History UsefulNotes / MLBTeams

4th Jan '17 3:11:34 AM Morgenthaler
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
23rd Nov '16 11:19:46 PM IlGreven
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Added DiffLines:

** First leadoff home run in a World Series game 7 (2016, Dexter Fowler[[note]]who almost didn't re-sign with the Cubs in the offseason and was a major catalyst for the entire season[[/note]])
** Oldest player to hit a home run in a World Series game (2016, David Ross (39), Game 7 (in his final at bat as a player, no less))
6th Nov '16 8:15:17 PM Arkasas
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Added DiffLines:

** First Team to win an extra-inning World Series game 7 on the road (in 10 innings in 2016)
6th Nov '16 5:10:32 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''Oakland Athletics''' are one of the league's oldest teams (being descended from earlier franchises in Philadelphia and Kansas City) and also one of the current sufferers of "small-market syndrome". However, their stretch of unexpectedly strong teams with tiny payrolls in the early 2000s led to writer Michael Lewis writing the book ''Moneyball'' on Oakland general manager Billy Beane. Beane's "Moneyball" approach to the game emphasized new statistics, computerized analysis, and unconventional means of analyzing players. And for a while, it worked, proving that baseball really is the GameOfNerds. Many other teams, most notably the Red Sox, then began adopting Moneyball-style strategies, relegating Oakland to the back end of the league for a time. More recently, the A's have again become contenders using what could be called "Moneyball 2.0" strategies. The franchise as a whole has won nine World Series, third most in baseball behind the Yankees and the Cardinals (although only one of those titles has come in the last 40 years).

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* The '''Oakland Athletics''' are one of the league's oldest teams (being descended from earlier franchises in Philadelphia and Kansas City) and also one of the current sufferers of "small-market syndrome". However, their stretch of unexpectedly strong teams with tiny payrolls in the early 2000s led to writer Michael Lewis writing the book ''Moneyball'' on Oakland general manager Billy Beane. Beane's "Moneyball" approach to the game emphasized new statistics, computerized analysis, and unconventional means of analyzing players. And for a while, it worked, proving that baseball really is the GameOfNerds. Many other teams, most notably the Red Sox, then began adopting Moneyball-style strategies, relegating Oakland to the back end of the league for a time. More recently, again, though the A's have again become contenders using what could be called still managed to scrounge several winning seasons thanks to "Moneyball 2.0" strategies. The franchise as a whole has won nine World Series, third most in baseball behind the Yankees and the Cardinals (although only one of those titles has come in the last 40 years).
6th Nov '16 4:07:11 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} most ugly uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their only World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.
* The '''Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim''': The other team in Greater Los Angeles area. Formerly known as the California Angels. They spent most of their history as the ButtMonkey of the area living in the shadow of the more popular and successful Dodgers and being a a place where past their prime players spent their final years. From its inception 1961 until his death in 1998, the team was owned by Gene Autry, a famous [[TheWestern Western film]] actor and singer. In the late '90s, the team was bought by Creator/{{Disney}} (which had begun to pour money into the club earlier in the decade, starting with the production of a remake of ''Film/AngelsInTheOutfield'' focused on the Angels instead of the Pirates). Upon the company's acquisition of the franchise, they changed the name to the Anaheim Angels and made the team one of the Dominant teams in the American League West, eventually winning their first (and so far only) World Series title in 2002. In 2004 Disney would eventually sell the team. The new owners decided to rename the team the Los Angeles Angels for marketing purposes, but because the team's contract with Anaheim contained a stipulation that "Anaheim" had to be part of the team name, this led to the rather cumbersome moniker "The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim"; much to Anaheim's (and the city the team borrowed without domicile, Los Angeles') dismay, there [[AintNoRule isn't a rule]] about two cities being used in a team's name, and the new name obeyed the ExactWords of the contract. As a BilingualBonus, Los Angeles ''means'' 'The Angels' in Spanish, so the name is effectively "[[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment The The Angels Angels of Anaheim]]". Angels' fans are noted for using Thunder Sticks, and being generally loud and enthusiastic (although the "leave early to beat traffic" thing still does occur every once and awhile). The team's mascot is the Rally Monkey (a capuchin monkey dressed in team apparel whose appearances are usually on videotape) who made his debut during the 2002 title run. Their biggest rivals are the Oakland Athletics, though they also have a strong inter-league rivalry with the Dodgers.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} most ugly the ugliest uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their only World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.
* The '''Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim''': The other team in Greater Los Angeles area. Formerly known as the California Angels. They spent most of their history as the ButtMonkey of the area living in the shadow of the more popular and successful Dodgers and being a a place where past their prime players spent their final years. From its inception 1961 until his death in 1998, the team was owned by Gene Autry, a famous [[TheWestern Western film]] actor and singer. In the late '90s, the team was bought by Creator/{{Disney}} (which had begun to pour money into the club earlier in the decade, starting with the production of a remake of ''Film/AngelsInTheOutfield'' focused on the Angels instead of the Pirates). Upon the company's acquisition of the franchise, they changed the name to the Anaheim Angels and made the team one of the Dominant teams in the American League West, eventually winning their first (and so far only) World Series title in 2002. In 2004 Disney would eventually sell the team. The new owners decided to rename the team the Los Angeles Angels for marketing purposes, but because the team's contract with Anaheim contained a stipulation that "Anaheim" had to be part of the team name, this led to the rather cumbersome moniker "The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim"; much to Anaheim's (and the city the team borrowed without domicile, Los Angeles') dismay, there [[AintNoRule isn't a rule]] about two cities being used in a team's name, and the new name obeyed the ExactWords of the contract. As a BilingualBonus, Los Angeles ''means'' 'The Angels' in Spanish, so the name is effectively "[[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment The The Angels Angels of Anaheim]]". Anaheim]]." Angels' fans are noted for using Thunder Sticks, and being generally loud and enthusiastic (although the "leave early to beat traffic" thing still does occur every once and awhile). The team's mascot is the Rally Monkey (a capuchin monkey dressed in team apparel whose appearances are usually on videotape) who made his debut during the 2002 title run. Their biggest rivals are the Oakland Athletics, though they also have a strong inter-league rivalry with the Dodgers.
6th Nov '16 3:35:40 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the [=SkyDome=], which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. The Jays tend to operate like a mid-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to it having much higher taxes than the US, not to mention that they have to pay income taxes to both Canada and America, as opposed to if they signed for a team located in a US state with no income tax. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League East division, where they been forced to compete against not just perennial powerhouses the Yankees and the Red Sox, but some pretty strong Rays and Orioles teams as well. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the [=SkyDome=], which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. The Jays tend to operate like a mid-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to it having much higher taxes than the US, not to mention that they have to pay income taxes to both Canada and America, as opposed to if they signed for a team located in a US state with no income tax. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League East division, where they they've been forced to compete against not just perennial powerhouses the Yankees and the Red Sox, but some pretty strong Rays and Orioles teams as well. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.



* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Colorado]] Rockies''' began play in 1993 along with Miami (then Florida). Based in Denver, which is by far the highest-altitude MLB city. This is important because the thin, dry air leads to balls flying out of the stadium regularly, leading to massively over-inflated offensive statistics and some very miserable pitchers. This has lessened somewhat in recent years as the local grounds crew began storing game balls in a special humidor in the stadium. Despite a well-earned reputation for on-field mediocrity (they have only two 90-or-more-win seasons and have never finished first in their own division), the Rockies have a strong fan base, which is even more impressive considering that Denver has always been a football-first city (with every other sport at best a distant second); the Rockies actually have the second highest attendance figures in the city, even though the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Colorado Avalanche]] and the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Denver Nuggets]] have both enjoyed far more on-field success. That said, they did have an insane streak in 2007 that saw them win 21 out of 22 games (including 7 playoff games in a row), a season that eventually resulted in them making it all the way to the World Series... [[RealityEnsues only to be swept by the Boston Red Sox]]. The team still holds the all-time single season attendance record, drawing 4,483,350 fans in their inagural 1993 season at Mile High Stadium.

to:

* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Denver}} Colorado]] Rockies''' began play in 1993 along with Miami (then Florida). Based in Denver, which is by far the highest-altitude MLB city. This is important because the thin, dry air leads to balls flying out of the stadium regularly, leading to massively over-inflated offensive statistics and some very miserable pitchers. This has lessened somewhat in recent years as the local grounds crew began storing game balls in a special humidor in the stadium. Despite a well-earned reputation for on-field mediocrity (they have only two 90-or-more-win seasons and have never finished first in their own division), the Rockies have a strong fan base, which is even more impressive considering that Denver has always been a football-first city (with every other sport at best a distant second); the Rockies actually have the second highest attendance figures in the city, even though the [[UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague Colorado Avalanche]] and the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Denver Nuggets]] have both enjoyed far more on-field success. That said, they did have an insane streak in 2007 that saw them win 21 out of 22 games (including 7 playoff games in a row), a season that eventually resulted in them making it all the way to the World Series... [[RealityEnsues only to be swept by the Boston Red Sox]]. The team still holds the all-time single season attendance record, drawing 4,483,350 fans in their inagural inaugural 1993 season at Mile High Stadium.
5th Nov '16 3:18:12 AM RezaMaulana98
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs'''[[note]]The name refers to bear cubs; the Chicago Bears NFL team is similarly named[[/note]]: The current World Champions. TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team still in existence; they had previously not won the World Series since 1908, and hadn't even reached it with a National League Championship since 1945. [[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' previous World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946), not to mention the MLB arrival of UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson (1947), the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire (1923) and the Qing Dynasty (1911), and even the construction of RMS ''Titanic'' (1909).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success was the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly had been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuturePartII some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). However, they were done justice by going all the way, taking the World Series in seven games over the Indians in 2016. This was a fitting conclusion of their deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought), and has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead of them. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs'''[[note]]The name refers to bear cubs; the Chicago Bears NFL team is similarly named[[/note]]: The current World Champions. TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team in America's big four league that is still in existence; existence[[note]]As a comparison, NBA's oldest team is the Pistons, founded in 1941; NFL's oldest team is the Cardinals, founded in 1898; while NHL's oldest team is the Canadiens, founded in 1909. For more comparison, English Premier League's oldest team (that have competed in the Premier League era, i.e. 1992 until now) is Stoke City, founded in 1863[[/note]]; they had previously not won the World Series since 1908, and hadn't even reached it with a National League Championship since 1945. [[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' previous World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946), not to mention the MLB arrival of UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson (1947), the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire (1923) and the Qing Dynasty (1911), and even the construction of RMS ''Titanic'' (1909).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success was the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly had been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuturePartII some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). However, they were done justice by going all the way, taking the World Series in seven games over the Indians in 2016. This was a fitting conclusion of their deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought), and has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead of them. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.
3rd Nov '16 6:59:00 PM TerminusOmega13
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
3rd Nov '16 3:20:17 PM TerminusOmega13
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
3rd Nov '16 3:17:13 PM zubaz6041
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead.lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century.
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