History UsefulNotes / JapaneseRomanization

18th Jun '16 9:01:42 AM Prfnoff
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One more issue is how to treat "n" followed by a vowel. Since "n", unlike other consonants, does not have to have a vowel sound after it, it's ambiguous whether "ni", for instance, refers to a single syllable or to a "n" followed by a separate "i". Some systems use an apostrophe to indicate this. (Examples: ''ren'ai'', "romantic love", vs. ''re'nai'', "no ''re''"; ''shin'en'', "passion" vs. ''shinen'', "thought".)

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One more issue is how to treat "n" followed by a vowel. Since "n", unlike other consonants, does not have to have a vowel sound after it, it's ambiguous whether "ni", for instance, refers to a single syllable or to a "n" followed by a separate "i". The latter is usually the case in personal names containing "ichi" (e.g. Kenichi, Shinichi). Some systems use an apostrophe to indicate this. (Examples: ''ren'ai'', "romantic love", vs. ''re'nai'', "no ''re''"; ''shin'en'', "passion" vs. ''shinen'', "thought".)
1st Feb '16 1:41:20 PM Prfnoff
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There are a few syllables that turn into combinations, like "ji-ya", "chi-yo", "ri-yu", etc., with the second syllable written smaller. (The smaller kana are a modern invention, and historical kana usage also included many confusing alternate spellings.) In modern Hepburn this is turned into "ja", "cho", "ryu", but you can also see "jya"; Nihon-shiki and Kunrei-shiki actually use "zya". Old Hepburn only did this consistently with sh(a/o/u), ch(a/o/u) and j(a/o/u), and wrote, for instance, the names of the city of Kyoto and the island of Kyushu as "Kiyoto" and "Kiushu."

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There are a few syllables that turn into combinations, like "ji-ya", "chi-yo", "ri-yu", etc., with the second syllable written smaller. (The smaller kana are a modern invention, and historical kana usage also included many confusing alternate spellings.) In modern Hepburn this is turned into "ja", "cho", "ryu", but you can also see "jya"; Nihon-shiki and Kunrei-shiki actually use "zya". Old Hepburn only did this consistently with sh(a/o/u), ch(a/o/u) and j(a/o/u), and wrote, for instance, the names of the city of Kyoto and the island of Kyushu as "Kiyoto" and "Kiushu."
" ("Kwa" and "gwa" used to occur in the ''on'yomi'' readings of many characters; language reforms have collapsed most cases to "ka" and "ga," though a few characters are still usually read as "kuwa.")
6th Jul '15 5:20:23 PM Prfnoff
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* ''[[ShadowHearts Shadow Hearts: From The New World]]'': Shub Niggurath → she-bu-ni-gu-ra-su → Jeb Niglas
* ''FinalFantasyTactics'': Breath → bu-re-su → Bracelet

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* ''[[ShadowHearts ''[[VideoGame/ShadowHearts Shadow Hearts: From The New World]]'': Shub Niggurath → she-bu-ni-gu-ra-su → Jeb Niglas
* ''FinalFantasyTactics'': ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTactics'': Breath → bu-re-su → Bracelet




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* ''VideoGame/LufiaIIRiseOfTheSinistrals'': Rafflesia → ra-fu-re-shi-a → La Fleshia
17th Sep '14 3:31:04 PM Prfnoff
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** "v" can be written as "u" with a digraph on it, followed by a vowel, but more often is just rendered with a "b" (e.g. "violin" would be "ba-i-o-ri-n"). This has caused the weapon name "Vulcan cannon" to be mistranslated as "Balkan cannon" in such games as ''VideoGame/MagicalChase'' and ''VideoGame/ForgottenWorlds''.

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** "v" can be written as "u" with a digraph on it, followed by a vowel, but more often is just rendered with a "b" (e.g. "violin" would be "ba-i-o-ri-n"). This has caused the weapon name [[GatlingGood "Vulcan cannon" cannon"]] to be mistranslated as "Balkan cannon" in such games as ''VideoGame/MagicalChase'' and ''VideoGame/ForgottenWorlds''.
17th Sep '14 3:27:39 PM Prfnoff
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** "v" can be written as "u" with a digraph on it, followed by a vowel, but more often is just rendered with a "b" (e.g. "violin" would be "ba-i-o-ri-n").

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** "v" can be written as "u" with a digraph on it, followed by a vowel, but more often is just rendered with a "b" (e.g. "violin" would be "ba-i-o-ri-n"). This has caused the weapon name "Vulcan cannon" to be mistranslated as "Balkan cannon" in such games as ''VideoGame/MagicalChase'' and ''VideoGame/ForgottenWorlds''.
14th Jan '14 3:25:24 PM Prfnoff
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* The lack of ending consonants. "n" is the only consonant that Japanese allows to end a syllable, so when foreign words are transliterated into the Japanese syllabaries they end up with extra vowels. "U" is commonly used since it's often elided in speech when it comes between unvoiced consonants. When "r" comes at the end of a syllable or is followed by a consonant, it's typical to double the preceding vowel (represented by a long dash in katakana), so for instance "number" becomes "nunbaa". The trailing "s" of plural nouns is often omitted, because the Japanese language lacks plurals.

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* The lack of ending consonants. "n" is the only consonant that Japanese allows to end a syllable, so when foreign words are transliterated into the Japanese syllabaries they end up with extra vowels. "U" is commonly used since it's often elided in speech when it comes between unvoiced consonants.consonants; for this reason, Old Hepburn usually wrote it as an apostrophe. When "r" comes at the end of a syllable or is followed by a consonant, it's typical to double the preceding vowel (represented by a long dash in katakana), so for instance "number" becomes "nunbaa". The trailing "s" of plural nouns is often omitted, because the Japanese language lacks plurals.
24th Dec '13 9:23:46 AM Prfnoff
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** This is because "n" is assimilated so it's pronounced "m" before labials (i.e. "b", "p", and "m" in Japanese), so writing it "ko-mu-bo" is unnecessary. The same thing happens in English when the prefix "in-" is added to a word beginning with "p" (i.e., in+possible=impossible).

This assimilation sometimes also happens in other languages, whether the speakers are aware of it or not.

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** This is because "n" is assimilated so it's pronounced "m" before labials (i.e. "b", "p", and "m" in Japanese), so writing it "ko-mu-bo" is unnecessary. The same thing happens in English when the prefix "in-" is added to a word beginning with "p" (i.e., in+possible=impossible).

in+possible=impossible). This assimilation sometimes also happens in other languages, whether the speakers are aware of it or not.
24th Dec '13 9:20:05 AM Prfnoff
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* For some reason, Japanese sometimes treats an ending "m" like an "n", leading to words like "combo" being turned into "ko-n-bo".

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* For some reason, Japanese sometimes treats an ending "m" like an "n", leading to words like "combo" and "computer" being turned into "ko-n-bo"."ko-n-bo" and "ko-n-pyuu-ta".
22nd Dec '13 10:13:50 AM SeanOHara
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* The lack of ending consonants. "n" is the only consonant that Japanese allows to end a syllable, although "r" is also simulated by a horizontal dash. The trailing "s" of plural nouns is often omitted, because the Japanese language lacks plurals. For everything else, an existing syllable is used, meaning there is an ending vowel (usually "u") that has to get chopped off when romanizing. Such vowels must also be used to break up consonant clusters.

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* The lack of ending consonants. "n" is the only consonant that Japanese allows to end a syllable, although so when foreign words are transliterated into the Japanese syllabaries they end up with extra vowels. "U" is commonly used since it's often elided in speech when it comes between unvoiced consonants. When "r" comes at the end of a syllable or is also simulated followed by a horizontal dash.consonant, it's typical to double the preceding vowel (represented by a long dash in katakana), so for instance "number" becomes "nunbaa". The trailing "s" of plural nouns is often omitted, because the Japanese language lacks plurals. For everything else, an existing syllable is used, meaning there is an ending vowel (usually "u") that has to get chopped off when romanizing. Such vowels must also be used to break up consonant clusters.



** This is because "n" is assimilated so it's pronounced "m" before labials (i.e. "b", "p", and "m" in Japanese), so writing it "ko-mu-bo" is unnecessary. This assimilation sometimes also happens in other languages, whether the speakers are aware of it or not.

to:

** This is because "n" is assimilated so it's pronounced "m" before labials (i.e. "b", "p", and "m" in Japanese), so writing it "ko-mu-bo" is unnecessary. The same thing happens in English when the prefix "in-" is added to a word beginning with "p" (i.e., in+possible=impossible).

This assimilation sometimes also happens in other languages, whether the speakers are aware of it or not.
21st Dec '13 9:12:51 AM Prfnoff
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* Kunrei-shiki uses the circumflex (ô) to indicate long vowels.

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* Kunrei-shiki uses the circumflex (ô) to indicate long vowels. This is handled better on many computers, though many Japanese-language programs will still reject it as input.
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