History UsefulNotes / MLBTeams

23rd Jul '17 10:20:07 AM Mdumas43073
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* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships) and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted fanbase (not surprising given that the Cards are ''by far'' the city's most consistently good sports team), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Though their fanbase has a reputation for niceness and knowledgeability, there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years, who point that St. Louis [[FanDumb has plenty of annoying racists and idiots too]]. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola (who would later carve out a career in game shows, most notably ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and ''[[Series/StrikeItLucky Strike It Rich]]''), and Jack Buck. (Jack's son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).

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* The '''UsefulNotes/StLouis Cardinals''': The most successful team in the National League during the World Series era (11 championships) and by far the most popular "small market" franchise, the Cardinals are noted for their highly-devoted fanbase (not surprising given that the Cards are ''by far'' the city's most consistently good sports team), their seemingly infinite well of minor league talent (their general manager from the 20s to early 40s, Branch Rickey, basically invented the modern farm system), their ability to consistently field solid teams (no back-to-back losing seasons since the end of 1959 [with the exception of strike-shortened 1994], by far the longest streak of its kind in all of MLB), and their rivalry with the Chicago Cubs (it is said that the ''only'' way you can get booed in Busch Stadium is if you are wearing a Chicago jersey - just ask UsefulNotes/BarackObama[[note]]He was wearing a ''White Sox'' jacket, for chrissakes![[/note]]). Though their fanbase has a reputation for niceness and knowledgeability, there has been some understandable HypeBacklash from other fanbases towards this notion in recent years, who point that St. Louis [[FanDumb has plenty of annoying racists and idiots too]]. Three Hall of Fame broadcasters were once employed by the Cardinals: Harry Caray (who spent 25 years in St. Louis before moving to Chicago), catcher-turned-announcer Joe Garagiola (who would later carve out a career in game shows, most notably ''Series/ToTellTheTruth'' and ''[[Series/StrikeItLucky Strike It Rich]]''), and Jack Buck. (Jack's Buck (whose son Joe is the current main broadcaster of both MLB and the NFL for Fox.) The Cardinals are currently best-known for their insane comeback from being 10 1/2 games (21 actual games) back from the Wild Card spot to winning the 2011 World Series, embracing most of the underdog-related sports tropes on this website. Game 6 alone brought them [[DownToTheLastPlay Down To The Last Strike]] ''twice'' and yet they pulled it out, proving to be both TruthInTelevision and RealityIsUnrealistic. Probably the highest-profile Cardinals fan today is Creator/JonHamm (a St. Louis native).
3rd Jul '17 7:23:46 PM Mdumas43073
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** The Tigers have boasted several Hall of Famers in their history, including Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford in the 1900s and '10s, Hank Greenberg (the majors' first Jewish-American star) and Charlie Gehringer in the '30s and '40s, and Al Kaline in the '50s and '60s. Another Tigers Hall of Famer is late manager Sparky Anderson, who after leading the Cincinnati Reds to two World Series crowns in the 70s spent 17 seasons managing the Tigers, leading them to their last World Series title to date in 1984.[[note]]Although Anderson's Hall of Fame plaque shows him wearing a Reds cap, his official biography on the Hall's website lists his main team as the Tigers.[[/note]] Late broadcaster Ernie Harwell, who called the team's games for over 40 years, is a recipient of the Hall's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence. (Although broadcasters are not eligible for Hall of Fame membership, fans usually call Frick Award recipients "Hall of Fame broadcasters".)

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** The Tigers have boasted several Hall of Famers in their history, including Ty Cobb and Sam Crawford in the 1900s and '10s, Hank Greenberg (the majors' first Jewish-American star) and Charlie Gehringer in the '30s and '40s, and Al Kaline in the '50s and '60s. Another Tigers Hall of Famer is late manager Sparky Anderson, who after leading the Cincinnati Reds to two World Series crowns in the 70s spent 17 seasons managing the Tigers, leading them to their last World Series title to date in 1984.[[note]]Although Anderson's Hall of Fame plaque shows him wearing a Reds cap, his official biography on the Hall's website lists his main team as the Tigers.[[/note]] Late The late radio/TV broadcaster Ernie Harwell, who called the team's games for over 40 years, is a recipient of the Hall's Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence. (Although broadcasters are not eligible for Hall of Fame membership, fans usually call Frick Award recipients "Hall of Fame broadcasters".)
7th Jun '17 1:23:41 AM KYCubbie
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** The Tigers also have an interesting pattern in their ownership history: they have the distinction of having been owned by the founders of Domino's Pizza (Tom Monaghan) and Little Caesars Pizza (Mike Ilitch). Both are from the Detroit area and life-long Tigers fans (Ilitch is a Detroit sports fan in general, and also owns [[UsefulNotes/IceHockey the Detroit Red Wings]] of the UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague).

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** The Tigers also have an interesting pattern in their ownership history: they have the distinction of having been owned by the founders of Domino's Pizza (Tom Monaghan) and Little Caesars Pizza (Mike Ilitch). Both are from the Detroit area and life-long Tigers fans (Ilitch is was a Detroit sports fan in general, and also owns owned [[UsefulNotes/IceHockey the Detroit Red Wings]] of the UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague).UsefulNotes/NationalHockeyLeague until his death in 2017).
28th May '17 3:22:59 PM Mullon
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{New York|City}} Mets''': TheUnfavourite of the two New York baseball teams, the Mets (a shortened version of '''Metropolitans''', the name of an old New York baseball team from the 19th century) have, for most their history, been the polar opposite of their more popular and older brother. They tend to go through cycles of brilliant play for five or six years followed by stretches where they're one of the worst teams in the league. They've won two World Series titles, both of which are the source of major Baseball mythology (the first one literally considered a miracle, the second one only happening because they were playing the Red Sox during their [[TheWoobie Curse of the Bambino]] stage (see: Bill Buckner). The Mets' first season (1962) featured only 40 wins in 160 games, and is considered the worst team in modern history. In the 1990s and early 2000s, they frequently sported one of the higher budgets in the majors, only to have an uncanny tendency to collapse in the season's final weeks; in 2007, they coughed up a seven game lead with seventeen to play, then did the same in 2008 with a three and a half game lead, both times losing the division race to their hated rival the Phillies. In 2009, a rash of injuries caused them to tumble to fourth place, sending them into rebuilding mode (which did help them to acquire a surplus of promising young pitching talent). Their situation hasn't been helped by their owners, the Wilpon family, losing millions of dollars in the Bernie Madoff scandal, forcing them to curb their spendthrift ways and creating the bizarre sight of a New York team being forced to take the field with a severely underfinanced roster. Things turned around greatly in 2015, however, as the team's young talented pitching staff began to gel, and the pickup for Yoenis Cespedes helped bring the offense to life and leading them to the Fall Classic, though they lost in 5 to the Kansas City Royals. Despite their checkered on field history, they have their fans ([[BigNameFan most notably]] [[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]], Jerry Seinfeld, and Music/LadyGaga). Everybody loves an underdog, right? The Mets are also infamous for attracting somewhat rowdy, undisciplined players; as a case in point, many of the players on the 1986 World Series team had cocaine problems at some point during their career.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{New York|City}} Mets''': TheUnfavourite of the two New York baseball teams, the Mets (a shortened version of '''Metropolitans''', the name of an old New York baseball team from the 19th century) have, for most their history, been the polar opposite of their more popular and older brother. They tend to go through cycles of brilliant play for five or six years followed by stretches where they're one of the worst teams in the league. They've won two World Series titles, both of which are the source of major Baseball mythology (the first one literally considered a miracle, the second one only happening because they were playing the Red Sox during their [[TheWoobie Curse of the Bambino]] stage (see: Bill Buckner). The Mets' first season (1962) featured only 40 wins in 160 games, and is considered the worst team in modern history. In the 1990s and early 2000s, they frequently sported one of the higher budgets in the majors, only to have an uncanny tendency to collapse in the season's final weeks; in 2007, they coughed up a seven game lead with seventeen to play, then did the same in 2008 with a three and a half game lead, both times losing the division race to their hated rival the Phillies. In 2009, a rash of injuries caused them to tumble to fourth place, sending them into rebuilding mode (which did help them to acquire a surplus of promising young pitching talent). Their situation hasn't been helped by their owners, the Wilpon family, losing millions of dollars in the Bernie Madoff scandal, forcing them to curb their spendthrift ways and creating the bizarre sight of a New York team being forced to take the field with a severely underfinanced roster. Things turned around greatly in 2015, however, as the team's young talented pitching staff began to gel, and the pickup for Yoenis Cespedes helped bring the offense to life and leading them to the Fall Classic, though they lost in 5 to the Kansas City Royals. Despite their checkered on field history, they have their fans ([[BigNameFan most notably]] [[Series/TheDailyShow Jon Stewart]], Jerry Seinfeld, Creator/JonStewart, Creator/JerrySeinfeld, Music/LadyGaga, and Music/LadyGaga).Franchise/SpiderMan). Everybody loves an underdog, right? The Mets are also infamous for attracting somewhat rowdy, undisciplined players; as a case in point, many of the players on the 1986 World Series team had cocaine problems at some point during their career.
26th Apr '17 6:30:33 PM Mdumas43073
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium.[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]] No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. They've won just two World Series championships in their history, the most recent of which was in 1948. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS title in over a century (and themselves the longest active championship drought in MLB, at 68 years and counting). To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.

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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium.[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]] No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. They've won just two World Series championships in their history, the most recent of which was in 1948. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the to give Cubs their first WS title in over a century (and themselves take over as the team with the longest active championship drought in MLB, the majors, at 68 years and counting). To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
26th Apr '17 6:28:35 PM Mdumas43073
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium.[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]] No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. They've won just two World Series championships in their history, the most recent of which was in 1948. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium.[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]] No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. They've won just two World Series championships in their history, the most recent of which was in 1948. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles title in over a century.century (and themselves the longest active championship drought in MLB, at 68 years and counting). To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
26th Apr '17 6:26:49 PM Mdumas43073
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium.[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]] No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their last World Series championship was in 1948. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium.[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]] No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their last They've won just two World Series championship championships in their history, the most recent of which was in 1948. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
26th Apr '17 6:25:34 PM Mdumas43073
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But stadium.[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. [[/note]] No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their last World Series championship was in 1948. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
24th Apr '17 2:27:09 PM OnoderaTearer
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** On the business side of things, the Sox are currently owned by a corporation called "Fenway Sports Group" (FSG for short). FSG is noted for turning their Red Sox proceeds into a sports empire, buying up teams in other sports (including [[UsefulNotes/BritishFootyTeams Liverpool FC]]) and establishing a massively successful sports-marketing consultancy (they handle [=LeBron=] James' rights, for one thing).

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** On the business side of things, the Sox are currently owned by a corporation called "Fenway Sports Group" (FSG for short). FSG is noted for turning their Red Sox proceeds into a sports empire, buying up teams in other sports (including [[UsefulNotes/BritishFootyTeams Liverpool FC]]) and establishing a massively successful sports-marketing consultancy (they handle [=LeBron=] James' UsefulNotes/LeBronJames' rights, for one thing).



** The ''Yankees'' nickname was not officially used until 1913. Actually the team originated in ''Baltimore'' in 1901 [[note]]A not-insignificant number of baseball historians actually consider the Yankees and Orioles to be separate franchises, since the Orioles basically disbanded in mid-1902[[/note]], playing for two seasons before moving to New York[[note]] Where the AL meant to put a team, but the NL Giants refused to let them.[[/note]].

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** The ''Yankees'' nickname was not officially used until 1913. Actually the team originated in ''Baltimore'' in 1901 [[note]]A not-insignificant number of baseball historians actually consider the Yankees and Orioles to be separate franchises, since the Orioles basically disbanded in mid-1902[[/note]], playing for two seasons before moving to New York[[note]] Where York[[note]]Where the AL meant to put a team, but the NL Giants refused to let them.[[/note]].
17th Apr '17 3:24:21 PM OnoderaTearer
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* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox''': President UsefulNotes/BarackObama's favorite team (to the point where he wore their logo-jacket to an All-Star Game in St. Louis, resulting in a awkward situation), they also had a ButtMonkey era, which began, it is said, in 1919 when 8 of the team's players ("The Black Sox" or "the 8 Men Out"), including Shoeless Joe Jackson, either took, intended to take or knew the others were taking money to throw the World Series. All 8 of them were kicked out. Forever. And then the White Sox didn't win anything until 2005 (except for the AL pennant in 1959), when MagnificentBastard Ozzie Guillén (who had starred for them as a shortstop during TheNineties) guided them to a World Series championship. It still didn't make them more popular than the Cubs though, since the city [[NeverLiveItDown hasn't really forgiven them for the 1919 scandal]] and that unlike Boston, this championship turned out to be a fluke: the team quickly returned to mediocrity, and has ended more often than not dead last or in the best of times, blowing their chances (it does not help that Detroit and Kansas City have become the division's powerhouses). Play-by-play announcer Ken "Hawk" Harrelson is known for his memetic play-calling and embrace of bias for the Sox when most announcers at least try to present a neutral position ("He gone" when an opposing player strikes out, "can of corn" for any high pop-up, and his signature home run call of "You can put on the boooaaaard, YES!").
* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
** Recent team iconography policy has resulted in a bit of a BrokenBase. Chief Wahoo, one of their logos, is a caricature of a Native American who was first made in the 1946 and who's current version was drawn in 1951. He's starting to [[ValuesDissonance not age too well]], so the Indians have been quietly phasing him out in favor of a rather bland block letter "C", all while denying that this is the case. Indians fans who see Wahoo as something [[ValuesDissonance whose time has passed]] have taken to boycotting merch that depicts him or remove him from their jerseys and hats. [[note]]ESPN wrote stories on both sides of the fandom: [[http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/10715887/uni-watch-some-fans-removing-chief-wahoo-logos-protest #DeCheif]] and [[http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/10750807/uni-watch-traditionalists-want-keep-chief-wahoo Keep Wahoo]][[/note]]

to:

* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Chicago}} White Sox''': President UsefulNotes/BarackObama's favorite team (to the point where he wore their logo-jacket to an All-Star Game in St. Louis, resulting in a awkward situation), they also had a ButtMonkey era, which began, it is said, in 1919 when 8 of the team's players ("The Black Sox" or "the 8 Men Out"), including Shoeless Joe Jackson, either took, intended to take or knew the others were taking money to throw the World Series. All 8 of them were kicked out. Forever. And then the White Sox didn't win anything until 2005 (except for the AL pennant in 1959), when MagnificentBastard Ozzie Guillén (who had starred for them as a shortstop during TheNineties) guided them to a World Series championship. It still didn't make them more popular than the Cubs though, since the city [[NeverLiveItDown hasn't really forgiven them for the 1919 scandal]] and that unlike Boston, this championship turned out to be a fluke: the team quickly returned to mediocrity, and has ended more often than not dead last or in the best of times, blowing their chances (it does not help that Detroit and Kansas City have become the division's powerhouses). Play-by-play announcer Ken "Hawk" Harrelson is known for his memetic play-calling and embrace of bias for the Sox when most announcers at least try to present a neutral position ("He gone" when an opposing player strikes out, "can of corn" for any high pop-up, and his signature home run call of "You can put on the boooaaaard, YES!").
* The '''UsefulNotes/{{Cleveland}} Indians''', a charter member of the American League, are the Cubs of the AL, only with a modern stadium[[note]]But unlike Chicago, which has the Bulls, Bears, Blackhawks, and White Sox all winning titles in recent history, Cleveland doesn't have that option... or at least didn't until [=LeBron=] UsefulNotes/LeBronJames willed the Cavaliers to a title in 2016.[[/note]]. No one really remembers how they got their name (popular belief asserts that it came from an early Native American-descended player named Louis Sockalexis, but this is wrong... he played for the Spiders[[note]]a late-19th century team remembered for their lousy records (a ''.130'' W-L average)[[/note]], which had also used the Indians nickname), but some agree it's politically incorrect. Their previous stadium was cold, windy, and in general a horrible place to play.[[note]]The fact that it was designed for football first played a major role in that.[[/note]] Their new stadium is still cold and windy, but it's at least pretty despite the occasional swarm of insects (which actually helped the Indians win a key playoff game in 2007) and, in 2009, seagulls. They lost a game in 1974 when their fans, drunk on cheap beer, began to attack the opposing players. They were perennial last-place finishers in the '80s, which led up to the movie ''Film/MajorLeague'', in which a fictional version of the Indians overcomes their idiosyncrasies and ineptitude to win the pennant. Incredibly, a few years after the release of the movie, the franchise turned its fortunes completely around and became one of the most consistently successful teams in the American League for several years. After coming up one win short of the American League pennant in 2007, they fell into mediocrity for the next several years, but an improved farm system and some promising young players restored them to contention, culminating in an AL pennant in 2016 and a World Series matchup against the MLB's other "black sheep": the Cubs, which ended with them choking a 3 games to 1 lead and giving the Cubs their first WS titles in over a century. To be fair, the Indians were missing their best hitter all season and had two starting pitchers injured before even coming into the playoffs.
** Recent team iconography policy has resulted in a bit of a BrokenBase. Chief Wahoo, one of their logos, is a caricature of a Native American who was first made in the 1946 and who's current version was drawn in 1951. He's starting to [[ValuesDissonance not age too well]], so the Indians have been quietly phasing him out in favor of a rather bland block letter "C", all while denying that this is the case. Indians fans who see Wahoo as something [[ValuesDissonance whose time has passed]] have taken to boycotting merch that depicts him or remove him from their jerseys and hats. [[note]]ESPN wrote stories on both sides of the fandom: [[http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/10715887/uni-watch-some-fans-removing-chief-wahoo-logos-protest #DeCheif]] #DeChief]] and [[http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/10750807/uni-watch-traditionalists-want-keep-chief-wahoo Keep Wahoo]][[/note]]
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