History UsefulNotes / JewishHolidays

5th Jan '16 4:08:20 AM zero5889
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Having said that, there are quite a few fast days as well. And because [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} there's so much variety in Jewish practice]], there is necessarily some FanMyopia in these descriptions. Unless otherwise stated, the practices described here correspond to Ashkenazi Orthodoxy, which can be seen as a sort of "template" for the others. Since AllJewsAreAshkenazi this is often a default in people's minds. Many Jews are less observant or non-observant and won't strictly follow, or even be aware of, all of these holidays; the ones they are most likely to observe would include Yom Kippur, Passover, and Chanukah. A Jewish holiday is known as a ''yom tov'' (literally, "good day"). On any ''yom tov'', one greets a fellow Jew with "Gut Yom Tov" (for those of a European background) or "Chag Same'ach" (for those more Eastern in extraction); the first is Yiddish and the second is Hebrew.
to:
Having said that, there are quite a few fast days as well. And because [[UsefulNotes/{{Judaism}} there's so much variety in Jewish practice]], there is necessarily some FanMyopia in these descriptions.descriptions tend to vary. Unless otherwise stated, the practices described here correspond to Ashkenazi Orthodoxy, which can be seen as a sort of "template" for the others. Since AllJewsAreAshkenazi in popular media this is often a default in people's minds. mindset. Many Jews are less observant or non-observant and won't strictly follow, or even be aware of, all of these holidays; the ones they are most likely to observe would include Yom Kippur, Passover, Passover and Chanukah. Hanukkah. A Jewish holiday is known as a ''yom tov'' (literally, "good day"). On any ''yom tov'', one greets a fellow Jew with "Gut Yom Tov" (for those of a European background) "gut yom tov" in Yuddish or "Chag Same'ach" (for those more Eastern "chag same'ach" in extraction); the first is Yiddish and the second is Hebrew.

* "Major holidays": Holidays which originated in the Torah. On these days, "work" is forbidden in mostly the same way it is on the Sabbath (cooking is allowed on these holidays, as is transferring flame from one already-burning fuel source to another. Starting a new fire is not allowed). This includes operating electrical devices like light switches, riding buses, conducting business, and a myriad other laws. To confuse you further, this is known as a ''yom tov'' when compared against ''chol hamo'ed'' (below) - but the full holiday is ''also'' known as ''yom tov'', so context matters. ** ''Chol Hamo'ed'' (literally "the mundane part of the holiday"): On Passover, which is 7 or 8 days long, and Sukkot, which is 8 or 9 days long, only the first one or two and last one or two days are full holidays. The ones in between are more minor, and many different kinds of "work" are permitted. Just how much is permitted depends on how lenient your views are. * "Minor Holidays": Holidays that originated later than the Torah (that is, in the Hebrew Bible and the Talmud). Unlike the major holidays, work during these days is allowed. * Fast days. No work is forbidden on these, for the most part (except on Yom Kippur), but eating and drinking is forbidden. Unlike most holidays, the minor fast days start from sunrise, not sunset of the previous day (this incidentally makes their rules more or less identical to the fast in UsefulNotes/{{Islam}}). The major ones (Yom Kippur and Tisha B'Av) do start from sunset. '''Jewish Calendar''' The Jewish calendar is lunar/solar. Each of the 12 months are 29 or 30 days. However, this results in a year of only 353-355 days (depending on how many there are of each month length), 10-12 days shorter than the solar year. To make sure that the holidays fall out in roughly the same time every year, an extra month is added on every so often (7 out of every 19 years). The month names (which ironically are Babylonian, not Hebrew), are as follows (with the holidays in that month indicated): * Nisan (Passover) * Iyar (Lag Ba'Omer) * Sivan (Shavuot) * Tammuz (17 Tammuz) * Av (Tisha B'Av, Tu B'Av)
to:
* "Major holidays": Holidays which originated in Holidays": They originate from the Torah. Torah (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy), the first five books of the Judaeo-Christian religious canon. On these days, "work" is forbidden in mostly the same way it is on the Sabbath (cooking is allowed on these holidays, allowed, as is transferring flame from one already-burning fuel source to another. Starting a new fire is not allowed). This includes operating electrical devices like light switches, riding buses, conducting business, and a myriad other laws. To confuse you further, this is known as a ''yom tov'' when compared against ''chol hamo'ed'' (below) - -- but the full holiday is ''also'' known as ''yom tov'', so context matters. ** ''Chol Hamo'ed'' (literally "the mundane part "Chol Hamo'ed" (literally, "Mundane Part of the holiday"): Holiday"): On Passover, which is 7 or 8 7-8 days long, and Sukkot, which is 8 or 9 8-9 days long, only the first one or two and last one or two 1-2 days are full holidays. The ones in between are more or less minor, and many different kinds of "work" are permitted. Just how much is permitted depends on how lenient your views are. the observer is. * "Minor Holidays": Holidays that originated later than They originate from observances outside the Torah (that is, in the Hebrew Bible and the Talmud).Torah. Unlike the major holidays, work during these days is allowed. * Fast days. "Fast days": No work is forbidden on these, for the most part (except on Yom Kippur), but eating and drinking is forbidden. Unlike most holidays, the minor fast days start from sunrise, not sunset of the previous day (this incidentally makes their rules more or less identical to the fast in UsefulNotes/{{Islam}}). The major ones (Yom Kippur and Tisha B'Av) do start from sunset. '''Jewish Calendar''' !! The Jewish Calendar The Jewish calendar is lunar/solar. lunisolar -- that means it attempts to simultaneously follow the phases of the Moon and the seasons. Each of the its 12 months are 29 or 30 days. 29-30 days, each roughly following the duration between two consecutive New Moons. However, this results in a year of only 353-355 days (depending on how many there are the length of each month length), the months), 10-12 days shorter than the solar year. To make sure that the holidays fall out in roughly the same time every solar year, an extra month is added on every so often (7 out of every 19 years). The month names (which ironically are Babylonian, not Hebrew), was derived from the Babylonian calendar, a product of the Jews' long exile) are as follows (with the holidays in that month indicated): follows: * Nisan (Passover) Nisan * Iyar (Lag Ba'Omer) Iyar * Sivan (Shavuot) Sivan * Tammuz (17 Tammuz) Tammuz * Av (Tisha B'Av, Tu B'Av)Av

* Tishrei (Rosh Hashana, Tzom Gedaliah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Shmini Atzeret, Simchat Torah) * Marcheshvan, more commonly known as Cheshvan * Kislev (the first few days of Chanukah) * Tevet (the last few days of Chanukah, Asara B'Tevet) * Shvat (Tu Bi'Shvat) * Adar I (added during leap years) * Adar or Adar II (Fast of Esther, Purim) Nisan is usually in March/April, so the other months continue from there. By the way, if you've played ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'', you may recognize the month names or mistranslations of them.
to:
* Tishrei (Rosh Hashana, Tzom Gedaliah, Yom Kippur, Sukkot, Shmini Atzeret, Simchat Torah) Tishri * Marcheshvan, more commonly known as Cheshvan Marcheshvan/Heshvan * Kislev (the first few days of Chanukah) Kislev * Tevet (the last few days of Chanukah, Asara B'Tevet) Tevet * Shvat (Tu Bi'Shvat) Shevat * Adar * Adar I (added during leap years) * Sheni (literally, "Second Adar"), the extra month The ecclesiastical year starts at Nisan, which roughly approximates the nearest New Moon to the Equinox of 21 March (thus Adar or Adar II (Fast of Esther, Purim) Nisan Sheni is usually in March/April, so placed at its very end), while the other months continue from there. civil year starts at Tishri, which in turn approximates the nearest New Moon to the Equinox of 23 September, which marks the start of the Near Eastern agro-economic cycle. By the way, if you've played ''VideoGame/{{Xenogears}}'', you may recognize the month names or mistranslations of them. them. Jewish years are termed "Anno Mundi" (AM), which begins on 1 Tishri, the afternoon of 6 September 3761 BCE, calculated by some Talmudic scholars to be the date when God created the world.

'''Rosh Hashana''' - 1-2 Tishrei Literally "head of the year", and one of the most important holidays in the Jewish calendar. It is also the exception that proves the rule: a holiday that is two days both in and out of Israel. Rosh Hashanah together with Yom Kippur, are known as the ''yamim nora'im'' or "Days of Awe", also known as the "High Holidays". During this time of year, Jews are exhorted to examine their sins and repent of them. It is believed that we are judged on Rosh Hashana for our actions, and our fates are sealed for the next year on Yom Kippur. Prayers on Rosh Hashana are much more liturgical and much longer than during a normal holiday. Some of this is taken up by the ''shofar'', a horn (usually that of a ram or Greater Kudu, a type of antelope) which is sounded 100 times in order to "awaken" Jews to repent. Rosh Hashana is the only "major holiday" which lasts two days even in Israel, possibly because it's the only one to fall on the first of a month, so even those nearby wouldn't know which day to observe. While Rosh Hashana has many joyous aspects, it is not a celebratory occasion. Because of this, "Happy New Year" is often seen as an inapropriate greeting (although "a sweet new year" is mentioned in several customs). The traditional greeting is "L'shana tova tikatev v'techatem", which translates as "May you be written and sealed for a good year", or simply "Shana Tova", "Have a good year". There are technically several different starts of the year for different purposes. The "first month" in the Jewish calendar is Nisan, the month that Passover falls on; the calendar year, however, starts with Rosh Hashana. This means that you go from e.g. 6/5700 to 7/5701, then from 12/5701 to 1/5701 until 6/5701, followed by 7/5702. Confusing, yes. ''Food!'' Starting from Rosh Hashana, the ''challah'' (a kind of braided bread) eaten every Shabbat are dipped in honey to symbolize the desire for a "sweet new year". Some communities also eat round/circular challah during Tishrei. On Rosh Hashana itself it's common practice to dip an apple in the honey as well. It is also customary to eat the head of a fish (symbolizing the "head" of the new year). This may be substituted for ''Gefilte Fish'', but then again many Ashkenazi families will eat Gefilte Fish at any festive opportunity. There are a great many other ''simanim'' (literally "signs") that various groups of Jews eat on Rosh Hashana, including the fish head (or, more commonly for Sephardim and Mizrahim, cow tongue) and honey. All of them have some kind of linguistic justification or pun associated with them as well as a short blessing, many of which refer to our enemies being vanquished. '''Yom Kippur''' - 10 Tishrei Occurs ten days after Rosh Hashana, and is the most serious day in the calendar. The ten days are known as ''aseret y'mei teshuvah'', "Ten Days of Repentance". The day immediately after Rosh Hashana is a fast day, called ''Tzom Gedaliah'' (Fast of Gedaliah), which mourns the assassination of Gedaliah Ben Achikam, the governor of Israel during the days of Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylonia, about 500 years BCE. Yom Kippur itself is not only a "major holiday" but also a fast day; however, unlike most other fast days, not only food and drink but also makeup, leather shoes, hand washing, and sexual relations are forbidden (Tisha B'Av is the only other day with these restrictions). The entire day and much of the preceding night is spent in the synagogue, praying. ''Food!'' None. Too bad. Though there's usually a good spread before the fast; it's said that, in eating a huge meal on the 9th to prepare for fasting on the 10th, God is appreciative enough to give you merit as though you fasted on both days. After the fast the food isn't bad either. Note: As Yom Kippur is not a "happy" day, it is not considered correct to wish someone a "Happy Yom Kippur." Instead, one should wish someone an "easy fast." '''Sukkot, Shmini Atzeret, Simchat Torah''' - 15-23 Tishrei (22 Tishrei in Israel) Occurs five days after Yom Kippur (yes, this time of year is extremely busy!). One of the big three holidays in the calendar. Essentially the "Festival of Huts", Sukkot is more of an agricultural festival, but nowadays is mainly known for the sometimes elaborate wooden huts that spring up in any heavily Jewish area. Jews eat and (some) sleep in them for a seven-day period, in remembrance of when the original Hebrews slept in huts in their journey out of Egypt (or, some say, as a reference to the Clouds of Glory that surrounded them). When in synagogue, men will carry the Four Species: the ''etrog'' (a yellow citron[[note]]The citron is a citrus fruit which is mostly skin and pith and contains little if any juicy pulp; outside of Jewish ritual, it is mostly used to make succade, which depending on your perspective is either a kind of marmalade or simply just candied citrus peel.[[/note]]), ''lulav'' (palm frond), ''hadasim'' (myrtle branches) and ''aravot'' (willow branches). The last three are bound together in one bundle. During the prayers, the Four Species are held and waved around at various points. Historically, many congregations could not access some or all of the Four Species (this was a particular problem among Ashkenazi congregations in Europe and later in North America), so it was common for a synagogue to have only one of each, but today all the men having a full set is pretty common. The last day of ''chol hamo'ed'' (i.e. the seventh day of the holiday) is known as Hoshana Rabbah. There are some aspects of the High Holidays that trickle down here. The prayers are longer, and near the end, the men will take a bundle of five ''aravos'' and bash them against the ground several times. This is very symbolic and [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial has nothing whatsoever to do with letting out the stress of building huts and cooking and cleaning so much]]. Outside Israel, the last two days of Sukkot are known as Shmini Atzeret and Simchat Torah. (In Israel, there's only one last day, on the 22nd of Tishrei, and it's Simchat Torah.) Shmini Atzeret is basically Simchat Torah lite. Simchat Torah itself is a day in which Jews celebrate the completion of the Torah reading for the year. They dance with Torah scrolls in the synagogue, and often get blindingly drunk.
to:
'''Rosh Hashana''' - 1-2 Tishrei Literally "head !! Rosh Hashanah (Head of the year", and one Year) -- 1-2 Tishri One of the most important holidays in the Jewish calendar.calendar, marking the beginning of the civil year. It is also the exception that proves the rule: a holiday that is two days both in and out of Israel. Rosh Hashanah Hashanah, together with Yom Kippur, are known as the ''yamim nora'im'' or "Days ("Days of Awe", Awe"), also known as the "High Holidays". During this time of year, time, Jews are exhorted to examine their sins and repent of them. It their sins, as it is believed that we are judged on Rosh Hashana this day God starts judging humanity for our actions, their actions during the previous year and our fates are seals their fate for the whole year ten days later (Yom Kippur). Thus, "Happy New Year" is often deemed an inappropriate greeting; traditionally it has to be "l'shana tova tikatev v'techatem" ("may you be written and sealed for the next year on Yom Kippur. a good year"), or simply "shana tova" ("have a good year"). Prayers on Rosh Hashana are much more liturgical and much longer than during a normal holiday. Some of this is taken up by the ''shofar'', a horn (usually that of a ram or Greater Kudu, greater kudu, a type of antelope) which is sounded 100 a hundred times in order to "awaken" Jews to repent. Rosh Hashana is the only "major holiday" which lasts two days even in Israel, possibly because it's the only one to fall on the first of a month, so even those nearby wouldn't know which day to observe. While Rosh Hashana has many joyous aspects, it is not a celebratory occasion. Because of this, "Happy New Year" is often seen as an inapropriate greeting (although "a sweet new year" is mentioned in several customs). The traditional greeting is "L'shana tova tikatev v'techatem", which translates as "May you be written and sealed for a good year", or simply "Shana Tova", "Have a good year". There are technically several different starts of the year for different purposes. The "first month" in the Jewish calendar is Nisan, the month that Passover falls on; the calendar year, however, starts with Rosh Hashana. This means that you go from e.g. 6/5700 to 7/5701, then from 12/5701 to 1/5701 until 6/5701, followed by 7/5702. Confusing, yes. ''Food!'' Starting from Rosh Hashana, here, the ''challah'' (a kind of braided bread) eaten every Shabbat are dipped in honey to symbolize the desire for a "sweet new year". Some communities also eat round/circular challah during Tishrei. throughout Tishri. On Rosh Hashana the day itself it's common practice to dip an apple in the honey as well. well. It is also customary to eat the head of a fish (symbolizing the "head" of the new year). This may be substituted for ''Gefilte Fish'', ''gefilte fish'', but then again many Ashkenazi families Ashkenazis will eat Gefilte Fish the fish at any festive opportunity. There are a great many other ''simanim'' (literally "signs") ("signs") that various groups of Jews eat on Rosh Hashana, this day, including the fish head (or, more commonly for Sephardim and Mizrahim, cow tongue) and honey. All of them have some kind of linguistic justification or pun associated with them as well as a short blessing, many of which refer to our enemies being vanquished. '''Yom Kippur''' - 10 Tishrei Occurs ten days after Rosh Hashana, and is the most serious day in the calendar. The ten days are known as ''aseret y'mei teshuvah'', "Ten hopes of vanquishing their enemies. !! Aseret Yemei Teshuva (Ten Days of Repentance". The day immediately after Rosh Hashana Penance) -- 1-10 Tishri Not so much a holiday as it is a fast day, called ''Tzom Gedaliah'' period of reflection and penance. !! Tzom Gedalia (Fast of Gedaliah), which mourns Gedaliah) -- 3/4 Tishri A fast observed from dawn to dusk, mourning the assassination of Gedaliah Ben Achikam, ben Ahikam, the governor of Israel during the days of Nebuchadnezzar, Judah appointed by King Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylonia, about 500 years BCE. Babylon to administer to Jews left behind after the majority were exiled to Babylon, by some Jews opposed to his appointment in spite of his efforts to restore order following the destruction of the Temple, forcing the remnant to flee to Egypt for fear of retaliation and thus dashing any semblance of autonomy. The assassination is generally believed to have occurred on a Rosh Hashanah, thus out of respect the fast is moved to the third of Tishri, except if it is a Shabbat, in which case it is moved to the fourth. !! Erev Yom Kippur (Eve of the Day of Atonement) -- 9 Tishri Literally the day before the big day, this is marked by additional morning prayers, exchanges of forgiveness, giving to charity and two festive meals -- think of it as the Mardi Gras of Jews. ''Food!'' Plentiful, as a preparation for the day-long fast. !! Yom Kippur (Day of Atonement) -- 10 Tishri Yom Kippur itself is not only a "major holiday" but also a fast day; however, day. However, unlike most other fast days, fasts, not only food and drink are forbidden, but also makeup, leather shoes, hand washing, washing and sexual relations are forbidden (Tisha B'Av is the only other day with these restrictions). The entire day and much of the preceding night is spent in the synagogue, praying. synagogue praying for forgiveness and reconciliation with God before their fates are sealed for the year after a ten-day examination which began at Rosh Hashanah. ''Food!'' None. Too bad. Though there's usually a good spread before the fast; it's said that, in eating a huge meal on the 9th to prepare for fasting on the 10th, God is appreciative enough to give you merit as though you fasted on both days. After the fast the food isn't bad either. Note: As Yom Kippur is not a "happy" day, it is not considered correct to wish someone a "Happy Yom Kippur." Instead, one should wish someone an "easy fast." '''Sukkot, Shmini Atzeret, Simchat Torah''' - 15-23 Tishrei bad. !! Sukkot (Feast of Booths) -- 15-21 Tishri (22 Tishrei in Israel) Tishri outside Israel) Occurs five days after Yom Kippur (yes, this time of year Tishri is extremely busy!). a busy month). One of the big three holidays in the calendar. Essentially calendar and originally one of the "Festival of Huts", three times when Jews are obliged to go to the Temple in Jerusalem (besides Passover and Shavuot). Sukkot is more of an agricultural festival, but nowadays is mainly known for the sometimes elaborate wooden huts that spring up in any heavily Jewish area. Jews eat and (some) sleep in them for a seven-day period, in remembrance of when seven days, celebrating God's providence throughout the original Hebrews slept in huts in their Jews' journey out of Egypt (or, some say, as a reference Egypt, during which time they had to the Clouds of Glory that surrounded them). sleep in huts. When in the synagogue, men will carry the Four Species: the ''etrog'' (a yellow citron[[note]]The citron is a citrus fruit which is mostly skin and pith and contains little if any juicy pulp; outside of Jewish ritual, it is mostly used to make succade, which depending on your perspective is either a kind of marmalade or simply just candied citrus peel.[[/note]]), the ''lulav'' (palm frond), the ''hadasim'' (myrtle branches) and the ''aravot'' (willow branches). The last latter three are bound together in one bundle. During the prayers, the Four Species are held and waved around at various points. Historically, many congregations could not access some or all of the Four Species (this was a particular problem among Ashkenazi congregations Ashkenazis in Europe and later in and, later, North America), so it was common for a synagogue to have only one of each, but today all the men having a full set is pretty common. The last day of ''chol hamo'ed'' (i.e. the seventh day of the holiday) is known as Hoshana Rabbah."Hoshana Rabbah". There are some aspects of the High Holidays that trickle down here. The prayers are longer, and near the end, the men will take a bundle of five ''aravos'' and bash them against the ground several times. This is very symbolic and [[SuspiciouslySpecificDenial has nothing whatsoever to do with letting out the stress of building huts and cooking and cleaning so much]]. Outside Israel, the last two days of Sukkot are known as Shmini !! Shemini Atzeret and Simchat Torah. (In Israel, there's only one last day, on (Eighth Day of Assembly) -- 22 Tishri Usually observed outside Israel (where it is considered the 22nd eighth day of Tishrei, and it's Simchat Torah.) Shmini Sukkot), Shemini Atzeret is basically both an extension of Sukkot and the eve of Simchat Torah. !! Simchat Torah lite. (Rejoicing with the Torah) -- 22 Tishri (Israel) / 23 Tishri (world) Simchat Torah itself is a day in which Jews celebrate the completion of the Torah reading for the year. They dance with Torah scrolls in the synagogue, synagogue and often get blindingly drunk.
16th Dec '15 4:34:54 PM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
-->'''Creator/JonStewart'''
to:
-->'''Creator/JonStewart''' -->--'''Creator/JonStewart'''
16th Dec '15 4:34:43 PM MarkLungo
Is there an issue? Send a Message
->"We have holidays up the ass! Sometimes I stay home, and I don't even know why!" -->Creator/JonStewart
to:
->"We ->''"We have holidays up the ass! Sometimes I stay home, and I don't even know why!" -->Creator/JonStewart why!"'' -->'''Creator/JonStewart'''

To commemmorate [[MaccabeanRevolt the war]] and the miracle, Jews light a ''chanukiyah'', a smaller version of the ''menorah'' with a total of nine lights: one for each night, plus a ''shamash'' or "helper" light. The ''shamash'' is necessary because the lights themselves are forbidden to be used for their light. Each night, one more light is lit (so one plus ''shamash'' on the first day, two plus ''shamash'' on the second day, up to 8 + 1 on the last day).
to:
To commemmorate [[MaccabeanRevolt [[UsefulNotes/TheMaccabeanRevolt the war]] and the miracle, Jews light a ''chanukiyah'', a smaller version of the ''menorah'' with a total of nine lights: one for each night, plus a ''shamash'' or "helper" light. The ''shamash'' is necessary because the lights themselves are forbidden to be used for their light. Each night, one more light is lit (so one plus ''shamash'' on the first day, two plus ''shamash'' on the second day, up to 8 + 1 on the last day).

Added DiffLines:
To commemmorate [[MaccabeanRevolt the war]] and the miracle, Jews light a ''chanukiyah'', a smaller version of the ''menorah'' with a total of nine lights: one for each night, plus a ''shamash'' or "helper" light. The ''shamash'' is necessary because the lights themselves are forbidden to be used for their light. Each night, one more light is lit (so one plus ''shamash'' on the first day, two plus ''shamash'' on the second day, up to 8 + 1 on the last day). ----
7th Dec '15 5:35:54 AM Cidolfas
Is there an issue? Send a Message
I've been celebrating and studying this all my life and have never heard this point. Do you have a source?
The story of Chanukah involves the Chashmona'im, a family of priests in power, and the Maccabees, a specific set of people in the family. The Syrian-Greeks, in occupying Israel, eventually started banning Jewish practices and even defiled the Jewish Temple. The Chashmona'im led a rebellion against them and ousted them from power. It is worth noting that this is the first recorded war for religious freedom. When they got back to the Temple, though, they couldn't find any unspoiled oil to light the ''menorah'', a holy ceremonial candelabra. They finally found one jar of oil still sealed, but it was only enough for a single day. However, miraculously, the oil lasted eight days, leaving them enough time to manufacture new oil.[[note]]The miracle of the oil is a much later invention by rabbinical authorities uncomfortable with a holiday that had no divine or spiritual element. Originally, the holiday lasted eight days because that's how long it took to ritually purify the recaptured Temple.[[/note]]
to:
The story of Chanukah involves the Chashmona'im, a family of priests in power, and the Maccabees, a specific set of people in the family. The Syrian-Greeks, in occupying Israel, eventually started banning Jewish practices and even defiled the Jewish Temple. The Chashmona'im led a rebellion against them and ousted them from power. It is worth noting that this is the first recorded war for religious freedom. When they got back to the Temple, though, they couldn't find any unspoiled oil to light the ''menorah'', a holy ceremonial candelabra. They finally found one jar of oil still sealed, but it was only enough for a single day. However, miraculously, the oil lasted eight days, leaving them enough time to manufacture new oil.[[note]]The miracle of the oil is a much later invention by rabbinical authorities uncomfortable with a holiday that had no divine or spiritual element. Originally, the holiday lasted eight days because that's how long it took to ritually purify the recaptured Temple.[[/note]] oil.
4th Dec '15 6:50:06 PM samhuddy
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The story of Chanukah involves the Chashmona'im, a family of priests in power, and the Maccabees, a specific set of people in the family. The Syrian-Greeks, in occupying Israel, eventually started banning Jewish practices and even defiled the Jewish Temple. The Chashmona'im led a rebellion against them and ousted them from power. It is worth noting that this is the first recorded war for religious freedom. When they got back to the Temple, though, they couldn't find any unspoiled oil to light the ''menorah'', a holy ceremonial candelabra. They finally found one jar of oil still sealed, but it was only enough for a single day. However, miraculously, the oil lasted eight days, leaving them enough time to manufacture new oil.
to:
The story of Chanukah involves the Chashmona'im, a family of priests in power, and the Maccabees, a specific set of people in the family. The Syrian-Greeks, in occupying Israel, eventually started banning Jewish practices and even defiled the Jewish Temple. The Chashmona'im led a rebellion against them and ousted them from power. It is worth noting that this is the first recorded war for religious freedom. When they got back to the Temple, though, they couldn't find any unspoiled oil to light the ''menorah'', a holy ceremonial candelabra. They finally found one jar of oil still sealed, but it was only enough for a single day. However, miraculously, the oil lasted eight days, leaving them enough time to manufacture new oil. oil.[[note]]The miracle of the oil is a much later invention by rabbinical authorities uncomfortable with a holiday that had no divine or spiritual element. Originally, the holiday lasted eight days because that's how long it took to ritually purify the recaptured Temple.[[/note]]
2nd Oct '15 8:06:07 AM pratchettgaiman
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
Note: As Yom Kippur is not a "happy" day, it is not considered correct to wish someone a "Happy Yom Kippur." Instead, one should wish someone an "easy fast."
27th Jul '15 5:42:18 AM Cidolfas
Is there an issue? Send a Message
On the first night (or first two outside Israel), a ''seder'' is held. This is a long, ritual-laden sequence which the family holds in their dining room. It involves discussion of the Exodus and Torah thoughts; specific foods eaten, such as ''matzah'' and ''maror'', a bitter herb (usually lettuce, particularly romaine--which is not bitter at first, but becomes bitter after a while, representing the Hebrew experience in Egypt--but horseradish, endive, green onion, and parsley are also used), to remember the servitude; a meal; four cups of wine; and many songs. The whole thing is contained in a book called the ''haggadah'' ("telling"). ''Sedarim'' can last well past midnight (this troper has wearily headed home at 3 AM from his uncle's house several times).
to:
On the first night (or first two outside Israel), a ''seder'' is held. This is a long, ritual-laden sequence which the family holds in their dining room. It involves discussion of the Exodus and Torah thoughts; specific foods eaten, such as ''matzah'' and ''maror'', a bitter herb (usually lettuce, particularly romaine--which is not bitter at first, but becomes bitter after a while, representing the Hebrew experience in Egypt--but horseradish, endive, green onion, and parsley are also used), to remember the servitude; a meal; four cups of wine; and many songs. The whole thing is contained in a book called the ''haggadah'' ("telling"). ''Sedarim'' can last well past midnight (this troper has wearily headed home at 3 AM from his uncle's house several times). midnight.
24th Jul '15 10:51:55 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message
On the first night (or first two outside Israel), a ''seder'' is held. This is a long, ritual-laden sequence which the family holds in their dining room. It involves discussion of the Exodus and Torah thoughts; specific foods eaten, such as ''matzah'' and ''maror'', a bitter herb, to remember the servitude; a meal; four cups of wine; and many songs. The whole thing is contained in a book called the ''haggadah'' ("telling"). ''Sedarim'' can last well past midnight (this troper has wearily headed home at 3 AM from his uncle's house several times).
to:
On the first night (or first two outside Israel), a ''seder'' is held. This is a long, ritual-laden sequence which the family holds in their dining room. It involves discussion of the Exodus and Torah thoughts; specific foods eaten, such as ''matzah'' and ''maror'', a bitter herb, herb (usually lettuce, particularly romaine--which is not bitter at first, but becomes bitter after a while, representing the Hebrew experience in Egypt--but horseradish, endive, green onion, and parsley are also used), to remember the servitude; a meal; four cups of wine; and many songs. The whole thing is contained in a book called the ''haggadah'' ("telling"). ''Sedarim'' can last well past midnight (this troper has wearily headed home at 3 AM from his uncle's house several times).
24th Jul '15 10:48:43 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message
The Last Supper in Christianity is generally held to have been a Passover seder, and in general, Easter falls quite close to Passover. The massive movement in the date of Easter is a result of having a Christian holiday map to the Jewish festival of Passover; the incessant debates over how to calculate the date of Easter is a result of the Christians refusing to just use the Jewish calendar to figure out the date already and rely on convoluted mathematics instead. The name of Easter in many languages is based on the Hebrew Pesach (Passover): Latin and Greek Pascha gave rise to Spanish Pascua, Italian Pasqua, French Pâques, and Dutch Pasen (among others), and the Hebrew Pesach directly led to Arabic Id ul-Fiṣḥ.[[note]]Lest you forget, about 20% of Arabs are Christian. Also, Arabic makes no differentiation between Passover and Easter; this no doubt led to significant confusion in Arabic-speaking countries back when their Jewish populations were still intact.[[/note]]
to:
The Last Supper in Christianity is generally held to have been a Passover seder, and in general, Easter falls quite close to Passover. The massive movement in the date of Easter is a result of having a Christian holiday map to the Jewish festival of Passover; the incessant debates over how to calculate the date of Easter is a result of the Christians refusing to just use the Jewish calendar to figure out the date already and rely on convoluted mathematics instead. The name of Easter in many languages is based on the Hebrew Pesach (Passover): Latin and Greek Pascha gave rise to Spanish Pascua, Italian Pasqua, French Pâques, Pques, and Dutch Pasen (among others), and the Hebrew Pesach directly led to Arabic Id ul-Fiṣḥ.[[note]]Lest you forget, about 20% of Arabs are Christian. Also, Arabic makes no differentiation between Passover and Easter; this no doubt led to significant confusion in Arabic-speaking countries back when their Jewish populations were still intact.[[/note]]
24th Jul '15 10:43:40 PM karstovich2
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Among Orthodox Jewry there is actually a great deal of debate over what exactly this requirement for drunkenness means in a practical sense. The general consensus among Modern Orthodox rabbis is that those who can drink in a safe and responsible manner should have something to drink, but not so much that they ''literally'' can't differentiate between "Blessed is Mordechai" and "Cursed is Haman", probably because that level of intoxication also leads to blackouts, drunk driving, assaults, and all sorts of general badness.
to:
* Among Orthodox Jewry there is actually a great deal of debate over what exactly this requirement for drunkenness means in a practical sense. The general consensus among Modern Orthodox rabbis is that those who can drink in a safe and responsible manner should have something to drink, perhaps even enough to make them appreciably (and pleasantly) drunk, but not so much that they ''literally'' can't differentiate between "Blessed is Mordechai" and "Cursed is Haman", probably because that level of intoxication also leads to blackouts, drunk driving, assaults, and all sorts of general badness.
This list shows the last 10 events of 80. Show all.