History UsefulNotes / JewishHolidays

4th Aug '17 9:01:26 PM karstovich2
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The Last Supper in Christianity is generally held to have been a Passover seder, and in general, Easter falls quite close to Passover. The massive movement in the date of Easter is a result of having a Christian holiday map to the Jewish festival of Passover; the incessant debates over how to calculate the date of Easter is a result of the Christians refusing to just use the Jewish calendar to figure out the date already and rely on convoluted mathematics instead. The name of Easter in many languages is based on the Hebrew Pesach (Passover): Latin and Greek Pascha gave rise to Spanish Pascua, Italian Pasqua, French Pâques, and Dutch Pasen (among others), and the Hebrew Pesach directly led to Arabic Id ul-Fiṣḥ.[[note]]Lest you forget, about 20% of Arabs are Christian. Also, Arabic makes no differentiation between Passover and Easter; this no doubt led to significant confusion in Arabic-speaking countries back when their Jewish populations were still intact.[[/note]]

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The Last Supper in Christianity is generally held to have been a Passover seder, and in general, Easter falls quite close to Passover. The massive movement in the date of Easter is a result of having a Christian holiday map to the Jewish festival of Passover; the incessant debates over how to calculate the date of Easter is a result of the Christians refusing to just use the Jewish calendar to figure out the date already and rely on convoluted mathematics instead. Sects that just rely on Passover were declared heretical a long time ago and are mostly nonexistent. The name of Easter in many languages is based on the Hebrew Pesach (Passover): Latin and Greek Pascha gave rise to Spanish Pascua, Italian Pasqua, French Pâques, and Dutch Pasen (among others), and the Hebrew Pesach directly led to Arabic Id ul-Fiṣḥ.[[note]]Lest you forget, about 20% of Arabs are Christian. Also, Arabic makes no differentiation between Passover and Easter; this no doubt led to significant confusion in Arabic-speaking countries back when their Jewish populations were still intact.[[/note]]
4th Aug '17 9:00:00 PM karstovich2
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People in cities that have been surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua push Purim off by a day, celebrating it on this date instead. This includes Jerusalem and Shushan ([[CaptainObvious for which the day is named]]),[[note]]Which doesn't exist anymore; the ancient walled city of Susa was destroyed by the Mongols in 1218, and the modern town bearing its name is a few kilometers away.[[/note]] as well as a widely varying list of other cities, depending on custom. This has also led to [[JewsLoveToArgue a great deal of debate]] about what constitutes "a city surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua": besides ''which'' cities these were, do people living in the same municipality but outside the old walls count?[[note]]This is actually rather important, thanks to the increasing sprawl around UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}}: should Jews in West Jerusalem or the Jewish districts of East Jerusalem outside the Old City celebrate regular Purim or Shushan Purim? What about the ones living in the Jerusalem commuter belt? What if your apartment is in Tel Aviv but you work in Jerusalem (it's only an hour's drive--commutes like this are no less common than, say, [[UsefulNotes/NewJersey Princeton to Newark]], which is about the same distance)? Or if you live in Jerusalem but work in Tel Aviv? Or--and this is more likely--you live in outer West Jerusalem but work at Ben Gurion Airport in Lod--and your spouse works in the Old City? Or if you spend half the week in Tel Aviv and half in Jerusalem? Etc., etc., etc.[[/note]] What if the walls were entirely destroyed and then rebuilt? What about a city with two or more walls concentrically (pretty common for a very long time), one older and one more recent? Etc., etc., etc.

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People in cities that have been surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua push Purim off by a day, celebrating it on this date instead. This includes Jerusalem and Shushan ([[CaptainObvious for which the day is named]]),[[note]]Which doesn't exist anymore; the ancient walled city of Susa was destroyed by the Mongols in 1218, and the modern town bearing its name is a few kilometers away.[[/note]] as well as a widely varying list of other cities, depending on custom. This has also led to [[JewsLoveToArgue a great deal of debate]] about what constitutes "a city surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua": besides ''which'' cities these were, do people living in the same municipality but outside the old walls count?[[note]]This is actually rather important, thanks to the increasing sprawl around UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}}: should Jews in West Jerusalem or the Jewish districts of East Jerusalem outside the Old City celebrate regular Purim or Shushan Purim? What about the ones living in the Jerusalem commuter belt? What if your apartment is in Tel Aviv but you work in Jerusalem (it's only an hour's drive--commutes like this are no less common than, say, [[UsefulNotes/NewJersey Princeton to Newark]], Newark, or New Brunswick to Manhattan]], which is are about the same distance)? Or if you live in Jerusalem but work in Tel Aviv? Or--and this is more likely--you live in outer West Jerusalem but work at Ben Gurion Airport in Lod--and your spouse works in the Old City? Or if you spend half the week in Tel Aviv and half in Jerusalem? Etc., etc., etc.[[/note]] What if the walls were entirely destroyed and then rebuilt? What about a city with two or more walls concentrically (pretty common for a very long time), one older and one more recent? Etc., etc., etc.
4th Aug '17 8:58:18 PM karstovich2
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People in cities that have been surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua push Purim off by a day, celebrating it on this date instead. This includes Jerusalem and Shushan ([[CaptainObvious for which the day is named]]),[[note]]Which doesn't exist anymore; the ancient walled city of Susa was destroyed by the Mongols in 1218, and the modern town bearing its name is a few kilometers away.[[/note]] as well as a widely varying list of other cities, depending on custom. This has also led to [[JewsLoveToArgue a great deal of debate]] about what constitutes "a city surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua": besides ''which'' cities these were, do people living in the same municipality but outside the old walls count?[[note]]This is actually rather important, thanks to the increasing sprawl around UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}}: should Jews in West Jerusalem or the Jewish districts of East Jerusalem outside the Old City celebrate regular Purim or Shushan Purim? What about the ones living in the Jerusalem commuter belt? What if your apartment is in Tel Aviv but you work in Jerusalem (it's only an hour's drive)? Or if you live in Jerusalem but work in Tel Aviv? Or--and this is more likely--you live in outer West Jerusalem but work at Ben Gurion Airport in Lod--and your spouse works in the Old City? Or if you spend half the week in Tel Aviv and half in Jerusalem? Etc., etc., etc.[[/note]] What if the walls were entirely destroyed and then rebuilt? What about a city with two or more walls concentrically (pretty common for a very long time), one older and one more recent? Etc., etc., etc.

to:

People in cities that have been surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua push Purim off by a day, celebrating it on this date instead. This includes Jerusalem and Shushan ([[CaptainObvious for which the day is named]]),[[note]]Which doesn't exist anymore; the ancient walled city of Susa was destroyed by the Mongols in 1218, and the modern town bearing its name is a few kilometers away.[[/note]] as well as a widely varying list of other cities, depending on custom. This has also led to [[JewsLoveToArgue a great deal of debate]] about what constitutes "a city surrounded by a wall since the time of Joshua": besides ''which'' cities these were, do people living in the same municipality but outside the old walls count?[[note]]This is actually rather important, thanks to the increasing sprawl around UsefulNotes/{{Jerusalem}}: should Jews in West Jerusalem or the Jewish districts of East Jerusalem outside the Old City celebrate regular Purim or Shushan Purim? What about the ones living in the Jerusalem commuter belt? What if your apartment is in Tel Aviv but you work in Jerusalem (it's only an hour's drive)? drive--commutes like this are no less common than, say, [[UsefulNotes/NewJersey Princeton to Newark]], which is about the same distance)? Or if you live in Jerusalem but work in Tel Aviv? Or--and this is more likely--you live in outer West Jerusalem but work at Ben Gurion Airport in Lod--and your spouse works in the Old City? Or if you spend half the week in Tel Aviv and half in Jerusalem? Etc., etc., etc.[[/note]] What if the walls were entirely destroyed and then rebuilt? What about a city with two or more walls concentrically (pretty common for a very long time), one older and one more recent? Etc., etc., etc.
4th Aug '17 8:43:28 PM karstovich2
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By its nature, Chanukah is ''totally dissimilar'' from Christmas other than falling around the same time of year. We get annoyed when people try to conflate the two. Unfortunately, there are some Jews (often those jealous of their Christian friends) who have begun to do so, hence the creation of the "Chanukah bush" (to emulate Christmas trees) and the giving of presents; some families even give a present every single night of the holiday, which makes people's heads hurt. The 'Chanukah bush' is tragically ironic, given that the point of Chanukah is that we did not assimilate into Greek culture but kept our Jewish identity. Presents are somewhat justified, however, as a variation on the giving of Chanukah gelt (Yiddish for "money").

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By its nature, Chanukah is ''totally dissimilar'' from Christmas other than falling around the same time of year. We get annoyed when people try to conflate the two. Unfortunately, there are some Jews (often those jealous of their Christian friends) who have begun to do so, hence the creation of the "Chanukah bush" (to emulate Christmas trees) and the giving of presents; some families even give a present every single night of the holiday, which makes people's heads hurt. The 'Chanukah bush' is tragically ironic, given that the point of Chanukah is that we did not assimilate into Greek culture but kept our Jewish identity. Presents are somewhat justified, however, as a variation on the Ashkenazi tradition of giving of Chanukah gelt (Yiddish for "money").
"money")--plus, who doesn't like presents?
29th May '17 3:52:09 AM The_Glorious_SOB
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'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, then stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\

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'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay holiday Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, then stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\
21st Mar '17 10:03:37 PM LaptopGuy
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Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BCE. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.

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Taking place 30 days after Purim, Passover (or Pesach) is one of the big three holidays.holidays, and probably the second best-known after Chanukah. It commemmorates the exodus from Egypt over 1,000 BCE. As the Bible says, the Jews were led out of Egypt so quickly that their bread didn't have time to rise. The end result was ''matzah'', which for Ashkenazi Jews is invariably a flat bread sort of like a cracker. Because of this, on Passover nothing leavened ("chametz") is eaten at all. Some Orthodox movements have latched onto Passover as a great place to introduce stringencies; so, for example, Ashkenazi Jews don't eat beans or rice, and many don't even allow matzah to come into contact with any liquid, for fear that there's a little uncooked dough inside that may rise. Sephardi and other Jews are for the most part free of this sort of thing, regarding the Ashkenazi stringencies as kind of silly, and several communities are known for their soft, bread-like matzah that is almost indistinguishable from regular bread--to say nothing of their fondness for rice dishes and plenty of legumes during Passover.
6th Dec '16 4:17:45 PM amaXdear
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* Marcheshvan/Heshvan

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* Marcheshvan/HeshvanMarcheshvan/Heshvan (the only month that, for most denominations, has no holidays, hence the addition of "mar," which is Hebrew for "bitter")
23rd Sep '16 6:46:23 AM Cidolfas
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A Jewish holiday is known as a ''yom tov'' (literally, "good day"). On any ''yom tov'', one greets a fellow Jew with "gut yom tov" in Yuddish or "chag same'ach" in Hebrew.

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A Jewish holiday is known as a ''yom tov'' (literally, "good day"). On any ''yom tov'', one greets a fellow Jew with "gut yom tov" in Yuddish Yiddish or "chag same'ach" in Hebrew.
22nd Sep '16 8:39:37 AM RobTan
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'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\

to:

'''Maxwell:''' Now is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the then stuff yourself; or the one where you light candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\
22nd Sep '16 8:36:59 AM RobTan
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'''Maxwell:''' Now id this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the stuff yourself; or the one where you light cnadles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\

to:

'''Maxwell:''' Now id is this the holdiay Miss Fine said you can't eat all day, the stuff yourself; or the one where you light cnadles, candles, then stuff yourself; or the one where you build a straw hut, then stuff yourself?\\
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