History UsefulNotes / JewishHolidays

29th May '17 3:52:09 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, then stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\

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'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay holiday Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, then stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\
21st Mar '17 10:03:37 PM LaptopGuy
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Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BCE. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.

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Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays.holidays, and probably the second best-known after Chanukah. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BCE. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.
6th Dec '16 4:17:45 PM amaXdear
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* Marcheshvan/Heshvan

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* Marcheshvan/HeshvanMarcheshvan/Heshvan (the only month that, for most denominations, has no holidays, hence the addition of "mar," which is Hebrew for "bitter")
23rd Sep '16 6:46:23 AM Cidolfas
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A Jewish holiday is known as a ''yom tov'' (literally, "good day"). On any ''yom tov'', one greets a fellow Jew with "gut yom tov" in Yuddish or "chag same'ach" in Hebrew.

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A Jewish holiday is known as a ''yom tov'' (literally, "good day"). On any ''yom tov'', one greets a fellow Jew with "gut yom tov" in Yuddish Yiddish or "chag same'ach" in Hebrew.
22nd Sep '16 8:39:37 AM RobTan
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'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\

to:

'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the then stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\
22nd Sep '16 8:36:59 AM RobTan
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'''Maxwell:''' Now id this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the stuff yourself; or the one where you light cnadles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\

to:

'''Maxwell:''' Now id is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the stuff yourself; or the one where you light cnadles, candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\
22nd Sep '16 8:34:51 AM RobTan
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Added DiffLines:

->'''Niles:''' Sylvia has invited us over for the Jewish holiday.\\
'''Maxwell:''' Now id this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the stuff yourself; or the one where you light cnadles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\
'''Niles:''' I believe it's the one where you hide crackers from small children, then stuff yourself.
-->--''Series/TheNanny''
5th Sep '16 2:41:59 AM foley
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'''Chanukah''' - 25 Kislev - 2 Tevet (3 Tevet, if that year Kislev has only 29 days in it)

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'''Chanukah''' - !! Chanukah -- 25 Kislev - 2 Tevet (3 Tevet, if that year Kislev has only 29 days in it)



'''Asara B'Tevet''' - 10 Tevet

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'''Asara B'Tevet''' - !! Asara B'Tevet -- 10 Tevet



'''Tu Bishvat''' - 15 Shvat

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'''Tu Bishvat''' - !! Tu Bishvat -- 15 Shvat



'''The Fast of Esther''' - 13 Adar or Adar II.

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'''The !! The Fast of Esther''' - Esther -- 13 Adar or Adar II.



'''Purim''' - 14 Adar or Adar II.

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'''Purim''' - !! Purim -- 14 Adar or Adar II.



'''Shushan Purim''' - 15 Adar or Adar II

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'''Shushan Purim''' - !! Shushan Purim -- 15 Adar or Adar II



'''Passover''' - 15-22 Nisan (21 Nisan in Israel)

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'''Passover''' - !! Passover -- 15-22 Nisan (21 Nisan in Israel)



'''Sefirat Ha'Omer''' - 16 Nisan - 5 Sivan

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'''Sefirat Ha'Omer''' - !! Sefirat Ha'Omer -- 16 Nisan - 5 Sivan



'''Lag Ba'Omer''' - 18 Iyar

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'''Lag Ba'Omer''' - !! Lag Ba'Omer -- 18 Iyar



'''Shavuot''' - 6-7 Sivan (in Israel only 6 Sivan)

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'''Shavuot''' - !! Shavuot -- 6-7 Sivan (in Israel only 6 Sivan)



'''The Three Weeks''' - 17 Tammuz - 9 Av

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'''The !! The Three Weeks''' - Weeks -- 17 Tammuz - 9 Av



'''Other'''


to:

'''Other'''

!! Other

20th Jun '16 6:52:45 AM Cidolfas
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Jewish years are termed "Anno Mundi" (AM), which begins on 1 Tishri, the afternoon of 6 September 3761 BC, calculated by some Talmudic scholars to be the date when God created the world.

to:

Jewish years are termed "Anno Mundi" (AM), which begins on 1 Tishri, the afternoon of 6 September 3761 BC, BCE, calculated by some Talmudic scholars to be the date when God created the world.



Or Hanukah, or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Channukkah]], or for those truly addicted to spelling, Chhhannnukkkkahhhh.[[note]]to be pronounced using as much phlegm as possible. "Hebrew", said Lewis Black, "is truly a phlegm-based language."[[/note]] The most well-known of the Jewish holidays, and ironically one of the least important in the calendar. Chanukah is the most recent holiday added to the universal Jewish calendar (around 100 BC) and is classified as a "minor holiday" (i.e. work is permitted).

to:

Or Hanukah, or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Channukkah]], or for those truly addicted to spelling, Chhhannnukkkkahhhh.[[note]]to be pronounced using as much phlegm as possible. "Hebrew", said Lewis Black, "is truly a phlegm-based language."[[/note]] The most well-known of the Jewish holidays, and ironically one of the least important in the calendar. Chanukah is the most recent holiday added to the universal Jewish calendar (around 100 BC) BCE) and is classified as a "minor holiday" (i.e. work is permitted).



A "minor holiday" in that work is not forbidden. The most joyous day in the Jewish calendar, and the holiday most obviously geared towards kids. The story of Purim is actually really cool, taking place around 300 BC, and involves kings! Queens! Betrayal! Conspiracy! Poison! Sex! Humiliation! War! [[Literature/{{Discworld}} And 1,000 Elephants!]] Essentially, the evil [[DastardlyWhiplash Haman]] tries to convince [[TheFool King Ahasuerus]] (sometimes known as Artaxerxes or Xerxes - yes, possibly [[ThreeHundred that Xerxes]]) to kill all the Jews. Needless to say, he doesn't win, thanks to the efforts of the noble Mordechai and Esther, and is in fact HoistByHisOwnPetard in an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome.

to:

A "minor holiday" in that work is not forbidden. The most joyous day in the Jewish calendar, and the holiday most obviously geared towards kids. The story of Purim is actually really cool, taking place around 300 BC, BCE, and involves kings! Queens! Betrayal! Conspiracy! Poison! Sex! Humiliation! War! [[Literature/{{Discworld}} And 1,000 Elephants!]] Essentially, the evil [[DastardlyWhiplash Haman]] tries to convince [[TheFool King Ahasuerus]] (sometimes known as Artaxerxes or Xerxes - yes, possibly [[ThreeHundred that Xerxes]]) to kill all the Jews. Needless to say, he doesn't win, thanks to the efforts of the noble Mordechai and Esther, and is in fact HoistByHisOwnPetard in an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome.



Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BC. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.

to:

Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BC.BCE. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.
19th Jun '16 3:30:14 AM Thisflyingtrain
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Jewish years are termed "Anno Mundi" (AM), which begins on 1 Tishri, the afternoon of 6 September 3761 BCE, calculated by some Talmudic scholars to be the date when God created the world.

to:

Jewish years are termed "Anno Mundi" (AM), which begins on 1 Tishri, the afternoon of 6 September 3761 BCE, BC, calculated by some Talmudic scholars to be the date when God created the world.



Or Hanukah, or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Channukkah]], or for those truly addicted to spelling, Chhhannnukkkkahhhh.[[note]]to be pronounced using as much phlegm as possible. "Hebrew", said Lewis Black, "is truly a phlegm-based language."[[/note]] The most well-known of the Jewish holidays, and ironically one of the least important in the calendar. Chanukah is the most recent holiday added to the universal Jewish calendar (around 100 BCE) and is classified as a "minor holiday" (i.e. work is permitted).

to:

Or Hanukah, or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS Channukkah]], or for those truly addicted to spelling, Chhhannnukkkkahhhh.[[note]]to be pronounced using as much phlegm as possible. "Hebrew", said Lewis Black, "is truly a phlegm-based language."[[/note]] The most well-known of the Jewish holidays, and ironically one of the least important in the calendar. Chanukah is the most recent holiday added to the universal Jewish calendar (around 100 BCE) BC) and is classified as a "minor holiday" (i.e. work is permitted).



A "minor holiday" in that work is not forbidden. The most joyous day in the Jewish calendar, and the holiday most obviously geared towards kids. The story of Purim is actually really cool, taking place around 300 BCE, and involves kings! Queens! Betrayal! Conspiracy! Poison! Sex! Humiliation! War! [[Literature/{{Discworld}} And 1,000 Elephants!]] Essentially, the evil [[DastardlyWhiplash Haman]] tries to convince [[TheFool King Ahasuerus]] (sometimes known as Artaxerxes or Xerxes - yes, possibly [[ThreeHundred that Xerxes]]) to kill all the Jews. Needless to say, he doesn't win, thanks to the efforts of the noble Mordechai and Esther, and is in fact HoistByHisOwnPetard in an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome.

to:

A "minor holiday" in that work is not forbidden. The most joyous day in the Jewish calendar, and the holiday most obviously geared towards kids. The story of Purim is actually really cool, taking place around 300 BCE, BC, and involves kings! Queens! Betrayal! Conspiracy! Poison! Sex! Humiliation! War! [[Literature/{{Discworld}} And 1,000 Elephants!]] Essentially, the evil [[DastardlyWhiplash Haman]] tries to convince [[TheFool King Ahasuerus]] (sometimes known as Artaxerxes or Xerxes - yes, possibly [[ThreeHundred that Xerxes]]) to kill all the Jews. Needless to say, he doesn't win, thanks to the efforts of the noble Mordechai and Esther, and is in fact HoistByHisOwnPetard in an incredible CrowningMomentOfAwesome.



Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BCE. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.

to:

Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BCE.BC. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.



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