History UsefulNotes / HolyRomanEmpire

30th Apr '17 9:52:36 PM JulianLapostat
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The '''Holy Roman Empire [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} of the German Nation]]''' (Latin: ''Imperium Romanum Sacrum Nationis Germanicæ''; German: ''Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation'') was traditionally founded on Christmas Day of the year 800 A.D., when [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Leo III placed the crown on the head of UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} in St. Peter's, and the assembled multitudes shouted "''Carolo Augusto, a Deo coronato magno et pacifico imperatori, vita et victoria!''" -- "To Charles the Magnificent, crowned the great and peace-giving emperor by God, life and victory!" Strictly speaking, however, Charles's empire was neither Roman nor German, but Frankish -- or as we might say, a sort of French-German mix (for that matter, there was a perfectly valid [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irene_of_Athens Roman Emperor]] at the time in any case[[note]]Or to be precise, ''empress''. Charlemagne's supporters [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne#Imperial_diplomacy claimed that a woman couldn't rule the Roman Empire]]. The Byzantines promptly deposed Irene and installed Nikephoros I, who was certainly a man; they were possibly disappointed that Charlemagne saw no reason to abdicate.[[/note]]). The Empire was not officially described as "Holy" until the twelfth century, nor officially "German" before the sixteenth. Charlemagne's empire quickly fell to pieces among his squabbling successors, and the Holy Roman Emperors themselves tended to ignore any discontinuity between [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire pagan]] and Christian Rome -- Frederick I Barbarossa (1123-1190) going so far as to assert that one of his reasons for going on [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades Crusade]] was to avenge the defeat of [[Film/{{Spartacus}} Crassus]] by the Parthians ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic 53 B.C.]]).[[note]]Never mind that the Parthians were Zoroastrian Persians and the rulers of the Middle East of the time were primarily Turkish and to a lesser extent Arab Muslims...[[/note]]

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The '''Holy ''Holy Roman Empire [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} of the German Nation]]''' Nation]]'' (Latin: ''Imperium Romanum Sacrum Nationis Germanicæ''; German: ''Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation'') was traditionally founded on Christmas Day of the year 800 A.D., when [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Leo III placed the crown on the head of UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} in St. Peter's, and the assembled multitudes shouted "''Carolo Augusto, a Deo coronato magno et pacifico imperatori, vita et victoria!''" -- "To Charles the Magnificent, crowned the great and peace-giving emperor by God, life and victory!" Strictly speaking, however, Charles's empire was neither Roman nor German, but Frankish -- or as we might say, a sort of French-German mix (for that matter, there was a perfectly valid [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irene_of_Athens Roman Emperor]] at the time in any case[[note]]Or to be precise, ''empress''. Charlemagne's supporters [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne#Imperial_diplomacy claimed that a woman couldn't rule the Roman Empire]]. The Byzantines promptly deposed Irene and installed Nikephoros I, who was certainly a man; they were possibly disappointed that Charlemagne saw no reason to abdicate.[[/note]]). The Empire was not officially described as "Holy" until the twelfth century, nor officially "German" before the sixteenth. Charlemagne's empire quickly fell to pieces among his squabbling successors, and the Holy Roman Emperors themselves tended to ignore any discontinuity between [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire pagan]] and Christian Rome -- Frederick I Barbarossa (1123-1190) going so far as to assert that one of his reasons for going on [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades Crusade]] was to avenge the defeat of [[Film/{{Spartacus}} Crassus]] by the Parthians ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic 53 B.C.]]).[[note]]Never mind that the Parthians were Zoroastrian Persians and the rulers of the Middle East of the time were primarily Turkish and to a lesser extent Arab Muslims...[[/note]]
28th Apr '17 7:07:45 AM Anarquistador
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The '''Holy Roman Empire [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} of the German Nation]]''' (Latin: ''Imperium Romanum Sacrum Nationis Germanicæ''; German: ''Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation'') was traditionally founded on Christmas Day of the year 800 A.D., when [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Leo III placed the crown on the head of Charlemagne in St. Peter's, and the assembled multitudes shouted "''Carolo Augusto, a Deo coronato magno et pacifico imperatori, vita et victoria!''" -- "To Charles the Magnificent, crowned the great and peace-giving emperor by God, life and victory!" Strictly speaking, however, Charles's empire was neither Roman nor German, but Frankish -- or as we might say, a sort of French-German mix (for that matter, there was a perfectly valid [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irene_of_Athens Roman Emperor]] at the time in any case[[note]]Or to be precise, ''empress''. Charlemagne's supporters [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne#Imperial_diplomacy claimed that a woman couldn't rule the Roman Empire]]. The Byzantines promptly deposed Irene and installed Nikephoros I, who was certainly a man; they were possibly disappointed that Charlemagne saw no reason to abdicate.[[/note]]). The Empire was not officially described as "Holy" until the twelfth century, nor officially "German" before the sixteenth. Charlemagne's empire quickly fell to pieces among his squabbling successors, and the Holy Roman Emperors themselves tended to ignore any discontinuity between [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire pagan]] and Christian Rome -- Frederick I Barbarossa (1123-1190) going so far as to assert that one of his reasons for going on [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades Crusade]] was to avenge the defeat of [[Film/{{Spartacus}} Crassus]] by the Parthians ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic 53 B.C.]]).[[note]]Never mind that the Parthians were Zoroastrian Persians and the rulers of the Middle East of the time were primarily Turkish and to a lesser extent Arab Muslims...[[/note]]

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The '''Holy Roman Empire [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} of the German Nation]]''' (Latin: ''Imperium Romanum Sacrum Nationis Germanicæ''; German: ''Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation'') was traditionally founded on Christmas Day of the year 800 A.D., when [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Leo III placed the crown on the head of Charlemagne UsefulNotes/{{Charlemagne}} in St. Peter's, and the assembled multitudes shouted "''Carolo Augusto, a Deo coronato magno et pacifico imperatori, vita et victoria!''" -- "To Charles the Magnificent, crowned the great and peace-giving emperor by God, life and victory!" Strictly speaking, however, Charles's empire was neither Roman nor German, but Frankish -- or as we might say, a sort of French-German mix (for that matter, there was a perfectly valid [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irene_of_Athens Roman Emperor]] at the time in any case[[note]]Or to be precise, ''empress''. Charlemagne's supporters [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne#Imperial_diplomacy claimed that a woman couldn't rule the Roman Empire]]. The Byzantines promptly deposed Irene and installed Nikephoros I, who was certainly a man; they were possibly disappointed that Charlemagne saw no reason to abdicate.[[/note]]). The Empire was not officially described as "Holy" until the twelfth century, nor officially "German" before the sixteenth. Charlemagne's empire quickly fell to pieces among his squabbling successors, and the Holy Roman Emperors themselves tended to ignore any discontinuity between [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire pagan]] and Christian Rome -- Frederick I Barbarossa (1123-1190) going so far as to assert that one of his reasons for going on [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades Crusade]] was to avenge the defeat of [[Film/{{Spartacus}} Crassus]] by the Parthians ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic 53 B.C.]]).[[note]]Never mind that the Parthians were Zoroastrian Persians and the rulers of the Middle East of the time were primarily Turkish and to a lesser extent Arab Muslims...[[/note]]
24th Apr '17 4:33:25 AM LordInsane
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* PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny: Or rather, its pre-[[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution French Revolution]] equivalent; "Holy," "Roman," and "Empire" were the great political buzzwords of the time, and by the end, it managed to be none of them. Most of the time the Holy Roman Emperors didn't even have any power in Rome itself. The "German" part (which was only official after 1512) is a bit more complicated; its core territory was Germany throughout its history, but it also contained much of North Italy, and Czech and Slovene lands until long after its demise.

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* PeoplesRepublicOfTyranny: Or rather, its pre-[[UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution French Revolution]] equivalent; "Holy," "Roman," and "Empire" were the great political buzzwords of the time, and by the end, it managed to be none of them.them[[note]]or at least not Holy or Roman. The Empire bit was accurate up to the end insofar as it fulfilled the technical requirements of both the English and German names -- it was a Realm (a very loose one, but not without common institutions) headed by an Emperor recognised within and outside the realm as an Emperor. The problem was that the Empire ''was'' the Artifact -- when other European realms had organised, consolidated and become modern states, the Empire... hadn't.[[/note]]. Most of the time the Holy Roman Emperors didn't even have any power in Rome itself. The "German" part (which was only official after 1512) is a bit more complicated; its core territory was Germany throughout its history, but it also contained much of North Italy, and Czech and Slovene lands until long after its demise.
31st Mar '17 8:22:42 AM Morgenthaler
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The '''Holy Roman Empire [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} of the German Nation]]''' (Latin: ''Imperium Romanum Sacrum Nationis Germanicæ''; German: ''Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation'') was traditionally founded on Christmas Day of the year 800 A.D., when [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Leo III placed the crown on the head of Charlemagne in St. Peter's, and the assembled multitudes shouted "''Carolo Augusto, a Deo coronato magno et pacifico imperatori, vita et victoria!''" -- "To Charles the Magnificent, crowned the great and peace-giving emperor by God, life and victory!" Strictly speaking, however, Charles's empire was neither Roman nor German, but Frankish -- or as we might say, a sort of French-German mix (for that matter, there was a perfectly valid [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irene_of_Athens Roman Emperor]] at the time in any case[[note]]Or to be precise, ''empress''. Charlemagne's supporters [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne#Imperial_diplomacy claimed that a woman couldn't rule the Roman Empire]]. The Byzantines promptly deposed Irene and installed Nikephoros I, who was certainly a man; they were possibly disappointed that Charlemagne saw no reason to abdicate.[[/note]]). The Empire was not officially described as "Holy" until the twelfth century, nor officially "German" before the sixteenth. Charlemagne's empire quickly fell to pieces among his squabbling successors, and the Holy Roman Emperors themselves tended to ignore any discontinuity between [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire pagan]] and Christian Rome -- Frederick I Barbarossa (1123-1190) going so far as to assert that one of his reasons for going on [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades Crusade]] was to avenge the defeat of [[Film/{{Spartacus}} Crassus]] by the Parthians ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic 53 B.C.]]).[[note]]Never mind that the Parthians were Zoroastrian Persians and the rulers of the Middle East of the time were primarily Turkish and to a lesser extent Arab Muslims...[[/note]]

to:

The '''Holy Roman Empire [[UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} of the German Nation]]''' (Latin: ''Imperium Romanum Sacrum Nationis Germanicæ''; German: ''Heiliges Römisches Reich Deutscher Nation'') was traditionally founded on Christmas Day of the year 800 A.D., when [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Leo III placed the crown on the head of Charlemagne in St. Peter's, and the assembled multitudes shouted "''Carolo Augusto, a Deo coronato magno et pacifico imperatori, vita et victoria!''" -- "To Charles the Magnificent, crowned the great and peace-giving emperor by God, life and victory!" Strictly speaking, however, Charles's empire was neither Roman nor German, but Frankish -- or as we might say, a sort of French-German mix (for that matter, there was a perfectly valid [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irene_of_Athens Roman Emperor]] at the time in any case[[note]]Or to be precise, ''empress''. Charlemagne's supporters [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlemagne#Imperial_diplomacy claimed that a woman couldn't rule the Roman Empire]]. The Byzantines promptly deposed Irene and installed Nikephoros I, who was certainly a man; they were possibly disappointed that Charlemagne saw no reason to abdicate.[[/note]]). The Empire was not officially described as "Holy" until the twelfth century, nor officially "German" before the sixteenth. Charlemagne's empire quickly fell to pieces among his squabbling successors, and the Holy Roman Emperors themselves tended to ignore any discontinuity between [[UsefulNotes/TheRomanEmpire pagan]] and Christian Rome -- Frederick I Barbarossa (1123-1190) going so far as to assert that one of his reasons for going on [[UsefulNotes/TheCrusades Crusade]] was to avenge the defeat of [[Film/{{Spartacus}} Crassus]] by the Parthians ([[UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic 53 B.C.]]).[[note]]Never mind that the Parthians were Zoroastrian Persians and the rulers of the Middle East of the time were primarily Turkish and to a lesser extent Arab Muslims...[[/note]]



The mediæval period of the Empire was dominated by a series of internal struggles with the powerful German nobility, by struggles with the Italian communes, and (above all) by the great struggle with [[UsefulNotes/ThePope the Papacy]]. Notable figures in that contest include Henry IV, whose famous submission to [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Gregory VII (Hildebrand) at Canossa was subsequently reversed by Gregory's exile, and the aforementioned Frederick I, whose defeat at Legnano led to his submission to Alexander III. The important point here is that the Empire and the Papacy, both competing for secular and religious power over all Christiandom without the means to enforce it, essentially destroyed each others credibility. This was not helped by a fairly consistent policy of Emperors to neglect the basis of their power in Germany to grasp at its shadow in Italy - because in order for a German king to become an Emperor, he had to go to Italy and be crowned by the pope. This worked much to the advantage of the nationalistic monarchies of France (especially), England and Spain.

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The mediæval period of the Empire was dominated by a series of internal struggles with the powerful German nobility, by struggles with the Italian communes, and (above all) by the great struggle with [[UsefulNotes/ThePope the Papacy]]. Notable figures in that contest include Henry IV, whose famous submission to [[UsefulNotes/ThePope Pope]] Gregory VII (Hildebrand) at Canossa was subsequently reversed by Gregory's exile, and the aforementioned Frederick I, whose defeat at Legnano led to his submission to Alexander III. The important point here is that the Empire and the Papacy, both competing for secular and religious power over all Christiandom without the means to enforce it, essentially destroyed each others credibility. This was not helped by a fairly consistent policy of Emperors to neglect the basis of their power in Germany to grasp at its shadow in Italy - because in order for a German king to become an Emperor, he had to go to Italy and be crowned by the pope. This worked much to the advantage of the nationalistic monarchies of France (especially), England and Spain.



Despite its name, the empire had many traits of a confederation, with the German King (Emperor-elect) being elected by the most powerful regional lords, although it was only through the Golden Bull of 1356 that it was settled in a legally binding way who had the right to elect a king. From 1356 there were seven prince electors: the archbishops of Mainz, Cologne and Trier, the King of Bohemia, the margraves of Brandenburg and Meissen (Saxony), and the Count Palatine on the Rhine (''Pfalzgraf bei Rhein''). This more or less set the tone, but there were several changes over the centuries. For one, the Duke of Bavaria would sometimes conspire with the Count Palatine to get Bavaria in by excluding Bohemia on the grounds that he wasn't German--but only when the duke and the Count Palatine weren't squabbling about some family issue (both were Wittelsbachs). During the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar, the Bavarian Wittelsbachs got ahold of the Palatinate vote because the Bavarian line were Catholics and their Palatinate cousins were not; after the war concluded, the Palatinate branch got a shiny new Electorate to maintain balance between Protestants and Catholics among the electors. However, this new electorate passed to a third, Catholic branch of the Wittelsbachs, leading to the appointment of a new Protestant elector, the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (whose territory became known as the Electorate of Hannover from its capital city; members of this line would [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover find greater success elsewhere]]). As luck would have it, the original Catholic Wittelsbach line of Bavaria petered out shortly thereafter, leaving the Catholic Palatinate Wittelsbachs to inherit Bavaria, as well, making the whole charade a moot point (although Hannover got to keep his electorate, nobody wishing to rock the boat). Finally, Regensburg, Salzburg, Würzburg, Württemberg, Baden, and Hesse-Kassel were all given electorates in the final years of the Holy Roman Empire to add to their stature (and in part to replace the four electorates that had been conquered by the French - Mainz, Trier, Cologne, and the Palatinate) however, this proved to be a moot point, as the Empire was dissolved a few years later.

At times, the empire consisted of over 300 sovereign kingdoms, duchies, free cities, and other entities. In the late 18th century, there were nearly 1800, ranging from the kingdom of Bohemia (=the current territory of the UsefulNotes/CzechRepublic almost exactly) to the nominally autonomous territories of ''Reichsritter'' (Imperial knights, i. e. knights subject only to the emperor) and even a handful of ''Reichsdörfer'' (Imperial villages). Unsurprisingly, it often was a total chaos.

to:

Despite its name, the empire had many traits of a confederation, with the German King (Emperor-elect) being elected by the most powerful regional lords, although it was only through the Golden Bull of 1356 that it was settled in a legally binding way who had the right to elect a king. From 1356 there were seven prince electors: the archbishops of Mainz, Cologne and Trier, the King of Bohemia, the margraves of Brandenburg and Meissen (Saxony), and the Count Palatine on the Rhine (''Pfalzgraf bei Rhein''). This more or less set the tone, but there were several changes over the centuries. For one, the Duke of Bavaria would sometimes conspire with the Count Palatine to get Bavaria in by excluding Bohemia on the grounds that he wasn't German--but only when the duke and the Count Palatine weren't squabbling about some family issue (both were Wittelsbachs). During the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar, the Bavarian Wittelsbachs got ahold of the Palatinate vote because the Bavarian line were Catholics and their Palatinate cousins were not; after the war concluded, the Palatinate branch got a shiny new Electorate to maintain balance between Protestants and Catholics among the electors. However, this new electorate passed to a third, Catholic branch of the Wittelsbachs, leading to the appointment of a new Protestant elector, the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (whose territory became known as the Electorate of Hannover from its capital city; members of this line would [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfHanover find greater success elsewhere]]). As luck would have it, the original Catholic Wittelsbach line of Bavaria petered out shortly thereafter, leaving the Catholic Palatinate Wittelsbachs to inherit Bavaria, as well, making the whole charade a moot point (although Hannover got to keep his electorate, nobody wishing to rock the boat). Finally, Regensburg, Salzburg, Würzburg, Württemberg, Baden, and Hesse-Kassel were all given electorates in the final years of the Holy Roman Empire to add to their stature (and in part to replace the four electorates that had been conquered by the French - Mainz, Trier, Cologne, and the Palatinate) however, this proved to be a moot point, as the Empire was dissolved a few years later.

At times, the empire consisted of over 300 sovereign kingdoms, duchies, free cities, and other entities. In the late 18th century, there were nearly 1800, ranging from the kingdom of Bohemia (=the current territory of the UsefulNotes/CzechRepublic almost exactly) to the nominally autonomous territories of ''Reichsritter'' (Imperial knights, i. e. knights subject only to the emperor) and even a handful of ''Reichsdörfer'' (Imperial villages). Unsurprisingly, it often was a total chaos.



Though the actual Holy Roman Empire lasted about 844 years, its depiction in popular culture is largely a matter of three periods: the time of the [[TheHighMiddleAges Minnesingers]], the time of [[TheRenaissance Albrecht Dürer]]; and the [[TheCavalierYears petty German princedoms]] of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

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Though the actual Holy Roman Empire lasted about 844 years, its depiction in popular culture is largely a matter of three periods: the time of the [[TheHighMiddleAges Minnesingers]], the time of [[TheRenaissance Albrecht Dürer]]; and the [[TheCavalierYears petty German princedoms]] of the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.



* The Dürer period (which effectively lasts a hundred years after the artist's death) features woodcuts, fat burghers, half-timbered and high-gabled houses, and earnest Lutheran preachers denouncing [[CorruptChurch Corrupt Churchmen]]. All writing is invariably done in '''Ye Olde [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraktur_(script) Fraktur]]'''.

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* The Dürer period (which effectively lasts a hundred years after the artist's death) features woodcuts, fat burghers, half-timbered and high-gabled houses, and earnest Lutheran preachers denouncing [[CorruptChurch Corrupt Churchmen]]. All writing is invariably done in '''Ye Olde [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraktur_(script) Fraktur]]'''.



* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: TheTeutonicKnights, who were really about on a par with other mediæval rulers, emerge in popular culture as proto-[[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Nazis]] dedicated to PuttingOnTheReich. Their common soldiers are all FacelessGoons.

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* HistoricalVillainUpgrade: TheTeutonicKnights, who were really about on a par with other mediæval rulers, emerge in popular culture as proto-[[UsefulNotes/NaziGermany Nazis]] dedicated to PuttingOnTheReich. Their common soldiers are all FacelessGoons.



* LandOfOneCity: The Free Imperial Cities (''freie Reichsstädte'') were this.

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* LandOfOneCity: The Free Imperial Cities (''freie Reichsstädte'') were this.



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* Ancient Belka in ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'' is obviously an {{expy}} of Holy Roman Empire. [[AC:With {{Magitek}}. In Space.]] Virtually everyone in the 'verse has Germanic name. Though by the time the series start, [[ShroudedInMyth Ancient Belka is no more]].

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* Ancient Belka in ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'' is obviously an {{expy}} of Holy Roman Empire. [[AC:With {{Magitek}}.[[AC: With Magitek. In Space. ]] Virtually everyone in the 'verse has Germanic name. Though by the time the series start, [[ShroudedInMyth Ancient Belka is no more]].



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* ''Film/TheGolem, How He Came Into The World'' (silent movie) -- Dürer

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* ''Film/TheGolem, How He Came Into The World'' (silent movie) -- Dürer



* ''Film/TheLastValley'' -- A rare example set actually ''in'' the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar, after Dürer days but before the Petty Princedoms.

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* ''Film/TheLastValley'' -- A rare example set actually ''in'' the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar, after Dürer days but before the Petty Princedoms.



* ''Film/{{Luther}}'' (2003 movie) -- Dürer

[[AC:Folklore (multiple media)]]
* All versions of the legend of {{Faust}} -- Dürer

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* ''Film/{{Luther}}'' (2003 movie) -- Dürer

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* All versions of the legend of {{Faust}} -- Dürer



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* Most of the works of Luise Mühlbach, Germany's answer to Dumas, ''père'', and Harrison Ainsworth

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* Most of the works of Luise Mühlbach, Germany's answer to Dumas, ''père'', and Harrison Ainsworth



* The ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'' series dumps a small modern West Virginian town into the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar period, hovering indistinctly between Dürer and the Petty Princedom era.

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* The ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'' series dumps a small modern West Virginian town into the UsefulNotes/ThirtyYearsWar period, hovering indistinctly between Dürer and the Petty Princedom era.



* Lion Feuchtwanger's novels ''Jew Suess'' (Petty Princedom, in this case the duchy of Württemberg) and ''The Ugly Duchess Margarete Maultasch'' (Dürer)
* Otfried Preußler's ''Literature/{{Krabat}}'', a YoungAdult novel set in Saxony around 1700.

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* Lion Feuchtwanger's novels ''Jew Suess'' (Petty Princedom, in this case the duchy of Württemberg) and ''The Ugly Duchess Margarete Maultasch'' (Dürer)
* Otfried Preußler's ''Literature/{{Krabat}}'', a YoungAdult novel set in Saxony around 1700.

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* On ''Series/{{Vikings}}'', King Ecbert of Wessex mentions the time he spent in Emperor Charlemagne’s court.

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* On ''Series/{{Vikings}}'', King Ecbert of Wessex mentions the time he spent in Emperor Charlemagne’s Charlemagne�s court.

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* Creator/WilliamShakespeare's ''Theatre/MeasureForMeasure'' is set in Vienna. -- Dürer (by default)
* ''Theatre/DerFreischuetz'' (opera) -- Dürer

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* Creator/WilliamShakespeare's ''Theatre/MeasureForMeasure'' is set in Vienna. -- Dürer (by default)
* ''Theatre/DerFreischuetz'' (opera) -- Dürer



** ''Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg'' -- Dürer
* Some of Friedrich Schiller's plays, including ''Theatre/KabaleUndLiebe'' (also turned into an opera by Verdi as ''Luise Millerin'', 18th century decadent court), ''Theatre/WilhelmTell'' (Dürer), and ''Theatre/{{Wallenstein}}'' (Thirty Years War).
* ''Theatre/GotzVonBerlichingen'', one of Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe's early theatrical successes. Also his ''Theatre/{{Faust}}'' duology that later became the model for an opera by Gounod. (Dürer both times).
* Heinrich von Kleist's ''Kätchen von Heilbronn'' -- Minnesinger.
* Austrian playwright Franz Grillparzer wrote e. g. ''König Ottokars Glück und Ende"'' (King Ottokar's Fortune and End, Dürer) and ''Ein Bruderzwist im Hause Habsburg'' (A Fraternal Strife in the House of Habsburg, early 17th century).
* Giacomo Meyerbeer's opera ''The Prophet'', about the Anabaptists of Münster -- Dürer.

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** ''Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg'' -- Dürer
* Some of Friedrich Schiller's plays, including ''Theatre/KabaleUndLiebe'' (also turned into an opera by Verdi as ''Luise Millerin'', 18th century decadent court), ''Theatre/WilhelmTell'' (Dürer), and ''Theatre/{{Wallenstein}}'' (Thirty Years War).
* ''Theatre/GotzVonBerlichingen'', one of Creator/JohannWolfgangVonGoethe's early theatrical successes. Also his ''Theatre/{{Faust}}'' duology that later became the model for an opera by Gounod. (Dürer both times).
* Heinrich von Kleist's ''Kätchen von Heilbronn'' -- Minnesinger.
* Austrian playwright Franz Grillparzer wrote e. g. ''König Ottokars Glück und Ende"'' (King Ottokar's Fortune and End, Dürer) and ''Ein Bruderzwist im Hause Habsburg'' (A Fraternal Strife in the House of Habsburg, early 17th century).
* Giacomo Meyerbeer's opera ''The Prophet'', about the Anabaptists of Münster -- Dürer.

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* ''VideoGame/AtelierSeries'' -- The early ("Salburg" and "Gramnad") games were heavily Dürer-influenced; Salburg is even a likely {{expy}} of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salzburg Salzburg]]. This fades in later games, though some influences remain throughout.

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* ''VideoGame/AtelierSeries'' -- The early ("Salburg" and "Gramnad") games were heavily Dürer-influenced; Salburg is even a likely {{expy}} of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salzburg Salzburg]]. This fades in later games, though some influences remain throughout.



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31st Mar '17 8:18:41 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medieval II: Total War]]'' has HRE as playeable faction and addon ''Kingdoms'' has [[TheTeutonicKnights Teutonic Knights]].
* ''AtelierSeries'' -- The early ("Salburg" and "Gramnad") games were heavily Dürer-influenced; Salburg is even a likely {{expy}} of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salzburg Salzburg]]. This fades in later games, though some influences remain throughout.
* ''EuropaUniversalis'' features a HRE mechanic, allowing the player to control any of the states within it, take or defend territory for the Empire, become the emperor and eventually, through a series of difficult diplomatic actions, unite the HRE into a single nation, often the most powerful nation in the world. Alternatively, the empire usually just collapses in its own internal politics and power struggles.

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* ''[[VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar Medieval II: Total War]]'' ''VideoGame/MedievalIITotalWar'' has HRE as playeable faction and addon ''Kingdoms'' has [[TheTeutonicKnights Teutonic Knights]].
* ''AtelierSeries'' ''VideoGame/AtelierSeries'' -- The early ("Salburg" and "Gramnad") games were heavily Dürer-influenced; Salburg is even a likely {{expy}} of [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salzburg Salzburg]]. This fades in later games, though some influences remain throughout.
* ''EuropaUniversalis'' ''VideoGame/EuropaUniversalis'' features a HRE mechanic, allowing the player to control any of the states within it, take or defend territory for the Empire, become the emperor and eventually, through a series of difficult diplomatic actions, unite the HRE into a single nation, often the most powerful nation in the world. Alternatively, the empire usually just collapses in its own internal politics and power struggles.
12th Mar '17 1:50:17 PM nombretomado
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** John Hodgman did him one better in ''MoreInformationThanYouRequire'', declaring that the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire, nor the.

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** John Hodgman did him one better in ''MoreInformationThanYouRequire'', ''Literature/MoreInformationThanYouRequire'', declaring that the Holy Roman Empire was neither holy, nor Roman, nor an empire, nor the.
11th Jan '17 6:02:57 PM nombretomado
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* In ''LookToTheWest'', it looks as though the Empire might reverse its decline when the Prussians lose the Silesian Wars against the Austrians, but in the end it falls around the same time as in our timeline thanks to WeAreStrugglingTogether in the face of a French invasion. However, it remains something of an inspiration for German unificationists in years to come.

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* In ''LookToTheWest'', ''Literature/LookToTheWest'', it looks as though the Empire might reverse its decline when the Prussians lose the Silesian Wars against the Austrians, but in the end it falls around the same time as in our timeline thanks to WeAreStrugglingTogether in the face of a French invasion. However, it remains something of an inspiration for German unificationists in years to come.
1st Nov '16 4:07:49 PM nanshe
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* NiceHat: There were several: the Iron Crown of Lombardy, the Crown of Charlemagne, the mitred crown of Rudolph II, and the little military hat of Frederick II of UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}, who famously said, "A crown is just a hat that lets the rain in."

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* NiceHat: There were several: the Iron Crown of Lombardy, the Crown of Charlemagne, the mitred crown of Rudolph II, and the little military hat of Frederick Friedrich II of UsefulNotes/{{Prussia}}, who famously said, "A crown is just a hat that lets the rain in."


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* StarCrossedLovers: Agnes von Staufen and Heinrich von Braunschweig; she was a Hohenstaufen (half-niece of Friedrich Barbarossa) and he was a Welf (son of Heinrich the Lion). Her father, Konrad, originally arranged for them to marry to ease the tensions between the two families. However, her cousin, the Holy Roman Emperor, wanted her to marry Philippe II of France instead and Konrad went along with this plan. Agnes and her mother secretly invited Heinrich to Stahleck Castle and they quickly married while he was away. Agnes' father and cousin was incensed at the news, but both eventually came around and let the two of them stay married.
29th Sep '16 12:24:59 AM nanshe
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* FeudingFamilies: The Salian/Hohenstaufen-Welf feud is a particularly bad example. It started with simple power struggles then took on religious significance with the Investiture Controversy. Their feud was so intense that quickly engulfed Italy and also drew in the vast majority of Christendom. Neither side really won.

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* FeudingFamilies: The Salian/Hohenstaufen-Welf feud is a particularly bad example. It started with simple power struggles then took on religious significance with the Investiture Controversy. Their feud was so intense that quickly engulfed Italy and also drew in the Italy, leading to three centuries of strife. The vast majority of Christendom. Christendom was drawn in as well to a degree, particularly France and England, who were happy to support whatever side had the most power at the time to support their own interests. Neither side really won.won: the Welfs were stripped off most of their power and the last two male Hohenstaufens both died at the hands of French and Italian Guelphs. The Welfs had remarkable staying power, however, and ended up as the kings of Great Britain in the 18th century.
29th Sep '16 12:20:02 AM nanshe
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Added DiffLines:

* FeudingFamilies: The Salian/Hohenstaufen-Welf feud is a particularly bad example. It started with simple power struggles then took on religious significance with the Investiture Controversy. Their feud was so intense that quickly engulfed Italy and also drew in the vast majority of Christendom. Neither side really won.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=UsefulNotes.HolyRomanEmpire