History UsefulNotes / MLBTeams

1st May '16 5:19:47 AM arsepoetica
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained competitive, winning another division in 2010 and coming out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011. How long they can keep this up, however, remains to be seen. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm to going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] don't help, not to mention the fact that they have to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York.

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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained competitive, winning another division in 2010 and coming out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011. How long they can keep this up, however, remains to be seen. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm to going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] don't help, not to mention the fact that they have to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area. It didn't help that the team was mired in last place and downright horrible for the first ten years of their existence, effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years.
27th Apr '16 4:02:10 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's was owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's was the Mariners were owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
27th Apr '16 4:01:42 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently was owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}.Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
12th Apr '16 5:52:19 AM jayharrison
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* The '''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers''': Formerly of Brooklyn ("trolley dodgers"), making their name an ArtifactTitle. In their Brooklyn days, they were one of the best teams in the National League, winning 12 NL pennants and being in contention practically every season, though they couldn't translate all those titles into success in the World Series (in those 12 trips, they only won once). They've been far more successful in LA, winning 9 NL pennants and 5 World Series. Noted today for their TV/radio announcer Vin Scully (who has been TheVoice of many a great baseball moment [[LongRunners for 66 years and counting]]—starting back in ''Brooklyn''), Spanish-language radio announcer Jaime Jarrín (another long runner at 57 years), former manager [[BigHam Tommy Lasorda]], and [[BigNameFan Alyssa Milano]]. A running joke in baseball is that most Dodger fans are [[JustHereForGodzilla just there to be seen]] and will leave early to beat traffic ([[TruthInTelevision after arriving late because of traffic]]). The Dodgers were also the team of Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball's unofficial "color barrier" and remains a revered figure. All Major League teams have retired the number 42 because of Robinson. Lately known for their despised, now former, owners, the [=McCourts=], who purchased the team with loans against their Boston parking lot empire in 2004 and used the franchise as a piggy bank, before the MLB commissioner took control away during their bickering divorce and bankruptcy. The team was finally sold in March 2012 for 2 billion dollars to a consortium that included Earvin "Magic" Johnson, formerly of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Lakers]].

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* The '''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers''': Formerly of Brooklyn ("trolley dodgers"), making their name an ArtifactTitle. In their Brooklyn days, they were one of the best teams in the National League, winning 12 NL pennants and being in contention practically every season, though they couldn't translate all those titles into success in the World Series (in those 12 trips, they only won once). They've been far more successful in LA, winning 9 NL pennants and 5 World Series. Noted today for their TV/radio announcer Vin Scully (who has been TheVoice of many a great baseball moment [[LongRunners for 66 years and counting]]—starting since 1950]]—starting back in ''Brooklyn''), ''Brooklyn''--with 2016 being his 67th and final season), Spanish-language radio announcer Jaime Jarrín (another long runner at 57 years), former manager [[BigHam Tommy Lasorda]], and [[BigNameFan Alyssa Milano]]. A running joke in baseball is that most Dodger fans are [[JustHereForGodzilla just there to be seen]] and will leave early to beat traffic ([[TruthInTelevision after arriving late because of traffic]]). The Dodgers were also the team of Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball's unofficial "color barrier" and remains a revered figure. All Major League teams have retired the number 42 because of Robinson. Lately known for their despised, now former, owners, the [=McCourts=], who purchased the team with loans against their Boston parking lot empire in 2004 and used the franchise as a piggy bank, before the MLB commissioner took control away during their bickering divorce and bankruptcy. The team was finally sold in March 2012 for 2 billion dollars to a consortium that included Earvin "Magic" Johnson, formerly of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Lakers]].
6th Apr '16 10:06:38 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), and had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2015 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, and closer Trevor Hoffman, who didn't make it to the Hall at his first chance in 2016 but looks likely to make it in the next year or two.[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as Mcdonald's) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.

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* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), and had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2015 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter).no-hitter), and been the only team to begin a season by being shutout in their first three games (getting outscored 25-0 by the Los Angeles Dodgers at ''home''). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, and closer Trevor Hoffman, who didn't make it to the Hall at his first chance in 2016 but looks likely to make it in the next year or two.[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as Mcdonald's) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
10th Mar '16 3:33:04 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated effort to spend their way into relevancy in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first team to lose at least 100 games with a payroll of over $100 million. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated effort attempt to spend their way into relevancy the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games with a payroll of over $100 million.games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
10th Mar '16 3:25:18 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} most ugly uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Los Angeles Angels and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their only World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} most ugly uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles Angels Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their only World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.
10th Mar '16 3:24:10 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success came from 1995 to 2001 when they made the playoffs four times, advancing to the League Championship Series three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated effort to spend their way into relevancy in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first team to lose at least 100 games with a payroll of over $100 million. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success came coming from 1995 to 2001 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times, advancing times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated effort to spend their way into relevancy in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first team to lose at least 100 games with a payroll of over $100 million. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
10th Mar '16 3:20:48 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' are now known for a high number of Japanese players and fans and a good budget who never close the deal. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series. The team's only real run of success came from 1995 to 2001 when they made the playoffs four times, and in three of those four occasions, advanced to the League Championship Series (though they never got any farther). In 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history, but still failed to reach the World Series; to add insult to injury, every season since then has ended up them completely missing the playoffs. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' are now known for have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans and a good budget who never close the deal. fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series. The Series, with the team's only real run of success came from 1995 to 2001 when they made the playoffs four times, and in three of those four occasions, advanced advancing to the League Championship Series three of those four occasions (though they never got any farther). In further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history, but still failed to reach the World Series; to history. To add insult to injury, every season since then has the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated effort to spend their way into relevancy in the [=mid-2000s=] ended up with them completely missing becoming the playoffs.first team to lose at least 100 games with a payroll of over $100 million. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
10th Mar '16 2:54:16 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} most ugly uniforms.]] MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding the cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Senators (now Rangers), Angels and Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} always fizzle out]], even though they did have a streak of success in the late 1990s and early 2000s. If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} most ugly uniforms.]] uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding the their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Los Angeles Angels and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} always fizzle just as often fizzles out]], even though they did have a with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s.2000s (which includes their only World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.



* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' are now known for a high number of Japanese players and fans and a good budget who never close the deal. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series. The team's only real run of success came from 1995 to 2001 when they made the playoffs four times, and in three of those four occasions, advanced to the League Championship Series (though they never got any farther). In 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history, but still failed to reach the World Series. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history), all of whom are likely future Hall of Famers and candidates to have ''any'' number besides 42 become permanently retired for the first time [[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux.[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner, as well as the first other than Robinson to have his number retired by the team. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
* The '''[[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Texas]] Rangers''' are best known as the team that UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush owned before his political career and producing a number of sluggers (Rafael Palmeiro, Juan Gonzalez, Ivan "Pudge" Rodriguez, among others) who may or may not have been chemically enhanced. They are descended from the Washington Senators, but not the old Senators team from the first half of the 20th century; rather, they are descended from the new expansion Senators that began play in 1961. The old Senators are now the Minnesota Twins. For years, the club was known for big bats, terrible pitching, and not much else. Until 2010, they were the only team in baseball who had never won a postseason series. They finally accomplished this in 2010 after nearly 50 years of trying, making it all the way to their first ever World Series before finally losing to the San Francisco Giants. In 2011, they lost ace pitcher Cliff Lee to free agency, but managed to have an even better year than before, reaching their second consecutive World Series. Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan pitched his last two no-hitters and earned his 5,000th strikeout and 300th win with the team. His plaque in Cooperstown bears a Rangers cap, and he served as part-owner and Team President until late in the 2013 season, when he was pushed out of the front office after a dispute with the majority owners and ended up selling his stake in the team. His guidance, especially with regard to how to handle pitchers, is considered the biggest factor in the team's turnaround. Especially in light of both the inter-division battle and the recent move by Josh Hamilton that came with Hammy making bashing remarks about Texas as a franchise, the Rangers' fans seem to see the Los Angeles Angels as their arch-rival.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' are now known for a high number of Japanese players and fans and a good budget who never close the deal. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series. The team's only real run of success came from 1995 to 2001 when they made the playoffs four times, and in three of those four occasions, advanced to the League Championship Series (though they never got any farther). In 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history, but still failed to reach the World Series. Series; to add insult to injury, every season since then has ended up them completely missing the playoffs. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martinez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki Suzuki, and Felix Hernandez (who pitched the first perfect game in team history), all history); the team plans to retire Griffey's number in the middle of whom the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are likely future Hall of Famers and major candidates to have ''any'' number besides 42 become permanently retired for the first time [[note]]Seattle honor as well[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux.[[/note]].Maddux[[/note]]. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and will be the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner, as well as Mariner. Ichiro and Hernandez are generally expected to make the first other than Robinson to have his number retired by Hall after their retirement, while the team.only obstacle standing in the way of Martinez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that this team's currently owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}}. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[{{Nintendo64}} consoles]].
* The '''[[UsefulNotes/DFWMetroplex Texas]] Rangers''' are best known as the team that UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush owned before his political career and producing a number of sluggers (Rafael Palmeiro, Juan Gonzalez, Ivan "Pudge" Rodriguez, among others) who may or may not have been chemically enhanced. They are descended from the Washington Senators, but not the old Senators team from the first half of the 20th century; rather, they are descended from the new expansion Senators that began play in 1961. The old Senators are now the Minnesota Twins. For years, the club was known for big bats, terrible pitching, and not much else. Until 2010, they were the only team in baseball who had never won a postseason series. They finally accomplished this in 2010 after nearly 50 years of trying, making it all the way to their first ever World Series before finally losing to the San Francisco Giants. In 2011, they lost ace pitcher Cliff Lee to free agency, but managed to have an even better year than before, reaching their second consecutive World Series.Series before losing to the St. Louis Cardinals. Hall of Famer Nolan Ryan pitched his last two no-hitters and earned his 5,000th strikeout and 300th win with the team. His plaque in Cooperstown bears a Rangers cap, and he served as part-owner and Team President until late in the 2013 season, when he was pushed out of the front office after a dispute with the majority owners and ended up selling his stake in the team. His guidance, especially with regard to how to handle pitchers, is considered the biggest factor in the team's turnaround. Especially in light of both Despite sharing the inter-division battle and same state with the recent move by Houston Astros, Rangers' fans seem to have traditionally seen the Los Angeles Angels as their main rival, especially after slugger Josh Hamilton that came with Hammy making left Texas for the Halos and made bashing remarks about Texas as a franchise, franchise on his way out (though the Rangers' fans seem to see the Los Angeles Angels as their arch-rival.ended up sending him back to the Rangers in 2015).
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