History UsefulNotes / MLBTeams

30th Dec '17 11:26:50 PM gongoroth
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* The '''Cincinnati Reds''': Cincy was the first city to have a professional team (the Cincinnati Red Stockings), and although the current Reds aren't directly descended from that one (see: Atlanta Braves), the Reds are still generally considered the oldest club in the league (even though they aren't). Before [[ExecutiveMeddling TV ratings became important]], it was custom that the first major league game of every season take place in Cincy, and even today the Reds Home Opener is quite a big deal. The glory days of the Reds were the '70s, when they were called the ''Big Red Machine''. Longtime ESPN broadcaster Joe Morgan was a member of the Big Red Machine, and he would never let you forget it. Another bright spot came in 1990, when the Reds swept the World Series against the heavily-favored A's. Owned for a while by the [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} totally insane]] Marge Schott, famous for her racist tirades, collection of Nazi memorabilia, and devotion to her Saint Bernard, Schottzie. The Reds have eight players in the Hall of Fame, and would undoubtedly have a ninth if longtime player (and later manager) Pete Rose hadn't been expelled from MLB for life in 1989 due to betting on games.[[note]]Diehard Reds fans will often point out that if he ever bet on the Reds, he bet on them to win. This might have been true, but from MLB's perspective it's irrelevant; the leadership has wanted the game to have as little to do with gambling as possible ever since the "Black Sox" scandal. Once bitten, twice shy, as you might say.[[/note]]

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* The '''Cincinnati Reds''': Cincy was the first city to have a professional team (the Cincinnati Red Stockings), and although the current Reds aren't directly descended from that one (see: Atlanta Braves), so the Reds are still generally considered the oldest club in the league (even though they aren't).though, in the words of Joel Luckhaupt, "the line from the Reds back to that 1869 squad isn't a straight one"). Before [[ExecutiveMeddling TV ratings became important]], it was custom that the first major league game of every season take place in Cincy, and even today the Reds Home Opener is quite a big deal. The glory days of the Reds were the '70s, when they were called the ''Big Red Machine''. Longtime ESPN broadcaster Joe Morgan was a member of the Big Red Machine, and he would never let you forget it. Another bright spot came in 1990, when the Reds swept the World Series against the heavily-favored A's. Owned for a while by the [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} totally insane]] Marge Schott, famous for her racist tirades, collection of Nazi memorabilia, and devotion to her Saint Bernard, Schottzie. The Reds have eight players in the Hall of Fame, and would undoubtedly have a ninth if longtime player (and later manager) Pete Rose hadn't been expelled from MLB for life in 1989 due to betting on games.[[note]]Diehard Reds fans will often point out that if he ever bet on the Reds, he bet on them to win. This might have been true, but from MLB's perspective it's irrelevant; the leadership has wanted the game to have as little to do with gambling as possible ever since the "Black Sox" scandal. Once bitten, twice shy, as you might say.[[/note]]
11th Dec '17 3:33:26 AM InfinityPlusTwo
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Miami}} Marlins''': Formerly known as the Florida Marlins. Came into the league in 1993. Until 2012, they played their games in a giant football stadium intended for the NFL's Miami Dolphins to minuscule audiences that would make even a smaller stadium appear empty. Announced attendances were small enough already, usually hovering around 10,000, but the crowd actually in the stadium had a tendency to go into triple digits from time to time, to the point where hecklers who would never be heard in a [[ICantHearYou regular game setting]] were thrown out of the game as the umpire could hear them very well, and player chatter was [[QuieterThanSilence easily heard in the stands]] without amplification. In a stadium with a capacity over 75,000. This comes partly as a result of Miami being a football town (although this comes off as a rather LameExcuse as teams from other football towns—such as Los Angeles, which has ''two'' teams—have no attendance problems) and most notably the distance to the stadium from population areas (suburban stadiums distant from a city are fine for football games and concerts, but nobody wants to make that drive up to 81 times a year for baseball), but more as a result of poor ownership. Weather is also a factor; games in Miami are extremely prone to being rained (or even hurricaned) out. The Marlins have won two World Series championships in 1997 and 2003, but both titles, and several other seasons besides, were immediately followed by releasing or trading virtually every [[{{BreakoutCharacter}} breakout player]] on them. They made frequent threats to move the team if a new stadium was not built, which they finally got; they moved into it in 2012, it has both a retractable roof and a backstop featuring [[AwesomeButImpractical an aquarium with real fish]] (which will be protected with hopefully multiple layers of Lexan). As a side effect, the team changed its name to the Miami Marlins upon its move, a condition of the new stadium deal. Former owner Jeffrey Loria was arguably one of the most hated owners in baseball behind Baltimore's Angelos and New York's Steinbrenner. He's been accused of deliberately putting an inferior product on the field simply to save money, and has on two separate occasions fired a well-liked, well-respected manager for failing to win with such a cash-strapped lineup.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Miami}} Marlins''': Formerly known as the Florida Marlins. Came into the league in 1993. Until 2012, they played their games in a giant football stadium intended for the NFL's Miami Dolphins to minuscule audiences that would make even a smaller stadium appear empty. Announced attendances were small enough already, usually hovering around 10,000, but the crowd actually in the stadium had a tendency to go into triple digits from time to time, to the point where hecklers who would never be heard in a [[ICantHearYou regular game setting]] were thrown out of the game as the umpire could hear them very well, and player chatter was [[QuieterThanSilence easily heard in the stands]] without amplification. In a stadium with a capacity over 75,000. This comes partly as a result of Miami being a football town (although this comes off as a rather LameExcuse as teams from other football towns—such as Los Angeles, which has ''two'' teams—have no attendance problems) and most notably the distance to the stadium from population areas (suburban stadiums distant from a city are fine for football games and concerts, but nobody wants to make that drive up to 81 times a year for baseball), but more as a result of poor ownership. Weather is also a factor; games in Miami are were extremely prone to being rained (or even hurricaned) out.out before they moved into a stadium with a retractable roof, eliminating that problem (though the Marlins still do occasionally have to cancel a game due to a hurricane). The Marlins have won two World Series championships in 1997 and 2003, but both titles, and several other seasons besides, were immediately followed by releasing or trading virtually every [[{{BreakoutCharacter}} breakout player]] on them. They made frequent threats to move the team if a new stadium was not built, which they finally got; they moved into it in 2012, it has both a retractable roof and a backstop featuring [[AwesomeButImpractical an aquarium with real fish]] (which will be protected with hopefully multiple layers of Lexan). As a side effect, the team changed its name to the Miami Marlins upon its move, a condition of the new stadium deal. Former owner Jeffrey Loria was arguably one of the most hated owners in baseball behind Baltimore's Angelos and New York's Steinbrenner. He's been accused of deliberately putting an inferior product on the field simply to save money, and has on two separate occasions fired a well-liked, well-respected manager for failing to win with such a cash-strapped lineup.



** After Loria's 2012 gutting of the team, he easily became the most hated owner in baseball. Fans from all teams believed he crossed the baseball equivalent of the MoralEventHorizon, and there was much rejoicing in 2017 when he finally agreed to sell to the team to a new ownership group headlined by incoming CEO Derek Jeter.

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** After Loria's 2012 gutting of the team, he easily became the most hated owner in baseball. Fans from all teams believed he crossed the baseball equivalent of the MoralEventHorizon, and there was much rejoicing in 2017 when he finally agreed to sell to the team to a new ownership group headlined by incoming CEO Derek Jeter.Jeter- [[DontCelebrateJustYet which was soon followed by the revelation]] that the new ownership group had to go deeply into debt to actually buy the team and didn't really have the money to run it, [[HereWeGoAgain so they embarked on yet another fire sale]].
19th Nov '17 7:18:30 PM InfinityPlusTwo
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox''': UsefulNotes/BarackObama's favorite team (to the point where he wore their logo-jacket to an All-Star Game in St. Louis, resulting in an awkward situation), they also had a ButtMonkey era, which began, it is said, in 1919 when 8 of the team's players ("The Black Sox" or "the 8 Men Out"), including Shoeless Joe Jackson, either took, intended to take or knew the others were taking money to throw the World Series. All 8 of them were kicked out. Forever. And then the White Sox didn't win anything until 2005 (except for the AL pennant in 1959), when MagnificentBastard Ozzie Guillén (who had starred for them as a shortstop during TheNineties) guided them to a World Series championship. It still didn't make them more popular than the Cubs though, since the city [[NeverLiveItDown hasn't really forgiven them for the 1919 scandal]] and that unlike Boston, this championship turned out to be a fluke: the team quickly returned to mediocrity, and has ended more often than not dead last or in the best of times, blowing their chances (it does not help that Detroit and Kansas City have become the division's powerhouses). Play-by-play announcer Ken "Hawk" Harrelson is known for his memetic play-calling and embrace of bias for the Sox when most announcers at least try to present a neutral position ("He gone" when an opposing player strikes out, "can of corn" for any high pop-up, and his signature home run call of "You can put on the boooaaaard, YES!").

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox''': UsefulNotes/BarackObama's favorite team (to the point where he wore their logo-jacket to an All-Star Game in St. Louis, resulting in an awkward situation), they also had a ButtMonkey era, which began, it is said, in 1919 when 8 of the team's players ("The Black Sox" or "the 8 Men Out"), including Shoeless Joe Jackson, either took, intended to take or knew the others were taking money to throw the World Series. All 8 of them were kicked out. Forever. And then the White Sox didn't win anything until 2005 (except for the AL pennant in 1959), when MagnificentBastard Ozzie Guillén (who had starred for them as a shortstop during TheNineties) guided them to a World Series championship. It still didn't make them more popular than the Cubs though, since the city [[NeverLiveItDown hasn't really forgiven them for the 1919 scandal]] and that unlike Boston, this championship turned out to be a fluke: the team quickly returned to mediocrity, and has ended more often than not dead last or in the best of times, blowing their chances (it does not help that Detroit and Kansas City have become other teams in the Central became the division's powerhouses).powerhouses- the Twins in the late 2000's, the Tigers in the early 2010's, the Royals in the mid-10's, and now the Indians). Play-by-play announcer Ken "Hawk" Harrelson is known for his memetic play-calling and embrace of bias for the Sox when most announcers at least try to present a neutral position ("He gone" when an opposing player strikes out, "can of corn" for any high pop-up, and his signature home run call of "You can put on the boooaaaard, YES!").
13th Nov '17 11:48:23 PM The_Glorious_SOB
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* The '''Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim''': The other team in Greater Los Angeles area. Formerly known as the California Angels. They spent most of their history as the ButtMonkey of the area living in the shadow of the more popular and successful Dodgers and being a a place where past their prime players spent their final years. From its inception 1961 until his death in 1998, the team was owned by Gene Autry, a famous [[TheWestern Western film]] actor and singer. In the late '90s, the team was bought by Creator/{{Disney}} (which had begun to pour money into the club earlier in the decade, starting with the production of a remake of ''Film/AngelsInTheOutfield'' focused on the Angels instead of the Pirates). Upon the company's acquisition of the franchise, they changed the name to the Anaheim Angels and made the team one of the Dominant teams in the American League West, eventually winning their first (and so far only) World Series title in 2002. In 2004 Disney would eventually sell the team. The new owners decided to rename the team the Los Angeles Angels for marketing purposes, but because the team's contract with Anaheim contained a stipulation that "Anaheim" had to be part of the team name, this led to the rather cumbersome moniker "The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim"; much to Anaheim's (and the city the team borrowed without domicile, Los Angeles') dismay, there [[AintNoRule isn't a rule]] about two cities being used in a team's name, and the new name obeyed the ExactWords of the contract. As a BilingualBonus, Los Angeles ''means'' 'The Angels' in Spanish, so the name is effectively "[[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment The The Angels Angels of Anaheim]]." Angels' fans are noted for using Thunder Sticks, and being generally loud and enthusiastic (although the "leave early to beat traffic" thing still does occur every once and awhile). The team's mascot is the Rally Monkey (a capuchin monkey dressed in team apparel whose appearances are usually on videotape) who made his debut during the 2002 title run. Their biggest rivals are the Oakland Athletics, though they also have a strong inter-league rivalry with the Dodgers.

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* The '''Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim''': The other team in Greater Los Angeles area. Formerly known as the California Angels. They spent most of their history as the ButtMonkey of the area living in the shadow of the more popular and successful Dodgers and being a a place where past their prime past-their-prime players spent their final years. From its inception 1961 until his death in 1998, the team was owned by Gene Autry, a famous [[TheWestern Western film]] actor and singer. In the late '90s, the team was bought by Creator/{{Disney}} (which had begun to pour money into the club earlier in the decade, starting with the production of a remake of ''Film/AngelsInTheOutfield'' focused on the Angels instead of the Pirates). Upon the company's acquisition of the franchise, they changed the name to the Anaheim Angels and made the team one of the Dominant teams in the American League West, eventually winning their first (and so far only) World Series title in 2002. In 2004 Disney would eventually sell the team. The new owners decided to rename the team the Los Angeles Angels for marketing purposes, but because the team's contract with Anaheim contained a stipulation that "Anaheim" had to be part of the team name, this led to the rather cumbersome moniker "The Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim"; much to Anaheim's (and the city the team borrowed without domicile, Los Angeles') dismay, there [[AintNoRule isn't a rule]] about two cities being used in a team's name, and the new name obeyed the ExactWords of the contract. As a BilingualBonus, Los Angeles ''means'' 'The Angels' in Spanish, so the name is effectively "[[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment The The Angels Angels of Anaheim]]." Angels' fans are noted for using Thunder Sticks, and being generally loud and enthusiastic (although the "leave early to beat traffic" thing still does occur every once and awhile). The team's mascot is the Rally Monkey (a capuchin monkey dressed in team apparel whose appearances are usually on videotape) who made his debut during the 2002 title run. Their biggest rivals are the Oakland Athletics, though they also have a strong inter-league rivalry with the Dodgers.
13th Nov '17 11:43:07 PM The_Glorious_SOB
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox''': UsefulNotes/BarackObama's favorite team (to the point where he wore their logo-jacket to an All-Star Game in St. Louis, resulting in a awkward situation), they also had a ButtMonkey era, which began, it is said, in 1919 when 8 of the team's players ("The Black Sox" or "the 8 Men Out"), including Shoeless Joe Jackson, either took, intended to take or knew the others were taking money to throw the World Series. All 8 of them were kicked out. Forever. And then the White Sox didn't win anything until 2005 (except for the AL pennant in 1959), when MagnificentBastard Ozzie Guillén (who had starred for them as a shortstop during TheNineties) guided them to a World Series championship. It still didn't make them more popular than the Cubs though, since the city [[NeverLiveItDown hasn't really forgiven them for the 1919 scandal]] and that unlike Boston, this championship turned out to be a fluke: the team quickly returned to mediocrity, and has ended more often than not dead last or in the best of times, blowing their chances (it does not help that Detroit and Kansas City have become the division's powerhouses). Play-by-play announcer Ken "Hawk" Harrelson is known for his memetic play-calling and embrace of bias for the Sox when most announcers at least try to present a neutral position ("He gone" when an opposing player strikes out, "can of corn" for any high pop-up, and his signature home run call of "You can put on the boooaaaard, YES!").

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox''': UsefulNotes/BarackObama's favorite team (to the point where he wore their logo-jacket to an All-Star Game in St. Louis, resulting in a an awkward situation), they also had a ButtMonkey era, which began, it is said, in 1919 when 8 of the team's players ("The Black Sox" or "the 8 Men Out"), including Shoeless Joe Jackson, either took, intended to take or knew the others were taking money to throw the World Series. All 8 of them were kicked out. Forever. And then the White Sox didn't win anything until 2005 (except for the AL pennant in 1959), when MagnificentBastard Ozzie Guillén (who had starred for them as a shortstop during TheNineties) guided them to a World Series championship. It still didn't make them more popular than the Cubs though, since the city [[NeverLiveItDown hasn't really forgiven them for the 1919 scandal]] and that unlike Boston, this championship turned out to be a fluke: the team quickly returned to mediocrity, and has ended more often than not dead last or in the best of times, blowing their chances (it does not help that Detroit and Kansas City have become the division's powerhouses). Play-by-play announcer Ken "Hawk" Harrelson is known for his memetic play-calling and embrace of bias for the Sox when most announcers at least try to present a neutral position ("He gone" when an opposing player strikes out, "can of corn" for any high pop-up, and his signature home run call of "You can put on the boooaaaard, YES!").
2nd Nov '17 3:27:38 AM KYCubbie
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese fans (thanks to the number of NPB players they've acquired over the years). They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martínez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Félix Hernández (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team retired Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' first officially retired number other than Robinson's) and Martínez's number the following season, with the other three being major candidates for the honor as well. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and was the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernández are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martínez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that the Mariners were owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 consoles]].

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Seattle}} Mariners''' have a reputation as a consistently mediocre team with a high number of Japanese fans (thanks to the number of NPB players they've acquired over the years). They are one of only two teams (along with the Washington Nationals) who have never played in the World Series, with the team's only real run of success coming from 1995-2001, when they made the playoffs four times and advanced to the League Championship Series in three of those four occasions (though they never got any further); in 2001, they had the best regular season record in baseball history. To add insult to injury, the four aforementioned playoff appearances remain the sum total of the Mariners' postseason history; an ill-fated attempt to spend their way into the playoffs in the [=mid-2000s=] ended with them becoming the first $100 million+ payroll team to lose at least 100 games. The club has had a few stars in its history, most notably Edgar Martínez, Ken Griffey Jr., Randy Johnson, Ichiro Suzuki, and Félix Hernández (who pitched the first perfect game in team history); the team retired Griffey's number in the middle of the 2016 season (making it the Mariners' history). The M's first officially retired number other (other than Robinson's) and was that of Griffey, which the team retired before the 2016 season (the ceremony was held in midseason)—not just for the Mariners themselves, but also for ''all their minor-league affiliates''. Martínez's number was retired the following season, with the other three being season. Johnson, Ichiro, and Hernández are major candidates for the honor as well. Johnson was elected to the Hall of Fame in 2014, but was inducted as a member of the Arizona Diamondbacks, with whom he won a World Series and had debatably greater success than with the Mariners. Griffey was elected the next year, breaking the record for highest percentage of votes (99.3%) and was the first player to enter the Hall as a Mariner. Ichiro and Hernández are generally expected to make the Hall after their retirement, while the only obstacle standing in the way of Martínez's induction is that he was mostly a DH. Alex Rodriguez also began his career with the Mariners before moving on to greater fame with the Rangers and Yankees. An interesting note is that the Mariners were owned by Creator/{{Nintendo}} from 1992 to 2016. It explains how Ken Griffey Jr. got a couple of video games on some of [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Nintendo's]] [[UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 consoles]].



* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Miami}} Marlins''': Formerly known as the Florida Marlins. Came into the league in 1993. Until 2012, they played their games in a giant football stadium intended for the NFL's Miami Dolphins to minuscule audiences that would make even a smaller stadium appear empty. Announced attendances were small enough already, usually hovering around 10,000, but the crowd actually in the stadium had a tendency to go into triple digits from time to time, to the point where hecklers who would never be heard in a [[ICantHearYou regular game setting]] were thrown out of the game as the umpire could hear them very well, and player chatter was [[QuieterThanSilence easily heard in the stands]] without amplification. In a stadium with a capacity over 75,000. This comes partly as a result of Miami being a football town (although this comes off as a rather LameExcuse as teams from other football towns—such as Los Angeles, which has ''two'' teams—have no attendance problems) and most notably the distance to the stadium from population areas (suburban stadiums distant from a city are fine for football games and concerts, but nobody wants to make that drive up to 81 times a year for baseball), but more as a result of poor ownership. Weather is also a factor; games in Miami are extremely prone to being rained (or even hurricaned) out. The Marlins have won two World Series championships in 1997 and 2003, but both titles, and several other seasons besides, were immediately followed by releasing or trading virtually every [[{{BreakoutCharacter}} breakout player]] on them. They made frequent threats to move the team if a new stadium was not built, which they finally got; they moved into it in 2012, it has both a retractable roof and a backstop featuring [[AwesomeButImpractical an aquarium with real fish]] (which will be protected with hopefully multiple layers of Lexan). As a side effect, the team changed its name to the Miami Marlins upon its move, a condition of the new stadium deal. Current Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria is arguably one of the most hated owners in baseball behind Baltimore's Angelos and New York's Steinbrenner. He's been accused of deliberately putting an inferior product on the field simply to save money, and has on two separate occasions fired a well-liked, well-respected manager for failing to win with such a cash-strapped lineup.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Miami}} Marlins''': Formerly known as the Florida Marlins. Came into the league in 1993. Until 2012, they played their games in a giant football stadium intended for the NFL's Miami Dolphins to minuscule audiences that would make even a smaller stadium appear empty. Announced attendances were small enough already, usually hovering around 10,000, but the crowd actually in the stadium had a tendency to go into triple digits from time to time, to the point where hecklers who would never be heard in a [[ICantHearYou regular game setting]] were thrown out of the game as the umpire could hear them very well, and player chatter was [[QuieterThanSilence easily heard in the stands]] without amplification. In a stadium with a capacity over 75,000. This comes partly as a result of Miami being a football town (although this comes off as a rather LameExcuse as teams from other football towns—such as Los Angeles, which has ''two'' teams—have no attendance problems) and most notably the distance to the stadium from population areas (suburban stadiums distant from a city are fine for football games and concerts, but nobody wants to make that drive up to 81 times a year for baseball), but more as a result of poor ownership. Weather is also a factor; games in Miami are extremely prone to being rained (or even hurricaned) out. The Marlins have won two World Series championships in 1997 and 2003, but both titles, and several other seasons besides, were immediately followed by releasing or trading virtually every [[{{BreakoutCharacter}} breakout player]] on them. They made frequent threats to move the team if a new stadium was not built, which they finally got; they moved into it in 2012, it has both a retractable roof and a backstop featuring [[AwesomeButImpractical an aquarium with real fish]] (which will be protected with hopefully multiple layers of Lexan). As a side effect, the team changed its name to the Miami Marlins upon its move, a condition of the new stadium deal. Current Marlins Former owner Jeffrey Loria is was arguably one of the most hated owners in baseball behind Baltimore's Angelos and New York's Steinbrenner. He's been accused of deliberately putting an inferior product on the field simply to save money, and has on two separate occasions fired a well-liked, well-respected manager for failing to win with such a cash-strapped lineup.



* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Washington|DC}} Nationals''': Founded in 1969 as the Montreal Expos, they are arguably TheChewToy of Major League Baseball. Sure, both the Phillies and the Braves have accumulated more than 10,000 losses, the Cubs had a nearly ''eleven decade''-long championship drought and have since joined the Phillies and Braves in the 10,000 loss club, the Red Sox spent decades always losing to their hated rival, the Pirates went 20 years without a winning season, the Rangers didn't win a playoff series for 50 years, and the Mets have to share a city with the Yankees, but all those teams have bright spots in their history as well. The Expos almost had one; they were leading their division in August 1994 and were considered a legitimate threat to win it all that year, only for the season to be cancelled by a strike (itself a DorkAge), leading to the first year without a World Series since 1904. Their owner spent the rest of the decade trading their stars for much cheaper players. This eventually resulted in the team being bought by the league, nearly eliminated altogether, and eventually sold and moved to Washington D.C. The old owner is now doing pretty much the same thing to his new team, the Florida/Miami Marlins (see their paragraph above). Oh, and don't confuse them with the Washington Senators—local politicians vow to oppose that name as long as Washington, D.C. [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem has no vote in Congress]], and on top of that the previous Senators baseball club still owns the rights to the name even though they became the Texas Rangers in 1972. As a result of their team's suckage, Washington D.C. became subject to the old chestnut "First in war, first in peace, and last in the National League" (which was true of both Senators teams except with "American" instead of "National"). However, the Nationals have managed to turn things around by following the Rays' and Athletics' method of stockpiling high draft picks (the two most prominent being pitcher Stephen Strasburg and catcher-turned-outfielder Bryce Harper), and supplementing a strong farm system with savvy trades and good free agent signings. And unlike the A's and Rays, the Nats have a budget which should allow them to hang on to their stars. They finished with the best record in the National League in both 2012 and 2014, though they lost in the Division Series both times.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Washington|DC}} Nationals''': Founded in 1969 as the Montreal Expos, they are arguably TheChewToy of Major League Baseball. Sure, both the Phillies and the Braves have accumulated more than 10,000 losses, the Cubs had a nearly ''eleven decade''-long championship drought and have since joined the Phillies and Braves in the 10,000 loss club, the Red Sox spent decades always losing to their hated rival, the Pirates went 20 years without a winning season, the Rangers didn't win a playoff series for 50 years, and the Mets have to share a city with the Yankees, but all those teams have bright spots in their history as well. The Expos almost had one; they were leading their division in August 1994 and were considered a legitimate threat to win it all that year, only for the season to be cancelled by a strike (itself a DorkAge), leading to the first year without a World Series since 1904. Their owner spent the rest of the decade trading their stars for much cheaper players. This eventually resulted in the team being bought by the league, nearly eliminated altogether, and eventually sold and moved to Washington D.C. The old owner is now doing went on to do pretty much the same thing to his new team, the Florida/Miami Marlins (see their paragraph above). Oh, and don't confuse them with the Washington Senators—local politicians vow to oppose that name as long as Washington, D.C. [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem has no vote in Congress]], and on top of that the previous Senators baseball club still owns the rights to the name even though they became the Texas Rangers in 1972. As a result of their team's suckage, Washington D.C. became subject to the old chestnut "First in war, first in peace, and last in the National League" (which was true of both Senators teams except with "American" instead of "National"). However, the Nationals have managed to turn things around by following the Rays' and Athletics' method of stockpiling high draft picks (the two most prominent being pitcher Stephen Strasburg and catcher-turned-outfielder Bryce Harper), and supplementing a strong farm system with savvy trades and good free agent signings. And unlike the A's and Rays, the Nats have a budget which should allow them to hang on to their stars. They finished with the best record in the National League in both 2012 and 2014, though they lost in the Division Series both times.
1st Nov '17 9:58:22 PM TotemicHero
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]): The current World Champions. They are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} the ugliest uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their first World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). While they were the worst team in all of baseball from 2011 to 2013 (losing an average of 108 games per season during those years), by 2015 they had reestablished themselves as a force to be reckoned with; in 2017, they not only had the best record in the entire American League, but went on to finally win their first World Series (and becoming the first and only team to go to the World Series as both an AL team and an NL team). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]): The current World Champions. They are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} the ugliest uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their first World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). While they were the worst team in all of baseball from 2011 to 2013 (losing an average of 108 games per season during those years), by 2015 they had reestablished themselves as a force to be reckoned with; in 2017, they not only had the best record in the entire American League, over 100 wins, but went on to finally win their first World Series (and becoming the first and only team to go to the World Series as both an AL team and an NL team). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.
1st Nov '17 9:56:37 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]): The current World Champions. They are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} the ugliest uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their first World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.
** In 2017, the Astros beat Yankees in ALCS and become the first and only team to go the World Series as both an AL team and a NL team.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]): The current World Champions. They are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} the ugliest uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their first World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). While they were the worst team in all of baseball from 2011 to 2013 (losing an average of 108 games per season during those years), by 2015 they had reestablished themselves as a force to be reckoned with; in 2017, they not only had the best record in the entire American League, but went on to finally win their first World Series (and becoming the first and only team to go to the World Series as both an AL team and an NL team). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues. \n** In 2017, the Astros beat Yankees in ALCS and become the first and only team to go the World Series as both an AL team and a NL team.
1st Nov '17 9:18:52 PM Kalle
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The current defending [[UsefulNotes/WorldSeries World Series]] (and, therefore, MLB) champions are the Chicago Cubs, who prior to this had not won a World Series in one hundred and eight years. ([[OneHundredAndEight Make of that what you will.]])

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The current defending [[UsefulNotes/WorldSeries World Series]] (and, therefore, MLB) champions are the Chicago Cubs, Houston Astros, who prior to this had not finally won a World Series their first title in one hundred and eight years. ([[OneHundredAndEight Make of that what you will.]])
2017.



* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} the ugliest uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their first World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Houston}} Astros''' (originally the [[AwesomeMcCoolname Colt .45s]]) 45s]]): The current World Champions. They are the world record holders for [[{{WTHCostumingDepartment}} the ugliest uniforms]]. MLB awarded the franchise in 1962 when owners unable to obtain expansion teams decided to form their own league, the Continental League. The league was intended solely to [[{{The Plan}} bluff]] MLB into awarding their cities MLB franchises; the Astros were awarded in response along with the Washington Senators (now Texas Rangers), Anaheim (now Los Angeles) Angels, and New York Mets. A National League team for their first half-century of existence, the Astros are responsible for both the domed stadium (the Astrodome) and, because grass doesn't grow indoors, for artificial turf, better known as [=AstroTurf=]. The team often contends, but [[{{EveryYearTheyFizzleOut}} just as often fizzles out]], with their most notable streak of success coming in the late 1990s and early 2000s (which includes their first World Series appearance in 2005, where they got swept by the Chicago White Sox). If you're any kind of player and have a last name starting with B, join the Astros and you're the next [[{{GangOfHats}} Killer B]], a reference to a period when the team had several very good players whose last names all began with the letter B (Jeff Bagwell, Craig Biggio, Lance Berkman, and several lesser names). Moved into [[{{UnfortunateNames}} Enron Field]] in 2000, just in time for Enron to have a major Enron-killing scandal; the stadium was quickly rebranded into Minute Maid Park. In 2011, Jim Crane officially decided to buy the team, in exchange for their move into the AL West (Pacific) division in 2013; this makes them the second of the currently operating teams to have switched leagues.



* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs'''[[note]]The name refers to bear cubs; the Chicago Bears NFL team is similarly named[[/note]]: The current World Champions. TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team in America's big four league that is still in existence[[note]]As a comparison, NBA's oldest team is the Pistons, founded in 1941; NFL's oldest team is the Cardinals, founded in 1898; while NHL's oldest team is the Canadiens, founded in 1909. For more comparison, English Premier League's oldest team (that have competed in the Premier League era, i.e. 1992 until now) is Stoke City, founded in 1863[[/note]]; they had previously not won the World Series since 1908, and hadn't even reached it with a National League Championship since 1945. [[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' previous World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946), not to mention the MLB arrival of UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson (1947), the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire (1923) and the Qing Dynasty (1911), and even the construction of RMS ''Titanic'' (1909).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success was the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly had been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuturePartII some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). However, they were done justice by going all the way, taking the World Series in seven games over the Indians in 2016. This was a fitting conclusion of their deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought), and has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead of them. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} Cubs'''[[note]]The name refers to bear cubs; the Chicago Bears NFL team is similarly named[[/note]]: The current World Champions. TheWoobie of Major League Baseball, and the oldest professional team in America's big four league that is still in existence[[note]]As a comparison, NBA's oldest team is the Pistons, founded in 1941; NFL's oldest team is the Cardinals, founded in 1898; while NHL's oldest team is the Canadiens, founded in 1909. For more comparison, English Premier League's oldest team (that have competed in the Premier League era, i.e. 1992 until now) is Stoke City, founded in 1863[[/note]]; they had previously not won the World Series since 1908, and hadn't even reached it with a National League Championship since 1945. [[note]]To put this in perspective, the Cubs' previous World Series win predates the ''formation'' of the NHL (1917), NFL (1920), and NBA (1946), not to mention the MLB arrival of UsefulNotes/JackieRobinson (1947), the dissolution of the Ottoman Empire (1923) and the Qing Dynasty (1911), and even the construction of RMS ''Titanic'' (1909).[[/note]] Superstitious Cubs fans claim that the team's lack of postseason success was the result of the "Curse of the Billy Goat" ([[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin don't ask]]), although this mostly had been the result of a series of misfortunes led by perpetual money shortages, including a succession of owners (one of them previously owned a ''Federal League'' team), a lot of losing seasons (barely hovering over .500 in their winning seasons[[note]]though at least they never spent more than ''10'' consecutive years losing[[/note]]), Chicago's traditionally bad luck in sports until recent years (though of course the Cubs haven't benefited too much from the rising tide yet [and neither the Sox for that matter, despite their 2005 championship [[note]]see above for more details[[/note]]). Even when they do play well, [[EveryYearTheyFizzleOut it pretty much always ends in heartbreak]]; they've had some agonizingly close calls (most prominently 1984 and 2003), and when [[ThrowTheDogABone they actually got into the NLCS in 2015]] after five straight losing seasons, [[YankTheDogsChain they ended up being swept by the Mets]]... on the same day [[Film/BackToTheFuturePartII some flick predicted]] ''[[{{Irony}} they]]'' [[{{Irony}} would sweep the World Series]] (fans rejoiced anyways since they beat [[TheRival the hated Cardinals]] in the Division Series for the first time). However, they were done justice by going all the way, taking the World Series in seven games over the Indians in 2016. This was a fitting conclusion of their deliberately painful rebuild under the oversight of Theo Epstein (the same man who helped end the Red Sox's own championship drought), and has turned the Cubs into a talented young team with a seemingly bright future ahead of them. They play in Wrigley Field, the oldest park in the National League (1914, originally used by the Federal League Whales), and second oldest in all of baseball, behind only Boston's Fenway Park, and, also like Fenway Park, among the most well-known and loved Major League stadiums. It's famous for countless quirks such as ivy-covered outfield walls, fans sitting on nearby rooftops to watch the game, and the fact that night games were not allowed there until 1988. They are also well known for now-deceased broadcaster Harry Caray, known for his 7th inning renditions of "Take Me Out To The Ballgame" as well as his unique approach to color commentary.
24th Oct '17 7:58:28 AM Mdumas43073
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* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history -- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2016 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter), and in 2016 became the only team to begin a season by being shutout in their first three games (getting outscored 25-0 by the Los Angeles Dodgers at ''home''). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn and closer Trevor Hoffman (who didn't make it to the Hall at his first chance in 2016 but looks likely to make it in the next year or two)[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case; he was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees[[/note]]. Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as UsefulNotes/McDonalds) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their long-time radio announcer Jerry Coleman was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.

to:

* The '''San Diego Padres''' are traditionally something of a ButtMonkey in the league, seemingly only receiving national attention for being on the wrong side of history -- they've surrendered several historical milestones (gave up Barry Bonds' record-tying 755th home run and Pete Rose's record-breaking 4,192nd base hit, were no-hit by pitcher Dock Ellis whilst the latter was high on LSD, and are one of only two teams to be no-hit twice by the same pitcher [that pitcher being Tim Lincecum of the Giants, with both no-hitters coming during otherwise poor seasons for him]), collapsed multiple times at the end of the regular season to allow division rivals to key up a MiracleRally (notably to the Colorado Rockies in 2007 and San Francisco Giants in 2010 -- both teams would eventually win the NL pennant, and the Giants won the World Series that year), had few players reach individual success (through the end of the 2016 season, San Diego remains the only team in baseball to have never had a player record a no-hitter), and in 2016 became the only team to begin a season by being shutout in their first three games (getting outscored 25-0 by the Los Angeles Dodgers at ''home''). The Padres typically field ok-to-mediocre teams, and few players get much in the way of national attention due to the team's small market and offense-unfriendly stadium. They've reached the World Series twice, but lost both times. The only players to really achieve superstardom with the Padres are Hall-of-Famer Tony Gwynn and closer Trevor Hoffman (who didn't make it to the Hall at his first chance in 2016 but looks likely to make it in the next year or two)[[note]]Dave Winfield is an arguable case; he was an established top player with the Padres, but didn't become nationally well-known until he joined the Yankees[[/note]]. Known for odd public address-related incidents; in the team's very first home game under owner Ray O. Kroc (the same as UsefulNotes/McDonalds) in 1974, Kroc grabbed the microphone and apologized to the befuddled crowd for the team's poor performance. Later, in 1990, they got Roseanne Arnold to sing the National Anthem for some reason, and she delivered a deliberately horrible rendition that briefly irritated the entire country. And finally, their Their long-time radio announcer announcer, the late Jerry Coleman Coleman, was well known for frequently saying things that just plain didn't make any sense ("It's a high sky out there, and that can get you in trouble if you get caught in the middle of it."), and while former television broadcaster Dick Enberg has been was known to openly root for the opposing team during losing streaks. Also known for their former mascot, the San Diego Chicken, who is the reason most teams have annoying mascots today, and their distinctive uniforms: both the 1970's era brown-and-yellows and the modern camouflage uniforms -- which are a tribute to San Diego being America's largest military town -- are widely regarded as some of the ugliest ever, though even these have their defenders.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.MLBTeams