History UsefulNotes / MLBTeams

11th Feb '16 2:15:17 AM Mdumas43073
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The current defending World Series champions (Best team in Major League Baseball) are the Kansas City Royals.
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The current defending World Series (and, therefore, MLB) champions (Best team in Major League Baseball) are the Kansas City Royals.
24th Jan '16 10:18:38 PM KYCubbie
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Damn Yankees was written in 1955... making it over 60 years old.
* The '''[[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity New York]] Yankees''': If you can name only one baseball team, it probably is this one. Being the most successful team in the World Series era (27 titles) and the fact that it is based in the BigApplesauce have combined to make the Yankees the most popular team in America.... and the most hated team in America. You must, by internet law, either [[{{Hatedom}} hate them with a passion that rivals the love you have of your own team]] or be an [[FanDumb obnoxious]], [[UnpleasableFanbase unpleasable]] pinstripe-wearer. An entire industry exists of anti-Yankee media, and although primarily centered in UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, it thrives throughout North America, including New York itself (like the primarily pro-Mets ''Daily News''). The same thing goes for pro-Yankee media (''especially'' the ''New York Post''). ''Easily'' the BigBad of Major League Baseball. (And CreatorsPet too: wherever you are in America, like 'em or not, odds are there's a Yankee game on the tube.) Team owners [[BigScrewedUpFamily George Steinbrenner and his sons]] are, however, universally considered an example of EvilOverlord (or at least a MeanBoss), while Lou Gehrig is universally beloved. This is not a new phenomenon. The play ''Damn Yankees!'', about a man who hates them so much he sells his soul to the Devil to beat them, was written over fifty years ago. Choked in game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, allowing the Red Sox to make the first 0-3 comeback in baseball history and win their first Series title in 86 years. Red Sox fans [[NeverLiveItDown will never let them forget this]]. Notable for having not one (Ruth), not two (Gehrig), not three ([=DiMaggio=]), but four (Mickey Mantle) names in the argument for best baseball player ever. Their 27 World Series championships make them both the most successful team in Major League Baseball, AND North American professional sports. Their current GM is Brian [[MeaningfulName Cashman]].
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity New York]] Yankees''': If you can name only one baseball team, it probably is this one. Being the most successful team in the World Series era (27 titles) and the fact that it is based in the BigApplesauce have combined to make the Yankees the most popular team in America.... and the most hated team in America. You must, by internet law, either [[{{Hatedom}} hate them with a passion that rivals the love you have of your own team]] or be an [[FanDumb obnoxious]], [[UnpleasableFanbase unpleasable]] pinstripe-wearer. An entire industry exists of anti-Yankee media, and although primarily centered in UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, it thrives throughout North America, including New York itself (like the primarily pro-Mets ''Daily News''). The same thing goes for pro-Yankee media (''especially'' the ''New York Post''). ''Easily'' the BigBad of Major League Baseball. (And CreatorsPet too: wherever you are in America, like 'em or not, odds are there's a Yankee game on the tube.) Team owners [[BigScrewedUpFamily George Steinbrenner and his sons]] are, however, universally considered an example of EvilOverlord (or at least a MeanBoss), while Lou Gehrig is universally beloved. This is not a new phenomenon. The play ''Damn Yankees!'', about a man who hates them so much he sells his soul to the Devil to beat them, was written over fifty 60 years ago. Choked in game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, allowing the Red Sox to make the first 0-3 comeback in baseball history and win their first Series title in 86 years. Red Sox fans [[NeverLiveItDown will never let them forget this]]. Notable for having not one (Ruth), not two (Gehrig), not three ([=DiMaggio=]), but four (Mickey Mantle) names in the argument for best baseball player ever. Their 27 World Series championships make them both the most successful team in Major League Baseball, AND North American professional sports. Their current GM is Brian [[MeaningfulName Cashman]].
24th Jan '16 10:13:23 PM KYCubbie
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Trevor Hoffman didn't get into Cooperstown on his first try... but looks likely to get there in a year or two.
* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), and had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2015 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, and closer Trevor Hoffman, who looks likely to join the Hall as soon as he is eligible.[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as Mcdonald's) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
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* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), and had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2015 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, and closer Trevor Hoffman, who didn't make it to the Hall at his first chance in 2016 but looks likely to join make it in the Hall as soon as he is eligible.next year or two.[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as Mcdonald's) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
6th Jan '16 11:44:41 PM LifeShouldBeAMusical
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs''': TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team still in existence. They have not won the World Series since 1908 and haven't even reached it since 1945.[[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' last World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success is the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly has been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuture some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). That said, the recent conclusion of their deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought) has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead of them. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs''': TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team still in existence. They have not won the World Series since 1908 and haven't even reached it since 1945.[[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' last World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946).(1946), not to mention the dissolution of the ''Ottoman Empire'' (1923).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success is the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly has been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuture some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). That said, the recent conclusion of their deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought) has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead of them. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.
2nd Jan '16 12:25:14 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Colorado]] Rockies''' began play in 1993 along with Miami (then Florida). Based in Denver, which is by far the highest-altitude MLB city. This is important because the thin, dry air leads to balls flying out of the stadium regularly, leading to massively over-inflated offensive statistics and some very miserable pitchers. This has lessened somewhat in recent years as the local grounds crew began storing game balls in a special humidor in the stadium. Despite a well-earned reputation for on-field mediocrity (they've only had two seasons where they've won at least 90 games and have never even once finished first in their own division), the Rockies have a strong fan base, which is even more impressive considering that Denver has always been a football-first city (with every other sport at best a distant second); the Rockies actually have the second highest attendance figures in the city, even though the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Colorado Avalanche]] and the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Denver Nuggets]] have both enjoyed far more on-field success. That said, they did have an insane streak in 2007 that saw them win 21 out of 22 games (including 7 playoff games in a row), a season that eventually resulted in them making it all the way to the World Series... [[RealityEnsues only to be swept by the Boston Red Sox]]. The team still holds the all-time single season attendance record, drawing 4,483,350 fans in their inagural 1993 season at Mile High Stadium.
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Colorado]] Rockies''' began play in 1993 along with Miami (then Florida). Based in Denver, which is by far the highest-altitude MLB city. This is important because the thin, dry air leads to balls flying out of the stadium regularly, leading to massively over-inflated offensive statistics and some very miserable pitchers. This has lessened somewhat in recent years as the local grounds crew began storing game balls in a special humidor in the stadium. Despite a well-earned reputation for on-field mediocrity (they've (they have only had two 90-or-more-win seasons where they've won at least 90 games and have never even once finished first in their own division), the Rockies have a strong fan base, which is even more impressive considering that Denver has always been a football-first city (with every other sport at best a distant second); the Rockies actually have the second highest attendance figures in the city, even though the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Colorado Avalanche]] and the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Denver Nuggets]] have both enjoyed far more on-field success. That said, they did have an insane streak in 2007 that saw them win 21 out of 22 games (including 7 playoff games in a row), a season that eventually resulted in them making it all the way to the World Series... [[RealityEnsues only to be swept by the Boston Red Sox]]. The team still holds the all-time single season attendance record, drawing 4,483,350 fans in their inagural 1993 season at Mile High Stadium.
2nd Jan '16 12:20:27 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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Though it'd be cool to see them do better, neither the Dads or Rockies have the greatest of histories even if we're only looking at regular season success.
* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Colorado]] Rockies''' began play in 1993 along with Miami (then Florida). Based in Denver, which is by far the highest-altitude MLB city. This is important because the thin, dry air leads to balls flying out of the stadium regularly, leading to massively over-inflated offensive statistics and some very miserable pitchers. This has lessened somewhat in recent years as the local grounds crew began storing game balls in a special humidor in the stadium. They have a strong fan base (particularly considering that Denver has always been a football-first city, with every other sport at best a distant second, and that the relocated Colorado Avalanche have enjoyed more success than the Rockies) and have generally been mediocre to good in recent years, including an insane streak in 2007 that saw them win 21 out of 22 games (including 7 playoff games in a row), a season that eventually resulted in them making it all the way to the World Series... [[RealityEnsues only to be swept by the Boston Red Sox]]. The team still holds the all-time single season attendance record, drawing 4,483,350 fans in their inagural 1993 season at Mile High Stadium. * The '''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers''': Formerly of Brooklyn ("trolley dodgers"), making their name an ArtifactTitle. In their Brooklyn days, they were one of the best teams in the National League, winning 12 NL pennants and being in contention practically every season, though they couldn't translate all those titles into success in the World Series. (In 12 trips, they only won once.) They've been far more successful in LA, winning 9 NL pennants and 5 World Series. Noted today for their TV/radio announcer Vin Scully (who has been TheVoice of many a great baseball moment [[LongRunners for 66 years and counting]]—starting back in ''Brooklyn''), Spanish-language radio announcer Jaime Jarrín (another long runner at 57 years), former manager [[BigHam Tommy Lasorda]], and [[BigNameFan Alyssa Milano]]. A running joke in baseball is that most Dodger fans are [[JustHereForGodzilla just there to be seen]] and will leave early to beat traffic ([[TruthInTelevision after arriving late because of traffic]]). The Dodgers were also the team of Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball's unofficial "color barrier" and remains a revered figure. All Major League teams have retired the number 42 because of Robinson. Lately known for their despised, now former, owners, the [=McCourts=], who purchased the team with loans against their Boston parking lot empire in 2004 and used the franchise as a piggy bank, before the MLB commissioner took control away during their bickering divorce and bankruptcy. The team was finally sold in March 2012 for 2 billion dollars to a consortium that included Earvin "Magic" Johnson, formerly of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Lakers]]. * The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run; gave up Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit; were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD; are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher (that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him); collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally, notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year) and had few players reach individual success (Going into the 2015 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter). The Padres typically field good but not great teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, and closer Trevor Hoffman, who looks likely to join the Hall as soon as he is eligible.[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same of Mcdonald's) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to the military -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Colorado]] Rockies''' began play in 1993 along with Miami (then Florida). Based in Denver, which is by far the highest-altitude MLB city. This is important because the thin, dry air leads to balls flying out of the stadium regularly, leading to massively over-inflated offensive statistics and some very miserable pitchers. This has lessened somewhat in recent years as the local grounds crew began storing game balls in a special humidor in the stadium. They Despite a well-earned reputation for on-field mediocrity (they've only had two seasons where they've won at least 90 games and have never even once finished first in their own division), the Rockies have a strong fan base (particularly base, which is even more impressive considering that Denver has always been a football-first city, with city (with every other sport at best a distant second, and that second); the relocated Rockies actually have the second highest attendance figures in the city, even though the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Colorado Avalanche Avalanche]] and the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Denver Nuggets]] have both enjoyed far more success than the Rockies) and on-field success. That said, they did have generally been mediocre to good in recent years, including an insane streak in 2007 that saw them win 21 out of 22 games (including 7 playoff games in a row), a season that eventually resulted in them making it all the way to the World Series... [[RealityEnsues only to be swept by the Boston Red Sox]]. The team still holds the all-time single season attendance record, drawing 4,483,350 fans in their inagural 1993 season at Mile High Stadium. * The '''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers''': Formerly of Brooklyn ("trolley dodgers"), making their name an ArtifactTitle. In their Brooklyn days, they were one of the best teams in the National League, winning 12 NL pennants and being in contention practically every season, though they couldn't translate all those titles into success in the World Series. (In Series (in those 12 trips, they only won once.) once). They've been far more successful in LA, winning 9 NL pennants and 5 World Series. Noted today for their TV/radio announcer Vin Scully (who has been TheVoice of many a great baseball moment [[LongRunners for 66 years and counting]]—starting back in ''Brooklyn''), Spanish-language radio announcer Jaime Jarrín (another long runner at 57 years), former manager [[BigHam Tommy Lasorda]], and [[BigNameFan Alyssa Milano]]. A running joke in baseball is that most Dodger fans are [[JustHereForGodzilla just there to be seen]] and will leave early to beat traffic ([[TruthInTelevision after arriving late because of traffic]]). The Dodgers were also the team of Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball's unofficial "color barrier" and remains a revered figure. All Major League teams have retired the number 42 because of Robinson. Lately known for their despised, now former, owners, the [=McCourts=], who purchased the team with loans against their Boston parking lot empire in 2004 and used the franchise as a piggy bank, before the MLB commissioner took control away during their bickering divorce and bankruptcy. The team was finally sold in March 2012 for 2 billion dollars to a consortium that included Earvin "Magic" Johnson, formerly of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Lakers]]. * The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run; gave up run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit; hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD; LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher (that [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him); him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally, notably MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year) year), and had few players reach individual success (Going into (through the end of the 2015 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter). The Padres typically field good but not great ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, and closer Trevor Hoffman, who looks likely to join the Hall as soon as he is eligible.[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same of as Mcdonald's) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to the San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
1st Jan '16 11:30:59 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, their victory in the 2008 Series ended Philadelphia's citywide 25-years championship drought (though Philly's reputation as an All-Sports ButtMonkey still remains somewhat intact). Though they were the best team in the National League in the late [=2000s=], they are historically the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. From 2007-2011, the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs. However, they went straight back to their losing ways in 2012, and were forced to commence a full-blown rebuild in 2015. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 With two World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, championships as of this edit, their victory in the 2008 Series ended Philadelphia's citywide 25-years is particularly notable for ending a 25-year streak of Philadelphia not winning a championship drought in ''any'' major sport (though Philly's reputation as an All-Sports ButtMonkey still remains has continued to remain somewhat intact). Though they were the best team in the National League in the late [=2000s=], they are historically the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. From 2007-2011, the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs. However, they went straight back to their losing ways in 2012, and were forced to commence a full-blown rebuild in 2015. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs''': TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team still in existence. They have not won the World Series since 1908 and haven't even reached it since 1945.[[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' last World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success is the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly has been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuture some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). That said, the deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought) has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs''': TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team still in existence. They have not won the World Series since 1908 and haven't even reached it since 1945.[[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' last World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success is the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly has been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuture some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). That said, the recent conclusion of their deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought) has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead.ahead of them. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} Brewers''' are descended from Seattle's original team, the Pilots, who were a complete disaster that only lasted one season. Then they were bought by a Milwaukee car salesman, Bud Selig, who somehow worked his way up to commissioner of MLB. The Brewers are best known for playing at Miller Park, considered by many to be the best modern ballpark, and for their odd traditions such as the 6th inning "sausage races" and the mascot, Bernie Brewer, who formerly slid into various containers of liquid but now just slides down a waterpark-sponsored slide as [[ThinkOfTheChildren a cute mascot marketed towards children can't dive into an over-sized mug of beer these days]]. Brewers fans are also considered to have invented tailgating back when the team played at County Stadium. Bob Uecker, better known outside of Wisconsin for his appearances in Miller Lite beer commercials, ''[[Series/MrBelvedere Mr. Belvedere]]'', and the ''Film/MajorLeague'' movies (not to mention being choked by Wrestling/AndreTheGiant at Wrestling/WrestleMania IV), has been the team's radio announcer since 1971. The Brewers had their glory days in the early '80s, nearly winning the 1982 World Series. They are the first of the currently existing MLB teams to have switched leagues, as they were American until 1998. Though they're a small market team, the Brewers nonetheless have a passionately devoted fanbase despite their [[SoOkItsAverage overall mediocre record]]. In many ways, they're considered a SpiritualSuccessor to the Milwaukee Braves, having retired Hank Aaron's jersey and erected a statue of him outside of Miller Park despite having only spent two uneventful seasons with the Brewers. The Brewers are also the fourth team to have the name; the first two were short-lived (as in one season) teams in the also short-lived American Association and Union Association, and the third is now the Baltimore Orioles. For a long time, they were the only team to switch leagues, but since the Astros switched leagues in time for the 2013 season, this is no longer the case.
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Milwaukee}} Brewers''' are descended from Seattle's original team, the Pilots, who were a complete disaster that only lasted one season. Then they were bought by a Milwaukee car salesman, Bud Selig, who somehow worked his way up to commissioner of MLB. The Brewers are best known for playing at Miller Park, considered by many to be the best modern ballpark, and for their odd traditions such as the 6th inning "sausage races" and the mascot, Bernie Brewer, who formerly slid into various containers of liquid but now just slides down a waterpark-sponsored slide as [[ThinkOfTheChildren a cute mascot marketed towards children can't dive into an over-sized mug of beer these days]]. Brewers fans are also considered to have invented tailgating back when the team played at County Stadium. Bob Uecker, better known outside of Wisconsin for his appearances in Miller Lite beer commercials, ''[[Series/MrBelvedere Mr. Belvedere]]'', and the ''Film/MajorLeague'' movies (not to mention being choked by Wrestling/AndreTheGiant at Wrestling/WrestleMania IV), has been the team's radio announcer since 1971. The Brewers had their glory days in the early '80s, nearly winning the 1982 World Series. They are the first of the currently existing MLB teams to have switched leagues, as they were American until 1998. Though they're Despite being a small market team, team with [[SoOkItsAverage an overall mediocre record]], the Brewers nonetheless have a passionately devoted fanbase despite their [[SoOkItsAverage overall mediocre record]].who steadfastly support the team in both good and bad years. In many ways, they're considered a SpiritualSuccessor to the Milwaukee Braves, having retired Hank Aaron's jersey and erected a statue of him outside of Miller Park despite having only spent two uneventful seasons with the Brewers. The Brewers are also the fourth team to have the name; the first two were short-lived (as in one season) teams in the also short-lived American Association and Union Association, and the third is now the Baltimore Orioles. For a long time, they were the only team to switch leagues, but since the Astros switched leagues in time for the 2013 season, this is no longer the case.
1st Jan '16 12:10:38 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, their victory in the 2008 WS ending Philly's citywide 25-years championship drought (though the city still hasn't quite ended its reputation as an All-Sports ButtMonkey). Though they were the best team in the National League in the late [=2000s=], they are historically the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. From 2007-2011, the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs. However, they went straight back to their losing ways in 2012, and were forced to commence a full-blown rebuild in 2015. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, their victory in the 2008 WS ending Philly's Series ended Philadelphia's citywide 25-years championship drought (though the city still hasn't quite ended its Philly's reputation as an All-Sports ButtMonkey).ButtMonkey still remains somewhat intact). Though they were the best team in the National League in the late [=2000s=], they are historically the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. From 2007-2011, the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs. However, they went straight back to their losing ways in 2012, and were forced to commence a full-blown rebuild in 2015. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.
1st Jan '16 12:08:40 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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Changing it a bit to reflect the odd state of Philly sports in recent years; some good teams, some awful ones, and not too much in the way of championships to show for it either way.
* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, their victory in the 2008 WS was the cherry on the cake to a period when it looked like Philly was about to fully end its long run of All-Sports ButtMonkey (true to form though, the city's sports teams have found themselves in the woods once more). Though they were the best team in the National League in the late [=2000s=], they are historically the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. From 2007-2011, the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs. However, they went straight back to their losing ways in 2012, and were forced to commence a full-blown rebuild in 2015. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, their victory in the 2008 WS was ending Philly's citywide 25-years championship drought (though the cherry on the cake to a period when it looked like Philly was about to fully end city still hasn't quite ended its long run of reputation as an All-Sports ButtMonkey (true to form though, the city's sports teams have found themselves in the woods once more).ButtMonkey). Though they were the best team in the National League in the late [=2000s=], they are historically the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. From 2007-2011, the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs. However, they went straight back to their losing ways in 2012, and were forced to commence a full-blown rebuild in 2015. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.
1st Jan '16 11:26:40 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, their victory in the 2008 WS ended Philly's long run of All-Sports ButtMonkey. Though they were the best team in the National League for a few years recently, historically, they are the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets. (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. While starting in 2007 the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs, though a poor 2012 season sent the team back into rebuilding mode. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.
to:
* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Philadelphia}} Phillies''': [[LongRunner Played their first season in 1883]] after [[MeaningfulRename replacing]] the [[NamesTheSame Worcester]] [[LocationThemeNaming Worcesters]], making them one of the oldest franchises in baseball, if not all of modern professional sports. 2008 World Series champions and 2009 runners-up, their victory in the 2008 WS ended Philly's was the cherry on the cake to a period when it looked like Philly was about to fully end its long run of All-Sports ButtMonkey. ButtMonkey (true to form though, the city's sports teams have found themselves in the woods once more). Though they were the best team in the National League for a few years recently, historically, in the late [=2000s=], they are historically the losingest baseball franchise ever (and in terms of number of losses, the losingest team in all of professional sports). They were also the last of the 16 original Major League teams to win a championship, their first title not coming until 1980. Like all Philadelphia sports teams, their fans are usually appear to be generally good-hearted working-class folk, but they can get really dangerous if drunk or if their team wins a championship (rioting is a popular Philly pastime), or if you are wearing a Mets uniform, a Mets cap, or anything related to the Mets. Mets (or [[FandomRivalry New York]], really). Then you are just asking for it. The late great Harry Kalas -- TheVoice of NFL Films after John Facenda died -- was their radio announcer until his death during the 2009 season. While starting in 2007 From 2007-2011, the team basically became the Yankees of the National League, procuring superstar players (mostly pitchers) at any price to make World Series runs, though a poor 2012 season sent the team runs. However, they went straight back into rebuilding mode.to their losing ways in 2012, and were forced to commence a full-blown rebuild in 2015. By the way, the team's somewhat uncreative nickname is an artifact of history; in the early days of baseball media would often refer to teams by simply pluralizing a city name. Also the home of the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillie_Phanatic Phillie Phanatic]], one of the goofiest and most-beloved mascots in sports.
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