History UsefulNotes / MLBTeams

11th Jun '16 11:15:26 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained surprisingly competitive; they won another division title in 2010, came out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011, and made it to the playoffs again in 2013. Since then, they've fallen back down to earth, but can still punch well above their weight in any given game; basically, the Rays are about as good as a team can be while still technically being mediocre. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm about going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] doesn't help their situation, not to mention the fact that they've had to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York, plus some strong Toronto and Baltimore squads. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area, which wasn't helped by the Rays effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens during their first decade while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years.

to:

* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained surprisingly competitive; they won another division title in 2010, came out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011, and made it to the playoffs again in 2013. Since then, they've fallen back down to earth, but can still punch well above their weight in any given game; basically, the current Rays are about as good as a team can be while still technically being mediocre. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm about going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] doesn't help their situation, not to mention the fact that they've had to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York, plus some strong Toronto and Baltimore squads. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area, which wasn't helped by the Rays effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens during their first decade while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years.
11th Jun '16 11:14:09 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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11th Jun '16 11:11:53 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Baltimore}} Orioles''': Although traditionally one of the flagship franchises of Baseball, they entered a DorkAge that previously seemed to have no end under the "leadership" of Peter Angelos, who was considered the most reviled owner in baseball until Miami Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria managed to take that title for himself with his 2012 Fire Sale. Since taking over the Orioles in 1993, Angelos' tremendous incompetence has turned a once proud franchise into the laughingstock of baseball. Almost everything he does makes you say WhatAnIdiot. They had 14 consecutive losing seasons, topped only by the Pirates' streak of 20 seasons. In 2012, they finally seemed to make it back to respectability by making it to the playoffs and winning the first ever AL Wild Card game against the Texas Rangers. In 2014, they won their division in a runaway (bear in mind that they play in the same division as the Yankees, Red Sox, and Rays), and swept the heavily favored Tigers in the Division Series before falling to the upstart Royals in the ALCS. The team's most famous players, historically, are super-fielder Brooks Robinson and "Iron Man" Cal Ripken Jr, both Hall-of-Famers who played their entire careers with the Orioles. The team's glory years were 1966-1983, when most of the franchise's best players were at their peak and the manager was the intelligent but famously hot-tempered Earl Weaver. Prior to 1953, the club was known as the St. Louis Browns and even then were mostly associated with losing, though they did manage a single World Series appearance in 1944 where they lost to in-town rivals the St. Louis Cardinals. During this era the Browns fielded the shortest player in baseball history, 3'7" midget Eddie Gaedel, who took one at-bat as a publicity stunt. The Browns years are something of an OldShame for Baltimore, as the Orioles do not recognize or commemorate any of their statistics or records from their time in St. Louis, and instead leave it to the Cardinals to honor the "Brownies." They currently play at Camden Yards, widely considered one of the most beautiful stadiums in the league. Camden Yards was, when built, a faux-retro baseball-only stadium that was, over the next decade or so, emulated league-wide by teams looking for a new stadium; previously, many teams (particularly the Braves, Cardinals, Reds, Pirates, and Phillies) played in bland, circular concrete structures built for multiple sports.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Baltimore}} Orioles''': Although traditionally one of the flagship franchises of Baseball, they entered a DorkAge that previously seemed to have no end under the "leadership" of Peter Angelos, who was considered the most reviled owner in baseball until Miami Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria managed to take that title for himself with his 2012 Fire Sale. Since taking over the Orioles in 1993, Angelos' tremendous incompetence has turned a once proud franchise into the laughingstock of baseball. Almost everything he does makes you say WhatAnIdiot. They had 14 consecutive losing seasons, topped only by the Pirates' streak of 20 seasons. In 2012, they finally seemed to make it back to respectability by making it to the playoffs and winning the first ever AL Wild Card game against the Texas Rangers. In 2014, they won their division in a runaway (bear in mind that they play in runaway, despite sharing it with three of the same division as the Yankees, previous season's strongest teams (Yankees, Red Sox, and Rays), and swept the heavily favored Tigers in the Division Series before falling to the upstart Royals in the ALCS. The team's most famous players, historically, players historically are super-fielder Brooks Robinson and "Iron Man" Cal Ripken Jr, both Hall-of-Famers who played their entire careers with the Orioles. The team's glory years were 1966-1983, when most of the franchise's best players were at their peak and the manager was the intelligent but famously hot-tempered Earl Weaver. Prior to 1953, the club was known as the St. Louis Browns and even then were mostly associated with losing, though they did manage a single World Series appearance in 1944 where they lost to in-town rivals the St. Louis Cardinals. During this era the Browns fielded the shortest player in baseball history, 3'7" midget Eddie Gaedel, who took one at-bat as a publicity stunt. The Browns years are something of an OldShame for Baltimore, as the Orioles do not recognize or commemorate any of their statistics or records from their time in St. Louis, and instead leave it to the Cardinals to honor the "Brownies." They currently play at Camden Yards, widely considered one of the most beautiful stadiums in the league. Camden Yards was, when built, a faux-retro baseball-only stadium that was, over the next decade or so, emulated league-wide by teams looking for a new stadium; previously, many teams (particularly the Braves, Cardinals, Reds, Pirates, and Phillies) played in bland, circular concrete structures built for multiple sports.



* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained competitive, winning another division in 2010 and coming out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011. How long they can keep this up, however, remains to be seen. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm to going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] don't help, not to mention the fact that they have to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area. It didn't help that the team was mired in last place and downright horrible for the first ten years of their existence, effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years.
* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the SkyDome, which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. Today, Toronto performs like a smallish-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to much higher taxes than the U.S., and that they have to pay income taxes to both Canada and America, as opposed to teams located in US states with no income tax. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League Eastern division, where they're forced to compete against perennial powerhouses like the Yankees, the Red Sox, and the recently good Tampa Bay Rays. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.

to:

* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained competitive, winning surprisingly competitive; they won another division title in 2010 and coming 2010, came out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011. How long they 2011, and made it to the playoffs again in 2013. Since then, they've fallen back down to earth, but can keep this up, however, remains to still punch well above their weight in any given game; basically, the Rays are about as good as a team can be seen. while still technically being mediocre. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm to about going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] don't help, doesn't help their situation, not to mention the fact that they have they've had to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York. York, plus some strong Toronto and Baltimore squads. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area. It didn't help that area, which wasn't helped by the team was mired in last place and downright horrible for the first ten years of their existence, Rays effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens during their first decade while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years.
* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the SkyDome, [=SkyDome=], which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. Today, Toronto performs The Jays tend to operate like a smallish-market mid-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to it having much higher taxes than the U.S., and US, not to mention that they have to pay income taxes to both Canada and America, as opposed to teams if they signed for a team located in a US states state with no income tax. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League Eastern division, where they're they been forced to compete against not just perennial powerhouses like the Yankees, Yankees and the Red Sox, but some pretty strong Rays and the recently good Tampa Bay Rays.Orioles teams as well. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.
11th Jun '16 9:16:03 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships), undisputed leader of the NL Central and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted, highly-racist,highly-annoying, and [[FanDumb highly-knowledgable]] fanbase (it is not uncommon for them to applaud the opposing team or one of their players should they do something impressive), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Their fanbase is not only incredibly devoted, but incredibly ''nice'' - see the booing example above - though there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola, and Jack Buck. (Jack's son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships), undisputed leader of the NL Central championships) and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted, highly-racist,highly-annoying, and [[FanDumb highly-knowledgable]] highly-devoted fanbase (it is not uncommon for them to applaud (not surprising given that the opposing team or one of their players should they do something impressive), Cards are ''by far'' the city's most consistently good sports team), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Their Though their fanbase is not only incredibly devoted, but incredibly ''nice'' - see the booing example above - though has a reputation for niceness and knowledgeability, there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years.years, who point that St. Louis [[FanDumb has plenty of annoying racists and idiots too]]. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola, and Jack Buck. (Jack's son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).
6th Jun '16 11:29:32 PM MJaxon
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* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships), undisputed leader of the NL Central and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted and [[ViewersAreGeniuses highly-knowledgable]] fanbase (it is not uncommon for them to applaud the opposing team or one of their players should they do something impressive), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Their fanbase is not only incredibly devoted, but incredibly ''nice'' - see the booing example above - though there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola, and Jack Buck. (Jack's son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships), undisputed leader of the NL Central and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted highly-devoted, highly-racist,highly-annoying, and [[ViewersAreGeniuses [[FanDumb highly-knowledgable]] fanbase (it is not uncommon for them to applaud the opposing team or one of their players should they do something impressive), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Their fanbase is not only incredibly devoted, but incredibly ''nice'' - see the booing example above - though there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola, and Jack Buck. (Jack's son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).
6th Jun '16 11:25:00 PM MJaxon
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the SkyDome, which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. Today, Toronto performs like a smallish-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to much higher taxes than the U.S. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League Eastern division, where they're forced to compete against perennial powerhouses like the Yankees, the Red Sox, and the recently good Tampa Bay Rays. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the SkyDome, which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. Today, Toronto performs like a smallish-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to much higher taxes than the U.S. , and that they have to pay income taxes to both Canada and America, as opposed to teams located in US states with no income tax. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League Eastern division, where they're forced to compete against perennial powerhouses like the Yankees, the Red Sox, and the recently good Tampa Bay Rays. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.
30th May '16 7:54:44 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minnesota]] Twins''': Originally the Washington Senators and one of the original eight American League teams, the Twins (who had lost a World Series in 1965) won the World Series in 1987 and 1991 before entering a bad stretch that saw them nearly be disbanded (along with the Montreal Expos). The only thing that kept them from being contracted was the lease they had with the city of Minneapolis. Then, go figure, they started winning, and have become a perennial threat in the AL Central during the 2000s (although success in the playoffs has been harder to come by). A common compliment said about the Twins is their seemingly bottomless farm system, which has allowed them to remain reasonably competitive even as star players leave town for big city riches. They are also often called "scrappy", with a habit of climbing back into things when least expected that led White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen to call them "The Piranhas," as their team at the time did not have one single "slugger" but a lot of "little" players chipping away at the edges.[[note]]This is, truth be told, an old technique, known as "small ball" today and "inside baseball" historically, popular in the "dead-ball era" from about 1900-1919.[[/note]]

to:

* The '''[[UsefulNotes/TwinCities Minnesota]] Twins''': Originally the Washington Senators and one of the original eight American League teams, the Twins (who had lost a World Series in 1965) won the World Series in 1987 and 1991 before entering a bad stretch that saw them nearly be disbanded (along with the Montreal Expos). The only thing that kept them from being contracted was the lease they had with the city of Minneapolis. Then, go figure, they started winning, and have become were a perennial threat in the AL Central during the 2000s (although success in the playoffs has been harder to come by). A common compliment said about the Twins is their seemingly bottomless farm system, which has allowed them to remain reasonably competitive even as star players leave town for big city riches. They are also often called "scrappy", with a habit of climbing back into things when least expected that led White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen to call them "The Piranhas," as their team at the time did not have one single "slugger" but a lot of "little" players chipping away at the edges.[[note]]This is, truth be told, an old technique, known as "small ball" today and "inside baseball" historically, popular in the "dead-ball era" from about 1900-1919.[[/note]]
1st May '16 5:19:47 AM arsepoetica
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained competitive, winning another division in 2010 and coming out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011. How long they can keep this up, however, remains to be seen. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm to going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] don't help, not to mention the fact that they have to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York.

to:

* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained competitive, winning another division in 2010 and coming out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011. How long they can keep this up, however, remains to be seen. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm to going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] don't help, not to mention the fact that they have to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area. It didn't help that the team was mired in last place and downright horrible for the first ten years of their existence, effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years.
27th Apr '16 4:02:10 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's was owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's was the Mariners were owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
27th Apr '16 4:01:42 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently was owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}.Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
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