History UsefulNotes / Judaism

26th Jun '16 9:11:12 AM Lopiny
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* The Yiddish word for "Jew" is, in fact, ''Yid'' (from the Hebrew "Yehudi"); "Yiddish" is just the Yiddish word for "Jewish". But the word "Yid" is almost always considered offensive in English--though people with a Yiddish-language background (mainly Hasidim) will often use it.

Unfortunately, TV Tropes is mainly run by Jews, due to most Tropers using Yiddish phrases and due to there being a ridiculous amount of tropes relating to Judaism. Be sure not to bash Judaism or say anything that might be interpreted as anti-Semetic, as you'll immediately be banned. Go bash Christianity or Islam or Hinduism or any other religion, it's okay. Just make sure to not bash Judaism. The kikes will get offended.

to:

* The Yiddish word for "Jew" is, in fact, ''Yid'' (from the Hebrew "Yehudi"); "Yiddish" is just the Yiddish word for "Jewish". But the word "Yid" is almost always considered offensive in English--though people with a Yiddish-language background (mainly Hasidim) will often use it.

Unfortunately, TV Tropes is mainly run by Jews, due to most Tropers using Yiddish phrases and due to there being a ridiculous amount of tropes relating to Judaism. Be sure not to bash Judaism or say anything that might be interpreted as anti-Semetic, as you'll immediately be banned. Go bash Christianity or Islam or Hinduism or any other religion, it's okay. Just make sure to not bash Judaism. The kikes will get offended.
it.
26th Jun '16 8:17:53 AM BobaFettuccine
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----Unfortunately, TV Tropes is mainly run by Jews, due to most Tropers using Yiddish phrases and due to there being a ridiculous amount of tropes relating to Judaism. Be sure not to bash Judaism or say anything that might be interpreted as anti-Semetic, as you'll immediately be banned. Go bash Christianity or Islam or Hinduism or any other religion, it's okay. Just make sure to not bash Judaism. The kikes will get offended.
29th Dec '15 8:09:13 PM MAI742
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If you go by Jewish TV characters, it would seem that [[YouHaveToHaveJews one in every three people is Jewish]]. On ''{{Friends}}'' this is literally true; two out of the six main characters are Jewish (Ross and Monica, for those keeping score, and ''possibly'' Rachel.) Judaism is usually portrayed as one of three major world religions, along with Christianity and Islam. The truth is that out of some six-and-a-half-billion people in the world, only fourteen-and-a-half-million are Jewish, which works out to just 0.215% of the world's population, making Judaism the 11th most populous religion. In the UK, according to the 2001 census, Jews were outnumbered three to two by people who said their religion was "Jedi". There were, however, as many as 18 million Jews (using the widest possible definition) before the Holocaust, or about 0.5% of the world population at the time. Also, Jews comprise about 2% of the population of the United States and have always been its second-most-populous religion. The reason Jewish characters are so common may be because of the absurdly high percentage of Jewish people in the entertainment industry. It may also be due to many shows being written in New York City, which has the largest Jewish population in the world outside of Israel: 1.54 million Jews lived in New York in 2011 (about 18.5% of the city's total population), and in the 1950s, ''2.5'' million Jews lived in the Big Apple (which, because the city was smaller then, comes out to just under a ''third'' of the total population: so one out of every three people ''was'' Jewish).

to:

If you go by Jewish TV characters, it would seem that [[YouHaveToHaveJews one in every three people is Jewish]]. On ''{{Friends}}'' this is literally true; two out of the six main characters are Jewish (Ross and Monica, for those keeping score, and ''possibly'' Rachel.) Judaism is usually portrayed as one of three major world religions, along with Christianity and Islam. The truth is that out of some six-and-a-half-billion people in the world, only fourteen-and-a-half-million are Jewish, which works out to just 0.215% of the world's population, making Judaism the 11th most populous religion. In the UK, according to the 2001 census, Jews were outnumbered three to two by people who said their religion was "Jedi". There were, however, as many as 18 million Jews (using the widest possible definition) before the Holocaust, UsefulNotes/TheHolocaust, or about 0.5% of the world population at the time. Also, Jews comprise about 2% of the population of the United States and have always been its second-most-populous religion. The reason Jewish characters are so common may be because of the absurdly high percentage of Jewish people in the entertainment industry. It may also be due to many shows being written in New York City, which has the largest Jewish population in the world outside of Israel: 1.54 million Jews lived in New York in 2011 (about 18.5% of the city's total population), and in the 1950s, ''2.5'' million Jews lived in the Big Apple (which, because the city was smaller then, comes out to just under a ''third'' of the total population: so one out of every three people ''was'' Jewish).
29th Dec '15 8:08:43 PM MAI742
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If you go by Jewish TV characters, it would seem that [[YouHaveToHaveJews one in every three people is Jewish]]. On ''{{Friends}}'' this is literally true; two out of the six main characters are Jewish (Ross and Monica, for those keeping score, and ''possibly'' Rachel.) Judaism is usually portrayed as one of three major world religions, along with Christianity and Islam. The truth is that out of some six-and-a-half-billion people in the world, only fourteen-and-a-half-million are Jewish, which works out to just 0.215% of the world's population, making Judaism the 11th most populous religion. In the UK, according to the 2001 census, Jews were outnumbered three to two by people who said their religion was "Jedi". There were, however, about 18 million Jews before the Holocaust, or almost 1% of the world population at the time. Also, Jews comprise about 2% of the population of the United States and have always been its second-most-populous religion. The reason Jewish characters are so common may be because of the absurdly high percentage of Jewish people in the entertainment industry. It may also be due to many shows being written in New York City, which has the largest Jewish population in the world outside of Israel: 1.54 million Jews lived in New York in 2011 (about 18.5% of the city's total population), and in the 1950s, ''2.5'' million Jews lived in the Big Apple (which, because the city was smaller then, comes out to just under a ''third'' of the total population: so one out of every three people ''was'' Jewish).

to:

If you go by Jewish TV characters, it would seem that [[YouHaveToHaveJews one in every three people is Jewish]]. On ''{{Friends}}'' this is literally true; two out of the six main characters are Jewish (Ross and Monica, for those keeping score, and ''possibly'' Rachel.) Judaism is usually portrayed as one of three major world religions, along with Christianity and Islam. The truth is that out of some six-and-a-half-billion people in the world, only fourteen-and-a-half-million are Jewish, which works out to just 0.215% of the world's population, making Judaism the 11th most populous religion. In the UK, according to the 2001 census, Jews were outnumbered three to two by people who said their religion was "Jedi". There were, however, about as many as 18 million Jews (using the widest possible definition) before the Holocaust, or almost 1% about 0.5% of the world population at the time. Also, Jews comprise about 2% of the population of the United States and have always been its second-most-populous religion. The reason Jewish characters are so common may be because of the absurdly high percentage of Jewish people in the entertainment industry. It may also be due to many shows being written in New York City, which has the largest Jewish population in the world outside of Israel: 1.54 million Jews lived in New York in 2011 (about 18.5% of the city's total population), and in the 1950s, ''2.5'' million Jews lived in the Big Apple (which, because the city was smaller then, comes out to just under a ''third'' of the total population: so one out of every three people ''was'' Jewish).
24th Nov '15 4:10:34 AM Yerushalmi
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* A lunar/solar calendar. The year is divided into 12 months. While in the earlier texts of the Bible these are just called first month, second month, etc., they were given Babylonian names when pretty much the entire Jewish population was deported there in 597-538 BCE. A year is therefore approximately 11 days shorter than the 365-day solar year (it's +/-1 because of all sorts of complications). However, because several holidays are tied into to the growing seasons and harvests, every few years (seven times every nineteen years, yes it's complicated) a "leap month" is added in the middle to keep the the holidays in the same season. The Jewish year is marked from the supposed date of Creation and can be found by adding 3760 to the Gregorian year (so 2009 becomes 5769). The year begins on Rosh Hashana (see below), which falls out in September or October, so the first three or four months of 5769 were in 2008. Every 19 years the Jewish and secular calendars (approximately) meet, such that one's birthday in each calendar are usually only on the same day every 19 years.

to:

* A lunar/solar calendar. The year is divided into 12 months. While in the earlier texts of the Bible these are just called first month, second month, etc., they were given Babylonian names when pretty much the entire Jewish population was deported there in 597-538 BCE. A year is therefore approximately 11 days shorter than the 365-day solar year (it's +/-1 because of all sorts of complications). However, because several holidays are tied into to the growing seasons and harvests, every few years (seven times every nineteen years, yes it's complicated) a "leap month" is added in to the middle end to keep the the holidays in the same season. The Jewish year is marked from the supposed date of Creation and can be found by adding 3760 to the Gregorian year (so 2009 becomes 5769). The year begins on Rosh Hashana (see below), which falls out in September or October, so the first three or four months of 5769 were in 2008. Every 19 years the Jewish and secular calendars (approximately) meet, such that one's birthday in each calendar are usually only on the same day every 19 years.
6th Sep '15 7:39:30 PM roee30
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Traditionally, Jewish thought on the afterlife has typically ranged from, "We don't know," to intimations that there's nothing at all (as it says in Ecclesiastes, "The dead know nothing, neither have they any more reward,"). With the notable exceptions of Maimonides and Nachmanides, we leave any mention of the afterlife at naming it "Ha'Olam Ha'Ba" (the World to Come), because it's unknowable to the living.

to:

Traditionally, Jewish thought on the afterlife has typically ranged from, "We don't know," to intimations that there's nothing at all (as it says in Ecclesiastes, "The dead know nothing, neither have they any more reward,"). With the notable exceptions of Maimonides and Nachmanides, we leave any mention of the afterlife at naming it "Ha'Olam Ha'Ba" (the World to Come), Next World), because it's unknowable to the living.
6th Sep '15 7:32:19 PM roee30
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* A lunar/solar calendar. The year is divided into 12 months. While in the earlier texts of the Bible these are just called first month, second month, etc., they were given Babylonian names when pretty much the entire Jewish population was deported there in 597-538 BCE. A year is therefore approximately 11 days shorter than the 365-day solar year (it's +/-1 because of all sorts of complications). However, because several holidays are tied into to the growing seasons and harvests, every few years (seven times every nineteen years, yes it's complicated) a "leap month" is added onto the end to keep the the holidays in the same season. The Jewish year is marked from the supposed date of Creation and can be found by adding 3760 to the Gregorian year (so 2009 becomes 5769). The year begins on Rosh Hashana (see below), which falls out in September or October, so the first three or four months of 5769 were in 2008. Every 19 years the Jewish and secular calendars (approximately) meet, such that one's birthday in each calendar are usually only on the same day every 19 years.

to:

* A lunar/solar calendar. The year is divided into 12 months. While in the earlier texts of the Bible these are just called first month, second month, etc., they were given Babylonian names when pretty much the entire Jewish population was deported there in 597-538 BCE. A year is therefore approximately 11 days shorter than the 365-day solar year (it's +/-1 because of all sorts of complications). However, because several holidays are tied into to the growing seasons and harvests, every few years (seven times every nineteen years, yes it's complicated) a "leap month" is added onto in the end middle to keep the the holidays in the same season. The Jewish year is marked from the supposed date of Creation and can be found by adding 3760 to the Gregorian year (so 2009 becomes 5769). The year begins on Rosh Hashana (see below), which falls out in September or October, so the first three or four months of 5769 were in 2008. Every 19 years the Jewish and secular calendars (approximately) meet, such that one's birthday in each calendar are usually only on the same day every 19 years.
6th Sep '15 7:24:39 PM roee30
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** ''Haredim'': Haredim are the most theologically conservative practitioners. If you see a Jewish man wearing a black suit with a black hat, a beard, side curls (payot), and fringes hanging from his shirt (a tallit worn under the clothing), he's probably (but not necessarily) Haredi. The term is generally used in Israel, but can apply to elsewhere as well. Haredim tend to be much more insular than others; they generally keep very tight-knit communities, refuse to consume non-Jewish media of any sort, and will usually work for each other as well.

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** ''Haredim'': Literally "(God) fearing", Haredim are the most theologically conservative practitioners. If you see a Jewish man wearing a black suit with a black hat, a beard, side curls (payot), and fringes hanging from his shirt (a tallit worn under the clothing), he's probably (but not necessarily) Haredi. The term is generally used in Israel, but can apply to elsewhere as well. Haredim tend to be much more insular than others; they generally keep very tight-knit communities, refuse to consume non-Jewish media of any sort, and will usually work for each other as well.
21st Jul '15 2:55:47 PM Narsil
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Added DiffLines:

* The Yiddish word for "Jew" is, in fact, ''Yid'' (from the Hebrew "Yehudi"); "Yiddish" is just the Yiddish word for "Jewish". But the word "Yid" is almost always considered offensive in English--though people with a Yiddish-language background (mainly Hasidim) will often use it.
24th Dec '14 7:18:47 AM DarkElfPrincess
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'''Mysticism''': Although some Jewish sections are mainly intellectual, there are plenty (especially the various Hasidic sects) who place a high value on mysticism. The Kabbalah (which has recently been reinvented as a new-age have-it-all movement) is a set of mystic descriptions of the spiritual, invisible world, and is often used for [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic symbolic]] value in Japanese works, like ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' and ''FinalFantasyVII''. There are stories of reincarnated spirits, [[DemonicPossession dybbuks]], golems, imps or ''sheidim'', witches, and holy men who can do miracles and commune with angels.

to:

'''Mysticism''': Although some Jewish sections are mainly intellectual, there are plenty (especially the various Hasidic sects) who place a high value on mysticism. The Kabbalah (which has recently been reinvented as a new-age have-it-all movement) is a set of mystic descriptions of the spiritual, invisible world, and is often used for [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic symbolic]] value in Japanese works, like ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'' and ''FinalFantasyVII''.''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII''. There are stories of reincarnated spirits, [[DemonicPossession dybbuks]], golems, imps or ''sheidim'', witches, and holy men who can do miracles and commune with angels.
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