crime (breaking up former open drug markets and seemingly leading to the lowest murder rate in years) and certain areas being cautiously scouted for potential redevelopment (the eventual hope, apparently, is to eventually turn it into Philadelphia's answer to Jersey City. Good luck with that.)

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** '''Camden''', directly across the Delaware River from Philadelphia. From the late 1960s, it has been, as noted, a bit of a WretchedHive, with rampant crime, corruption, and general abject poverty. It wasn't always so, of course; Camden was once a prosperous working-to-middle-class industrial city, home to [[Creator/RCARecords RCA Victor]] (whose factories once consumed the Camden waterfront and have now been either demolished and turned into parking for Downtown Camden's few attractions, or refurbished into lofts and office space) and Campbell's Soup Company (which retains its HQ in town in a heavily-secured complex off 11th St., but closed down its factory decades ago). The city made the news in 2012 for breaking its own absurdly-high murder rate record; however, on the other hand, it made news in 2014 when the implementation of new policing methods (including--and [[SarcasmMode this is shocking]]--getting out of squad cars, walking beats, and getting to know the good citizens as people) apparently caused a sharp drop in crime (breaking up former open drug markets and seemingly leading to the lowest murder rate in years) and certain areas being cautiously scouted for potential redevelopment (the eventual hope, apparently, is to eventually turn it into Philadelphia's answer to Jersey City. Good luck with that.)that). As of this writing (April 2018), there are office buildings rising on the Camden waterfront and the local satellite campus of Rutgers is buying a lot of (very cheap) land, so watch this space.
20th Apr '18 7:51:53 PM karstovich2
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This suburban trend has long colored New Jersey's politics. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, New Jersey was a solidly Republican state, with the large and growing numbers of suburbanites voting against the largely Democratic cities that they had moved out of. UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan won New Jersey by a greater margin than he had won nationally during both of his [[LandslideElection electoral landslides]], taking 60% of the vote in 1984. In TheNineties, though, the state began to swing to the left, the pivotal year being 1992 when New Jersey served as a key swing state that ultimately went to the Democrats. Much of this has been attributed to the rise of the fiscally moderate, socially liberal "New Democrats" ''a la'' UsefulNotes/BillClinton within the Democratic Party, and to the growing dominance of the Christian Right within the Republican Party; New Jersey's conservatives had long been of the more center-right, business-oriented, "Rockefeller Republican" variety rather than the "movement conservatism" of the post-Reagan Republican Party.[[note]]An early sign of this was in 1980, when independent candidate John B. Anderson, running as [[TakeAThirdOption a moderate alternative]] to both the unpopular UsefulNotes/JimmyCarter and to the arch-conservative Reagan, won 7.9% of the vote in New Jersey, a fair bit more than the 6.6% he had won nationally. Today, this can be seen in the state's current governor, Chris Christie, a leading moderate figure within the Republican Party whose career has been defined by compromise with the state's Democratic legislature. A good analogy to UsefulNotes/{{British politic|alSystem}}s would be that New Jersey would probably vote for the Lib Dems or New Labour if it were British.[[/note]] Today, New Jersey is a Democratic stronghold, especially in Presidential elections and in the "belt" running between UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity and UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, though the northwest and the Shore (outside Atlantic City and Asbury Park) vote reliably Republican, and the state overall is willing to elect center-right moderates as their governor (two recent examples being Christine Todd Whitman and Chris Christie--although Christie's name has become mud even in Republican circles on account of his hard fiscal line on police pensions, the abuse-of-office scandals associated with his 2013 reelection campaign, and his willingness to carry water for UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump[[note]]As noted below, New Jersey Republicans tend to look warily on the Donald, tending to be moderate suburbanites who mostly care about tax rates. South Jersey Republicans also tend to be cautious towards him because of his numerous misadventures in the Atlantic City casino industry.[[/note]]).

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This suburban trend has long colored New Jersey's politics. In TheSeventies and TheEighties, New Jersey was a solidly Republican state, with the large and growing numbers of suburbanites voting against the largely Democratic cities that they had moved out of. UsefulNotes/RonaldReagan won New Jersey by a greater margin than he had won nationally during both of his [[LandslideElection electoral landslides]], taking 60% of the vote in 1984. In TheNineties, though, the state began to swing to the left, the pivotal year being 1992 when New Jersey served as a key swing state that ultimately went to the Democrats. Much of this has been attributed to the rise of the fiscally moderate, socially liberal "New Democrats" ''a la'' UsefulNotes/BillClinton within the Democratic Party, and to the growing dominance of the Christian Right within the Republican Party; New Jersey's conservatives had long been of the more center-right, business-oriented, "Rockefeller Republican" variety rather than the "movement conservatism" of the post-Reagan Republican Party.[[note]]An early sign of this was in 1980, when independent candidate John B. Anderson, running as [[TakeAThirdOption a moderate alternative]] to both the unpopular UsefulNotes/JimmyCarter and to the arch-conservative Reagan, won 7.9% of the vote in New Jersey, a fair bit more than the 6.6% he had won nationally. Today, this can be seen in the state's current governor, Chris Christie, a leading moderate figure within the Republican Party whose career has been defined by compromise with the state's Democratic legislature. A good analogy to UsefulNotes/{{British politic|alSystem}}s would be that New Jersey would probably vote for the Lib Dems or New Labour if it were British.[[/note]] Today, New Jersey is a Democratic stronghold, especially in Presidential elections and in the "belt" running between UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity and UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}}, though the northwest and the Shore (outside Atlantic City and Asbury Park) vote reliably Republican, and the state overall is willing to elect center-right moderates as their governor (two recent examples being Christine Todd Whitman and Chris Christie--although Christie's name has become mud even in Republican circles on account of his hard fiscal line on police pensions, the abuse-of-office scandals associated with his 2013 reelection campaign, and his willingness to carry water for UsefulNotes/DonaldTrump[[note]]As noted below, noted, New Jersey Republicans tend to look warily on the Donald, tending to be moderate suburbanites who mostly care about tax rates. South Jersey Republicans also tend to be cautious towards him because of his numerous misadventures in the Atlantic City casino industry.[[/note]]).
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