History UsefulNotes / NewJersey

16th Apr '17 11:36:56 AM karstovich2
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** '''Little India''': A quick note: north-central Middlesex County, particularly Edison and Iselin,[[note]]Iselin being the northwestern portion of Woodbridge Township[[/note]] is heavily populated by Indian-Americans and others from the Subcontinent. The community formed as a result of the research and medical industries in the area (immediately northeast of New Brunswick, with its university and pharmaceutical and chemical companies--did we mention that Johnson & Johnson is headquartered in New Brunswick?), with Indian students and immigrant researchers who came in the 1970s-90s settling down and forming a community; today, Edison in particular is nearly 30% Indian. Since Indians tend to speak English, there isn't as much an issue of ballots being provided in...well...there's another problem (lots of languages in India), although Middlesex County does provide voting information in Gujarati. That said, the main street in Iselin is noted to always smell of curry, Indian languages are commonly spoken, and the Metropark station (the New Jersey Transit rail and Amtrak station around there) is usually festooned with ads (some written entirely in Hindi) for Indian television shows or other India-related products/services and will always have at least one Indian person on the platform during working hours. Always.

to:

** '''Little India''': A quick note: north-central Middlesex County, particularly Edison and Iselin,[[note]]Iselin being the northwestern portion of Woodbridge Township[[/note]] is heavily populated by Indian-Americans and others from the Subcontinent. The community formed as a result of the research and medical industries in the area (immediately northeast of New Brunswick, with its university and pharmaceutical and chemical companies--did we mention that Johnson & Johnson is headquartered in New Brunswick?), with Indian students and immigrant researchers who came in the 1970s-90s settling down and forming a community; today, Edison in particular is nearly 30% Indian. Since Indians tend to speak English, there isn't as much an issue of ballots being provided in...well...there's another problem (lots of languages in India), although Middlesex County does provide voting information in have some ballots with Gujarati. That said, the main street in Iselin is noted to always smell of curry, Indian languages are commonly spoken, and the Metropark station (the New Jersey Transit rail and Amtrak station around there) is usually festooned with ads (some written entirely in Hindi) for Indian television shows or other India-related products/services and will always have at least one Indian person on the platform during working hours. Always.
16th Apr '17 11:34:47 AM karstovich2
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** '''Little India''': A quick note: north-central Middlesex County, particularly Edison and Iselin,[[note]]Iselin being the northwestern portion of Woodbridge Township[[/note]] is heavily populated by Indian-Americans and others from the Subcontinent. The community formed as a result of the research and medical industries in the area (immediately northeast of New Brunswick, with its university and pharmaceutical and chemical companies--did we mention that Johnson & Johnson is headquartered in New Brunswick?), with Indian students and immigrant researchers who came in the 1970s-90s settling down and forming a community; today, Edison in particular is nearly 30% Indian. Since Indians tend to speak English, there isn't an issue of ballots being provided in...well...there's another problem (lots of languages in India). That said, the main street in Iselin is noted to always smell of curry, Indian languages are commonly spoken, and the Metropark station (the New Jersey Transit rail and Amtrak station around there) is usually festooned with ads (some written entirely in Hindi) for Indian television shows or other India-related products/services and will always have at least one Indian person on the platform during working hours. Always.

to:

** '''Little India''': A quick note: north-central Middlesex County, particularly Edison and Iselin,[[note]]Iselin being the northwestern portion of Woodbridge Township[[/note]] is heavily populated by Indian-Americans and others from the Subcontinent. The community formed as a result of the research and medical industries in the area (immediately northeast of New Brunswick, with its university and pharmaceutical and chemical companies--did we mention that Johnson & Johnson is headquartered in New Brunswick?), with Indian students and immigrant researchers who came in the 1970s-90s settling down and forming a community; today, Edison in particular is nearly 30% Indian. Since Indians tend to speak English, there isn't as much an issue of ballots being provided in...well...there's another problem (lots of languages in India).India), although Middlesex County does provide voting information in Gujarati. That said, the main street in Iselin is noted to always smell of curry, Indian languages are commonly spoken, and the Metropark station (the New Jersey Transit rail and Amtrak station around there) is usually festooned with ads (some written entirely in Hindi) for Indian television shows or other India-related products/services and will always have at least one Indian person on the platform during working hours. Always.
17th Mar '17 10:47:06 PM karstovich2
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In addition to the above counties, many people in Central Jersey count the northernmost part of Ocean County as part of Central Jersey. This is mainly because this sliver of land includes the community of Jackson Township, home of Six Flags Great Adventure (see below), as well as the beach town of Point Pleasant. South Jerseyans, naturally, consider it to be in South Jersey. A few people split the difference and say South Central New Jersey, but in their hearts, they know that they'll have to wait for [[CueTheFlyingPigs the Cubs to win the Series]] before most of New Jersey accepts such a thing.

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In addition to the above counties, many people in Central Jersey count the northernmost part of Ocean County as part of Central Jersey. This is mainly because this sliver of land includes the community of Jackson Township, home of Six Flags Great Adventure (see below), as well as the beach town of Point Pleasant. South Jerseyans, naturally, consider it to be in South Jersey. A few people split the difference and say South Central New Jersey, but in their hearts, they know that they'll have to wait for [[CueTheFlyingPigs the Cubs Lions to win the Series]] Super Bowl]] before most of New Jersey accepts such a thing.
17th Mar '17 10:38:42 PM karstovich2
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New Jersey is the fourth smallest state by land area in the US, but it is also the eleventh most populated and single most densely populated. It has a high level of ethnic and religious diversity, being home to Italians, Irish, Jews, [[UsefulNotes/{{Russia}} Russians]], Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, Muslims, [[UsefulNotes/{{Jamaica}} Jamaicans]], Haitians, [[UsefulNotes/{{Guyana}} Guyanese]], Trinidadians, etc. in large numbers. Its landscape is also highly diverse, especially for a state of its size, being home to forests, mountains, swamps, cliffs, white sand beaches, and miles of rolling farmland. It is the location of several military facilities, including one of the largest in the country, Joint Base [=McGuire=]-Dix-Lakehurst. It has the highest population density in the US, and combined with its [[UsefulNotes/NewJerseyTransit system of public transit]], it is easy to get anywhere. New Jersey is the second most affluent state in the US, possesses one of the most highly-regarded [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem education systems]] in the country, and has the lowest poverty rate in the nation. There are affluent suburbs, bustling cities, and lush dairy farms all within a few miles of each other. In short, it's one of the most diverse states, filled to the brim with a plethora of different cultures and lifestyles.

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New Jersey is the fourth smallest state by land area in the US, but it is also the eleventh most populated and single most densely populated. It has a high level of ethnic and religious diversity, being home to Italians, Irish, Jews, [[UsefulNotes/{{Russia}} Russians]], Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, Muslims, [[UsefulNotes/{{Jamaica}} Jamaicans]], Haitians, [[UsefulNotes/{{Guyana}} Guyanese]], Trinidadians, etc. in large numbers. Its landscape is also highly diverse, especially for a state of its size, being home to forests, mountains, swamps, cliffs, white sand beaches, and miles of rolling farmland. It is the location of several military facilities, including one of the largest in the country, Joint Base [=McGuire=]-Dix-Lakehurst. It has the highest population density in the US, and combined with its [[UsefulNotes/NewJerseyTransit system of public transit]], it is easy to get anywhere. (almost) anywhere.[[note]]The state's surprisingly-numerous rural areas are unsurprisingly not accessible by transit. Although it has to be said: is Sussex County ''really'' New Jersey?[[/note]] New Jersey is the second most affluent state in the US, possesses one of the most highly-regarded [[UsefulNotes/AmericanEducationalSystem education systems]] in the country, and has the lowest poverty rate in the nation. There are affluent suburbs, bustling cities, and lush dairy farms all within a few miles of each other. In short, it's one of the most diverse states, filled to the brim with a plethora of different cultures and lifestyles.
16th Mar '17 10:22:27 AM LaptopGuy
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* '''Central Jersey:''' To hear it from someone from the area, Central Jersey is a distinct region of the state consisting of the area covered by the Raritan Valley, in Hunterdon, Mercer, Somerset, Middlesex, and Monmouth counties. To hear it from someone from North or South Jersey, Central Jersey is a nonexistent entity that is really an extension of whichever side of Jersey the speaker isn't from (e.g. North Jersey residents consider it part of South Jersey, while South Jersey residents consider it part of North Jersey and NEITHER side wants to take credit for Trenton), and its residents all have an inferiority complex. (A good rule of thumb is when someone from Jersey City tells you you're in South Jersey, and someone from Cherry Hill tells you you're in North Jersey, despite both times being in the same place, then you're in Central) The site of the state capital, Trenton, as well as suburban sprawl ballooning out from both New York and Philly. If a story requires that the characters consult a brainy professor, this scene will often either take place at [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Princeton]], or elsewhere with a professor who teaches there. If not Princeton, then the main campus of Rutgers University, in New Brunswick, will do in a pinch. (Never Rutgers Newark,[[note]]Unless it's a law professor; then your only options are Rutgers Law School--which has a campus in Newark and a campus in Camden but nothing in New Brunswick--and Seton Hall, which despite being private doesn't have as strong a reputation as Rutgers Law. Princeton famously has no law school.[[/note]] or Montclair State University, and for good reason.)\\

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* '''Central Jersey:''' To hear it from someone from the area, Central Jersey is a distinct region of the state consisting of the area covered by the Raritan Valley, in Hunterdon, Mercer, Somerset, Middlesex, and Monmouth counties.counties, and occasionally Union county. To hear it from someone from North or South Jersey, Central Jersey is a nonexistent entity that is really an extension of whichever side of Jersey the speaker isn't from (e.g. North Jersey residents consider it part of South Jersey, while South Jersey residents consider it part of North Jersey and NEITHER side wants to take credit for Trenton), and its residents all have an inferiority complex. (A good rule of thumb is when someone from Jersey City tells you you're in South Jersey, and someone from Cherry Hill tells you you're in North Jersey, despite both times being in the same place, then you're in Central) The site of the state capital, Trenton, as well as suburban sprawl ballooning out from both New York and Philly. If a story requires that the characters consult a brainy professor, this scene will often either take place at [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Princeton]], or elsewhere with a professor who teaches there. If not Princeton, then the main campus of Rutgers University, in New Brunswick, will do in a pinch. (Never Rutgers Newark,[[note]]Unless it's a law professor; then your only options are Rutgers Law School--which has a campus in Newark and a campus in Camden but nothing in New Brunswick--and Seton Hall, which despite being private doesn't have as strong a reputation as Rutgers Law. Princeton famously has no law school.[[/note]] or Montclair State University, and for good reason.)\\



** '''Education''': As noted, Central Jersey is home to New Jersey's major educational institutions, Princeton University and Rutgers University. The two are just down Route 27 from each other and are only two stops apart on New Jersey Transit (from New Brunswick, you take the train to Princeton Junction and then the Dinky to Princeton proper), and there's something of a quiet rivalry between the two (with Princeton treating Rutgers as uncouth proles not to be given the time of day, and Rutgers treating Princeton as a bunch of rich snobbish assholes); they played the first-ever game of UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball in 1869, using rules that looked more like the bastard child of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]] and rugby than the modern game. (Rutgers won, by the way.) We would be remiss if we didn't note the nigh-universal consensus that Princeton, which has taken extensive steps to isolate itself in an effort to make it "nicer" is generally considered to only technically be part of New Jersey--and never mind that the Governor's official mansion, Drumthwacket, is in Princeton Borough. Also present, but usually ignored, is The College of New Jersey right outside Trenton, a public university that took Princeton's old name and is mainly focused on giving New Jersey's best and brightest a top-notch education at a reasonable price.

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** '''Education''': As noted, Central Jersey is home to New Jersey's major educational institutions, Princeton University and Rutgers University. The two are just down Route 27 from each other and are only two stops apart on New Jersey Transit (from New Brunswick, you take the train to Princeton Junction and then the Dinky to Princeton proper), and there's something of a quiet rivalry between the two (with Princeton treating Rutgers as uncouth proles not to be given the time of day, and Rutgers treating Princeton as a bunch of rich snobbish assholes); they played the first-ever game of UsefulNotes/AmericanFootball in 1869, using rules that looked more like the bastard child of [[UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball soccer]] and rugby than the modern game. (Rutgers won, by the way.) We would be remiss if we didn't note the nigh-universal consensus that Princeton, which has taken extensive steps to isolate itself in an effort to make it "nicer" is generally considered to only technically be part of New Jersey--and never mind that the Governor's official mansion, Drumthwacket, is in Princeton Borough. Also present, but usually ignored, is The College of New Jersey right outside Trenton, a public university that took Princeton's old name and is mainly focused on giving New Jersey's best and brightest a top-notch education at a reasonable price. The region's other universities are all local institutions, like Rider University, Monmouth University, and Thomas Edison State University.



* '''South Jersey:''' With the exception of the Shore, this area, like the Highlands, is rarely seen in the media, due to the fact that it's more closely associated with UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} than UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. Often shown as being poorer than the rest of the state, with the suburbs being more working-class. This is partially TruthInTelevision, but not exactly -- a visit to Cherry Hill, Mount Laurel, Moorestown, or Medford would quickly discredit this assumption (and ironically are all next to each other in some way, due to some weird borders). Home to two towns named [[Franchise/{{Halloween}} Haddonfield]] [[note]]Fun fact -- the Haddonfield in ''Film/{{Halloween 1978}}'' is actually named after the one in New Jersey, which is where Debra Hill, the co-writer of the film, was born and went to high school.[[/note]] [[note]]Another fun fact: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadrosaurus Hadrosaurus]]'' was discovered in and named after Haddonfield.[[/note]] and [[Franchise/FridayThe13th Voorhees]], which are served ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg along with Gibbsboro]]) [[http://www.aaroads.com/northeast/new_jersey200/i-295_nb_exit_032_01.jpg by the same freeway exit]]; note, however, that Haddonfield is a bit more comfortable. If producers need a {{Gangsterland}}, then Camden (in terms of crime rate, imagine a FunSize Detroit)[[note]]Actually, that doesn't even capture it; Detroit at least has hipsters trying to make the place slightly better[[/note]] is often used in place of Newark.\\

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* '''South Jersey:''' With the exception of the Shore, this area, like the Highlands, is rarely seen in the media, due to the fact that it's more closely associated with UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} than UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity. Often shown as being poorer than the rest of the state, with the suburbs being more working-class. This is partially TruthInTelevision, but not exactly -- a visit to Cherry Hill, Mount Laurel, Evesham, Haddonfield, Moorestown, or Medford would quickly discredit this assumption (and ironically are all next to each other in some way, due to some weird borders). Home to two towns named [[Franchise/{{Halloween}} Haddonfield]] [[note]]Fun fact -- the Haddonfield in ''Film/{{Halloween 1978}}'' is actually named after the one in New Jersey, which is where Debra Hill, the co-writer of the film, was born and went to high school.[[/note]] [[note]]Another fun fact: ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hadrosaurus Hadrosaurus]]'' was discovered in and named after Haddonfield.[[/note]] and [[Franchise/FridayThe13th Voorhees]], which are served ([[MyFriendsAndZoidberg along with Gibbsboro]]) [[http://www.aaroads.com/northeast/new_jersey200/i-295_nb_exit_032_01.jpg by the same freeway exit]]; note, however, that Haddonfield is a bit more comfortable. If producers need a {{Gangsterland}}, then Camden (in terms of crime rate, imagine a FunSize Detroit)[[note]]Actually, that doesn't even capture it; Detroit at least has hipsters trying to make the place slightly better[[/note]] is often used in place of Newark.\\



* Music/MyChemicalRomance (Jersey City)

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* Music/MyChemicalRomance (Jersey (members were raised in Belleville, but based in Jersey City)



* [[BigEater Chris]] [[BigFun Christie]] (born in Newark, raised in Livingston. Current governor of NJ; ran an abortive campaign for President in 2016. Notable for giving a scathing speech about UsefulNotes/BarackObama at the 2012 Republican National Convention, but dropping all partisanship after Hurricane Sandy hit--and ''crying'' in the speech thanking the Administration for its help, causing many GOP commentators to turn on him; apparently they think he was supposed to screw over his own state in order to keep trashing the other party, but this move garnered him significant support in his own state. He then squandered this goodwill by trying to secure endorsements he really didn't need from Democratic politicians (which led to the aforementioned Bridgegate) and then spending so much time out of state for the presidential campaign that it became a statewide joke.

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* Cory Booker (born in D.C., former mayor of Newark, now a Senator)
* [[BigEater Chris]] [[BigFun Christie]] (born in Newark, raised in Livingston.Livingston, resided in Mendham. Current governor of NJ; ran an abortive campaign for President in 2016. Notable for giving a scathing speech about UsefulNotes/BarackObama at the 2012 Republican National Convention, but dropping all partisanship after Hurricane Sandy hit--and ''crying'' in the speech thanking the Administration for its help, causing many GOP commentators to turn on him; apparently they think he was supposed to screw over his own state in order to keep trashing the other party, but this move garnered him significant support in his own state. He then squandered this goodwill by trying to secure endorsements he really didn't need from Democratic politicians (which led to the aforementioned Bridgegate) and then spending so much time out of state for the presidential campaign that it became a statewide joke.



* Richard Codey (born in Orange, but raised in West Orange, where a hockey arena is named for him; currently lives in Roseland)
* Jon Corzine (born in Illinois, raised id Hoboken)
* Tom Kean (born in New York City, but raised in Livingston; he was a former governor and head of the 9/11 Commission)
* Bob Menendez (born in New York City, raised in Union City, and currently living in Paramus)



* Gary Brolsma (the "Numa Numa" guy, from Saddle Brook)



* Dharun Ravi (from West Windsor, the plaintiff charged in the Tyler Clementi suicide case)



* Also, ThomasEdison and UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein both adopted New Jersey as their homes: Einstein lived in Princeton, where he taught, and as for Edison? Well, there's a reason that the town just northeast of New Brunswick is called Edison...

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* Also, ThomasEdison and UsefulNotes/AlbertEinstein both adopted New Jersey as their homes: Einstein lived in Princeton, where he taught, and as for Edison? Well, there's a reason that the town just northeast of New Brunswick is called Edison...
Edison (although he spent more time in West Orange)...
11th Mar '17 10:34:57 PM karstovich2
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* [[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]] (born in New York, but raised in Lawrenceville). Somewhat amusingly, he now lives in New York City, but his protege Creator/StephenColbert, born in Washington, DC and raised in South Carolina, lives in Montclair.

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* [[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]] (born in New York, but raised in Lawrenceville). Somewhat amusingly, For a long time, he now lives amusingly lived in New York City, but City while his protege Creator/StephenColbert, born in Washington, DC and raised in South Carolina, lives lived in Montclair.Montclair. Colbert is still in Montclair, but Stewart has since moved back to Jersey, settling on a large property in Middletown (not far from his idol Bruce Springsteen's horse farm in Colts Neck).



* [[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]], who grew up in Lawrence Township. Oddly enough, Stewart has chosen to raise his children in New York City, while his partner in comedic crime Creator/StephenColbert, from South Carolina, decided to settle in Montclair.

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* [[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]], who grew up in Lawrence Township. Oddly enough, Stewart has chosen to raise his children in New York City, while his partner in comedic crime Creator/StephenColbert, from South Carolina, decided to settle in Montclair.
11th Mar '17 10:30:16 PM karstovich2
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* Music/BruceSpringsteen (born in Long Branch, raised in Freehold Borough, currently lives in Colts Neck)

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* Music/BruceSpringsteen (born (a true Monmouth County boy: born in Long Branch, Branch; raised in Freehold Borough, Borough; launched his career in various Monmouth shore towns, but especially Asbury Park; currently lives in Colts Neck)
11th Mar '17 9:31:11 PM karstovich2
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** '''Little India''': A quick note: northeastern Middlesex County, particularly Edison and Iselin, is heavily populated by Indian-Americans and others from the Subcontinent. The community formed as a result of the research and medical industries in the area (immediately northeast of New Brunswick, with its university and pharmaceutical and chemical companies--did we mention that Johnson & Johnson is headquartered in New Brunswick?), with Indian students and immigrant researchers who came in the 1970s-90s settling down and forming a community; today, Edison in particular is nearly 30% Indian. Since Indians tend to speak English, there isn't an issue of ballots being provided in...well...there's another problem (lots of languages in India), but the main street in Iselin is noted to always smell of curry, Indian languages are commonly spoken, and the Metropark station (the New Jersey Transit rail and Amtrak station around there) is usually festooned with ads (some written entirely in Hindi) for Indian television shows or other India-related products/services and will always have at least one Indian person on the platform during working hours. Always.

to:

** '''Little India''': A quick note: northeastern north-central Middlesex County, particularly Edison and Iselin, Iselin,[[note]]Iselin being the northwestern portion of Woodbridge Township[[/note]] is heavily populated by Indian-Americans and others from the Subcontinent. The community formed as a result of the research and medical industries in the area (immediately northeast of New Brunswick, with its university and pharmaceutical and chemical companies--did we mention that Johnson & Johnson is headquartered in New Brunswick?), with Indian students and immigrant researchers who came in the 1970s-90s settling down and forming a community; today, Edison in particular is nearly 30% Indian. Since Indians tend to speak English, there isn't an issue of ballots being provided in...well...there's another problem (lots of languages in India), but India). That said, the main street in Iselin is noted to always smell of curry, Indian languages are commonly spoken, and the Metropark station (the New Jersey Transit rail and Amtrak station around there) is usually festooned with ads (some written entirely in Hindi) for Indian television shows or other India-related products/services and will always have at least one Indian person on the platform during working hours. Always.
11th Mar '17 9:17:44 PM karstovich2
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** '''Trenton''': As noted in other places, the state capital, and also the seat of Mercer County. Situated directly on the Delaware immediately across from Morrisville, Pennsylvania (making Trenton one of only two state capitals directly on a state border--the other is Carson City, Nevada, which borders California--and also one of the few cases where the city in New Jersey is bigger than the one outside it). Almost exactly halfway between New York and Philadelphia, it is a prime example of the confusion of Central Jersey. It's a fine example of the New Jersey melting pot, with a large Black community, as well as many Hispanics (especially Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, and Guatemalans) and a sizeable community of Haitians (the courts even have a number of Haitian Creole interpreters on retainer), and although White flight hit the city hard, the White community remains sizeable (although a substantial number of those technically live in Hamilton Township even though they have Trenton addresses--Mercer County political geography is confusing even by New Jersey standards). It is also a prime example of the rise and fall of New Jersey industry; its position between NYC and Philly originally made it a prime location for manufacturing (the city's motto is still "Trenton Makes, the World Takes"), industry has declined substantially. State government is now the main industry, and keeps the city on life support; as such, it hasn't fallen quite as hard as Newark, Camden, Paterson, or Atlantic City. A fun fact Trentonians like to talk about: Trenton was also capital of the US in November-December 1784.

to:

** '''Trenton''': As noted in other places, the state capital, and also the seat of Mercer County. Situated directly on the Delaware immediately across from Morrisville, Pennsylvania (making Trenton one of only two state capitals directly on a state border--the other is Carson City, Nevada, which borders California--and also one of the few cases where the city in New Jersey is bigger than the one outside it). Almost exactly halfway between New York and Philadelphia, it is a prime example of the confusion of Central Jersey. Jersey, being one of the few places with essentially equal numbers of New York and Philadelphia sports fans (beware the day the Giants play the Eagles!). It's also a fine example of the New Jersey melting pot, with a large Black community, as well as many Hispanics (especially Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, and Guatemalans) and a sizeable community of Haitians (the courts even have a number of Haitian Creole interpreters on retainer), and although White flight hit the city hard, the White community remains sizeable (although a substantial number of those technically live in Hamilton Township even though they have Trenton addresses--Mercer County political geography is confusing even by New Jersey standards). It is also a prime example of the rise and fall of New Jersey industry; its position between NYC and Philly originally made it a prime location for manufacturing (the city's motto is still "Trenton Makes, the World Takes"), industry has declined substantially. State government is now the main industry, and keeps the city on life support; as such, it hasn't fallen quite as hard as Newark, Camden, Paterson, or Atlantic City. A fun fact Trentonians like to talk about: Trenton was also capital of the US in November-December 1784.
11th Mar '17 9:14:49 PM karstovich2
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** '''Trenton''': As noted in other places, the state capital, and also the seat of Mercer County. Situated directly on the Delaware immediately across from Morrisville, Pennsylvania (making Trenton one of only two state capitals directly on a state border--the other is Carson City, Nevada, which borders California--and also one of the few cases where the city in New Jersey is bigger than the one outside it). Almost exactly halfway between New York and Philadelphia, it is a prime example of the confusion of Central Jersey. It's a fine example of the New Jersey melting pot, with a large Black community, as well as many Hispanics (especially Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, and Guatemalans) and a sizeable community of Haitians (the courts even have a Haitian Creole interpreter on salary), and although White flight hit the city hard, the White community remains sizeable (although a substantial number of those technically live in Hamilton Township even though they have Trenton addresses--Mercer County political geography is confusing even by New Jersey standards). It is also a prime example of the rise and fall of New Jersey industry; its position between NYC and Philly originally made it a prime location for manufacturing (the city's motto is still "Trenton Makes, the World Takes"), industry has declined substantially. State government is now the main industry, and keeps the city on life support; as such, it hasn't fallen quite as hard as Newark, Camden, Paterson, or Atlantic City. A fun fact Trentonians like to talk about: Trenton was also capital of the US in November-December 1784.

to:

** '''Trenton''': As noted in other places, the state capital, and also the seat of Mercer County. Situated directly on the Delaware immediately across from Morrisville, Pennsylvania (making Trenton one of only two state capitals directly on a state border--the other is Carson City, Nevada, which borders California--and also one of the few cases where the city in New Jersey is bigger than the one outside it). Almost exactly halfway between New York and Philadelphia, it is a prime example of the confusion of Central Jersey. It's a fine example of the New Jersey melting pot, with a large Black community, as well as many Hispanics (especially Dominicans, Puerto Ricans, and Guatemalans) and a sizeable community of Haitians (the courts even have a number of Haitian Creole interpreter interpreters on salary), retainer), and although White flight hit the city hard, the White community remains sizeable (although a substantial number of those technically live in Hamilton Township even though they have Trenton addresses--Mercer County political geography is confusing even by New Jersey standards). It is also a prime example of the rise and fall of New Jersey industry; its position between NYC and Philly originally made it a prime location for manufacturing (the city's motto is still "Trenton Makes, the World Takes"), industry has declined substantially. State government is now the main industry, and keeps the city on life support; as such, it hasn't fallen quite as hard as Newark, Camden, Paterson, or Atlantic City. A fun fact Trentonians like to talk about: Trenton was also capital of the US in November-December 1784.
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