History UsefulNotes / MLBTeams

7th Oct '17 4:07:33 PM AriRockefeller
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{New York|City}} Yankees''': If you can name only one baseball team, it probably is this one. Being the most successful team in the World Series era (27 titles) and the fact that it is based in the BigApplesauce have combined to make the Yankees the most popular team in America.... and the most hated team in America. You must, by internet law, either [[{{Hatedom}} hate them with a passion that rivals the love you have of your own team]] or be an [[FanDumb obnoxious]], [[UnpleasableFanbase unpleasable]] pinstripe-wearer. An entire industry exists of anti-Yankee media, and although primarily centered in UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, it thrives throughout North America, including New York itself (like the primarily pro-Mets ''Daily News''). The same thing goes for pro-Yankee media (''especially'' the ''New York Post''). ''Easily'' the BigBad of Major League Baseball. (And CreatorsPet too: wherever you are in America, like 'em or not, odds are there's a Yankee game on the tube.) Team owners [[BigScrewedUpFamily George Steinbrenner and his sons]] are, however, universally considered an example of EvilOverlord (or at least a MeanBoss), while Lou Gehrig is universally beloved. This is not a new phenomenon. The play ''Theatre/DamnYankees'', about a man who hates them so much he sells his soul to the Devil to beat them, was written over 60 years ago. Choked in game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, allowing the Red Sox to make the first 0-3 comeback in baseball history and win their first Series title in 86 years. Red Sox fans [[NeverLiveItDown will never let them forget this]]. Notable for having not one (Ruth), not two (Gehrig), not three ([=DiMaggio=]), but four (Mickey Mantle) names in the argument for best baseball player ever. Their 27 World Series championships make them both the most successful team in Major League Baseball, AND North American professional sports. Their current GM is Brian [[MeaningfulName Cashman]].

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{New York|City}} Yankees''': If you can name only one baseball team, it probably is this one. Being the most successful team in the World Series era (27 titles) and the fact that it is based in the BigApplesauce have combined to make the Yankees the most popular team in America.... and the most hated team in America. You must, by internet law, either [[{{Hatedom}} hate them with a passion that rivals the love you have of your own team]] or be an [[FanDumb obnoxious]], [[UnpleasableFanbase unpleasable]] pinstripe-wearer. An entire industry exists of anti-Yankee media, and although primarily centered in UsefulNotes/{{Boston}}, it thrives throughout North America, including New York itself (like the primarily pro-Mets ''Daily News''). The same thing goes for pro-Yankee media (''especially'' the ''New York Post''). ''Easily'' the BigBad of Major League Baseball. (And CreatorsPet too: wherever you are in America, like 'em or not, odds are there's a Yankee game on the tube.) Team owners [[BigScrewedUpFamily George Steinbrenner and his sons]] are, however, universally considered an example of EvilOverlord (or at least a MeanBoss), while Lou Gehrig is universally beloved. This is not a new phenomenon. The play ''Theatre/DamnYankees'', about a man who hates them so much he sells his soul to the Devil to beat them, was written over 60 years ago. Choked in game 4 of the 2004 ALCS, allowing the Red Sox to make the first 0-3 comeback in baseball history and win their first Series title in 86 years. Red Sox fans [[NeverLiveItDown will never let them forget this]]. Notable for having not one (Ruth), not two (Gehrig), not three ([=DiMaggio=]), but four (Mickey Mantle) names in the argument for best baseball player ever. Their 27 World Series championships make them both the most successful team in Major League Baseball, AND North American professional sports. Twenty-three numbers (for 21 different players) are retired, another MLB record. With Derek Jeter's retirement, the Yankees have retired every single single-digit number[[note]]Unless someone retires with number 0, a number they don't issue[[/note]]. Their current GM is Brian [[MeaningfulName Cashman]].
7th Oct '17 3:55:26 PM AriRockefeller
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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained surprisingly competitive; they won another division title in 2010, came out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011, and made it to the playoffs again in 2013. Since then, they've fallen back down to earth, but can still punch well above their weight in any given game; basically, the current Rays are about as good as a team can be while still technically being mediocre. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm about going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] doesn't help their situation, not to mention the fact that they've had to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York, plus some strong Toronto and Baltimore squads. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area, which wasn't helped by the Rays effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens during their first decade while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years.

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* The '''[[UsefulNotes/{{Florida}} Tampa Bay]] (Devil) Rays''': A relatively new team, they spent the first decade of existence losing a lot and generally coming in last. However, in 2008, they TookALevelInBadass: going worst-to-first, winning their division, defeated the much-higher-payroll Yankees and Red Sox, and made it all the way to the World Series, largely due to the emergence of a number of extremely talented younger players and lights-out relief pitching. Though they've displayed a Montreal Expos-like inability to hold onto their stars, they have remained surprisingly competitive; they won another division title in 2010, came out of nowhere to steal the wild card from the Boston Red Sox in 2011, and made it to the playoffs again in 2013. Since then, they've fallen back down to earth, but can still punch well above their weight in any given game; basically, the current Rays are about as good as a team can be while still technically being mediocre. Their notoriously lukewarm fanbase and terrible stadium[[note]]At least, the fanbase is lukewarm about going to St. Petersburg. [[http://www.draysbay.com/2012/10/8/3473250/tampa-bay-rays-tv-ratings-historical-2012 They draw good local TV ratings]].[[/note]] doesn't help their situation, not to mention the fact that they've had to share a division with perennial AL powerhouses Boston and New York, plus some strong Toronto and Baltimore squads. Furthermore, the Yankees' spring training complex and official team headquarters have long been located in Tampa, resulting in a large fan base and a great deal of media focus on the Yankees in the area, which wasn't helped by the Rays effectively fielding a team of minor leaguers and washed-up has-beens during their first decade while the Yankees were appearing in one World Series after another during the Joe Torre years. Their team name was originally based on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinetail_mobula a derivatie of a stingray, a species of fish found in tropical waters]]. The "devil" part was dropped and the name reworked to mean a burst of sunlight, though the devil ray from the old logo appears on the sleeves of their current uniforms.
7th Oct '17 3:48:38 PM AriRockefeller
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The current defending World Series (and, therefore, MLB) champions are the Chicago Cubs, who prior to this had not won a World Series in one hundred and eight years. ([[OneHundredAndEight Make of that what you will.]])

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The current defending [[UsefulNotes/WorldSeries World Series Series]] (and, therefore, MLB) champions are the Chicago Cubs, who prior to this had not won a World Series in one hundred and eight years. ([[OneHundredAndEight Make of that what you will.]])
15th Sep '17 12:27:40 AM KYCubbie
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the [=SkyDome=], which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. The Jays tend to operate like a mid-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to it having much higher taxes than the US, not to mention that they have to pay income taxes to both Canada and America, as opposed to if they signed for a team located in a US state with no income tax. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League East division, where they've been forced to compete against not just perennial powerhouses the Yankees and the Red Sox, but some pretty strong Rays and Orioles teams as well. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} Blue Jays''' are Canada's team. Their glory days were the early 90s when they put together an All-Star lineup and won two consecutive World Series ('92 and '93). They also got a stadium, first called the [=SkyDome=], which had this cool "futuristic" retractable roof that popularized the trend in bad-weather ballparks. The Jays tend to operate like a mid-market team, not because Toronto is a small city, but rather because some players refuse to play in Canada due to it having much higher taxes than the US, not to mention that they have to pay income taxes to both Canada and America, as opposed to if they signed for a team located in a US state with no income tax. They also have the misfortune of playing in the brutal American League East division, where they've been forced to compete against not just perennial powerhouses the Yankees and the Red Sox, but some pretty strong Rays and Orioles teams as well. In recent years, they've had a tendency to get off to a fast start only to fade halfway through the season. In 2015, they finally won the AL East again after a 22-year playoff drought, thanks to GM Alex Anthopoulos's acquiring of several all-star fielders and pitchers both during the off-season and the trade deadline. Roberto Alomar, who played a crucial role in the Jays' back-to-back championships, was inducted into the Hall of Fame wearing a Blue Jays cap. Paul Molitor, another Hall-of-Famer, Hall of Famer, also spent time in Toronto, and was the MVP of the Jays' 1993 World Series championship.



** Oldest player to hit a home run in a World Series game (2016, David Ross (39), Game 7 (in his final at bat as a player, no less))

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** Oldest player to hit a home run in a World Series game (2016, David Ross (39), Game 7 (in his final at bat at-bat as a player, no less))



** An interesting thing to note is that despite only existing for 14 years, there's been only ''4 years'' so far where a Diamondbacks player hasn't been nominated for the Cy Young award. This kind of gives an implication that the Diamondbacks are like Heaven for pitchers, although it does help that they had one of the very best one-two pitching tandems around for a few years.
** Ironically, they play their home games in a very hitter friendly park.

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** An interesting thing to note is that despite only existing for 14 years, there's been only ''4 years'' so far where a Diamondbacks player hasn't been nominated for the Cy Young award.Award. This kind of gives an implication that the Diamondbacks are like Heaven for pitchers, although it does help that they had one of the very best one-two pitching tandems around for a few years.
** Ironically, they play their home games in a very hitter friendly hitter-friendly park.



* The '''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers''': Formerly of Brooklyn ("trolley dodgers"), making their name an ArtifactTitle. In their Brooklyn days, they were one of the best teams in the National League, winning 12 NL pennants and being in contention practically every season, though they couldn't translate all those titles into success in the World Series (in those 12 trips, they only won once). They've been far more successful in LA, winning 9 NL pennants and 5 World Series. Noted for their TV/radio announcer Vin Scully (who was TheVoice of many a great baseball moment [[LongRunners from 1950]]—starting back in ''Brooklyn''—until retiring at the end of his 67th season in 2016), Spanish-language radio announcer Jaime Jarrín (another long runner at 58 seasons and counting), former manager [[BigHam Tommy Lasorda]], and [[BigNameFan Alyssa Milano]]. A running joke in baseball is that most Dodger fans are [[JustHereForGodzilla just there to be seen]] and will leave early to beat traffic ([[TruthInTelevision after arriving late because of traffic]]). The Dodgers were also the team of Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball's unofficial "color barrier" and remains a revered figure. All Major League teams have retired the number 42 because of Robinson. Lately known for their despised, now former, owners, the [=McCourts=], who purchased the team with loans against their Boston parking lot empire in 2004 and used the franchise as a piggy bank, before the MLB commissioner took control away during their bickering divorce and bankruptcy. The team was finally sold in March 2012 for 2 billion dollars to a consortium that included Earvin "Magic" Johnson, formerly of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Lakers]].

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* The '''UsefulNotes/LosAngeles Dodgers''': Formerly of Brooklyn ("trolley dodgers"), making their name an ArtifactTitle. In their Brooklyn days, they were one of the best teams in the National League, winning 12 NL pennants and being in contention practically every season, though they couldn't translate all those titles into success in the World Series (in those 12 trips, they only won once). They've been far more successful in LA, winning 9 NL pennants and 5 World Series. Noted for their TV/radio announcer Vin Scully (who was TheVoice of many a great baseball moment [[LongRunners from 1950]]—starting back in ''Brooklyn''—until retiring at the end of his 67th season in 2016), Spanish-language radio announcer Jaime Jarrín (another long runner at 58 59 seasons and counting), former manager [[BigHam Tommy Lasorda]], and [[BigNameFan Alyssa Milano]]. A running joke in baseball is that most Dodger fans are [[JustHereForGodzilla just there to be seen]] and will leave early to beat traffic ([[TruthInTelevision after arriving late because of traffic]]). The Dodgers were also the team of Jackie Robinson, UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson, who broke baseball's unofficial "color barrier" and remains a revered figure. All Major League teams have retired the number 42 because of Robinson. Lately known for their despised, now former, owners, the [=McCourts=], who purchased the team with loans against their Boston parking lot empire in 2004 and used the franchise as a piggy bank, before the MLB commissioner took control away during their bickering divorce and bankruptcy. The team was finally sold in March 2012 for 2 billion dollars to a consortium that included Earvin "Magic" Johnson, formerly of the [[UsefulNotes/NationalBasketballAssociation Lakers]].
9th Sep '17 4:03:01 PM nombretomado
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Washington|DC}} Nationals''': Founded in 1969 as the Montreal Expos, they are arguably TheChewToy of Major League Baseball. Sure, both the Phillies and the Braves have accumulated more than 10,000 losses, the Cubs had a nearly ''eleven decade''-long championship drought and have since joined the Phillies and Braves in the 10,000 loss club, the Red Sox spent decades always losing to their hated rival, the Pirates went 20 years without a winning season, the Rangers didn't win a playoff series for 50 years, and the Mets have to share a city with the Yankees, but all those teams have bright spots in their history as well. The Expos almost had one; they were leading their division in August 1994 and were considered a legitimate threat to win it all that year, only for the season to be cancelled by a strike (itself a DorkAge), leading to the first year without a World Series since 1904. Their owner spent the rest of the decade trading their stars for much cheaper players. This eventually resulted in the team being bought by the league, nearly eliminated altogether, and eventually sold and moved to Washington D.C. The old owner is now doing pretty much the same thing to his new team, the Florida/Miami Marlins (see their paragraph above). Oh, and don't confuse them with the Washington Senators—local politicians vow to oppose that name as long as Washington, D.C. [[AmericanPoliticalSystem has no vote in Congress]], and on top of that the previous Senators baseball club still owns the rights to the name even though they became the Texas Rangers in 1972. As a result of their team's suckage, Washington D.C. became subject to the old chestnut "First in war, first in peace, and last in the National League" (which was true of both Senators teams except with "American" instead of "National"). However, the Nationals have managed to turn things around by following the Rays' and Athletics' method of stockpiling high draft picks (the two most prominent being pitcher Stephen Strasburg and catcher-turned-outfielder Bryce Harper), and supplementing a strong farm system with savvy trades and good free agent signings. And unlike the A's and Rays, the Nats have a budget which should allow them to hang on to their stars. They finished with the best record in the National League in both 2012 and 2014, though they lost in the Division Series both times.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Washington|DC}} Nationals''': Founded in 1969 as the Montreal Expos, they are arguably TheChewToy of Major League Baseball. Sure, both the Phillies and the Braves have accumulated more than 10,000 losses, the Cubs had a nearly ''eleven decade''-long championship drought and have since joined the Phillies and Braves in the 10,000 loss club, the Red Sox spent decades always losing to their hated rival, the Pirates went 20 years without a winning season, the Rangers didn't win a playoff series for 50 years, and the Mets have to share a city with the Yankees, but all those teams have bright spots in their history as well. The Expos almost had one; they were leading their division in August 1994 and were considered a legitimate threat to win it all that year, only for the season to be cancelled by a strike (itself a DorkAge), leading to the first year without a World Series since 1904. Their owner spent the rest of the decade trading their stars for much cheaper players. This eventually resulted in the team being bought by the league, nearly eliminated altogether, and eventually sold and moved to Washington D.C. The old owner is now doing pretty much the same thing to his new team, the Florida/Miami Marlins (see their paragraph above). Oh, and don't confuse them with the Washington Senators—local politicians vow to oppose that name as long as Washington, D.C. [[AmericanPoliticalSystem [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem has no vote in Congress]], and on top of that the previous Senators baseball club still owns the rights to the name even though they became the Texas Rangers in 1972. As a result of their team's suckage, Washington D.C. became subject to the old chestnut "First in war, first in peace, and last in the National League" (which was true of both Senators teams except with "American" instead of "National"). However, the Nationals have managed to turn things around by following the Rays' and Athletics' method of stockpiling high draft picks (the two most prominent being pitcher Stephen Strasburg and catcher-turned-outfielder Bryce Harper), and supplementing a strong farm system with savvy trades and good free agent signings. And unlike the A's and Rays, the Nats have a budget which should allow them to hang on to their stars. They finished with the best record in the National League in both 2012 and 2014, though they lost in the Division Series both times.
13th Aug '17 12:55:01 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2015 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter), and been the only team to begin a season by being shutout in their first three games (getting outscored 25-0 by the Los Angeles Dodgers at ''home''). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, and closer Trevor Hoffman, who didn't make it to the Hall at his first chance in 2016 but looks likely to make it in the next year or two.[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as UsefulNotes/McDonalds) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
** Padres fans are generally regarded as knowledgeable and loyal, though one might say that's because the team has gone through such a rough time in the past 15 years that anyone remaining on the bandwagon has to be a fanatic.

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* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history-- history -- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2015 2016 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter), and been in 2016 became the only team to begin a season by being shutout in their first three games (getting outscored 25-0 by the Los Angeles Dodgers at ''home''). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn, Gwynn and closer Trevor Hoffman, who Hoffman (who didn't make it to the Hall at his first chance in 2016 but looks likely to make it in the next year or two.[[note]]Dave two)[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case. He case; he was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees.[[/note]] Yankees[[/note]]. Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as UsefulNotes/McDonalds) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
** Padres fans are generally regarded as knowledgeable and loyal, though one might say that's because the team has gone through such a rough time in the past 15 years for most of its history that anyone remaining on the bandwagon has ''has'' to be a fanatic.
13th Aug '17 12:40:11 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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** After Loria's 2012 gutting of the team, he easily became the most hated owner in baseball. Fans believed he crossed the baseball equivalent of the MoralEventHorizon.

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** After Loria's 2012 gutting of the team, he easily became the most hated owner in baseball. Fans from all teams believed he crossed the baseball equivalent of the MoralEventHorizon.MoralEventHorizon, and there was much rejoicing in 2017 when he finally agreed to sell to the team to a new ownership group headlined by incoming CEO Derek Jeter.
13th Aug '17 12:35:00 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese players and fans. They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martínez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Félix Hernández (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team retired Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), and the other four are major candidates for the honor as well.[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux.[[/note]] Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and was the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernández are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martínez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that the Mariners were owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 consoles]].

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese fans (thanks to the number of NPB players and fans.they've acquired over the years). They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martínez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Félix Hernández (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team retired Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's), Robinson's) and Martínez's number the following season, with the other four are three being major candidates for the honor as well.[[note]]Seattle has a special condition where they ''only'' retire a number if they played about 5 or so years with the Mariners and said player ends up going to the Hall of Fame. Although, we do admit it'll be interesting to see how they'll handle both Randy & Ichiro's numbers at the same time since they '''both''' had the same number there. Then again, that issue was no problem for the Chicago Cubs, who have retired 31 for both Ferguson Jenkins and Greg Maddux.[[/note]] well. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and was the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernández are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martínez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that the Mariners were owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 consoles]].
23rd Jul '17 10:20:07 AM Mdumas43073
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* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships) and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted fanbase (not surprising given that the Cards are ''by far'' the city's most consistently good sports team), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Though their fanbase has a reputation for niceness and knowledgeability, there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years, who point that St. Louis [[FanDumb has plenty of annoying racists and idiots too]]. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola (who would later carve out a career in game shows, most notably ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and ''[[Series/StrikeItLucky Strike It Rich]]''), and Jack Buck. (Jack's son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).

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* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships) and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted fanbase (not surprising given that the Cards are ''by far'' the city's most consistently good sports team), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Though their fanbase has a reputation for niceness and knowledgeability, there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years, who point that St. Louis [[FanDumb has plenty of annoying racists and idiots too]]. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola (who would later carve out a career in game shows, most notably ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and ''[[Series/StrikeItLucky Strike It Rich]]''), and Jack Buck. (Jack's Buck (whose son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).
3rd Jul '17 7:23:46 PM Mdumas43073
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** The Tigers have boasted several Hall of Famers in their history, including Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford in the 1900s and '10s, Hank Greenberg (the majors' first Jewish-American star) and Charlie Gehringer in the '30s and '40s, and Al Kaline in the '50s and '60s. Another Tigers Hall of Famer is late manager Sparky Anderson, who after leading the Cincinnati Reds to two World Series crowns in the 70s spent 17 seasons managing the Tigers, leading them to their last World Series title to date in 1984.[[note]]Although Anderson's Hall of Fame plaque shows him wearing a Reds cap, his official biography on the Hall's website lists his main team as the Tigers.[[/note]] Late broadcaster Ernie Harwell, who called the team's games for over 40 years, is a recipient of the Hall's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence. (Although broadcasters are not eligible for Hall of Fame membership, fans usually call Frick Award recipients "Hall of Fame broadcasters".)

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** The Tigers have boasted several Hall of Famers in their history, including Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford in the 1900s and '10s, Hank Greenberg (the majors' first Jewish-American star) and Charlie Gehringer in the '30s and '40s, and Al Kaline in the '50s and '60s. Another Tigers Hall of Famer is late manager Sparky Anderson, who after leading the Cincinnati Reds to two World Series crowns in the 70s spent 17 seasons managing the Tigers, leading them to their last World Series title to date in 1984.[[note]]Although Anderson's Hall of Fame plaque shows him wearing a Reds cap, his official biography on the Hall's website lists his main team as the Tigers.[[/note]] Late The late radio/TV broadcaster Ernie Harwell, who called the team's games for over 40 years, is a recipient of the Hall's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence. (Although broadcasters are not eligible for Hall of Fame membership, fans usually call Frick Award recipients "Hall of Fame broadcasters".)
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