History UsefulNotes / Ireland

31st Jan '16 6:43:27 AM Sagetsu
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* Comedian and ''MockTheWeek'' host Dara Ó Briain.
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* Celebrity chat-show host [[Series/TheGrahamNortonShow Graham Norton]] * Comedian and ''MockTheWeek'' host [[Creator/DaraOBriain Dara Ó Briain.Briain]].
8th Nov '15 9:15:38 PM karstovich2
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Its '''military''' is relatively small, unlike many other neutral states, though it is still larger than a few similarly sized-states such as New Zealand (and in per-capita terms Ireland has a higher percentage of soldiers than Canada or Australia.) Since 1958, its main active function has been involvement in UN peacekeeping operations.
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Its '''military''' '''[[UsefulNotes/PaddiesWithPropellerPlanes military]]''' is relatively small, unlike many other neutral states, though it is still larger than a few similarly sized-states such as New Zealand (and in per-capita terms Ireland has a higher percentage of soldiers than Canada or Australia.) Since 1958, its main active function has been involvement in UN peacekeeping operations. operations. A small but significant number of Irish citizens looking for more, er, "interesting" military service serve in the [[UsefulNotes/BritsWithBattleships British Armed Forces]], with the Irish authorities generally turning a blind eye to Britain's recruitment activities in the Republic.
8th Nov '15 9:01:35 PM karstovich2
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Since then, Ireland has had a history of '''emigration''', resulting in the massive [[TheIrishDiaspora Irish diaspora]] across the globe -- an estimated eighty million people are eligible for Irish passports by the grandparent rule. Most of them are concentrated in English-speaking countries, but just about everywhere has an Irish community. The emigration situation ironically reversed in the 1990s, when net migration was inward thanks to the Celtic Tiger. With the ten new countries in the EU in 2004, immigration increased further and coupled with high fertility rates, it makes Ireland's population one of the fastest growing in Europe. We should note that on account of the massive emigration in the 19th century, Ireland's current population is a lot lower than it should be--in the 18th and early 19th centuries, Dublin was the second-largest city of the British Empire and one of the ten largest cities in Europe. The emigration had a lasting effect, keeping Ireland's base population low and its agricultural emphasis strong as it entered the 20th century. Had Ireland been properly fed in the 19th century, it might well have been ''far'' more populous than it is (to give you an idea, if the island of Ireland was as densely populated as the island of Great Britain, it would have a population of about 25.5 million, rather than the population of about 6.7 million it actually has, making it the sixth-most-populous island in the world rather than the 19th).
to:
Since then, Ireland has had a history of '''emigration''', resulting in the massive [[TheIrishDiaspora Irish diaspora]] across the globe -- an estimated eighty million people are eligible for Irish passports by the grandparent rule. Most of them are concentrated in English-speaking countries, but just about everywhere has an Irish community. The emigration situation ironically reversed in the 1990s, when net migration was inward thanks to the Celtic Tiger. With the ten new countries in the EU in 2004, immigration increased further and coupled with high fertility rates, it makes Ireland's population one of the fastest growing in Europe. We should note that on account of the massive emigration in the 19th century, Ireland's current population is a lot lower than it should be--in the 18th and early 19th centuries, Dublin was the second-largest city of the British Empire and one of the ten largest cities in Europe. The emigration had a lasting effect, keeping Ireland's base population low and its agricultural emphasis strong as it entered the 20th century. Had Ireland been properly fed in the 19th century, it might well have been ''far'' more populous than it is (to give you an idea, if the island of Ireland was were as densely populated as the island of Great Britain, it would have a population of about 25.5 million, rather than the population of about 6.7 million it actually has, making it the sixth-most-populous island in the world rather than the 19th).
8th Nov '15 8:59:05 PM karstovich2
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Since then, Ireland has had a history of '''emigration''', resulting in the massive [[TheIrishDiaspora Irish diaspora]] across the globe -- an estimated eighty million people are eligible for Irish passports by the grandparent rule. Most of them are concentrated in English-speaking countries, but just about everywhere has an Irish community. The emigration situation ironically reversed in the 1990s, when net migration was inward thanks to the Celtic Tiger. With the ten new countries in the EU in 2004, immigration increased further and coupled with high fertility rates, it makes Ireland's population one of the fastest growing in Europe. We should note that on account of the massive emigration in the 19th century, Ireland's current population is a lot lower than it should be--in the 18th and early 19th centuries, Dublin was the second-largest city of the British Empire and one of the ten largest cities in Europe. The emigration had a lasting effect, keeping Ireland's base population low and its agricultural emphasis strong as it entered the 20th century. Had Ireland been properly fed in the 19th century, it might well have been ''far'' more populous than it is (to give you an idea, if the island of Ireland was as densely populated as the island of Great Britain, it would have a population of about 25.5 million, rather than the population of about 6.7 million it actually has).
to:
Since then, Ireland has had a history of '''emigration''', resulting in the massive [[TheIrishDiaspora Irish diaspora]] across the globe -- an estimated eighty million people are eligible for Irish passports by the grandparent rule. Most of them are concentrated in English-speaking countries, but just about everywhere has an Irish community. The emigration situation ironically reversed in the 1990s, when net migration was inward thanks to the Celtic Tiger. With the ten new countries in the EU in 2004, immigration increased further and coupled with high fertility rates, it makes Ireland's population one of the fastest growing in Europe. We should note that on account of the massive emigration in the 19th century, Ireland's current population is a lot lower than it should be--in the 18th and early 19th centuries, Dublin was the second-largest city of the British Empire and one of the ten largest cities in Europe. The emigration had a lasting effect, keeping Ireland's base population low and its agricultural emphasis strong as it entered the 20th century. Had Ireland been properly fed in the 19th century, it might well have been ''far'' more populous than it is (to give you an idea, if the island of Ireland was as densely populated as the island of Great Britain, it would have a population of about 25.5 million, rather than the population of about 6.7 million it actually has). has, making it the sixth-most-populous island in the world rather than the 19th).
8th Nov '15 8:55:32 PM karstovich2
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Since then, Ireland has had a history of '''emigration''', resulting in the massive [[TheIrishDiaspora Irish diaspora]] across the globe -- an estimated eighty million people are eligible for Irish passports by the grandparent rule. Most of them are concentrated in English-speaking countries, but just about everywhere has an Irish community. The emigration situation ironically reversed in the 1990s, when net migration was inward thanks to the Celtic Tiger. With the ten new countries in the EU in 2004, immigration increased further and coupled with high fertility rates, it makes Ireland's population one of the fastest growing in Europe. We should note that on account of the massive emigration in the 19th century, Ireland's current population is a lot lower than it should be--in the 18th and early 19th centuries, Dublin was the second-largest city of the British Empire and one of the ten largest cities in Europe. The emigration had a lasting effect, keeping Ireland's base population low and its agricultural emphasis strong as it entered the 20th century. Had Ireland been properly fed in the 19th century, it might well have been ''far'' more populous than it is.
to:
Since then, Ireland has had a history of '''emigration''', resulting in the massive [[TheIrishDiaspora Irish diaspora]] across the globe -- an estimated eighty million people are eligible for Irish passports by the grandparent rule. Most of them are concentrated in English-speaking countries, but just about everywhere has an Irish community. The emigration situation ironically reversed in the 1990s, when net migration was inward thanks to the Celtic Tiger. With the ten new countries in the EU in 2004, immigration increased further and coupled with high fertility rates, it makes Ireland's population one of the fastest growing in Europe. We should note that on account of the massive emigration in the 19th century, Ireland's current population is a lot lower than it should be--in the 18th and early 19th centuries, Dublin was the second-largest city of the British Empire and one of the ten largest cities in Europe. The emigration had a lasting effect, keeping Ireland's base population low and its agricultural emphasis strong as it entered the 20th century. Had Ireland been properly fed in the 19th century, it might well have been ''far'' more populous than it is. is (to give you an idea, if the island of Ireland was as densely populated as the island of Great Britain, it would have a population of about 25.5 million, rather than the population of about 6.7 million it actually has).
9th Oct '15 2:49:43 AM Morgenthaler
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Prior to him, it was '''Bertie Ahern'''. He stood down on 6 May 2008 for reasons involving alleged corruption (let's just say he was very good at guessing who won at the races, but the [[FatherTed money was just resting in his account]]). His daughter, Cecilia, wrote the original novel for ''[[Literature/PSILoveYou PS I Love You]]'', which has been made into a feature film. She's also the co-creator of ''SamanthaWho''.
to:
Prior to him, it was '''Bertie Ahern'''. He stood down on 6 May 2008 for reasons involving alleged corruption (let's just say he was very good at guessing who won at the races, but the [[FatherTed money was just resting in his account]]). His daughter, Cecilia, wrote the original novel for ''[[Literature/PSILoveYou PS I Love You]]'', which has been made into a feature film. She's also the co-creator of ''SamanthaWho''. ''Series/SamanthaWho''.
5th Sep '15 7:17:57 PM nombretomado
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'''Politically''', Ireland is best described as non-aligned but Western leaning. It's a member of UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion, but not of {{NATO}}. It does allow Shannon airport to be used for refuelling by US military flights (which caused controversy in the lead-up to the IraqWar, and due to the open secret of CIA extraordinary rendition flights) and Soviet aircraft refuelled there during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During WorldWarTwo, it was officially neutral (but implicitly aligned to the Allies politically and through majority public opinion.) Thousands of Irish men, both emigrés and volunteers, fought in the British and American armies. Perhaps the best example, though, is the folk history, largely based in truth, that while crashed Luftwaffe pilots were universally interned for duration, Allied pilots were frequently (and technically illegally) [[CouldSayItBut pointed in the direction of the Border so they could reach Belfast]]. The country also suffered rationing due to the German blockade, that lasted until 1947. Dublin was bombed once on 31 May 1941 by a German aircraft, killing 34 people, for reasons that aren't clear to this day, with various arguments for navigation error, reprisal for Dublin sending rescue personnel to Belfast, a warning not to enter the war or a result of the British radio beam "bending". The Germans apologized and offered compensation. There were two other attacks by the Luftwaffe during the war.
to:
'''Politically''', Ireland is best described as non-aligned but Western leaning. It's a member of UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion, but not of {{NATO}}.UsefulNotes/{{NATO}}. It does allow Shannon airport to be used for refuelling by US military flights (which caused controversy in the lead-up to the IraqWar, and due to the open secret of CIA extraordinary rendition flights) and Soviet aircraft refuelled there during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During WorldWarTwo, it was officially neutral (but implicitly aligned to the Allies politically and through majority public opinion.) Thousands of Irish men, both emigrés and volunteers, fought in the British and American armies. Perhaps the best example, though, is the folk history, largely based in truth, that while crashed Luftwaffe pilots were universally interned for duration, Allied pilots were frequently (and technically illegally) [[CouldSayItBut pointed in the direction of the Border so they could reach Belfast]]. The country also suffered rationing due to the German blockade, that lasted until 1947. Dublin was bombed once on 31 May 1941 by a German aircraft, killing 34 people, for reasons that aren't clear to this day, with various arguments for navigation error, reprisal for Dublin sending rescue personnel to Belfast, a warning not to enter the war or a result of the British radio beam "bending". The Germans apologized and offered compensation. There were two other attacks by the Luftwaffe during the war.
10th Aug '15 10:22:59 AM MyFinalEdits
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* Bands/singers including {{U2}}, ThinLizzy, Music/MyBloodyValentine, The Boomtown Rats, The Cranberries, Van Morrison, and Sinead O'Connor, Boyzone, The Script, Westlife [[AndZoidberg and Jedward]].
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* Bands/singers including {{U2}}, ThinLizzy, Music/MyBloodyValentine, The Boomtown Rats, The Cranberries, Music/TheCranberries, Van Morrison, and Sinead O'Connor, Boyzone, The Script, Westlife [[AndZoidberg and Jedward]].
9th Aug '15 6:13:54 AM Morgenthaler
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Added namespaces.
* ''SingleHanded'' (Galway) * ''SisterFidelma'' (Cashel and other parts of Munster, in the seventh century)
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* ''SingleHanded'' ''Series/SingleHanded'' (Galway) * ''SisterFidelma'' ''Literature/SisterFidelma'' (Cashel and other parts of Munster, in the seventh century)
20th Jun '15 7:07:00 PM aoicor
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'''Politically''', Ireland is best described as non-aligned but Western leaning. It's a member of UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion, but not of {{NATO}}. It does allow Shannon airport to be used for refuelling by US military flights (which caused controversy in the lead-up to the IraqWar, and due to the open secret of CIA extraordinary rendition flights) and Soviet aircraft refuelled there during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During WorldWarTwo, it was officially neutral (but implicitly aligned to the Allies politically and through majority public opinion.) Thousands of Irish men, both emigrés and volunteers, fought in the British and American armies. Perhaps the best example, though, is the folk history, largely based in truth, that while crashed Luftwaffe pilots were universally interned for duration, Allied pilots were frequently (and technically illegally) [[CouldSayItBut pointed in the direction of the Border so they could reach Belfast]]. In particular, the Allies were given a The country also suffered rationing due to the German blockade, that lasted until 1947. Dublin was bombed once on 31 May 1941 by a German aircraft, killing 34 people, for reasons that aren't clear to this day, with various arguments for navigation error, reprisal for Dublin sending rescue personnel to Belfast, a warning not to enter the war or a result of the British radio beam "bending". The Germans apologized and offered compensation. There were two other attacks by the Luftwaffe during the war.
to:
'''Politically''', Ireland is best described as non-aligned but Western leaning. It's a member of UsefulNotes/TheEuropeanUnion, but not of {{NATO}}. It does allow Shannon airport to be used for refuelling by US military flights (which caused controversy in the lead-up to the IraqWar, and due to the open secret of CIA extraordinary rendition flights) and Soviet aircraft refuelled there during the Cuban Missile Crisis. During WorldWarTwo, it was officially neutral (but implicitly aligned to the Allies politically and through majority public opinion.) Thousands of Irish men, both emigrés and volunteers, fought in the British and American armies. Perhaps the best example, though, is the folk history, largely based in truth, that while crashed Luftwaffe pilots were universally interned for duration, Allied pilots were frequently (and technically illegally) [[CouldSayItBut pointed in the direction of the Border so they could reach Belfast]]. In particular, the Allies were given a The country also suffered rationing due to the German blockade, that lasted until 1947. Dublin was bombed once on 31 May 1941 by a German aircraft, killing 34 people, for reasons that aren't clear to this day, with various arguments for navigation error, reprisal for Dublin sending rescue personnel to Belfast, a warning not to enter the war or a result of the British radio beam "bending". The Germans apologized and offered compensation. There were two other attacks by the Luftwaffe during the war.
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