History UsefulNotes / NewJersey

31st Jul '17 9:25:58 PM karstovich2
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* Kim Guadagno (born in Iowa, moved to Monmouth Beach after marrying her husband; first Lieutenant Governor of N.J. after the whole [=McGreevey=] debacle convinced everyone that having the Senate President take over as governor was just confusing; other than that, mostly notable for being the Republican sacrificial lamb in the 2017 gubernatorial election and for the [[http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/02/read_the_note_michael_guadagno_sent_to_lieutenant.html cute letter]] her husband (a respected jurist on the state Superior Court, Appellate Division) sent her when he reached his mandatory retirement at age 70.)

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* Kim Guadagno (born in Iowa, moved to Monmouth Beach after marrying her husband; first Lieutenant Governor of N.J. after the whole [=McGreevey=] debacle convinced everyone that having the Senate President take over as governor was just confusing; other than that, mostly notable for being the Republican sacrificial lamb in the 2017 gubernatorial election and for the [[http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/02/read_the_note_michael_guadagno_sent_to_lieutenant.html cute letter]] her husband (a respected jurist on the state Superior Court, Appellate Division) sent her when he reached his mandatory retirement at age 70.)
31st Jul '17 9:24:48 PM karstovich2
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* Richard Codey (born in Orange, but raised in West Orange, where a hockey arena is named for him; currently lives in Roseland)
* Jon Corzine (born in Illinois, raised id Hoboken)

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* Richard Codey (born in Orange, but raised in West Orange, where a hockey arena is named for him; currently lives in Roseland)
* Jon Corzine (born in Illinois, raised id in Hoboken)



* [[CaughtWithYourPantsDown Jim McGreevey]] (Jersey City, then Metuchen)

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* [[CaughtWithYourPantsDown Jim McGreevey]] (Jersey City, then Metuchen)Metuchen: Notable for having come out as gay in the same speech in which he admitted that the clearly-unqualified Israeli man he had appointed as his homeland-security advisor was his lover and also declared that he would be resigning the governorship, all while [[TheBeard his wife]] stood beside him in shock)
* Richard Codey (born in Orange, but raised in West Orange, where a hockey arena is named for him; currently lives in Roseland; long-time State Senate President notable mostly for having been Governor after Jim [=McGreevey=] resigned, after which he wrote a political memoir entitled ''[[SelfDeprecation Me, Governor?]]'')
* Kim Guadagno (born in Iowa, moved to Monmouth Beach after marrying her husband; first Lieutenant Governor of N.J. after the whole [=McGreevey=] debacle convinced everyone that having the Senate President take over as governor was just confusing; other than that, mostly notable for being the Republican sacrificial lamb in the 2017 gubernatorial election and for the [[http://www.nj.com/politics/index.ssf/2017/02/read_the_note_michael_guadagno_sent_to_lieutenant.html cute letter]] her husband (a respected jurist on the state Superior Court, Appellate Division) sent her when he reached his mandatory retirement at age 70.)
30th Jul '17 9:31:40 PM karstovich2
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Residents are known to react even worse to the standard New Jersey jokes. The Turnpike has very few exits to the southern half of the state (and the Parkway has none outside of the Shore), and the near-absence of chemical and industrial plants outside of the immediate vicinity of Philadelphia results in little pollution. Plus, there are still many, many thriving farms in the area (it's home to the regionally-famous Jersey tomato, much if not most of New Jersey's large cranberry industry, and a substantial blueberry crop, as well as a number of decent wineries), as it is relatively undeveloped outside of the Shore and the Delaware Valley, lending some credence to the state nickname that so many seem to think is ironic -- "The Garden State."\\

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Residents are known to react even worse to the standard New Jersey jokes. The Turnpike has very few exits to the southern half of the state (and the Parkway has none outside of the Shore), and the near-absence of chemical and industrial plants outside of the immediate vicinity of Philadelphia results in little pollution. Plus, there are still many, many thriving farms in the area (it's home to the regionally-famous Jersey tomato, the also-regionally-famous Jersey asparagus, much if not most of New Jersey's large cranberry industry, and a substantial blueberry crop, as well as a number of decent wineries), as it is relatively undeveloped outside of the Shore and the Delaware Valley, lending some credence to the state nickname that so many seem to think is ironic -- "The Garden State."\\
30th Jul '17 9:21:03 PM karstovich2
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* Creator/JanetEvanovich (South River)

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* Creator/JanetEvanovich [[Literature/StephaniePlum Janet Evanovich]] (South River)
30th Jul '17 9:19:15 PM karstovich2
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Added DiffLines:

* Creator/WilliamCarlosWilliams (born, raised, and lived in Rutherford, but associated with nearby Paterson; he practiced pediatrics and family medicine at Passaic General Hospital and wrote his masterwork ''Paterson'' about the city)
* Creator/AllenGinsberg (born in Newark, raised in Paterson)
30th Jul '17 9:04:25 PM karstovich2
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Yes, diners. The Great American GreasySpoon is [[SeriousBusiness practically a religion]] in New Jersey. No, seriously, you go to eat at a diner "after church" on Sundays, even if you aren't religious (or even Christian) and for you "church" consists of "sleeping off a hangover." Each town--remember that business about New Jersey liking towns?--has at least one diner; in "large cities," it's every neighborhood, but that's the same idea. If you value your life (or at least your hearing or the absence of boots from your rectum) don't tell a native New Jerseyan that Denny's, IHOP, or (God forbid) Waffle House is a diner -- a diner must be a small, independent business, owned and operated by an immigrant, his son, his grandson, or his great-grandson.[[note]]Presumably in a little while we'll be adding in "great-great grandson" and so on, but you get the gist.[[/note]] Said immigrant is preferably Greek, although a Russian or an Ashkenazi Jew will do in a pinch. If the owner is Greek, there should be some element of Greek kitsch in the decor; all-out faux-marble columns and pediments aren't necessary, but at least put a meandering border or some olive branches somewhere. Furthermore, it must generally be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, ready to serve customers whether they're heading to work or school in the morning, coming home from such in the late afternoon, or heading to and from the club late at night.[[note]]Short closing hours--closing from around midnight or 2:00 until 6AM--on weekdays are acceptable in some areas with lower population densities, like much of South Jersey.[[/note]]

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Yes, diners. The Great American GreasySpoon is [[SeriousBusiness practically a religion]] in New Jersey. No, seriously, you go to eat at a diner "after church" on Sundays, even if you aren't religious (or even Christian) and for you "church" consists of "sleeping off a hangover." Each town--remember that business about New Jersey liking towns?--has at least one diner; in "large cities," it's every neighborhood, but that's the same idea. If you value your life (or at least your hearing or the absence of boots from your rectum) don't tell a native New Jerseyan that Denny's, IHOP, or (God forbid) Waffle House is a diner -- a diner must be a small, independent business, owned and operated by an immigrant, his son, his grandson, or his great-grandson.[[note]]Presumably in a little while we'll be adding in "great-great grandson" and so on, and of course daughters, granddaughters, great-grand-daughters, etc., also count, but you get the gist.[[/note]] Said immigrant is preferably Greek, although a Russian or an Ashkenazi Jew will do in a pinch. If the owner is Greek, there should be some element of Greek kitsch in the decor; all-out faux-marble columns and pediments aren't necessary, but at least put a meandering border or some olive branches somewhere. Furthermore, it must generally be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, ready to serve customers whether they're heading to work or school in the morning, coming home from such in the late afternoon, or heading to and from the club late at night.[[note]]Short closing hours--closing from around midnight or 2:00 until 6AM--on weekdays are acceptable in some areas with lower population densities, like much of South Jersey.[[/note]]
30th Jul '17 9:00:05 PM karstovich2
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Definitions of South Jersey will vary depending on who you ask. Some will define the region as everything south of Interstate 195. Others will draw a line starting just south of Trenton and ending just north of Atlantic City, and classify South Jersey as everything south of that line. Many in Monmouth County will make the cutoff for South Jersey anything south of Toms River in Ocean County[[note]]A definition that conveniently leaves out Point Pleasant and Six Flags Great Adventure, likely so that Central Jersey can count that little sliver of Ocean County as its own.[[/note]], while many people in South Jersey will make the cutoff at Howell Township in Monmouth County instead, a definition that follows county lines more neatly. Central Jersey partisans will frequently say the county lines don't matter and define South Jersey as everything south of Interstate 195, which runs from just south of Bordentown in Burlington County to Belmar in Monmouth. (The same Central Jersey people say North Jersey starts at about Interstate 78, specifically the part that runs from Newark Airport to Philipsburg in Warren County.) A few people go so far as to count everything south of Newark as South Jersey, a definition that includes New Brunswick and even Elizabeth. Needless to say, the distinction causes a lot of arguments within the state.

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Definitions of South Jersey will vary depending on who you ask. Some will define the region as everything south of Interstate 195. 195, which runs from just south of Bordentown in Burlington County to Belmar in Monmouth; this definition is popular among Central Jersey partians, as it gives some room for the unique identity they claim. (The same Central Jersey people say North Jersey starts at about Interstate 78, specifically the part that runs from just north of Newark Airport to Philipsburg in Warren County.) Others will draw a line starting just south of Trenton and ending just north of Atlantic City, and classify South Jersey as everything south of that line. Many in Monmouth County will make the cutoff for South Jersey anything south of Toms River in Ocean County[[note]]A definition that conveniently leaves out Point Pleasant and Six Flags Great Adventure, likely so that Central Jersey can count that little sliver of Ocean County as its own.[[/note]], while many people in South Jersey will make the cutoff at Howell Township in Monmouth County instead, a definition that follows county lines more neatly. Central Jersey partisans will frequently say the county lines don't matter and define South Jersey as everything south of Interstate 195, which runs from just south of Bordentown in Burlington County to Belmar in Monmouth. (The same Central Jersey people say North Jersey starts at about Interstate 78, specifically the part that runs from Newark Airport to Philipsburg in Warren County.) A few people go so far as to count everything south of Newark as South Jersey, a definition that includes New Brunswick and even Elizabeth. Needless to say, the distinction causes a lot of arguments within the state.
30th Jul '17 8:56:03 PM karstovich2
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Definitions of South Jersey will vary depending on who you ask. Some will define the region as everything south of Interstate 195. Others will draw a line starting just south of Trenton and ending just north of Atlantic City, and classify South Jersey as everything south of that line. Many in Monmouth County will make the cutoff for South Jersey anything south of Toms River in Ocean County[[note]]A definition that conveniently leaves out Point Pleasant and Six Flags Great Adventure, likely so that Central Jersey can count that little sliver of Ocean County as its own.[[/note]], while many people in South Jersey will make the cutoff at Howell Township in Monmouth County instead, a definition that follows county lines more neatly. A few people go so far as to count everything south of Newark as South Jersey, a definition that includes New Brunswick and even Elizabeth. Needless to say, the distinction causes a lot of arguments within the state.

to:

Definitions of South Jersey will vary depending on who you ask. Some will define the region as everything south of Interstate 195. Others will draw a line starting just south of Trenton and ending just north of Atlantic City, and classify South Jersey as everything south of that line. Many in Monmouth County will make the cutoff for South Jersey anything south of Toms River in Ocean County[[note]]A definition that conveniently leaves out Point Pleasant and Six Flags Great Adventure, likely so that Central Jersey can count that little sliver of Ocean County as its own.[[/note]], while many people in South Jersey will make the cutoff at Howell Township in Monmouth County instead, a definition that follows county lines more neatly. Central Jersey partisans will frequently say the county lines don't matter and define South Jersey as everything south of Interstate 195, which runs from just south of Bordentown in Burlington County to Belmar in Monmouth. (The same Central Jersey people say North Jersey starts at about Interstate 78, specifically the part that runs from Newark Airport to Philipsburg in Warren County.) A few people go so far as to count everything south of Newark as South Jersey, a definition that includes New Brunswick and even Elizabeth. Needless to say, the distinction causes a lot of arguments within the state.
7th Jul '17 7:19:07 AM HasturHasturHastur
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* Cognitive (Jobbstown)

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* Cognitive Music/{{Cognitive}} (Jobbstown)
19th Jun '17 7:22:58 PM qnncwn
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** '''Ocean City:''' Located on an island in northern Cape May County, OC is considered one of, if not the best family friendly resort town in the country. Originally founded as a Christian retreat after the Civil War, it's still a dry town so residents have to buy liquor on the mainland. The city's biggest attraction is it's 2 1/2 mile boardwalk containing shops, restaurants, mini golf, amusement parks, and a waterpark. [[Main/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphiaS07E02TheGangGoesToTheJerseyShore Its Always Sunny]] Locals here call tourists "shoobies".

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** '''Ocean City:''' Located on an island in northern Cape May County, OC is considered one of, if not the best family friendly resort town in the country. Originally founded as a Christian retreat after the Civil War, it's still a dry town so residents have to buy liquor on the mainland. The city's biggest attraction is it's 2 1/2 mile boardwalk containing shops, restaurants, mini golf, amusement parks, and a waterpark. [[Main/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphiaS07E02TheGangGoesToTheJerseyShore [[Recap/ItsAlwaysSunnyInPhiladelphiaS07E02TheGangGoesToTheJerseyShore Its Always Sunny]] filmed an episode here which the final cut the city government understandably doesn't approve of. Locals here call tourists "shoobies".
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.NewJersey